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List of Bath City F.C. seasons

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This is a list of seasons played by Bath City Football Club in English football, from the year they first turned competitive in 1908 in the Western League, to the present day.

Bath City 1920 Squad
Bath City 1920 Squad

In 1889 Bath City were formed as Bath AFC and began to play at the Belvoir North Parade Ground, making them one of England's most senior non league football clubs. In 1908, they commenced playing competitive league format football, joining the Western League Division Two. And moved up to Western League division 1, in which they were runners up in the 1913–14 season. Bath remained in the western league until 1921, in which they joined the Southern league English section, the fourth tier at the time. After the 1921 reform, the English non league structure was changed, with division three (Southern league) becoming the English Football League's new Third Division. As a result, non-League football went from hosting tiers three and four to tiers four and five.[1]

Almost a decade later, Bath were crowned Champions in 1929–30 but lost 3–2 in the play offs to Eastern Section Champions Aldershot Town in 1930, so did not get promoted to the Southern League division 1, (the fourth division.) In 1933, Bath won the Southern League again, but lost in the final to play-off Eastern Section Champions Norwich City 2–1.

Bath remained in the Southern League until 1939, with Liverpool legend and Scottish international, Alex Raisbeck as first team coach from 1938 to 1939. Upon outbreak of the Second World War, Bath were, by chance, accepted to join the temporary Football League North, competing with the likes of Liverpool, Manchester United, Aston Villa and Everton, finishing the eventual champions, thereby becoming the only semi-professional side ever to win a Football League trophy. After the War they were forced to resume playing in the Southern Premier Division, which was the 5th tier at the time. Bath won the league in the 1959–60 season. A year later they were runners up in the same league.

In 1959, the Southern league was added to the football league, as the Fourth Division, thus non league football went from hosting tiers four, five, to tiers five and six.

Bath's history is entirely in non-league football, predominantly in the 5th tier. Bath narrowly missed out on election to the Football League by a few votes in 1978 and again in 1985.[2] The club have a good history in the FA Cup, reaching the Third Round six times, and have beaten league sides including Crystal Palace (in 1931), Millwall (in 1959), and Cardiff City (in 1992).[3]

In total, Bath have won two Southern League Western Section (Tier 4) titles - 1929–30, 1930–33, two Southern League (Tier 5) titles - 1959–60, 1977–78, one Conference South (Tier 6) play off, one Southern Football League (Tier 7) title - 2006–07, One Southern League Cup, one non league championship trophy, one Football League North - 1943–44 and twenty four Somerset Premier Cups.

Discover more about List of Bath City F.C. seasons related topics

Bath City F.C.

Bath City F.C.

Bath City Football Club is a semi-professional football club based in Bath, Somerset, England. The club is affiliated to the Somerset FA and currently competes in the National League South, the sixth tier of English football. The club have played their home matches at Twerton Park since 1932.

Association football

Association football

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played between two teams of 11 players who primarily use their feet to propel a ball around a rectangular field called a pitch. The objective of the game is to score more goals than the opposite team by moving the ball beyond the goal line into a rectangular-framed goal defended by the opposing side. Traditionally, the game has been played over two 45 minute halves, for a total match time of 90 minutes. With an estimated 250 million players active in over 200 countries and territories, it is considered the world's most popular sport.

Aldershot Town F.C.

Aldershot Town F.C.

Aldershot Town Football Club is a professional association football club based in Aldershot, Hampshire, England. The team competes in the National League, the fifth tier of the English football league system. The club was founded in the spring of 1992 after the closure of debt-ridden Fourth Division club Aldershot. Aldershot Town play at the Recreation Ground, which had also been the home ground of the previous club.

Alex Raisbeck

Alex Raisbeck

Alexander Galloway Raisbeck was a Scottish professional football player and manager. After playing junior football for Larkhall Thistle, he was signed by Hibernian where he made his professional debut at the age of 17. Despite playing only ten matches in his first season, he was chosen to represent a Scottish League XI in a match against their Irish counterparts.

Aston Villa F.C.

Aston Villa F.C.

Aston Villa Football Club is a professional football club based in Aston, Birmingham, England. The club competes in the Premier League, the top tier of the English football league system. Founded in 1874, they have played at their home ground, Villa Park, since 1897. Aston Villa is one of the oldest and most successful clubs in England, having won the Football League First Division seven times, the FA Cup seven times, the League Cup five times, and the European Cup and European (UEFA) Super Cup once.

Cardiff City F.C.

Cardiff City F.C.

Cardiff City Football Club is a professional association football club based in Cardiff, Wales. It competes in the Championship, the second tier of the English football league system. Founded in 1899 as Riverside A.F.C., the club changed its name to Cardiff City in 1908 and entered the Southern Football League in 1910 before joining the English Football League in 1920. The team has spent 17 seasons in the top tier of English football, the longest period being between 1921 and 1929. Their most recent season in the top flight was the 2018–19 Premier League season.

1929–30 in English football

1929–30 in English football

The 1929–30 season was the 55th season of competitive football in England.

1932–33 in English football

1932–33 in English football

The 1932–33 season was the 58th season of competitive football in England. For the second time in three seasons, Arsenal were crowned league champions, building on a start of just one defeat in the first fourteen games. They clinched the crown with a 3–1 win at Chelsea in April 1933. Meanwhile, Stoke City ended their nine-year wait for top flight promotion by attaining First Division status after winning an impressive 56 points over the campaign. Hull City and Brentford were also promoted. Everton won their second FA Cup defeating Manchester City 3–0 in the final. Lower league Walsall provided the surprise by knocking out Arsenal in an earlier round.

1959–60 in English football

1959–60 in English football

The 1959–60 season was the 80th season of competitive football in England.

1977–78 in English football

1977–78 in English football

The 1977–78 season was the 98th season of competitive football in England.

2006–07 in English football

2006–07 in English football

The 2006–07 season was the 127th season of competitive association football in England.

1943–44 in English football

1943–44 in English football

The 1943–44 season was the fifth season of special wartime football in England during the Second World War.

Key

Key Meaning Key Bras
P Matches played QR1 1st Qualifying Round
W Matches won QR2 2nd Qualifying Round
D Matches drawn QR3 3rd Qualifying Round
L Matches lost QR4 4th Qualifying Round
GF Goals for R1 Round 1
GA Goals against R2 Round 2
Pts Points R3 Round 3
Pos Final position R4 Round 4
SLW Southern League West (tier 4 from 1921-1959)
SL Southern League (tier 4)
SLP Southern League Premier (tier 5 from 1959-1980)
SL Div 1 Southern League Div 1 (tier 6)
CS Conference South (tier 6)
WL Western Football League (tiers 5 and 6 before 1921)
NLS National League South (tier 6)
SFL Southern Football league (tiers 6 and 7 from 1980-2004)
Winners Runners-up Promoted Relegated

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Southern Football League

Southern Football League

The Southern League is a men's football competition featuring semi-professional clubs from East Anglia, the South and Midlands of England, and South Wales. Together with the Isthmian League and the Northern Premier League it forms levels seven and eight of the English football league system.

National League South

National League South

The National League South, formerly Conference South, is one of the second divisions of the National League in England, immediately below the top division National League. Along with National League North, it is in the second level of the National League System, and is the sixth tier overall of the English football league system.

Western Football League

Western Football League

The Western Football League is a football league in South West England, covering Bristol, Cornwall, Devon, Somerset, western Dorset, parts of Gloucestershire and Wiltshire. The league's current main sponsor is Toolstation, so it is also known as the Toolstation League.

Promotion and relegation

Promotion and relegation

In sports leagues, promotion and relegation is a process where teams are transferred between multiple divisions based on their performance for the completed season. Leagues that use promotion and relegation systems are often called open leagues. In a system of promotion and relegation, the best-ranked team(s) in the lower division are promoted to the higher division for the next season, and the worst-ranked team(s) in the higher division are relegated to the lower division for the next season. In some leagues, playoffs or qualifying rounds are also used to determine rankings. This process can continue through several levels of divisions, with teams being exchanged between adjacent divisions. During the season, teams that are high enough in the league table that they would qualify for promotion are sometimes said to be in the promotion zone, and those at the bottom are in the relegation zone or Reg zone.

Seasons

Season League FA Cup FA Trophy Other competitions Top scorer(s)[a] Average

attendance

Tier League Name P W D L F A Pts Pos Player (s) Goals
1907–08 Joined competitive football
1908–09 Div 6 WL Div 2 22 6 7 9 39 45 19 8th QR3
1909–10 Div 5 WL Div 1 24 5 6 13 31 66 15 9th QR1
1910-11 18 9 4 5 38 30 22 3rd QR1
1911–12 20 10 2 8 31 27 22 9th QR1
1912–13 22 13 1 8 52 35 27 4th QR1
1913–14 22 17 2 3 67 34 36 2nd QR4
Competitive football suspended for the duration of World War I [P]
1919–20 Div 5 WL Div 1 18 8 2 8 48 29 18 5th QR4
1920–21 30 12 7 11 45 45 31 8th QR1
1921–22 Div 4 SLW[b] 36 16 5 15 55 53 37 11th QR5
1922–23 38 10 8 20 44 71 28 15th R1
1923–24 34 6 9 19 32 17 21 16th QR1
1924–25 38 8 8 22 28 85 24 18th QR1
1925–26 26 7 1 18 38 86 15 14th R2
1926–27 26 7 9 10 44 52 23 11th QR1
1927–28 30 12 3 15 64 68 27 11th QR1
1928-29 26 13 4 9 61 59 30 6th QR1 Somerset Cup W
1929–30 28 16 6 6 85 52 38 1st R2
1930–31 22 10 6 6 47 39 26 5th QR3
1931–32 24 12 7 5 50 33 31 3rd R3 Somerset Cup W
1932–33 20 13 4 3 62 34 30 1st QR4
1933–34 20 11 3 6 43 25 25 3rd R1 Somerset Cup W
1934-35 16 6 4 6 35 32 16 5th R3
1935–36 16 5 5 6 18 26 15 5th QR4 Somerset Cup W
1936–37 SL 30 15 5 10 66 52 35 4th R1
1937–38 32 9 9 16 45 65 27 14th QR4
1938–39 44 16 12 16 58 74 44 11th QR4
Competitive football suspended for the duration of World War II
1945–46 Div 4 SL 20 12 2 6 62 32 34 3rd QR2
1946–47 32 7 7 18 52 93 21 16th QR4 2,126
1947–48 34 12 8 14 55 62 32 11th QR4 2,932
1948–49 42 15 8 19 72 87 38 13th QR4
1949–50 46 16 7 23 61 78 39 17th QR1
1950–51 44 15 10 19 66 73 40 15th QR1
1951–52 42 19 6 17 75 67 44 10th QR4 Somerset Cup W
1952–53 42 22 10 10 71 46 54 5th R2 Somerset Cup W
1953–54 42 17 12 13 73 67 46 4th R1
1954–55 42 18 9 15 73 80 45 9th QR4
1955–56 42 7 10 25 43 107 24 22nd QR2
1956–57 42 15 8 19 56 78 38 17th QR1
1957-58 42 13 9 20 65 64 35 16th[c] R2

Somerset Cup

W
1958–59 Div 5 SLP 34 17 5 12 89 62 39 6th R1
1959–60 42 32 3 7 116 50 67 1st[d] R3 4,500[4]
1960–61 42 18 14 10 74 52 50 6th R1
1961–62 42 25 7 10 102 70 57 2nd QR4
1962–63 40 18 6 16 58 56 42 10th QR4
1963–64 42 24 9 9 88 51 57 3rd R3
1964–65 42 13 3 26 60 86 29 22nd R1
1965–66 Div 6 SL Div 1 46 25 13 8 88 50 63 4th R2 Somerset Cup W
1966–67 Div 5 SLP 42 11 12 19 51 74 30 19th R2
1967–68 Div 6 SL Div 1 42 21 12 9 78 51 54 6th QR4

Somerset Cup

W Henderson 32 2,076
1968–69 42 26 10 6 96 40 62 2nd QR4 2,151
1969–70 Div 5 SLP 42 18 8 16 63 55 44 11th QR3 R1 Somerset Cup W 1,831
1970–71 42 13 12 17 48 68 38 15th QR3 QR3 1,239
1971–72 42 11 4 27 45 86 26 20th QR2 QR2 1,308
1972–73 Div 6 SL Div 1 42 18 11 13 56 54 47 7th QR1 R1 1,229
1973-74 38 20 8 10 55 35 48 2nd QR2 QR3 1,309
1974–75 Div 5 SLP 42 20 8 14 63 50 48 6th R1 QR3 n/a
1975–76 42 11 16 15 62 57 38 16th QR1 QR1 867
1976–77 42 20 15 7 51 30 55 4th QR4 R1 Anglo-Italian Cup RU n/a
1977–78 42 22 18 2 83 32 62 1st[e] R1 QR3

Somerset Cup

W 1,600
1978–79 42 17 19 6 55 35 53 5th QR4 R1 Southern League Cup W 1,060
1979–80 Alliance Prem 38 10 12 16 43 69 32 16th QR1 R3 970
1980–81 38 16 10 12 61 32 42 6th QR4 R1 Somerset Cup W 898
1981–82 42 15 10 17 50 57 55[f] 12th QR2 R1 Somerset Cup W 888
1982–83 42 17 9 16 51 42 60 10th QR3 R1 738
1983–84 42 17 12 13 60 48 53 6th QR2 R2 Somerset Cup W Smith 16 635
1984–85 42 21 9 12 63 47 57 4th[g] QR3 R3 Somerset Cup W Gary Smith 16 688
1985–86 42 13 11 18 53 54 45 12th R2 R1 Somerset Cup W Dale Singleton 16 590
1986–87 42 17 12 13 63 62 63 10th R2 R2 Paul Bodin 27 637
1987–88 42 9 10 23 48 76 37 20th R3 R2 Paul Bodin 14 625
1988–89 Div 6 SFL 42 15 13 14 66 51 58 9th R2 R1 Somerset Cup W John Freegard 27 560
1989-90 42 30 8 4 81 28 98 2nd R1 R1 Somerset Cup W Paul Randall 51 821
1990–91 Div 5 Conference 42 10 12 20 55 61 42 20th QR4 R3 Paul Randall 22 826
1991–92 42 16 12 14 54 51 60 9th QR3 R3 Paul Randall 26 789
1992–93 42 15 14 13 63 56 59 7th R2 R1 Richard Crowley 13 797
1993–94 42 13 17 12 47 38 56 12th R3 R2 Somerset Cup W Paul Adcock 23 1,393
1994–95 42 15 12 15 55 56 57 12th R1 R1 Somerset Cup W Dean Birkby 19 887
1995–96 42 13 7 24 45 66 46 18th QR4 R1 Graham Withey 13 663
1996–97 42 12 11 19 39 53 47 20th QR4 R2 Mike Davis 21 685
1997–98 Div 6 SFL 42 19 12 11 72 51 69 6th QR4 R2 Mike Davis 23 735
1998–99 42 18 11 13 70 44 65 4th QR4 R3 Martin Paul 30 793
1999–00 42 19 15 8 70 49 72 4th R1 R1 Martin Paul 30 993
2000–01 42 15 13 14 67 68 55 15th QR4 R2 Martin Paul 19 812
2001–02 42 13 11 18 56 65 50 17th QR2 R2 Adrian Foster 21 850
2002–03 42 13 13 16 50 61 52 14th QR4 R3 Jason Eaton 16 866
2003–04 42 13 12 17 49 57 51 16th [h] QR3 R3 Scott Partridge 18 714
2004–05 Div 7 SFL 42 19 12 11 57 43 69 6th R2 R3 John Williams 19 616
2005-06 42 25 8 9 66 33 83 2nd QR3 QR3 Scott Partridge 23 732
2006–07 42 27 10 5 84 29 91 1st QR2 R1 Scott Partridge 18 930
2007–08 Div 6 CS 42 10 8 3 30 59 36 8th QR4 R1 Somerset Cup W Dave Gilroy 26 851
2008-09 42 20 8 14 56 45 68 8th QR3 R1 Dave Gilroy 22 618
2009–10 42 20 12 10 66 46 72 4th[5] R1 QR3 Darren Edwards 25 965
2010–11 Div 5 Conference 46 16 15 15 64 68 63 10th QR4 R2 Lee Phillips 16 1,053
2011–12 46 7 10 29 43 89 31 23rd R1 R3 Sean Canham 11 848
2012–13 Div 6 NLS 42 15 10 17 60 58 55 11th QR3 R1 Charlie Griffin 20 583
2013–14 42 18 12 12 63 38 66 7th QR4 QR3 David Pratt 18 599
2014–15 40 15 8 17 59 57 53 14th QR4 SF David Pratt 22 500
2015–16 42 14 11 17 50 61 53 14th QR3 R1 David Pratt 10 727
2016–17 42 18 8 16 71 52 62 9th QR3 QR3 Andy Waltkins 14 612
2017–18 42 17 12 13 64 48 63 9th[6] QR4 R1 Jack Compton 12 702
2018-19 42 20 11 11 58 36 71 5th QR4 R1 Ross Stearn 14 1,142
2019–20 35 18 9 8 50 37 63 4th QR4 R1 Tom Smith 17 1,081
2020-21 13 4 1 21 15 23 13 18th QR3 R1 Tommy Conway 9 n/a
2021-22 40 13 6 21 45 68 45 18th QR4 R4 Somerset Cup RU Cody Cooke 20 1,204

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1907–08 in English football

1907–08 in English football

The 1907–08 season was the 37th season of competitive football in England. Manchester United were Football League champions for the first time, while Bradford City won the Second Division and Wolverhampton Wanderers won the FA Cup. The Home Championship was shared between England and Scotland.

1908–09 in English football

1908–09 in English football

The 1908–09 season was the 38th season of competitive football in England.

1908–09 FA Cup

1908–09 FA Cup

The 1908–09 FA Cup was the 38th staging of the world's oldest association football competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup. Manchester United won the competition for the first time, beating Bristol City 1–0 in the final at Crystal Palace, through a goal from Sandy Turnbull.

1909–10 in English football

1909–10 in English football

The 1909–10 season was the 39th season of competitive football in England.

1909–10 FA Cup

1909–10 FA Cup

The 1909–10 FA Cup was the 39th season of the world's oldest association football competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup. Newcastle United won the competition for the first time, beating Barnsley 2–0 in the replay of the final at Goodison Park in Liverpool, through two goals from Albert Shepherd. The first match, held at Crystal Palace, London, was a 1–1 draw.

1910–11 in English football

1910–11 in English football

The 1910–11 season was the 40th season of competitive football in England.

1910–11 FA Cup

1910–11 FA Cup

The 1910–11 FA Cup was the 40th season of the world's oldest association football competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup. Bradford City won the competition for the first and only time, beating holders Newcastle United 1–0 in the replay of the final at Old Trafford in Manchester, through a goal from Jimmy Speirs. The first match, held at Crystal Palace, London, was a 0–0 draw.

1911–12 in English football

1911–12 in English football

The 1911–12 season was the 41st season of competitive football in England.

1911–12 FA Cup

1911–12 FA Cup

The 1911–12 FA Cup was the 41st season of the world's oldest association football competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup. Barnsley won the competition for the first time, beating West Bromwich Albion 1–0 after extra time in the replay of the final at Bramall Lane in Sheffield, through a goal from Harry Tufnell. The first match, held at Crystal Palace, London, was a 0–0 draw.

1912–13 in English football

1912–13 in English football

The 1912–13 season was the 42nd season of competitive football in England.

1912–13 FA Cup

1912–13 FA Cup

The 1912–13 FA Cup was the 42nd season of the world's oldest association football competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup. Aston Villa won the competition for the fifth time, beating Sunderland 1–0 in the final at Crystal Palace, London. Villa's triumph ended a series of new FA Cup winners which had occurred since 1909.

1913–14 FA Cup

1913–14 FA Cup

The 1913–14 FA Cup was the 43rd season of the world's oldest association football competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup. Burnley won the competition for the first and only time, beating Liverpool 1–0 in the final at Crystal Palace, London.

Overall

  • Seasons spent at Level 4 of the football league system: 31
  • Seasons spent at Level 5 of the football league system: 40
  • Seasons spent at Level 6 of the football league system: 27
  • Seasons spent at Level 7 of the football league system: 3

Source: "List of Bath City F.C. seasons", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Bath_City_F.C._seasons.

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Footnotes
  1. ^ Goals in all competitions, Southern League, FA Trophy, FA Cup and Somerset Premier Cup are counted.
  2. ^ From 1921 to 1959, the top division of Non League football was the Southern league Western and Eastern sections, which both acted as the fourth tier being only one division below the Football League Third Division, however automatic promotion from Non League to The Football League was not in place until the mid 1980s.
  3. ^ Football League Fourth Division was created
  4. ^ Though the club won the top tier of non league football for a third time, no non league teams were allowed to apply for election to the English Football League that year.
  5. ^ Though winning the division, Bath missed out on election to the English Football League for a second time.
  6. ^ The 1981–82 season saw the introduction of three points for a win.
  7. ^ Bath missed out on election to the English Football League for a third time
  8. ^ With the formation of the Conference South in 2004, The Southern league became tier seven, as a result, Bath moved down one division in the football pyramid, albeit, without being relegated. Subsequently, The club ended up playing some of the lowest tier football in the club's history from 2004 to 2007.
References
  1. ^ Strack-Zimmermann, Benjamin. "Bath City (1977/78)". www.national-football-teams.com. Retrieved 2023-01-10.
  2. ^ "Bath City Football club". City of Bath. Archived from the original on 21 November 2010. Retrieved 21 November 2010.
  3. ^ "Bath City Archive". Bath City Archive. Archived from the original on 3 February 2020. Retrieved 29 April 2020.
  4. ^ "Bath still want bigger gates". British Newspaper Archive. Bath Chronicle. 13 February 1960. p. 37. Retrieved 26 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ "FOOTBALL: Standard man Bartlett wins promotion to Conference". Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard. Retrieved 2022-10-05.
  6. ^ "Bath City FC appoint Jerry Gill as new First Team Manager". Bath City FC. 2017-10-05. Retrieved 2022-10-16.

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