Get Our Extension

Linda Barwick

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Linda Barwick

Born
Linda Mary Barwick

1954
Academic background
Alma materFlinders University
ThesisCritical perspectives on oral song in performance : the case of Donna lombarda (1986)
Academic work
InstitutionsSydney Conservatorium of Music
The University of Sydney

Linda Mary Barwick AM FAHA (born 1954) is an Australian musicologist and professor emerita at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. Barwick has focused on researching Australian Indigenous music and the music of immigrant communities. She also works in the field of digital humanities, archiving recordings.[1]

Early life and education

Barwick was born Linda Mary Barwick in 1954. Early publications appeared under her married surname Linda Mary Bone[2][3] She graduated with a BA (hons, 1980)[2] and PhD (1986) from Flinders University. Her PhD thesis was titled "Critical perspectives on oral song in performance : the case of Donna lombarda".[4]

Career

Following her PhD, Barwick moved to the University of New England, where she worked with Professor Catherine Ellis and began to study Australian Indigenous music and Aboriginal women's participation in it.[5][6]

Based at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, Barwick was co-founder[7] and served as the first director of the Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures (PARADISEC) in 2003.[8] As of June 2022 she is chair of the steering committee of PARADISEC.[9]

In 1995 she co-edited a collection of essays titled The essence of singing and the substance of song recent responses to the Aboriginal performing arts and other essays in honour of Catherine Ellis.[10]

Barwick was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities in 2014.[8] She was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in the 2023 Australia Day Honours.[11]

Discover more about Career related topics

University of New England (Australia)

University of New England (Australia)

The University of New England (UNE) is a public university in Australia with approximately 22,500 higher education students. Its original and main campus is located in the city of Armidale in northern central New South Wales. UNE was the first Australian university established outside a state capital city.

Catherine Ellis (ethnomusicologist)

Catherine Ellis (ethnomusicologist)

Catherine Joan Ellis (1935–1996) was an Australian ethnomusicologist. She established the Centre for Aboriginal Studies in Music at the University of Adelaide.

Sydney Conservatorium of Music

Sydney Conservatorium of Music

The Sydney Conservatorium of Music is a heritage-listed music school in Macquarie Street, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It is one of the oldest and most prestigious music schools in Australia. Located adjacent to the Royal Botanic Gardens on the eastern fringe of the Sydney central business district, the conservatorium is a faculty of the University of Sydney, and incorporates the community-based Conservatorium Open Academy and the Conservatorium High School. In addition to its secondary, undergraduate, post-graduate and community education teaching and learning functions, the conservatorium undertakes research in various fields of music. The building was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 14 January 2011.

Paradisec

Paradisec

The Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures (PARADISEC) is a cross-institutional project that supports work on endangered languages and cultures of the Pacific and the region around Australia. They digitise reel-to-reel field tapes, have a mass data store and use international standards for metadata description. PARADISEC is part of the worldwide community of language archives. PARADISEC's main motivation is to ensure that unique recordings of small languages are themselves preserved for the future, and that researchers consider the future accessibility to their materials for other researchers, community members, or anyone who has an interest in such materials.

Australian Academy of the Humanities

Australian Academy of the Humanities

The Australian Academy of the Humanities was established by Royal Charter in 1969 to advance scholarship and public interest in the humanities in Australia. It operates as an independent not-for-profit organisation partly funded by the Australian government.

Order of Australia

Order of Australia

The Order of Australia is an honour that recognises Australian citizens and other persons for outstanding achievement and service. It was established on 14 February 1975 by Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia, on the advice of the Australian Government. Before the establishment of the order, Australian citizens received British honours.

2023 Australia Day Honours

2023 Australia Day Honours

The 2023 Australia Day Honours are appointments to various orders and honours to recognise and reward good works by Australian citizens. The list was announced on 26 January 2023 by the Governor General of Australia, David Hurley.

Selected publications

Books

  • Marett, Allan; Barwick, Linda; Ford, Lysbeth Julie (2012), For the sake of a song : Wangga songmen and their repertories, Sydney University Press, ISBN 978-1-920899-75-2
  • Harris, Amanda; Thieberger, Nicholas; Barwick, Linda, eds. (2015), Research, records and responsibility : ten years of PARADISEC, Sydney University Press, ISBN 978-1-74332-443-1
  • Barwick, Linda; Green, Jenny; Vaarzon-Morel, Petronella, eds. (2020), Archival returns : Central Australia and beyond, Sydney University Press, ISBN 978-1-74332-672-5

Source: "Linda Barwick", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_Barwick.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ Bunyan, Marcus (25 February 2021). "Associates — Research Unit for Indigenous Language". Faculty of Arts. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  2. ^ a b Italian dialect questionnaires for Marchigiano dialects from the province of Ascoli Piceno, PARADISEC, 1980, retrieved 16 June 2022
  3. ^ "Barwick, Linda (1954–)", Trove, 2009, retrieved 16 June 2022
  4. ^ Barwick, Linda (1986), Critical perspectives on oral song in performance : the case of Donna lombarda, retrieved 16 June 2022
  5. ^ Catherine J. Ellis; Linda M. Barwick (January 1987). "Musical syntax and the problem of meaning in a central Australian songline". Musicology Australia. 10 (1): 41–57. doi:10.1080/08145857.1987.10415179. ISSN 0814-5857. Wikidata Q110628536.
  6. ^ Linda Barwick (1990). "Central Australian Women's Ritual Music: Knowing through Analysis versus Knowing through Performance". Yearbook for Traditional Music. 22: 60. doi:10.2307/767932. ISSN 0740-1558. Wikidata Q112583114.
  7. ^ "Professor Linda Barwick". Australian National University. 12 March 2019. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  8. ^ a b "Linda Barwick". Australian Academy of the Humanities. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  9. ^ "PARADISEC". PARADISEC. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  10. ^ Barwick, Linda; Marett, Allan; Tunstill, Guy, eds. (1995), The essence of singing and the substance of song recent responses to the Aboriginal performing arts and other essays in honour of Catherine Ellis, University of Sydney, ISBN 978-0-86758-994-8
  11. ^ "Australia Day 2023 Honours: Full list". The Sydney Morning Herald. 25 January 2023. Retrieved 25 January 2023.

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.