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List of Paris meetings, agreements and declarations

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This is a list of agreements resulting from meetings in Paris.

Listed by name

Paris Accords

may refer to:

Paris Agreement[s]

may refer to:

Paris Charter

refers to the Charter of Paris for a New Europe (1990), which helped to found the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)

Paris Convention

may refer to:

Paris Conference

may refer to:

Paris Peace Conference

may refer to:

Paris Principles

may refer to:

Paris Protocol

may refer to:

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London and Paris Conferences

London and Paris Conferences

The London and Paris Conferences were two related conferences held in London and Paris during September–October 1954 to determine the status of West Germany. The talks concluded with the signing of the Paris Agreements, which granted West Germany some sovereignty, ended the occupation, and allowed its admittance to NATO. Furthermore, both West Germany and Italy joined the Brussels Treaty on 23 October 1954. The Agreements went into force on 5 May 1955. The participating powers included France, the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, West Germany, Italy, Canada, the United States, and remaining NATO members.

Berlin Conference (1954)

Berlin Conference (1954)

The Berlin Conference of 1954 was a meeting of the "Big Four" foreign ministers of the United States, Britain, France, and the Soviet Union from 25 January to 18 February 1954.

1954 Geneva Conference

1954 Geneva Conference

The Geneva Conference, intended to settle outstanding issues resulting from the Korean War and the First Indochina War, was a conference involving several nations that took place in Geneva, Switzerland, from 26 April to 20 July 1954. The part of the conference on the Korean question ended without adopting any declarations or proposals, so is generally considered less relevant. The Geneva Accords that dealt with the dismantling of French Indochina proved to have long-lasting repercussions, however. The crumbling of the French colonial empire in Southeast Asia led to the formation of the states of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, the State of Vietnam, the Kingdom of Cambodia and the Kingdom of Laos.

Paris Agreement

Paris Agreement

The Paris Agreement, often referred to as the Paris Accords or the Paris Climate Accords, is an international treaty on climate change. Adopted in 2015, the agreement covers climate change mitigation, adaptation, and finance. The Paris Agreement was negotiated by 196 parties at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference near Paris, France. As of September 2022, 194 members of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) are parties to the agreement. Of the four UNFCCC member states which have not ratified the agreement, the only major emitter is Iran. The United States withdrew from the Agreement in 2020, but rejoined in 2021.

Paris Charter

Paris Charter

The Charter of Paris for a New Europe was adopted by a summit meeting of most European governments in addition to those of Canada, the United States and the Soviet Union, in Paris from 19–21 November 1990. The charter was established on the foundation of the Helsinki Accords and was further amended in the 1999 Charter for European Security. Together, these documents form the agreed basis for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. However, not all OSCE member countries have signed the treaty.

Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is the world's largest regional security-oriented intergovernmental organization with observer status at the United Nations. Its mandate includes issues such as arms control, promotion of human rights, freedom of the press, and free and fair elections. It employs around 3,460 people, mostly in its field operations but also in its secretariat in Vienna, Austria, and its institutions.

Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property

Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property

The Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, signed in Paris, France, on 20 March 1883, was one of the first intellectual property treaties. It established a Union for the protection of industrial property. The convention is currently still in force. The substantive provisions of the Convention fall into three main categories: national treatment, priority right and common rules.

Paris Convention of 1919

Paris Convention of 1919

The Paris Convention of 1919 was the first international convention to address the political difficulties and intricacies involved in international aerial navigation. The convention was concluded under the auspices of the International Commission for Air Navigation. It attempted to reduce the confusing patchwork of ideologies and regulations which differed by country by defining certain guiding principles and provisions, and was signed in Paris on October 13, 1919.

Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy

Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy

The Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy is a 1960 OECD Convention on liability and compensation for damage caused by accidents occurring while producing nuclear energy. The convention entered into force on 1 April 1968 and has been amended by protocols in 1964, 1982, and 2004. The convention, as amended by the 1964 and 1982 protocols have 16 parties. The 2004 protocol has not entered into force. Austria and Luxembourg signed the convention but have not ratified it. Switzerland deposited its instruments of ratification for the convention as amended by the 2004 protocol. The convention will entered into force for this country when the 2004 protocol entered into force in 2022.

Paris Conference on Passports & Customs Formalities and Through Tickets

Paris Conference on Passports & Customs Formalities and Through Tickets

The Paris Conference on Passports & Customs Formalities and Through Tickets was a conference organised by the League of Nations in 1920 which agreed, for the first time, on a set of standards for all passports issued by members of the League. Prior to that time, there were no internationally agreed standards for passports because they were not generally required for travel until World War I.

2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference

2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference

The 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP 21 or CMP 11 was held in Paris, France, from 30 November to 12 December 2015. It was the 21st yearly session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the 11th session of the Meeting of the Parties (CMP) to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol.

Congress of Paris (1856)

Congress of Paris (1856)

The Congress of Paris was an 1856 diplomatic meeting held in Paris, France, between representatives of the great powers in Europe to make peace almost three years after the Crimean War had started.

Listed by date

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Congress of Paris (1856)

Congress of Paris (1856)

The Congress of Paris was an 1856 diplomatic meeting held in Paris, France, between representatives of the great powers in Europe to make peace almost three years after the Crimean War had started.

Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property

Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property

The Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property, signed in Paris, France, on 20 March 1883, was one of the first intellectual property treaties. It established a Union for the protection of industrial property. The convention is currently still in force. The substantive provisions of the Convention fall into three main categories: national treatment, priority right and common rules.

Paris Convention of 1919

Paris Convention of 1919

The Paris Convention of 1919 was the first international convention to address the political difficulties and intricacies involved in international aerial navigation. The convention was concluded under the auspices of the International Commission for Air Navigation. It attempted to reduce the confusing patchwork of ideologies and regulations which differed by country by defining certain guiding principles and provisions, and was signed in Paris on October 13, 1919.

Paris Peace Conference (1919–1920)

Paris Peace Conference (1919–1920)

The Paris Peace Conference was the formal meeting in 1919 and 1920 of the victorious Allies after the end of World War I to set the peace terms for the defeated Central Powers. Dominated by the leaders of Britain, France, the United States and Italy, it resulted in five treaties that rearranged the maps of Europe and parts of Asia, Africa and the Pacific Islands, and also imposed financial penalties. Germany and the other losing nations had no voice in the Conference's deliberations; this gave rise to political resentments that lasted for decades.

Paris Conference on Passports & Customs Formalities and Through Tickets

Paris Conference on Passports & Customs Formalities and Through Tickets

The Paris Conference on Passports & Customs Formalities and Through Tickets was a conference organised by the League of Nations in 1920 which agreed, for the first time, on a set of standards for all passports issued by members of the League. Prior to that time, there were no internationally agreed standards for passports because they were not generally required for travel until World War I.

Paris Peace Treaties, 1947

Paris Peace Treaties, 1947

The Paris Peace Treaties were signed on 10 February 1947 following the end of World War II in 1945. The Paris Peace Conference lasted from 29 July until 15 October 1946. The victorious wartime Allied powers negotiated the details of peace treaties with Italy, Romania, Hungary, Bulgaria and Finland. The treaties allowed the defeated Axis powers to resume their responsibilities as sovereign states in international affairs and to qualify for membership in the United Nations.

London and Paris Conferences

London and Paris Conferences

The London and Paris Conferences were two related conferences held in London and Paris during September–October 1954 to determine the status of West Germany. The talks concluded with the signing of the Paris Agreements, which granted West Germany some sovereignty, ended the occupation, and allowed its admittance to NATO. Furthermore, both West Germany and Italy joined the Brussels Treaty on 23 October 1954. The Agreements went into force on 5 May 1955. The participating powers included France, the United Kingdom, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg, West Germany, Italy, Canada, the United States, and remaining NATO members.

Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy

Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy

The Paris Convention on Third Party Liability in the Field of Nuclear Energy is a 1960 OECD Convention on liability and compensation for damage caused by accidents occurring while producing nuclear energy. The convention entered into force on 1 April 1968 and has been amended by protocols in 1964, 1982, and 2004. The convention, as amended by the 1964 and 1982 protocols have 16 parties. The 2004 protocol has not entered into force. Austria and Luxembourg signed the convention but have not ratified it. Switzerland deposited its instruments of ratification for the convention as amended by the 2004 protocol. The convention will entered into force for this country when the 2004 protocol entered into force in 2022.

Paris Peace Accords

Paris Peace Accords

The Paris Peace Accords, officially titled the Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Viet Nam, was a peace treaty signed on January 27, 1973, to establish peace in Vietnam and end the Vietnam War. The treaty included the governments of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, the Republic of Vietnam, and the United States, as well as the Republic of South Vietnam (PRG) that represented South Vietnamese communists. US ground forces up to that point had been sidelined with deteriorating morale and gradually withdrawn to coastal regions, not taking part in offensive operations or much direct combat for the preceding two-year period. The Paris Agreement Treaty would in effect remove all remaining US Forces, including air and naval forces in exchange. Direct U.S. military intervention was ended, and fighting between the three remaining powers temporarily stopped for less than a day. The agreement was not ratified by the United States Senate.

Paris Charter

Paris Charter

The Charter of Paris for a New Europe was adopted by a summit meeting of most European governments in addition to those of Canada, the United States and the Soviet Union, in Paris from 19–21 November 1990. The charter was established on the foundation of the Helsinki Accords and was further amended in the 1999 Charter for European Security. Together, these documents form the agreed basis for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. However, not all OSCE member countries have signed the treaty.

Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is the world's largest regional security-oriented intergovernmental organization with observer status at the United Nations. Its mandate includes issues such as arms control, promotion of human rights, freedom of the press, and free and fair elections. It employs around 3,460 people, mostly in its field operations but also in its secretariat in Vienna, Austria, and its institutions.

Free Children from War conference

Free Children from War conference

The Free Children from War Conference was a conference co-hosted by the French government and UNICEF on 5–6 February 2007 in Paris, France. The goal of the conference was to bring together countries, non-governmental organizations, and international organizations to discuss the issue of child soldiers. The 59 involved countries signed the Paris Principles and Paris Commitments, which update the Cape Town Principles and outline a practical approach to preventing the use of child soldiers and the reintegration of current child soldiers. The Principles define a child associated with an armed force or armed group as:... any person below 18 years of age who is or who has been recruited or used by an armed force or armed group in any capacity, including but not limited to children, boys and girls, used as fighters, cooks, porters, messengers, spies or for sexual purposes. It does not only refer to a child who is taking or has taken a direct part in hostilities..

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