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List of Staten Island Railway stations

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2009 Map of the Staten Island Railway, which includes the now-closed Nassau, Atlantic, and Richmond County Bank Ballpark stations, as well as the now-opened Arthur Kill station.
2009 Map of the Staten Island Railway, which includes the now-closed Nassau, Atlantic, and Richmond County Bank Ballpark stations, as well as the now-opened Arthur Kill station.

The Staten Island Railway (formerly known as the Staten Island Rapid Transit) is a rapid transit system on Staten Island, New York. Its operator has been the Metropolitan Transportation Authority of New York since 1971, whereas prior to that year it was owned by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad (B&O).

Main Line

This list contains all stations currently operating on the Staten Island Railway (SIR). All active SIR stations are located on the Main Line, which spans from the St. George Ferry Terminal to Tottenville. Stations tend to be built either above ground level on embankments or are open-cut stations built below ground level, but open to the sky.

Disabled access Station is accessible by wheelchair[1]
Name Opened Disabled access Other names Connections/Notes
St. George March 7, 1886 Disabled access Staten Island Ferry
Tompkinsville July 31, 1884
Stapleton July 31, 1884
1936
Clifton April 23, 1860 Vanderbilt's Landing Only three cars can platform at the St. George-bound platform. This station was the original northern terminal of the line.
Grasmere c. 1886 S53 bus to Bay Ridge, Brooklyn
Old Town 1937–1938 Old Town Road
Dongan Hills April 23, 1860 Disabled access Garretson's
Jefferson Avenue 1937–1938
Grant City April 23, 1860
New Dorp April 23, 1860
Oakwood Heights April 23, 1860 Richmond, then Court House, then Oakwood
Bay Terrace Early 1900s Whitlock
Great Kills April 23, 1860 Disabled access Gifford's
Eltingville April 23, 1860 Bus to Eltingville Transit Center and Staten Island Mall
Annadale May 14, 1860
1939
Huguenot June 2, 1860 Bloomingview, then Huguenot Park
Prince's Bay June 2, 1860 Lemon Creek
Princes Bay
Pleasant Plains June 2, 1860
Richmond Valley June 2, 1860 Only three cars can platform at this station. The former West Shore Line, which was used for freight, diverged south of this station.
Arthur Kill January 21, 2017 Disabled access
Tottenville June 2, 1860 Disabled access Formerly connected to a ferry to Perth Amboy, New Jersey

Discover more about Main Line related topics

Accessibility

Accessibility

Accessibility is the design of products, devices, services, vehicles, or environments so as to be usable by people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design and practice of accessible development ensures both "direct access" and "indirect access" meaning compatibility with a person's assistive technology.

Clifton station (Staten Island Railway)

Clifton station (Staten Island Railway)

Clifton is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Clifton, Staten Island, New York. This station was the original terminal of the Staten Island Railway from 1860 until 1886. The station was known as Vanderbilt's Landing, and was used as a transfer point for passengers going to Manhattan via ferries to South Ferry.

Grasmere station

Grasmere station

Grasmere is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Grasmere, Staten Island, New York. It is located at Clove Road on the Main Line.

Bay Ridge, Brooklyn

Bay Ridge, Brooklyn

Bay Ridge is a neighborhood in the southwest corner of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is bounded by Sunset Park to the north, Dyker Heights to the east, the Narrows and the Belt Parkway to the west, and Fort Hamilton Army Base and the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge to the south. The section of Bay Ridge south of 86th Street is sometimes considered part of a sub-neighborhood called Fort Hamilton.

Old Town station (Staten Island Railway)

Old Town station (Staten Island Railway)

The Old Town station is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Old Town, Staten Island, New York.

Dongan Hills station

Dongan Hills station

The Dongan Hills station is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Dongan Hills, Staten Island, New York.

Jefferson Avenue station

Jefferson Avenue station

The Jefferson Avenue station is a Staten Island Railway station between the neighborhoods of Grant City and Dongan Hills, in Staten Island, New York.

Grant City station

Grant City station

Grant City is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Grant City, Staten Island, New York.

New Dorp station

New Dorp station

The New Dorp station is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of New Dorp, Staten Island, New York.

Oakwood Heights station

Oakwood Heights station

The Oakwood Heights station is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Oakwood, Staten Island, New York.

Bay Terrace station

Bay Terrace station

The Bay Terrace station is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Bay Terrace, Staten Island, New York.

Great Kills station

Great Kills station

Great Kills is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Great Kills, Staten Island, New York. It is located on an open cut west of Giffords Lane and Amboy Road on the main line. It has two side platforms and turquoise blue canopies and walls.

Disused and former stations

The majority of former stations are located on the North Shore Branch and South Beach Branch, which were closed to passenger service at midnight on Tuesday, March 31, 1953. A small western portion of the North Shore Branch that is disconnected to the Main Line is used for freight service, and a smaller eastern portion of the same branch provided seasonal service to the Richmond County Bank Ballpark station from 2001 to 2009. Restoration is being discussed along this mostly abandoned 6.1-mile (9.8 km) line as part of the Staten Island light rail plan.[2] The South Beach Branch was abandoned and demolished except for a remaining stanchion on St. John's Avenue and the Robin Road Trestle.[3][4] This 4.1-mile (6.6 km) line diverged from the Main Line south of the Clifton station and lay to the east of the Main Line.

Name Line Opened Closed Distance from St. George Notes
Arlington North Shore Branch 1889–1890 March 31, 1953 5.2 miles (8.4 km)
Arrochar South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 March 31, 1953 3.2 miles (5.1 km)
Atlantic Main Line 1909-1911 January 21, 2017 26.1 miles (42.0 km)
Bachmann South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 1937 2.0 miles (3.2 km)
Belair Road South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 March 31, 1953 2.5 miles (4.0 km)
Cedar Avenue South Beach Branch 1931[5] March 31, 1953 3.5 miles (5.6 km)
Elm Park North Shore Branch February 23, 1886 March 31, 1953 3.9 miles (6.3 km)
Fort Wadsworth South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 March 31, 1953 2.7 miles (4.3 km)
Harbor Road North Shore Branch 1935–1937 March 31, 1953 4.9 miles (7.9 km)
Lake Avenue North Shore Branch 1937 March 31, 1953 4.3 miles (6.9 km)
Livingston North Shore Branch February 23, 1886 March 31, 1953 1.8 miles (2.9 km)
Mariners Harbor North Shore Branch Summer 1886 March 31, 1953 4.6 miles (7.4 km)
Mount Loretto Orphanage Mount Loretto Branch[6][7] 1885 1950 This station was used for special excursions.
Nassau Main Line after 1922 January 21, 2017 25.7 miles (41.4 km) Served the Nassau Smelting Company.
New Brighton North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 0.7 miles (1.1 km)
Ocean Park Main Line Flag stop, south of Annadale, c.1890.
Port Ivory North Shore Branch 1906 1948 6.1 miles (9.8 km) Served the employees of Procter & Gamble's factory.
Port Richmond North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 3.0 miles (4.8 km)
Richmond County Bank Ballpark North Shore Branch June 24, 2001 June 18, 2010 150 yards (140 m)
Rosebank South Beach Branch March 8, 1886 March 31, 1953 2.1 miles (3.4 km)
Sailors' Snug Harbor North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 1.2 miles (1.9 km)
South Beach South Beach Branch 1890 March 31, 1953 3.9 miles (6.3 km)
Tower Hill North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 3.4 miles (5.5 km)
Wentworth Avenue South Beach Branch 1925 March 31, 1953 4.1 miles (6.6 km) This likely was the shortest rapid transit station in the world.
West Brighton North Shore Branch February 26, 1886 March 31, 1953 2.4 miles (3.9 km)
Woods of Arden Main Line 1886 1894–1895 14.6 miles (23.5 km)

Discover more about Disused and former stations related topics

Clifton station (Staten Island Railway)

Clifton station (Staten Island Railway)

Clifton is a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Clifton, Staten Island, New York. This station was the original terminal of the Staten Island Railway from 1860 until 1886. The station was known as Vanderbilt's Landing, and was used as a transfer point for passengers going to Manhattan via ferries to South Ferry.

Arlington station (Staten Island Railway)

Arlington station (Staten Island Railway)

Arlington was a station on the abandoned North Shore Branch of the Staten Island Railway, in Staten Island, New York. Located in an open-cut 5.2 miles (8.4 km) from the St. George Terminal, it had two tracks and one island platform. For a few years before its closure in 1953, it was the western terminus of the North Shore Line; before then, the terminus was the Port Ivory station to the west, though most trains terminated at Arlington. It was located in the Arlington and Mariners Harbor sections of Staten Island, near the Arlington Yard, under the South Avenue overpass, between Arlington Place and Brabant Street.

Arrochar station

Arrochar station

Arrochar was a station on the demolished South Beach Branch of the Staten Island Railway. It had two side platforms and two tracks and was located at Major Avenue. The station was able to platform two train cars.

Atlantic station (Staten Island Railway)

Atlantic station (Staten Island Railway)

Atlantic was a Staten Island Railway station in the neighborhood of Tottenville, Staten Island, New York. With the condition of the station having deteriorated after the 1990s, this station, and the Nassau station to the north, were replaced by a new station at Arthur Kill Road. When that station opened in January 2017, Atlantic station closed. The station was subsequently demolished.

Bachmann station

Bachmann station

Bachmann was a station on the demolished South Beach Branch of the Staten Island Railway. Constructed in 1886 to serve the employees of Bachmann's Brewery, it had two tracks and two side platforms, and was located east of Tompkins Avenue, between Lynhurst and Chestnut Avenues. During a grade crossing elimination project on the South Beach Branch, the station was closed and razed in 1937, due to its proximity to the Rosebank station and the fact that the brewery never reopened after Prohibition. Well after the closure of the Bachmann station, the rest of the South Beach Branch was abandoned in 1953, because of city-operated bus competition.

Belair Road station

Belair Road station

Belair Road is a demolished station on the abandoned South Beach Branch of the Staten Island Railway. It had two side platforms and two tracks, and was located at Vermont Avenue, between Belair Road & St. Johns Avenue. This station served the US Quarantine station, which was one block to the east.

Cedar Avenue station

Cedar Avenue station

Cedar Avenue was a station on the demolished South Beach Branch of the Staten Island Railway. It had two tracks and two side platforms and was located at Cedar Avenue and Railroad Avenue. It opened in 1931, and closed in 1953.

Elm Park station (Staten Island Railway)

Elm Park station (Staten Island Railway)

Elm Park is a station on the abandoned North Shore Branch of the Staten Island Railway (SIR). The station is located in an open cut under the Bayonne Bridge approach in Elm Park, Staten Island, at Morningstar Road between Innis Street and Newark Avenue. It has two tracks and two side platforms. The station is approximately 3.9 miles (6.3 km) from the Saint George terminal of the SIR.

Fort Wadsworth station

Fort Wadsworth station

Fort Wadsworth was a station on the demolished South Beach Branch of the Staten Island Railway, near the historic Fort Wadsworth. It had two side platforms and two tracks, and was located at Fingerboard Road.

Harbor Road station

Harbor Road station

Harbor Road was a station on the abandoned North Shore Branch of the Staten Island Railway in Mariners Harbor, Staten Island, New York. The station, located under the overpass at the highest point of Harbor Road, was built in an open-cut with two tracks and one island platform. It was located 4.9 miles (7.9 km) from the Saint George terminal. The station was opened during the SIRT grade crossing elimination project of 1935 – 1937. It closed on March 31, 1953, along with the South Beach Branch and the rest of the North Shore Branch. The station was demolished in 2004 during a reconstruction of the rail system for reactivated freight service by the nearby Howland Hook Marine Terminal.

Lake Avenue station

Lake Avenue station

Lake Avenue is a station on the abandoned North Shore Branch of the Staten Island Railway in Mariners Harbor, Staten Island, New York. It has two tracks and two side platforms. It is located in an open cut, approximately 4.3 miles (6.9 km) from Saint George Terminal.

Livingston station (Staten Island Railway)

Livingston station (Staten Island Railway)

Livingston is a former station on the abandoned North Shore Branch of the Staten Island Railway. Located north of Richmond Terrace at Bard Avenue in the Livingston section of Staten Island, it had two tracks and two side platforms. The site is 1.8 miles (2.9 km) from the Saint George terminal. Closed in 1953, the station was demolished, with few remnants of the site today.

Source: "List of Staten Island Railway stations", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Staten_Island_Railway_stations.

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See also
References
  1. ^ "MTA Guide to Accessible Transit: Accessible Stations in the MTA Network". New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  2. ^ Yates, Maura; Helsel, Phil (July 12, 2008). "Reality check for Staten Island's rail plans". Retrieved February 24, 2009.
  3. ^ "Gary Owen's S.I.R.T. South Beach Line Page". Retrieved March 7, 2009.
  4. ^ "Gary Owen's S.I.R.T. South Beach Line Page". p. 2. Retrieved March 7, 2009.
  5. ^ Eleventh Annual Report For The Calendar Year 1931. New York State Transit Commission. 1922. p. 75.
  6. ^ "Gary Owen's SIRT Page". gretschviking.net.
  7. ^ Staten Island Rapid Transit: The Essential History, by Irvin Leigh & Paul Matus (The Third Rail Online) Archived August 26, 2014, at the Wayback Machine
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