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List of Sufi saints

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The mausoleum of Ahmad Yasawi who was also considered a Sufi saint and poet in Turkistan, current day Kazakhstan.
The mausoleum of Ahmad Yasawi who was also considered a Sufi saint and poet in Turkistan, current day Kazakhstan.

Sufi saints or Wali (Arabic: ولي, plural ʾawliyāʾ أولياء) played an instrumental role in spreading Islam throughout the world.[1] In the traditional Islamic view, a saint is portrayed as someone "marked by [special] divine favor ... [and] holiness", and who is specifically "chosen by God and endowed with exceptional gifts, such as the ability to work miracles."[2]

List

Mosque and shrine of Sayyid Baha ud-Din Naqshband Bukhari in Bukhara, Uzbekistan. After whom the Naqshbandi Golden Chain is named after.
Mosque and shrine of Sayyid Baha ud-Din Naqshband Bukhari in Bukhara, Uzbekistan. After whom the Naqshbandi Golden Chain is named after.
Quranic calligraphy inscribed on the walls of the famous 12th century Islamic saint, scholar, jurist and theologian Jalal ad-Din Rumi in Konya, Turkey.
Quranic calligraphy inscribed on the walls of the famous 12th century Islamic saint, scholar, jurist and theologian Jalal ad-Din Rumi in Konya, Turkey.
Mosque and shrine of Imam Al-Mursi Abu'l-'Abbas, in ميدان المساجد، الجمرك، Qesm Al Gomrok, Alexandria Governorate, Egypt.
Mosque and shrine of Imam Al-Mursi Abu'l-'Abbas, in ميدان المساجد، الجمرك، Qesm Al Gomrok, Alexandria Governorate, Egypt.
Shrine of Pir Hadi Hassan Bux Shah Jilani in Sindh, Pakistan
Shrine of Pir Hadi Hassan Bux Shah Jilani in Sindh, Pakistan

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  • Muhammad Fawzi Al-Karkari
  •  محمد فوزي الكركري 
    

    (1974),Sceau des Saints, Revificateur du 21eme siècle [27]

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    Discover more about List related topics

    Ameer Muhammad Akram Awan

    Ameer Muhammad Akram Awan

    Ameer Muhammad Akram Awan was an Islamic scholar and spiritual leader of the Naqshbandia Owaisiah order of Sufism. He belonged to Awan tribe. As a mufassir, he authored four exegeses (tafsir) of the Qur'an, including Asrar at-Tanzeel. Awan was dean of the Siqarah Education System and patron of the magazine Al-Murshid and of the Al-Falah Foundation.

    Hadhramaut

    Hadhramaut

    Hadhramaut is a region in South Arabia, comprising eastern Yemen, parts of western Oman and southern Saudi Arabia. The name is of ancient origin, and is retained in the name of the Yemeni Governorate of Hadhramaut. The people of Hadhramaut are called Hadhrami. They formerly spoke Hadramautic, an old South Arabian language, but they now predominantly speak Hadhrami Arabic, which has much influence from Hadramautic.

    Dhikr

    Dhikr

    Dhikr is a form of Islamic meditation in which phrases or prayers are repeatedly chanted in order to remember God. It plays a central role in Sufi Islam, and each Sufi order has usually adopted a specific dhikr, typically accompanied by specific posture, breathing, and movement. In Sufi Islam, dhikr refers to both the act of this remembrance as well as the prayers used in these acts of remembrance. Dhikr can be performed in solitude or as a collective group. It can be counted on a set of prayer beads or through the fingers of the hand. A person who recites the Dhikr is called a Dhakir , literally "he who remembers." The content of the prayers includes the names of God, or a dua taken from the hadiths or the Quran.

    Abdullah Ansari

    Abdullah Ansari

    Abu Ismaïl Abdullah al-Harawi al-Ansari or Abdullah Ansari of Herat (1006–1088) also known as Pir-i Herat "Sage of Herat", was a Muslim Sufi saint who lived in Herat. Ansari was a commentator on the Qur'an, scholar of the Hanbali school of thought (madhhab), traditionalist, polemicist and spiritual master, known for his oratory and poetic talents in Arabic and Persian.

    Abdullah Shah Ghazi

    Abdullah Shah Ghazi

    Abdullah Shah Ghazi was a Muslim mystic and Sufi whose shrine is located in Clifton in Karachi, in Sindh province of Pakistan. His real name was Abdullah al-Ashtar. His father, Muhammad al-Nafs al-Zakiyya, was a descendant of the Holy Prophet Muhammad Sallallahu ‘alaihi Wa Salam through his daughter Fatimah RadiAllahu ‘anha.

    Karachi

    Karachi

    Karachi is the largest city in Pakistan and 12th largest in the world, with a population of over 20 million. It is situated at the southern tip of the country along the Arabian Sea coast. It is the former capital of Pakistan and capital of the province of Sindh. Ranked as a beta-global city, it is Pakistan's premier industrial and financial centre, with an estimated GDP of over $200 billion (PPP) as of 2021. Karachi paid $9 billion as tax during fiscal year July 2021 to May 2022 according to FBR report. Karachi is Pakistan's most cosmopolitan city, linguistically, ethnically, and religiously diverse, as well as one of Pakistan's most socially liberal cities. Karachi serves as a transport hub, and contains Pakistan's two largest seaports, the Port of Karachi and Port Qasim, as well as Pakistan's busiest airport, Jinnah International Airport. Karachi is also a media center, home to news channels, film and fashion industry of Pakistan. Most of Pakistan's multinational companies and banks have their headquarters in Karachi. Karachi is also a tourism hub due to its scenic beaches, historic buildings and shopping malls.

    Bukhara

    Bukhara

    Bukhara is the seventh-largest city in Uzbekistan, with a population of 280,187 as of 1 January 2020, and the capital of Bukhara Region.

    Abdul Qadir Gilani

    Abdul Qadir Gilani

    ʿAbdul Qādir Gīlānī, known by admirers as Muḥyī l-Dīn Abū Muḥammad b. Abū Sāliḥ ʿAbd al-Qādir al-Jīlānī al-Baḡdādī al-Ḥasanī al-Ḥusaynī, was a Sunni Muslim preacher, ascetic, mystic, jurist, and theologian belonging to the Hanbali, and the eponymous founder of the Qadiriyya tariqa of Sufism. The Qadiriyya tariqa is named after him.

    Baghdad

    Baghdad

    Baghdad is the capital of Iraq and the second-largest city in the Arab world after Cairo. It is located on the Tigris near the ruins of the ancient city of Babylon. In 762 CE, Baghdad was chosen as the capital of the Abbasid Caliphate, and became its most notable major development project. Within a short time, the city evolved into a significant cultural, commercial, and intellectual center of the Muslim world. This, in addition to housing several key academic institutions, including the House of Wisdom, as well as a multiethnic and multi-religious environment, garnered it a worldwide reputation as the "Center of Learning".

    Abdul Razzaq Gilani

    Abdul Razzaq Gilani

    ʿAbd al-Razzāq b. ʿAbd al-Qādir al-Jīlānī, also known as Abū Bakr al-Jīlī or ʿAbd al-Razzāq al-Jīlānī for short, or reverentially as Shaykh ʿAbd al-Razzāq al-Jīlānī by Sunni Muslims, was a Persian Sunni Muslim Hanbali theologian, jurist, traditionalist and Sufi mystic based in Baghdad. He received his initial training in the traditional Islamic sciences from his father, Abdul-Qadir Gilani, the founder of the Qadiriyya order of Sunni mysticism, prior to setting out "on his own to attend the lectures of other prominent Hanbali scholars" in his region. He is sometimes given the Arabic honorary epithet Tāj al-Dīn in Sunni tradition, due to his reputation as a mystic of the Hanbali school.

    Abu Ishaq Shami

    Abu Ishaq Shami

    Abu Ishaq Shami was a Muslim scholar who is often regarded as the founder of the Sufi Chishti Order. He was the first in the Chishti lineage (silsila) to live in Chisht and so to adopt the name "Chishti", so that, if the Chishti order itself dates back to him, it is one of the oldest recorded Sufi orders. His original name, Shami, implies he came from Syria (ash-Sham). He died in Damascus and lies buried on Mount Qasiyun, where Ibn Arabi was later buried.

    Chishti Order

    Chishti Order

    The Chishtī Order is a tariqa, an order or school within the mystic Sufi tradition of Sunni Islam. The Chishti Order is known for its emphasis on love, tolerance, and openness. It began with Abu Ishaq Shami in Chisht, a small town near Herat, Afghanistan about 930 AD.

    Source: "List of Sufi saints", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Sufi_saints.

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