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List of Interstate Highways in North Carolina

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Interstate Highways of North Carolina

Interstate 40 marker

Interstate 485 marker

Interstate 85 Business marker

Highway markers for I-40, I-485, and I-85 Bus. Loop
Interstate Highways highlighted in red; future sections in blue; unbuilt sections in orange; related state highways in purple
System information
Maintained by NCDOT
Length1,410 mi[1] (2,270 km)
Highway names
InterstatesInterstate nn (I-nn)
Business LoopInterstate nn Business Loop (I-nn Bus.)
System links

There are 19 Interstate Highways—8 primary and 11 auxiliary—that exist entirely or partially in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of January 2020, the state had a total of 1,410 miles (2,270 km) of Interstates and 70 miles (110 km) of Interstate business routes, all maintained by the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT).[1][2]

Primary Interstates

Number Length (mi)[3] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
I-26 53.67 86.37 I-26/US 23 at the Tennessee state line I-26 at the South Carolina state line 01966-01-011966[4] current Gap in Asheville, signed as Future I-26
I-40 419.40 674.96 I-40 at the Tennessee state line US 117/NC 132 in Wilmington 01958-01-011958[5] current

Future I-42
I-40/US 70 near Garner US 70 in Morehead City proposed Future designation along US 70[6]
I-73 76.52 123.15 US 220 near Ellerbe US 220 in Summerfield 01997-01-011997[7] current One segment currently open between Greensboro and Ellerbe; scheduled to be extended to Virginia and South Carolina borders
I-74 69.61 112.03 I-77 at the Virginia state line US 74/NC 41 near Lumberton 01997-01-011997[7] current Three open segments in Mount Airy, Piedmont Triad and Laurinburg areas; will be continuous once completed
I-77 102.31 164.65 I-77/US 21 at the South Carolina state line I-77 at the Virginia state line 01965-01-011965[8] current
I-85 231.23 372.13 I-85 at the South Carolina state line I-85 at the Virginia state line 01958-01-011958[9] current
I-87 12.6 20.3 I-40/US 64 in Raleigh US 64/US 264 in Wendell 02017-01-012017 current Future designated along US 64 and US 17 to Norfolk, Virginia[6]
I-95 181.71 292.43 I-95 at the South Carolina state line I-95 at the Virginia state line 01958-01-011958[10] current
  •       Proposed and unbuilt

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Interstate 26 in North Carolina

Interstate 26 in North Carolina

Interstate 26 (I-26) in North Carolina runs through the western part of the state from the Tennessee border to the South Carolina border, following the Appalachian Mountains. It is part of the larger I-26, a regional Interstate that runs from Kingsport, Tennessee, to Charleston, South Carolina. I-26 is mostly four lanes through North Carolina with few exceptions. Though signed with east–west cardinal directions, in North Carolina and Tennessee, the route goes nearly north–south, with the northern direction labeled "West" and vice versa.

Tennessee

Tennessee

Tennessee, officially the State of Tennessee, is a landlocked state in the Southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th-largest by area and the 16th-most populous of the 50 states. It is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the southwest, and Missouri to the northwest. Tennessee is geographically, culturally, and legally divided into three Grand Divisions of East, Middle, and West Tennessee. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, and anchors its largest metropolitan area. Other major cities include Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga, and Clarksville. Tennessee's population as of the 2020 United States census is approximately 6.9 million.

Interstate 26 in South Carolina

Interstate 26 in South Carolina

Interstate 26 (I-26) is a South Carolina Interstate highway running generally east–west from near Landrum, in Spartanburg County, to U.S. Route 17 (US 17), in Charleston, South Carolina. It is also the longest Interstate Highway in South Carolina.

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina is a state in the coastal Southeastern region of the United States. It is bordered to the north by North Carolina, to the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the southwest by Georgia across the Savannah River. South Carolina is the 40th most extensive and 23rd most populous U.S. state with a recorded population of 5,124,712 according to the 2020 census. In 2019, its GDP was $213.45 billion. South Carolina is composed of 46 counties. The capital is Columbia with a population of 137,300 in 2020; while its largest city is Charleston with a 2020 population of 150,277. The Greenville–Spartanburg-Anderson metropolitan area is the most populous in the state, with a 2020 population estimate of 1,455,892.

Interstate 40 in North Carolina

Interstate 40 in North Carolina

Interstate 40 (I-40) is a part of the Interstate Highway System that travels 2,556.61 miles (4,114.46 km) from Barstow, California, to Wilmington, North Carolina. In North Carolina, I-40 travels 420.21 miles (676.26 km) across the entirety of the state from the Tennessee state line along the Pigeon River Gorge to U.S. Route 117 (US 117) and North Carolina Highway 132 (NC 132) in Wilmington. I-40 is the longest Interstate Highway in North Carolina and is the only Interstate to completely span the state from west to east.

Interstate 40 in Tennessee

Interstate 40 in Tennessee

Interstate 40 (I-40) is part of the Interstate Highway System that spans 2,556.61 miles (4,114.46 km) from Barstow, California, to Wilmington, North Carolina. In Tennessee, I-40 traverses the entirety of the state from west to east, from the Mississippi River at the Arkansas border to the northern base of the Great Smoky Mountains at the North Carolina border. At a length of 455.28 miles (732.70 km), the Tennessee segment of I-40 is the longest of the eight states on the route, and the longest Interstate Highway in Tennessee.

North Carolina Highway 132

North Carolina Highway 132

North Carolina Highway 132 (NC 132) is a north-south North Carolina State Highway entirely in New Hanover County. The highway follows College Road for the duration of its route. The southern terminus of NC 132 begins at U.S. Route 421 (US 421) in the census-designated place of Myrtle Grove south of Wilmington. Continuing north, NC 132 continues along a major north-south artillery road in the city of Wilmington. Between Shipyard Boulevard and its northern terminus, NC 132 runs concurrently with US 117. NC 132 shares a short concurrency at the eastern terminus of Interstate 40 (I-40), before continuing north toward Castle Hayne. The northern terminus of NC 132 is located at a roundabout with US 117 and NC 133 just south of the main business district of Castle Hayne.

Garner, North Carolina

Garner, North Carolina

Garner is a town in Wake County, North Carolina, United States and a suburb of Raleigh. The population is 31,159 as of the 2020 Census. The city limits are entirely within Wake County, though portions of unincorporated Wake County, as well as the Cleveland community in northern Johnston County, have Garner mailing addresses. It is part of the Research Triangle region of North Carolina and serves as a bedroom community for the region.

Morehead City, North Carolina

Morehead City, North Carolina

Morehead City is a port town in Carteret County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 8,661 at the 2010 census. Morehead City celebrated the 150th anniversary of its founding on May 5, 2007. It forms part of the Crystal Coast.

Interstate 73 in North Carolina

Interstate 73 in North Carolina

Interstate 73 (I-73) is a partially completed Interstate Highway in the US state of North Carolina, traversing the state from south of Ellerbe to near Summerfield through Asheboro and Greensboro. When completed, it will continue south toward Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, and north to Martinsville, Virginia.

Ellerbe, North Carolina

Ellerbe, North Carolina

Ellerbe is a town in Richmond County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 1,054 at the 2010 census. It is perhaps best known as the one-time home of professional wrestler André the Giant, who owned a nearby ranch/farm. His ashes were scattered on his ranch after his death.

Summerfield, North Carolina

Summerfield, North Carolina

Summerfield is a town in Guilford County, North Carolina. The population was 7,018 at the 2000 census. At the 2010 census, the population had risen to 10,232.

Auxiliary Interstates

Number Length (mi)[11] Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
I-140 25.40 40.88 US 17 near Winnabow I-40/NC 140 in Murraysville 02008-01-012008[12] current
I-240 9.14 14.71 I-26/I-40/US 74 in Asheville I-40/US 74A in Asheville 01980-01-011980[13] current

Future I-274
16.83 27.09 US 158 in Winston-Salem I-74/I-285/US 52 in Winston-Salem proposed NCDOT proposed designation along the western segment of the Winston-Salem Northern Beltway[14][15]
I-277 4.41 7.10 I-77/US 21/US 74 in Charlotte I-77/US 21/NC 16 in Charlotte 01981-01-011981 current
I-285 23.00 37.01 I-85/US 29/US 52/US 70 in Lexington I-40/US 52/NC 8 in Winston-Salem 02018-01-012018[16] current Ground mounted signs November 2018 along US 52
I-295 22.00 35.41 US 401 in Fayetteville I-95/US 13 in Eastover 02019-01-012019[17] current Eventually to extend to I-95 near Parkton by 2025
I-440 16.40 26.39 I-40/US 1/US 64 in Raleigh I-40/US 64 in Raleigh 01991-01-011991[18] current
I-485 67.60 108.79 Charlotte 01988-01-011988[19] current
I-495 4.09 6.58 I-440/US 64/US 64 Bus. in Raleigh I-540/US 64/US 264 in Knightdale 02013-01-012013[20] 02017-01-012017 Was originally planned to continue along US 64 to Rocky Mount; replaced by I-87
I-540 27.30 43.94 I-40/NC 540 near Durham I-87/US 64/US 264 in Knightdale 01997-01-011997[21] current Northern (untolled) half of the Raleigh Outer Loop; partially completed (toll) southern half designated NC 540
I-587 37.00[22] 59.55 I-95/I-795/US 264 in Wilson US 264 / NC 11 Bypass in Greenville 02022-01-012022 current Current and future designation along US 264[23]

Future I-685
I-85/US 421 near Greensboro I-95 near Dunn proposed NCDOT proposed designation on future route included in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act[24]
I-785 7.00 11.27 I-40/I-85 in Greensboro US 29 in Greensboro 02013-01-012013[25] current Future designation along US 29 to Danville, Virginia
I-795 25.40 40.88 US 70 in Goldsboro I-95/US 264 in Wilson 02007-01-012007[26] current Eventually to extend to I-40 near Faison
I-840 5.77 9.29 I-40/I-73/US 421 in Greensboro I-40 in Greensboro 02011-01-012011[27] current Northern half of Greensboro Urban Loop; two short open sections at the eastern and western termini
I-885 8.40[28] 13.52 I-40 in RTP I-85 in Durham 02022-01-012022[29] current
  •       Former
  •       Proposed and unbuilt

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Interstate 140 (North Carolina)

Interstate 140 (North Carolina)

Interstate 140 (I-140) and North Carolina Highway 140 (NC 140) is a 25.4-mile (40.9 km) auxiliary Interstate Highway and state highway in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Officially designated the John Jay Burney Jr. Freeway, it serves as a bypass of Wilmington. The western terminus of the highway is at U.S. Route 17 (US 17) near Winnabow. It heads north in western Leland before turning to the east north of an interchange with U.S. Route 74 (US 74)/U.S. Route 76 (US 76). I-140 crosses the Cape Fear River north of Navassa and the Northeast Cape Fear River northwest of Wrightsboro. I-140 ends at Interstate 40 (I-40), and the route number changes to NC 140. NC 140 continues to the east, ending at US 17 in Kirkland.

U.S. Route 17 in North Carolina

U.S. Route 17 in North Carolina

U.S. Route 17 (US 17) in the U.S. state of North Carolina is a north–south highway that is known as the Coastal Highway in the southeastern half of the state and the Ocean Highway in other areas. The route enters the state from South Carolina near Calabash, and leaves in the vicinity of the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia. Between the US 64 freeway and the Virginia state line, US 17 is a four-lane divided highway with speed limits varying between 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) and 70 miles per hour (110 km/h).

Winnabow, North Carolina

Winnabow, North Carolina

Winnabow is a unincorporated community and census-designated place in Brunswick County in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It is located at 34°08′57″N 78°05′36″W It is mainly a farming community along US Highway 17. There is no large retail presence in the area, except a Han Dee Hugo's convenience store at the intersection of NC 87 and US 17 South. Mill Creek Farm and Garden Center is the feed store for the area and is located beside Willetts Farm. Winnabow has a post office and a zip code of 28479.

Murraysville, North Carolina

Murraysville, North Carolina

Murraysville is a census-designated place (CDP) in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 14,215 at the 2010 census, up from 7,279 in 2000. It is part of the Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Interstate 240 (North Carolina)

Interstate 240 (North Carolina)

Interstate 240 (I-240) is a 9.1-mile-long (14.6 km) Interstate Highway loop in the US state of North Carolina. It serves as an urban connector for Asheville and runs in a semicircle around the north of the city's downtown district between exits 53B and 46B of I-40. Between those points, I-40 continues in an east–west direction further south of the city, roughly parallel to the Swannanoa and French Broad rivers. The western segment of I-240 is now being cosigned with I-26 as part of a larger project extending I-26 from its former western terminus at I-40/I-240 to U.S. Highway 23 (US 23) near Kingsport, Tennessee.

U.S. Route 74

U.S. Route 74

U.S. Route 74 (US 74) is an east–west United States highway that runs for 515 miles (829 km) from Chattanooga, Tennessee to Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. Primarily in North Carolina, it serves as an important highway from the mountains to the sea, connecting the cities of Asheville, Charlotte and Wilmington. The entire length of the route is known as Andrew Jackson Highway.

Asheville, North Carolina

Asheville, North Carolina

Asheville is a city in, and the county seat of, Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States. Located at the confluence of the French Broad and Swannanoa rivers, it is the largest city in Western North Carolina, and the state's 11th-most populous city. According to the 2020 United States Census, the city's population was 94,589, up from 83,393 in the 2010 census. It is the principal city in the four-county Asheville metropolitan area, which had a population of 424,858 in 2010, and of 469,015 in 2020.

U.S. Route 158

U.S. Route 158

U.S. Route 158 (US 158) is an east–west United States highway that runs for 350 miles (560 km) from Mocksville to Whalebone Junction in Nags Head, entirely in the state of North Carolina. It is also a critical route that connects the cities of Winston-Salem, Summerfield, and Reidsville with one another.

Interstate 74 in North Carolina

Interstate 74 in North Carolina

Interstate 74 (I-74) is a partially completed part of the Interstate Highway System that will eventually run from Davenport, Iowa, to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. In the US state of North Carolina, I-74 currently exists in three distinct segments; from I-77 at the Virginia state line to U.S. Highway 52 (US 52) near Mount Airy, from I-40 in Winston-Salem to US 220 near Ellerbe, and from US 74 and US 74 Business near Maxton to US 74/North Carolina Highway 41 (NC 41) near Lumberton. I-74 has an extensive concurrency with I-73 from Randleman to Ellerbe in the Piedmont. When completed, I-74 will link the cities of Mount Airy, Winston-Salem, High Point, Rockingham, Laurinburg, and Lumberton.

Interstate 285 (North Carolina)

Interstate 285 (North Carolina)

Interstate 285 (I-285) in the US state of North Carolina is the designation for a freeway connecting the cities of Lexington and Winston-Salem. The route was approved in February 2018 and was first signed in November 2018. An auxiliary route of I-85, it branches off of its parent route and runs northeast, bypassing central Lexington, before turning due north and heading toward Winston-Salem, terminating at an interchange with I-40. I-285 is cosigned with US Highway 52 (US 52) for its entire route, and as of November 2018, still uses US 52 milemarkers and exit numbers. Other routes cosigned along parts of the route include I-85 Business, US 29, US 70, and North Carolina Highway 8 (NC 8). I-285 has been approved for an extension along the US 52 freeway through Winston-Salem to meet the future Winston-Salem Northern Beltway.

U.S. Route 52 in North Carolina

U.S. Route 52 in North Carolina

U.S. Route 52 (US 52) is a north–south United States highway that runs for 150 miles (240 km) from the South Carolina state line, near McFarlan, to the Virginia state line, near Mount Airy. It serves as a strategic highway through the central North Carolina Piedmont. Because of its alignment in the state, US 52 does not follow the standard convention of an even U.S. route number going east–west.

Interstate 277 (North Carolina)

Interstate 277 (North Carolina)

Interstate 277 (I-277) is an auxiliary Interstate Highway in the US state of North Carolina. It serves as a 4.41-mile (7.10 km) partial loop around Uptown Charlotte.

Business routes

Number Length (mi) Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
I-40 BL 18.50 29.77 I-40/US 421 in Winston-Salem I-40/US 421 in Colfax 01992-01-011992[30] 02020-01-012020 Was a freeway-grade business loop
I-40 BL 16.40 26.39 I-40/US 1/US 64 in Raleigh I-40/US 64/US 70/US 401 in Raleigh 01991-01-011991[31] Was a freeway-grade, unsigned, designated business loop along the northern half of the Raleigh beltway; replaced by I-440
I-85 BL 29.80 47.96 I-85/US 29/US 52/US 70 in Lexington I-85/US 29/US 70 in Greensboro 01984-01-011984 current Expressway-grade business loop
I-95 BL 16.00 25.75 I-95 in Hope Mills I-95 in Eastover 01978-01-011978[32] current Boulevard-grade business loop
I-95 BL 44.60 71.78 I-95/US 301 in Kenly I-95 near Battleboro 01978-01-011978[32] 01986-01-011986[33] Was a boulevard-grade business loop
  •       Former

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Colfax, North Carolina

Colfax, North Carolina

Colfax is a small unincorporated community located in Guilford County, North Carolina, United States. It is located at in the western part of the county. The population in 2010 was 4,136.

U.S. Route 1 in North Carolina

U.S. Route 1 in North Carolina

U.S. Route 1 (US 1) is a north–south United States highway which runs along the Eastern Coast of the United States between Key West, Florida and the United States–Canada border near Fort Kent, Maine. In North Carolina, US 1 runs for 174.1 miles (280.2 km) across the central region of the state. The highway enters North Carolina from South Carolina, southwest of Rockingham. US 1 runs northeast, passing through or closely bypassing Southern Pines and Sanford in the Sandhills region. It next passes through Cary, the state capital of Raleigh, and Wake Forest. The highway continues north to Henderson, before leaving the state at the Virginia state line, near Wise. The route is mostly a multi-lane divided arterial road, with several freeway segments. It serves as a strategic highway, connecting the North Carolina Sandhills and Research Triangle regions northwards to the Southside Virginia region.

Raleigh, North Carolina

Raleigh, North Carolina

Raleigh is the capital city of the state of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County in the United States. It is the second-most populous city in North Carolina, after Charlotte, the tenth-most populous city in the Southeast, the 41st-most populous city in the U.S., and the largest city of the Research Triangle metro area. Raleigh is known as the "City of Oaks" for its many oak trees, which line the streets in the heart of the city. The city covers a land area of 147.6 sq mi (382 km2). The U.S. Census Bureau counted the city's population as 474,069 in 2020. It is one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States. The city of Raleigh is named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who established the lost Roanoke Colony in present-day Dare County.

U.S. Route 401

U.S. Route 401

U.S. Route 401 (US 401) is a north–south United States highway, a spur of U.S. Route 1, that travels along the Fall Line from Sumter, South Carolina to Interstate 85 near Wise, North Carolina.

Interstate 85 Business (North Carolina)

Interstate 85 Business (North Carolina)

Interstate 85 Business in the US state of North Carolina is a 29.8-mile-long (48.0 km) business loop of Interstate 85 (I-85) which serves several cities in the Piedmont Triad.

U.S. Route 29 in North Carolina

U.S. Route 29 in North Carolina

U.S. Route 29 is a United States highway that runs for 168 miles (270 km) from the South Carolina state line, near Blacksburg, to the commonwealth of Virginia, near Danville. It is signed with north-south cardinal directions, but is actually a north-east and south-west diagonal highway throughout the state. The route serves the North Carolina Piedmont, including the cities of Charlotte, Salisbury, High Point, and Greensboro. From Salisbury to Greensboro, US 29 spends roughly a third of its length in the state being concurrent with US 70.

Lexington, North Carolina

Lexington, North Carolina

Lexington is the county seat of Davidson County, North Carolina, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 18,931. It is located in central North Carolina, 20 miles (32 km) south of Winston-Salem. Major highways include I-85, I-85B, U.S. Route 29, U.S. Route 70, U.S. Route 52 / I-285 and U.S. Route 64. Lexington is part of the Piedmont Triad region of the state.

Greensboro, North Carolina

Greensboro, North Carolina

Greensboro is a city in and the county seat of Guilford County, North Carolina, United States. It is the third-most populous city in North Carolina after Charlotte and Raleigh, the 69th-most populous city in the United States, and the largest city in the Piedmont Triad metropolitan region. At the 2020 United States census, its population was 299,035. Three major interstate highways in the Piedmont region of central North Carolina were built to intersect at this city.

Limited-access road

Limited-access road

A limited-access road, known by various terms worldwide, including limited-access highway, dual-carriageway, expressway, and partial controlled access highway, is a highway or arterial road for high-speed traffic which has many or most characteristics of a controlled-access highway, including limited or no access to adjacent property, some degree of separation of opposing traffic flow, use of grade separated interchanges to some extent, prohibition of slow modes of transport, such as bicycles, (draught) horses, or self-propelled agricultural machines; and very few or no intersecting cross-streets or level crossings. The degree of isolation from local traffic allowed varies between countries and regions. The precise definition of these terms varies by jurisdiction.

Interstate 95 Business (North Carolina)

Interstate 95 Business (North Carolina)

Interstate 95 Business is a business loop of Interstate 95 entirely within Cumberland County, North Carolina. It runs from nearby Hope Mills to Eastover, passing through the eastern side of downtown Fayetteville.

Hope Mills, North Carolina

Hope Mills, North Carolina

Hope Mills is a town in Cumberland County, North Carolina, United States. Its population was 15,176 at the 2010 census.

Eastover, North Carolina

Eastover, North Carolina

Eastover is a town in Cumberland County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 3,628 at the 2010 census. It was incorporated on July 25, 2007.

Source: "List of Interstate Highways in North Carolina", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Interstate_Highways_in_North_Carolina.

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See also
References
  1. ^ a b "2019 Highway and Road Mileage" (PDF). Connect NCDOT. North Carolina Department of Transportation. June 2020. Retrieved May 15, 2022.
  2. ^ Price, Jeff (May 6, 2019). "Table 3: Interstate Routes in Each of the 50 States, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  3. ^ Price, Jeff (May 6, 2019). "Table 1: Main Routes of the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways as of December 31, 2018". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  4. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (June 21, 2008). "I-26 Fact Sheet" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
  5. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (June 21, 2008). "I-40 Fact Sheet" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
  6. ^ a b North Carolina Department of Transportation (May 25, 2016). "North Carolina Gains Names for Two New Interstate Designations" (Press release). North Carolina Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on June 16, 2016. Retrieved May 25, 2016.
  7. ^ a b Division of Highways (September 20, 1996). "I-73/I-74 (1996-09-20)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  8. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (June 21, 2008). "I-77 Fact Sheet" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
  9. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (June 21, 2008). "I-85 Fact Sheet" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
  10. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (June 21, 2008). "I-95 Fact Sheet" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2014.
  11. ^ Price, Jeff (May 6, 2019). "Table 2: Auxiliary Routes of the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways as of December 31, 2018". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved March 13, 2021.
  12. ^ "Vovici EFM Report: RN-08-03 (2008-12-15)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. December 15, 2008. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  13. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (November 1, 1980). "I-240 (1980-11-01)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Justice. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  14. ^ "Winston-Salem Northern Beltway". North Carolina Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 12, 2022.
  15. ^ "Project Highlights". North Carolina Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 12, 2022.
  16. ^ "I-285 (2018-02-01)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. February 1, 2018. Retrieved January 16, 2019.
  17. ^ "Route Change (2019-01-15)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. January 15, 2019. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  18. ^ "I-440 (1991-07-16)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. July 16, 1991. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  19. ^ Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering (June 7, 1988). "Route Numbering Committee Agenda" (PDF) (Report). Washington, DC: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. p. 2. Retrieved June 5, 2015 – via Wikimedia Commons.
  20. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (December 12, 2013). "North Carolina Gets a New Interstate, with the I-495 Designation near Raleigh" (Press release). North Carolina Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on July 5, 2017. Retrieved December 12, 2013.
  21. ^ "I-540 (1996-12-04)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. December 4, 1996. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  22. ^ Google (November 28, 2021). "Interstate 587" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved November 28, 2021.
  23. ^ North Carolina Department of Transportation (November 21, 2016). "Governor McCrory Announces Designation for US 264 to Greenville" (Press release). North Carolina Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on November 25, 2016. Retrieved November 24, 2016.
  24. ^ Rogers, Mark (November 19, 2021). "Infrastructure bill clears way for future I-685". The Sanford Herald. Retrieved November 22, 2021.
  25. ^ "I-785 (2013-07-31)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. July 31, 2013. Retrieved August 28, 2013.
  26. ^ "I-795 (2007-10-19)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. October 19, 2007. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  27. ^ "I-840 (2011-09-02)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. September 2, 2011. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  28. ^ Google (October 12, 2022). "Interstate 885" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved October 12, 2022.
  29. ^ "Durham's East End Connector to open to drivers this afternoon" by Monica Casey and Nia Harden, June 30, 2022 (WRAL.com)
  30. ^ "I-40 Bus (1992-11-09)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. November 9, 1992. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  31. ^ "Interstate 440 Route Change (07-16-1991)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. July 16, 1991. Retrieved November 16, 2013.
  32. ^ a b "I-95 Bus (1978-05-01)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. May 1, 1978. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  33. ^ "I-95 Bus (1986-01-01)" (PDF). North Carolina Department of Transportation. January 1, 1986. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
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