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Lionsgate Films

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Lionsgate Films
FormerlyCinépix Film Properties (1962-1998)
TypeDivision
IndustryMotion pictures
PredecessorTrimark Pictures
Artisan Entertainment
Founded1962; 61 years ago (1962)
FoundersJohn Dunning
Andre Link
Frank Giustra
Headquarters,
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
ProductsMotion pictures
ServicesFilm distribution
ParentLionsgate
DivisionsLionsgate Premiere
Subsidiaries
Websitewww.lionsgate.com/movies/

Lionsgate Films (formerly known as Cinépix Film Properties) is a Canadian-American[2] film production and film distribution studio, headquartered in Santa Monica and founded in Canada, and is the flagship division of Lionsgate Entertainment. It is the largest and most successful mini-major film studio in North America. It focuses on foreign and independent films and has distributed various commercially successful film franchises, including The Hunger Games, Rambo, Divergent, The Punisher, John Wick, Saw, Madea, Blair Witch, Now You See Me, Hostel, The Expendables, Sinister, The Twilight Saga and Step Up.

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Canada

Canada

Canada is a country in North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean and northward into the Arctic Ocean, making it the world's second-largest country by total area, with the world's longest coastline. It is characterized by a wide range of both meteorologic and geological regions. The country is sparsely inhabited, with most residing south of the 55th parallel in urban areas. Canada's capital is Ottawa and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Lionsgate

Lionsgate

Lions Gate Entertainment Corporation, doing business as Lionsgate, is a Canadian-American entertainment company. It was formed by Frank Giustra on July 10, 1997, domiciled in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, and is currently headquartered in Santa Monica, California, United States. In addition to its flagship Lionsgate Films division, the company contains other divisions such as Lionsgate Television and Lionsgate Interactive. It owns a variety of subsidiaries such as Summit Entertainment, Debmar-Mercury, and Starz Inc.

The Hunger Games (film series)

The Hunger Games (film series)

The Hunger Games film series is composed of science fiction dystopian adventure films, based on The Hunger Games trilogy of novels by American author Suzanne Collins. The films are distributed by Lionsgate and produced by Nina Jacobson and Jon Kilik. The series feature an ensemble cast including Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen, Josh Hutcherson as Peeta Mellark, Liam Hemsworth as Gale Hawthorne, Woody Harrelson as Haymitch Abernathy, Elizabeth Banks as Effie Trinket, Stanley Tucci as Caesar Flickerman, and Donald Sutherland as President Snow.

The Divergent Series

The Divergent Series

The Divergent Series is a feature film series based on the Divergent novels by the American author Veronica Roth. Distributed by Summit Entertainment and Lionsgate Films, the series consists of three science fiction action films set in a dystopian society: Divergent, Insurgent, and Allegiant. They have been produced by Lucy Fisher, Pouya Shabazian, and Douglas Wick.

John Wick

John Wick

John Wick is an American action thriller media franchise created by Derek Kolstad and centered around John Wick, a former hitman who is forced back into the criminal underworld he had previously abandoned.

Saw (franchise)

Saw (franchise)

Saw is a horror franchise created by Australian film makers James Wan and Leigh Whannell, consisting of ten feature films and additional media. Set in an unnamed city in the United States, the first eight films primarily revolve around the fictional serial killer John "Jigsaw" Kramer, while the ninth movie revolves around a copycat killer while still keeping continuity with the previous films. John Kramer was introduced briefly in Saw and developed in more detail in Saw II and the subsequent films. Rather than killing his victims outright, he traps them in life-threatening situations that he calls "tests" or "games" to test their will to survive through physical or psychological torture, believing that if they survive, they will be "rehabilitated". Kramer was killed off in Saw III, but the films continued to focus on his posthumous influence, particularly by his apprentices, and explore his character via flashbacks.

Madea

Madea

Mable "Madea" Earlene Simmons is a character created and portrayed by Tyler Perry. She is portrayed as a tough, street-smart elderly African-American woman.

Blair Witch

Blair Witch

Blair Witch is an American horror media franchise created by Daniel Myrick and Eduardo Sánchez, distributed by Artisan Entertainment and produced by Haxan Films that consists of three feature films and various additional media. The development of the franchise's first installment, The Blair Witch Project, started in 1993. Myrick and Sanchez wrote a 35-page outline of a story with the dialogue to be improvised. Filming began in 1997 and lasted eight days. The film follows the disappearance of three student filmmakers in the woods near Burkittsville, Maryland, while shooting a documentary on the local legend known as the "Blair Witch".

Now You See Me (film series)

Now You See Me (film series)

The Now You See Me film series consists of heist-thriller films, based on original characters created by Boaz Yakin and Edward Ricourt. The overall plot centers on a team of illusionists named The Four Horsemen, who use their stage productions as a means of completing unfeasible and lucrative heists. The movies feature an ensemble cast including: Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, Isla Fisher, Dave Franco, Michael Caine, Lizzy Caplan, and Morgan Freeman.

Hostel (2005 film)

Hostel (2005 film)

Hostel is a 2005 horror film written and directed by Eli Roth. It stars Jay Hernandez, Derek Richardson, Eyþór Guðjónsson, and Barbara Nedeljáková. It was produced by Mike Fleiss, Roth, and Chris Briggs, and executive produced by Boaz Yakin, Scott Spiegel, and Quentin Tarantino. The film follows a group of American tourists, as they end up in Slovakia where they are eventually taken one-by-one by an organization that allows people to torture and kill others.

Sinister (film)

Sinister (film)

Sinister is a 2012 supernatural horror film directed by Scott Derrickson and written by C. Robert Cargill and Derrickson. It stars Ethan Hawke as a struggling true-crime writer whose discovery of videos depicting grisly murders in his new house puts his family in danger. Juliet Rylance, Fred Thompson, James Ransone, Clare Foley, and Michael Hall D'Addario appear in supporting roles.

The Twilight Saga (film series)

The Twilight Saga (film series)

The Twilight Saga is a series of romance fantasy films based on the book series Twilight by Stephenie Meyer. The series has grossed over $3.4 billion worldwide. The first installment, Twilight, was released on November 21, 2008. The second installment, New Moon, followed on November 20, 2009. The third installment, Eclipse, was released on June 30, 2010. The fourth installment, Breaking Dawn – Part 1, was released on November 18, 2011, while the fifth installment, Breaking Dawn – Part 2, was released on November 16, 2012.

History

Cinépix

Cinépix was founded by John Dunning and Andre Link in 1962.[3] Cinépix, based in Montreal, was a Canadian independent motion picture company that released English- and French-language films in Canada and the United States.[4]

Initially a distribution company, Cinépix's first production was the 1969 erotic drama Valérie, which earned $1 million at the box office.[5] Cinépix produced early work by David Cronenberg (Shivers) and Ivan Reitman (Meatballs).[6] The company also distributed art-house films including the grunge rock documentary Hype, Vincent Gallo's Buffalo '66, and SICK: The Life & Death of Bob Flanagan, Supermasochist.[7]

From 1989 to 1994, Cinépix was partners with Famous Players in C/FP Distribution, which was renamed Cinépix Film Properties (C/FP). In 1994, Cinépix bought Famous Players' stake in the organization.[8]

By 1997, Cinépix had a New York-based U.S. distribution arm and owned 56 percent of Ciné-Groupe, an animated film production company.[7]

Lionsgate Films

Lions Gate Entertainment Corporation (LGEC) was formed in 1997 by Frank Giustra, a banker.[9] LGEC purchased Cinépix and kept its leadership.[7] Cinépix was renamed Lions Gate Films on January 13, 1998.[10] LGEC also purchased the Vancouver-based North Shore Studios, which became Lions Gate Studios.[7] In June 1998, LGE purchased International Movie Group, whose film library included Jean-Claude Van Damme's Kickboxer.[7]

Its first major box office success was American Psycho in 2000, which began a trend of producing and distributing films too controversial for the major film studios.[11] Other notable films included Affliction (1998),[12] Gods and Monsters (1998),[13] Dogma (1999),[14] O (2001),[15] Cube 2: Hypercube (2002), Open Water (2003), Saw (2004),[16] The Punisher (2004) and the Michael Moore documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004), which had been the studio's highest-grossing film until the release of The Hunger Games in 2012.[17]

Giustra left the firm in 2000.[9] That same year, Jon Feltheimer became CEO and Michael Burns became vice chairman.[18] They decided to focus on the profits of videos and DVDs and began buying struggling firms that controlled large libraries. The two most notable acquisitions were Trimark Holdings (650 titles) in 2000[7] and Artisan Entertainment in 2003.[19] The Trimark purchase also included CinemaNow, a broadband streaming website, where Lionsgate could feature its own movies.[7] These two purchases along with others gave Lions Gate a large DVD (and later Blu-Ray) library, which includes Total Recall, Reservoir Dogs, Terminator 2: Judgment Day, Young Guns, Dirty Dancing and Apocalypse Now, in some cases via output deals with StudioCanal, American Zoetrope, and Miramax (most of them the result of prior licensing deals with Lions Gate's home video predecessor Artisan).

Lions Gate occasionally co-produces films with major studios. For example, Lions Gate teamed with Miramax Films for the 2004 sequel Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights and with Paramount Pictures for 2002's Narc and 2004's The Prince & Me which was given a studio credit. Lions Gate was also a silent partner in 20th Century Fox's 2004 sci-fi film The Day After Tomorrow. Also in 2004, Lions Gate joined forces with United Artists in producing Hotel Rwanda.[20]

On August 1, 2005, Lions Gate Entertainment Corp acquired the entire library of Modern Entertainment.[21][22] On October 17, 2005, Lionsgate acquired Redbus Film Distribution for $35 million[23][24] and became Lionsgate UK on February 23, 2006.[25][26] Following this, Zygi Kamasa, who co-founded Redbus with Simon Franks, became CEO of Lionsgate UK and Europe.

In 2007, Joe Drake became Lionsgate's co-COO and motion picture group president.[27] Lionsgate cut back its annual production by four in February 2009.[28]

The Lionsgate film The Hunger Games grossed $68.3 million when it premiered at the U.S. box office on March 23, 2012. At the time, it was the best opening day ever for a non-sequel and the fifth highest of all time. Of that total, $19.7 million was earned via Thursday midnight screenings.[29] In its first weekend, The Hunger Games grossed $152.5 million, making it Lionsgate's highest-grossing film after just three days.[30]

On January 13, 2012, Lions Gate Entertainment Corp acquired Summit Entertainment, the studio behind the Twilight and Step Up series for $412.5 million.[31] On May 3, 2012, Lionsgate Films made an agreement with CodeBlack Enterprises' CEO Jeff Clanagan to create CodeBlack Films, based at Lionsgate.[32] Drake left in 2012 to found Good Universe.[27]

On January 16, 2013, Lionsgate announced a low-budget film division to be led by John Sacchi. The division would release films under $2.5 million. Sacchi recently looked to acquire such films as Rock Bottom Creek (2012) and other independently made films as well.[33]

On November 22, 2013, Lions Gate released The Hunger Games: Catching Fire. In its opening weekend, the movie grossed $158 million at the US box office, surpassing its predecessor, which generated $150 million in its opening weekend.[34] The film had a budget of $130 million, breaking even soon after its opening, and making it profitable. Critics highly praised the film; it received a Rotten Tomatoes rating of 89% "certified fresh".[35] The third Hunger Games film, Mockingjay- Part 1, was released in 2014. The final film, Mockingjay - Part 2, was released in 2015.

On April 1, 2015, according to Deadline, Lions Gate announced it has created its new label, Lionsgate Premiere. This new label will handle up to 15 releases a year, targeting young audiences at theaters and digital outlets. The new label, part of the company's diversification effort, will incorporate Lionsgate and Summit Entertainment titles and then specialize in "innovative multiplatform and other release strategies" to reach "affinity audiences with branded content and targeted marketing." Marketing and Research SVP Jean McDowell will handle marketing, with distribution to be run by Adam Sorensen, who currently manages Western Sales.[36]

On May 2, 2016, according to Deadline Hollywood, Lions Gate announced it has teaming with eight international companies to launch the GlobalGate Entertainment consortium. GlobalGate will produce and distribute local-language films in markets around the world. Lionsgate said Monday it has partnered with international entertainment executives Paul Presburger, William Pfeiffer and Clifford Werber to launch GlobalGate.[37]

Drake returned in October 2017 as Liongate's film group chairman. The company laid off staff for theatrical marketing and publicity in its New York office, and moved to end its participation as a partner in CodeBlack Films in January 2019. The cut backs were due to the failures of Robin Hood, and the comedy The Spy Who Dumped Me.[27] In June 2019, Hulu and FX picked up show rights to Lionsgate films released in 2020 and 2021.[38]

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John Dunning (film producer)

John Dunning (film producer)

John Dunning was a pioneering Canadian film producer from Montreal who co-founded the Canadian film production company Cinépix and produced early works by notable Canadian directors David Cronenberg and Ivan Reitman. Dunning launched Cinépix with partner André Link in Montreal in the early 1960s. Their biggest commercial success—and the first Canadian box office hit—came with Reitman's Meatballs (1979).

David Cronenberg

David Cronenberg

David Paul Cronenberg is a Canadian film director, screenwriter, and actor. He is a principal originator of the genre commonly known as body horror, with his films exploring visceral bodily transformation, infectious diseases, and the intertwining of the psychological, the physical and the technological. Cronenberg is best known for exploring these themes through sci-fi horror films such as Shivers (1975), Scanners (1981), Videodrome (1983) and The Fly (1986), though he has also directed dramas, psychological thrillers and gangster films.

Ivan Reitman

Ivan Reitman

Ivan Reitman was a Czechoslovak-born Canadian filmmaker. He was best known for his comedy work, especially in the 1980s and 1990s. He was the owner of The Montecito Picture Company, founded in 1998.

Buffalo '66

Buffalo '66

Buffalo '66 is a 1998 American crime comedy-drama film written and directed by Vincent Gallo, starring Gallo, Christina Ricci, Ben Gazzara and Anjelica Huston. The plot revolves around Billy Brown (Gallo), a man who kidnaps a young tap dancer named Layla (Ricci) and forces her to pretend to be his wife to impress his parents after he gets released from prison.

Famous Players

Famous Players

Famous Players Limited Partnership is a Canadian-based subsidiary of Cineplex Entertainment. As an independent company, it existed as a film exhibitor and cable television service provider. Famous Players operated numerous movie theatre locations in Canada from British Columbia to Newfoundland and Labrador. The company was owned by Viacom Canada but was sold to Cineplex Galaxy LP in 2005.

CinéGroupe

CinéGroupe

CinéGroupe was a Canadian animation studio based in Montreal, Quebec. The company was founded in 1974. Its shows and films have been seen in over 125 countries.

Animation

Animation

Animation is a method by which still figures are manipulated to appear as moving images. In traditional animation, images are drawn or painted by hand on transparent celluloid sheets to be photographed and exhibited on film. Today, many animations are made with computer-generated imagery (CGI). Computer animation can be very detailed 3D animation, while 2D computer animation can be used for stylistic reasons, low bandwidth, or faster real-time renderings. Other common animation methods apply a stop motion technique to two- and three-dimensional objects like paper cutouts, puppets, or clay figures.

Jean-Claude Van Damme

Jean-Claude Van Damme

Jean-Claude Camille François Van Varenberg, known professionally as Jean-Claude Van Damme, is a Belgian actor, martial artist, filmmaker, and fight choreographer. Credited with helping popularize martial arts in film, Van Damme is widely regarded as one of the most iconic martial arts action stars of all time.

American Psycho (film)

American Psycho (film)

American Psycho is a 2000 horror film directed by Mary Harron, who co-wrote the screenplay with Guinevere Turner. Based on the 1991 novel by Bret Easton Ellis, it stars Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman, a New York City investment banker who leads a double life as a serial killer. Willem Dafoe, Jared Leto, Josh Lucas, Chloë Sevigny, Samantha Mathis, Cara Seymour, Justin Theroux, and Reese Witherspoon appear in supporting roles. The film blends horror and black comedy to satirize 1980s yuppie culture and consumerism, exemplified by Bateman and supporting cast.

Affliction (1997 film)

Affliction (1997 film)

Affliction is a 1997 American neo-noir crime drama directed and written by Paul Schrader. Based on the 1989 novel of the same name by Russell Banks, the film stars Nick Nolte, Sissy Spacek, James Coburn, and Willem Dafoe.

Gods and Monsters (film)

Gods and Monsters (film)

Gods and Monsters is a 1998 period drama film that recounts the partly fictionalized last days of the life of film director James Whale, whose experience of war in World War I is a central theme. The film stars Ian McKellen, Brendan Fraser, Lynn Redgrave, Lolita Davidovich, and David Dukes. An international co-production between the United Kingdom and the United States, the film is written and directed by Bill Condon, based on Christopher Bram's 1995 novel Father of Frankenstein. The film is produced by Paul Colichman, Gregg Fienberg, and Mark R. Harris; Clive Barker served as executive producer. Despite positive reviews, the film was a box office failure.

Dogma (film)

Dogma (film)

Dogma is a 1999 American fantasy comedy film written and directed by Kevin Smith, who also stars with Ben Affleck, Matt Damon, George Carlin, Linda Fiorentino, Janeane Garofalo, Chris Rock, Jason Lee, Salma Hayek, Bud Cort, Alan Rickman, Alanis Morissette and Jason Mewes. It is the fourth film in Smith's View Askewniverse series. Brian O'Halloran and Jeff Anderson, stars of the first Askewniverse film Clerks, appear in the film, as do Smith regulars Scott Mosier, Dwight Ewell, Walt Flanagan, and Bryan Johnson.

Film library

Film series

Title Release date No. Films Notes
Les Boys 1997–98 2 Distribution only
American Psycho 2000–02
Cube 2002–04 Acquired from Trimark Pictures
Leprechaun 2003–present 3
Saw 2004–present 9
The Punisher 2004–08 2
Hostel 2005–07
Madea 2005–19 11
Marvel Animated Features 2006–11 8
Happily N'Ever After 2007–09 2
The Twilight Saga 2008–12 5 Acquired from Summit Entertainment.
Rambo 2008–18 2
Alpha and Omega 2010–17; TBA 8
The Expendables 2010–present 3
Sinister 2012 1
The Hunger Games 2012–present 4
Step Up 2012–20 3 Acquired from Summit Entertainment
Now You See Me 2013–present 2
Escape Plan 2013–19 3
John Wick 2014–present
The Divergent Series 2014–16
Sicario 2015–present 1 (2) Co-distributed with Sony Pictures Releasing
Norm of the North 2016–present 4
Blair Witch 1 Acquired from Artisan Entertainment
Rock Dog 2 First installment released through Summit Entertainment.
The Hitman's Bodyguard 2017–present
Hellraiser 2018 1 Distribution only
Children of the Corn
Knives Out 2019–21 Rights sold to Netflix.
Clerks 2022 Distribution only
Detective Knight 2022–23 3

Highest-grossing films

Highest-grossing films in North America
Rank Title Year Domestic gross Notes
1 The Hunger Games: Catching Fire 2013 $424,668,047
2 The Hunger Games 2012 $408,010,692
3 The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 2014 $337,135,885
4 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 2012 $292,324,737 Distributed by Summit Entertainment.
5 The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2 2015 $281,723,902
6 The Day After Tomorrow 2004 $186,740,799 Released by 20th Century Fox.
7 John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum 2019 $171,015,687
8 Knives Out 2019 $165,359,751
9 La La Land 2016 $151,101,803 Distributed by Summit Entertainment.
10 Divergent 2014 $150,947,895 Distributed by Summit Entertainment.
Highest-grossing films worldwide
Rank Title Year Box office gross
1 The Hunger Games: Catching Fire 2013 $865,011,746
2 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 2012 $829,746,820
3 The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 2014 $755,356,711
4 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 1 2011 $712,205,856
5 The Twilight Saga: New Moon 2009 $709,711,008
6 The Twilight Saga: Eclipse 2010 $698,491,347
7 The Hunger Games 2012 $694,394,724
8 The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 2015 $658,344,137
9 The Day After Tomorrow 2004 $552,639,571
10 La La Land 2016 $448,906,865

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Lists of Lionsgate films

Lists of Lionsgate films

This is a list of feature films originally released and/or distributed by Lionsgate.

Les Boys

Les Boys

Les Boys is a 1997 Quebec-made comedy film directed by Louis Saia. It has spawned three sequels and by any measure is the most successful Quebec made film series of all time, and one of the most successful Canadian-made film series of all time.

American Psycho (film)

American Psycho (film)

American Psycho is a 2000 horror film directed by Mary Harron, who co-wrote the screenplay with Guinevere Turner. Based on the 1991 novel by Bret Easton Ellis, it stars Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman, a New York City investment banker who leads a double life as a serial killer. Willem Dafoe, Jared Leto, Josh Lucas, Chloë Sevigny, Samantha Mathis, Cara Seymour, Justin Theroux, and Reese Witherspoon appear in supporting roles. The film blends horror and black comedy to satirize 1980s yuppie culture and consumerism, exemplified by Bateman and supporting cast.

Cube (film series)

Cube (film series)

Cube is a Canadian science fiction horror film series. The films were directed by Vincenzo Natali, Andrzej Sekuła, Ernie Barbarash and Yasuhiko Shimizu respectively.

Leprechaun (film series)

Leprechaun (film series)

Leprechaun is an American horror comedy film series consisting of eight slasher films. Beginning with Leprechaun (1993), the series centers on a malevolent and murderous leprechaun referred to as Lubdan Buttowski, who, when his gold is taken from him, resorts to any means necessary to reclaim it. None of the films in the series are presented in chronological order. Warwick Davis plays the title role in every film except for the 2014 film Leprechaun: Origins, and the 2018 film Leprechaun Returns, in which the character is respectively portrayed by Dylan Postl and Linden Porco. On St. Patrick's Day, all Leprechaun films are played on Syfy.

Punisher in film

Punisher in film

The fictional character Frank Castle / Punisher, a comic book vigilante antihero created by Gerry Conway, John Romita Sr. and Ross Andru and featured in Marvel Comics publications, has appeared as a main character in multiple theatrical and straight-to-video films, many of them unrelated to each other. The first live-action film in 1989, was released theatrically worldwide then straight-to-video in the United States, starring Dolph Lundgren, while the second film was released in theaters in 2004, starring Thomas Jane. After an unsuccessful script of Punisher 2, the film series was then rebooted again in 2008 with the film Punisher: War Zone, starring Ray Stevenson.

Hostel (2005 film)

Hostel (2005 film)

Hostel is a 2005 horror film written and directed by Eli Roth. It stars Jay Hernandez, Derek Richardson, Eyþór Guðjónsson, and Barbara Nedeljáková. It was produced by Mike Fleiss, Roth, and Chris Briggs, and executive produced by Boaz Yakin, Scott Spiegel, and Quentin Tarantino. The film follows a group of American tourists, as they end up in Slovakia where they are eventually taken one-by-one by an organization that allows people to torture and kill others.

Madea

Madea

Mable "Madea" Earlene Simmons is a character created and portrayed by Tyler Perry. She is portrayed as a tough, street-smart elderly African-American woman.

Marvel Animated Features

Marvel Animated Features

Marvel Animated Features (MAF) is a series of eight direct-to-video animated superhero films made by MLG Productions, a joint venture between Marvel Studios and Lions Gate Entertainment.

Happily N'Ever After

Happily N'Ever After

Happily N'Ever After is a 2006 computer-animated family adventure comedy film directed by Paul J. Bolger, produced by John H. Williams, and written by Rob Moreland. It is inspired by fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen and is loosely based on the 1999 animated German television series Simsala Grimm. The title is the opposite of a stock phrase, happily ever after; the name is contracted with an apostrophe between the N and the E. The film stars the voices of Sarah Michelle Gellar, Freddie Prinze, Jr., Andy Dick, Wallace Shawn, Patrick Warburton, George Carlin, and Sigourney Weaver. This film was one of Carlin's final works before he died.

Rambo (franchise)

Rambo (franchise)

Rambo is an American media franchise centered on a series of action films featuring John J. Rambo. The five films are First Blood (1982), Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985), Rambo III (1988), Rambo (2008), and Rambo: Last Blood (2019). Rambo is a United States Army Special Forces veteran played by Sylvester Stallone, whose Vietnam War experience traumatized him but also gave him superior military skills, which he has used to fight corrupt police officers, enemy troops and drug cartels. First Blood is an adaptation of the 1972 novel First Blood by David Morrell.

Alpha and Omega (film series)

Alpha and Omega (film series)

Alpha and Omega is a series of animated films produced by Crest Animation Productions and distributed by Lionsgate Films. The first film was released in 2010 and featured the voices of Justin Long and Hayden Panettiere, though subsequent films were direct-to-video and therefore featured a smaller cast, primarily Ben Diskin and Kate Higgins.

Source: "Lionsgate Films", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lionsgate_Films.

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