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List of Beeching cuts service reopenings

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The Beeching cuts were a reduction of route network and restructuring of British Rail in the 1960s. Since the mid-1990s there has been significant growth in passenger numbers on the railways and renewed government interest in the role of rail in UK transport. Some closed stations have reopened, and rail passenger services been restored on a few lines where they had been removed.

Some former British Rail lines have become heritage railways.

Completed reopenings

The reopened Borders Railway in Scotland
The reopened Borders Railway in Scotland
Closed lines now converted to light rail operation for Manchester Metrolink
Closed lines now converted to light rail operation for Manchester Metrolink
Closed line converted into a guided busway – the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway
Closed line converted into a guided busway – the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway

London

South East

South West

  • Stations reopened include Ashchurch, Cam and Dursley, Feniton, Pinhoe, Templecombe and Yate.
  • Service between Swindon and Trowbridge ceased in 1966 but two passenger trains each way were reinstated in 1985, along with the reopening of Melksham station. Passenger numbers rose rapidly, and the service – now increased in frequency and known as the TransWilts Line – was extended to Westbury.
  • Regular passenger services between Yeovil Junction and Yeovil Pen Mill were withdrawn in 1968; a limited service was reinstated in 2015 and has since slowly increased.
  • A summer Sunday service ran to Okehampton from 1997 to 2019, with a full daily service reinstated in 2021

East Anglia/Lincolnshire

  • Needham Market, closed in 1967, was reopened in 1971; Soham, closed in 1965 was reopened in 2021; and Watlington, closed in 1968, was reopened in 1975.
  • Peterborough to Lincoln Line: the section between Peterborough and Spalding closed to passengers on 5 October 1970 and reopened on 7 June 1971.

East Midlands

  • The Robin Hood Line in Nottinghamshire, between Nottingham and Worksop via Mansfield, reopened in the early 1990s. Since closure in 1964 Mansfield had been the largest town in Britain without a rail link.
  • Stations at Syston, Sileby and Barrow-upon-Soar between Leicester and Loughborough closed in 1968 reopened in 1994.
  • The Kettering to Manton Jn Line via Corby closed to passengers on 18 April 1966. A shuttle service between Kettering and Corby was introduced in 1987, but the service was unreliable and lost funding support from the local council, leading to its closure in 1990. The line was then reopened on 23 February 2009 with Corby served by direct trains to London and a limited number of trains continuing on towards Oakham and Melton Mowbray.
  • Alfreton, Langley Mill and Ilkeston stations on the Erewash Valley Line have since been reopened.
  • Dronfield (closed 1967 reopened 1981), Matlock Bath was closed in 1967 and reopened in 1972, Narborough was closed in 1968 but reopened two years later, Peartree was closed in 1968 and reopened 1976, Tutbury and Hatton was closed in 1966 and reopened in 1989, Willington was closed in 1968 and reopened in 1994, Wigston Glen Parva was closed in 1968 and replaced with a new station South Wigston in 1986 on an adjacent site.

West Midlands

North East/Yorkshire

North West

North and Mid Wales

South Wales

Scotland

Discover more about Completed reopenings related topics

Borders Railway

Borders Railway

The Borders Railway connects the city of Edinburgh with Galashiels and Tweedbank in the Scottish Borders. The railway follows most of the alignment of the northern part of the Waverley Route, a former double-track line in southern Scotland and northern England that ran between Edinburgh and Carlisle. That line was controversially closed in 1969, as part of the Beeching cuts, leaving the Borders region without any access to the National Rail network. Following the closure, a campaign to revive the Waverley Route emerged. Discussion on reopening the northern part of the line came to a head during the early 2000s. Following deliberations in the Scottish Parliament, the Waverley Railway (Scotland) Act 2006 received royal assent in June 2006. The project was renamed the "Borders Railway" in August 2008, and building works began in November 2012. Passenger service on the line began on 6 September 2015, whilst an official opening by Queen Elizabeth II took place on 9 September.

Light rail

Light rail

Light rail transit (LRT) is a form of passenger urban rail transit characterized by a combination of tram and rapid transit features. While its rolling stock is more similar to a traditional tram, it operates at a higher capacity and speed, and often on an exclusive right-of-way. In many cities, light rail transit systems more closely resemble, and are therefore indistinguishable from, traditional underground or at-grade subways and heavy-rail metros.

Manchester Metrolink

Manchester Metrolink

Manchester Metrolink is a tram/light rail system in Greater Manchester, England. The network has 99 stops along 64 miles (103 km) of standard-gauge route, making it the most extensive light rail system in the United Kingdom. Metrolink is owned by the public body Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) and operated and maintained under contract by a Keolis/Amey consortium. In 2021/22, 26 million passenger journeys were made on the system.

Cambridgeshire Guided Busway

Cambridgeshire Guided Busway

The Cambridgeshire Guided Busway, known locally as The Busway, connects Cambridge, Huntingdon and St Ives in the English county of Cambridgeshire. It is the longest guided busway in the world, overtaking the O-Bahn Busway in Adelaide, South Australia.

Heritage railway

Heritage railway

A heritage railway or heritage railroad is a railway operated as living history to re-create or preserve railway scenes of the past. Heritage railways are often old railway lines preserved in a state depicting a period in the history of rail transport.

Farringdon station

Farringdon station

Farringdon is a London Underground and connected main line National Rail station in Clerkenwell, central London. The station is in the London Borough of Islington, just outside the boundary of the City of London. Opened in 1863 as the terminus of the Metropolitan Railway, the world's first underground passenger railway, Farringdon is one of the oldest surviving underground railway stations in the world.

Midland Main Line

Midland Main Line

The Midland Main Line is a major railway line in England from London to Nottingham and Sheffield in the Midlands. It comprises the lines from London's St Pancras station via Leicester, Derby/Nottingham and Chesterfield in the East Midlands.

Blackfriars station

Blackfriars station

Blackfriars, also known as London Blackfriars, is a central London railway station and connected London Underground station in the City of London. It provides Thameslink services: local, and regional and limited Southeastern commuter services to South East London and Kent. Its platforms span the River Thames, the only one in London to do so, along the length of Blackfriars Railway Bridge, a short distance downstream from Blackfriars Bridge. There are two station entrances either side of the Thames, along with a connection to the London Underground District and Circle lines.

Chiltern Main Line

Chiltern Main Line

The Chiltern Main Line is a railway line which links London (Marylebone) and Birmingham, the United Kingdom's two largest cities, by a 112-mile (180 km) route via High Wycombe, Bicester, Banbury, Leamington Spa and Solihull.

Aynho Junction

Aynho Junction

Aynho Junction is a railway junction in Northamptonshire, England, five miles south of Banbury. The junction is a flying junction, with the down line from Bicester North grade separated from the up and down lines from Oxford. The junction is the point where the Great Western Railway's New North Main Line of 1910 joins the original Didcot and Chester Line via Oxford. The former line is also known as the Bicester cut-off line.

Chandler's Ford railway station

Chandler's Ford railway station

Chandler's Ford railway station serves the Chandler's Ford area of Eastleigh in Hampshire, England. It is on the Eastleigh to Romsey Line, 75 miles 25 chains (121.2 km) measured from London Waterloo.

Hampshire

Hampshire

Hampshire is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in western South East England on the coast of the English Channel. Home to two major English cities on its south coast, Southampton and Portsmouth, Hampshire is the 9th-most populous county in England. The county town of Hampshire is Winchester, located in the north of the county. The county is bordered by Dorset to the south-west, Wiltshire to the north-west, Berkshire to the north, Surrey to the north-east, and West Sussex to the south east. The county is geographically diverse, with upland rising to 286 m (938 ft) and mostly south-flowing rivers. There are areas of downland and marsh, and two national parks: the New Forest and part of the South Downs, which together cover 45 per cent of Hampshire.

Heritage railways

Further proposals

As of 2022, proposals being pursued included

In November 2017 the government announced plans to reverse some of the cuts made in the 1960s, and later cuts by British Rail, to restore lost capacity and introduce new routes to help with new housing or relieve congestion.[4][5][6]

In December 2018, the Department for Transport confirmed that it was investigating a number of proposals to restore old lines in addition to plans to improve Heathrow links, reinstate stations on the Camp Hill Line in the West Midlands, reopen the Northumberland Line to passengers and build a new station at Cambridge South.[7]

2020 initiative

In January 2020, the Department for Transport announced a £500 million "Restoring Your Railway" fund and asked MPs, local authorities and community groups to make proposals to reinstate local services and reopen stations.[8] The government also announced £1.5 million towards plans to reopen the Northumberland line,[9] £100,000 towards assessment of the Fleetwood branch line, and £20 million for a third round of the New Stations Fund.[3]

The £500 million would not be spent on building railway lines but on developing proposals through feasibility studies, business cases and designs.[10] Proposals for projects would be sponsored by a local MP, gather local support, and then be put to a panel of experts chaired by the Rail Minister.[8] Examples given were:

  • upgrading a freight line to provide passenger services and restoring stations on it
  • restoring track and services to an old alignment
  • modifying an old route which has been built over.[8]

Successful proposals will receive funding to develop their business case, which will be submitted to the Department for Transport in a bid for more substantial development funding.[8]

In April 2020, the Department for Transport stated that any unsuccessful proposals would receive help from the department so they can improve their proposals for a later round of ideas. At the same time, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Department announced a third round of ideas for November 2020.[11]

In May 2020, the Department announced that ten schemes had been successful in the first round of bidding:[8]

In November 2020, the Department announced that fifteen further schemes had been successful in the second round of bidding, as well as the restoration of rail links to Okehampton:[13]

In November 2020, the Department announced that five schemes had been successful in the New Stations Fund 3:[13]

In October 2021, the third and final round of successful bids were announced,[14] taking the number of schemes accepted for further feasibility studies to 38.[15]

The first project to be completed under the "Restoring Your Railway" banner was the 15½-mile Dartmoor line from Crediton to Okehampton, where services resumed on 20 November 2021. The line had closed to passengers in 1972 but had been operated as a heritage railway from 1997 to 2019. Nine months of work by Network Rail included laying 11 miles (17 km) of new track.[16]

Discover more about Further proposals related topics

East West Rail

East West Rail

East West Rail is a major project to establish a strategic railway connecting East Anglia with Central, Southern and Western England. In particular, it plans to build a line linking Oxford and Cambridge via Bicester, Milton Keynes and Bedford, largely using the trackbed of the former Varsity Line. Thus it provides a route between any or all of the Great Western, Chiltern, West Coast, Midland, East Coast, West Anglia, Great Eastern and the Cotswold main lines, avoiding London. The new line will provide a route for potential new services between Southampton Central and Ipswich or Norwich via Reading, Didcot and Ely, using existing onward lines. The government approved the western section in November 2011, with completion of this section expected by 2025. As of January 2019, the company aims to complete the Central section by "the mid 2020s". As of March 2020, electrification of the line is not planned, but the 2019 decision is under review. The plan is divided into three sections:"Western section" from Oxford to Bedford on the former Varsity Line route, taking advantage of the recently reconstructed Oxford-Bicester line and the existing Bletchley–Bedford Marston Vale line ; the original scope of this section included a branch line to Aylesbury: as of January 2021, this element is 'under review'; "Central section" from Bedford to Cambridge over a substantially new alignment; "Eastern section" from Cambridge to Norwich, Felixstowe and Ipswich on existing lines.

East West Rail

East West Rail

East West Rail is a major project to establish a strategic railway connecting East Anglia with Central, Southern and Western England. In particular, it plans to build a line linking Oxford and Cambridge via Bicester, Milton Keynes and Bedford, largely using the trackbed of the former Varsity Line. Thus it provides a route between any or all of the Great Western, Chiltern, West Coast, Midland, East Coast, West Anglia, Great Eastern and the Cotswold main lines, avoiding London. The new line will provide a route for potential new services between Southampton Central and Ipswich or Norwich via Reading, Didcot and Ely, using existing onward lines. The government approved the western section in November 2011, with completion of this section expected by 2025. As of January 2019, the company aims to complete the Central section by "the mid 2020s". As of March 2020, electrification of the line is not planned, but the 2019 decision is under review. The plan is divided into three sections:"Western section" from Oxford to Bedford on the former Varsity Line route, taking advantage of the recently reconstructed Oxford-Bicester line and the existing Bletchley–Bedford Marston Vale line ; the original scope of this section included a branch line to Aylesbury: as of January 2021, this element is 'under review'; "Central section" from Bedford to Cambridge over a substantially new alignment; "Eastern section" from Cambridge to Norwich, Felixstowe and Ipswich on existing lines.

Camp Hill Line

Camp Hill Line

The Camp Hill line is a railway line in Birmingham which lies between Kings Norton on the Cross-City Line and Birmingham New Street via Grand Junction on the main lines from Derby and Coventry.

Filton Abbey Wood railway station

Filton Abbey Wood railway station

Filton Abbey Wood railway station serves the town of Filton in South Gloucestershire, England, inside the Bristol conurbation. It is 4.4 miles (7.1 km) from Bristol Temple Meads. There are four platforms but minimal facilities. The station is managed by Great Western Railway that operates all services. The general service level is eight trains per hour - two to South Wales, two to Bristol Parkway, two toward Weston-super-Mare and two toward Westbury.

Henbury railway station

Henbury railway station

Henbury railway station served the Bristol suburb of Henbury, England, from 1910 to 1965. The station was situated on the Henbury Loop Line of the Great Western Railway and was opened on 9 May 1910 for passenger services. Under the Beeching cuts, it was closed to passengers on 23 November 1964, with goods services ceasing on 5 July 1965. There is a proposal to reopen the station as part of the Greater Bristol Metro scheme.

Levenmouth rail link

Levenmouth rail link

The Levenmouth rail link is a planned scheme to re-open 5 miles (8 km) of railway line in Fife, Scotland. The link will connect the town of Leven and other settlements in the Levenmouth conurbation with Thornton, and will join the Fife Circle Line at Thornton North Junction. The line is being promoted by Fife Council and the South East Scotland Transport Partnership (SESTRAN). The plan was approved by the Scottish Government on 8 August 2019.

Blyth and Tyne Railway

Blyth and Tyne Railway

The Blyth and Tyne Railway was a railway company in Northumberland, England, incorporated by Act of Parliament on 30 June 1852. It was created to unify the various private railways and waggonways built to carry coal from the Northumberland coalfield to Blyth and the River Tyne, which it took control of on 1st January 1853. Over time, the railway expanded its network to reach Morpeth (1857/8), North Seaton (1859), Tynemouth (1860/1), Newcastle upon Tyne (1864), and finally Newbiggin-by-the-Sea (1872). It became part of the much larger North Eastern Railway in 1874.

Charfield railway station

Charfield railway station

Charfield railway station served the village of Charfield in South Gloucestershire, England. The station was on the Bristol and Gloucester Railway, originally a broad gauge line overseen by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, but later taken over by the Midland Railway and converted to standard gauge.

Heathrow Airport

Heathrow Airport

Heathrow Airport, called London Airport until 1966 and now known as London Heathrow, is a major international airport in London, England. It is the largest of the six international airports serving Greater London. The airport facility is owned and operated by Heathrow Airport Holdings. In 2021, it was the seventh-busiest airport in the world by international passenger traffic and eighth-busiest in Europe by total passenger traffic.

Cambridge South railway station

Cambridge South railway station

Cambridge South railway station is a planned railway station located in Cambridge adjacent to Addenbrooke's Hospital and Cambridge Biomedical Campus. The station will be on the Cambridge line and West Anglia Main Line. It is planned to open in 2025.

Member of parliament

Member of parliament

A member of parliament (MP) is the representative in parliament of the people who live in their electoral district. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this term refers only to members of the lower house since upper house members often have a different title. The terms congressman/congresswoman or deputy are equivalent terms used in other jurisdictions. The term parliamentarian is also sometimes used for members of parliament, but this may also be used to refer to unelected government officials with specific roles in a parliament and other expert advisers on parliamentary procedure such as the Senate Parliamentarian in the United States. The term is also used to the characteristic of performing the duties of a member of a legislature, for example: "The two party leaders often disagreed on issues, but both were excellent parliamentarians and cooperated to get many good things done."

Fleetwood branch line

Fleetwood branch line

The Fleetwood branch line consists of the railway line from Preston to Fleetwood. It passed through many smaller stations along the way. When work at Fleetwood docks was under threat in the mid-1960s, the main Fleetwood station was closed; the remainder of the branch south to Poulton followed in 1970. Proposals exist to re-open the branch to passenger services in the near future.

Source: "List of Beeching cuts service reopenings", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Beeching_cuts_service_reopenings.

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References
  1. ^ SPT News Archived September 22, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Levenmouth rail link to reopen in £70m project". BBC News: Scotland. 8 August 2019. Retrieved 18 November 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Government pledges £500 million to bring back historic rail lines, improving connectivity for communities across the country". GOV.UK. Department for Transport. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  4. ^ "Connecting people: a strategic vision for rail" (PDF). GOV.UK. Department for Transport. November 2017. Retrieved 12 May 2019.
  5. ^ Ellis, Mark (28 November 2017). "Rail boost for Britain by reopening lines axed in the 1960s". Mirror. Retrieved 12 May 2019.
  6. ^ Topham, Gwyn (28 November 2017). "Rail services lost under 1960s Beeching cuts may reopen". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 12 May 2019.
  7. ^ White, Mark (26 December 2018). "Axed rail routes may be reopened under new Department for Transport plans". Sky News. Retrieved 12 May 2019.
  8. ^ a b c d e "Restoring Your Railway Fund". GOV.UK. Department for Transport. 23 May 2020. Retrieved 23 May 2020.
  9. ^ Sharma, Sonia (28 January 2020). "How plans to re-open Newcastle to Ashington railway line could boost region". North East Chronicle. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  10. ^ "£500m fund to help restore Beeching rail lines". BBC News. 28 January 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  11. ^ Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund: round 1 update Gov.uk 27 April 2020
  12. ^ a b "Restoring your railway: successful bids". Department for Transport. 26 November 2020.
  13. ^ a b "National Infrastructure Strategy" (PDF). GOV.UK. HM Treasury. November 2020. p. 41. Retrieved 25 January 2021.
  14. ^ "Restoring your railway: successful bids". GOV.UK. Department for Transport. 27 October 2021. Retrieved 28 October 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  15. ^ Horgan, Rob (28 October 2021). "13 more abandoned railways and stations backed by DfT for restoration". New Civil Engineer. Retrieved 28 October 2021.
  16. ^ Kennedy, Catherine (12 October 2021). "How engineers restored the abandoned Dartmoor railway line in just nine months". New Civil Engineer. Retrieved 28 October 2021.

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