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Lightyear (soundtrack)

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Lightyear (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
Album cover
Soundtrack album by
ReleasedJune 17, 2022
Recorded2021–2022
StudioEastwood Scoring Stage (Orchestra)
Newman Scoring Stage (Choir)
Genre
Length1:16:14
LabelWalt Disney
ProducerMichael Giacchino
Pixar soundtrack chronology
Turning Red
(2022)
Lightyear
(2022)
Michael Giacchino chronology
Jurassic World Dominion
(2022)
Lightyear
(2022)
Thor: Love and Thunder
(2022)
Singles from Lightyear (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
  1. "Mission Perpetual"
    Released: June 3, 2022[1]

Lightyear (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) is the soundtrack album to the 2022 Disney/Pixar film of the same name. The score is composed by Michael Giacchino, in his eighth Pixar film as well as his 50th film as a film score composer.[2] Giacchino stated that the score is a blend of several works based on space opera in various formats, and he experienced in his childhood period. The scoring was held remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic at the Eastwood Scoring Stage and Newman Scoring Stage in Los Angeles for 15 days which required a 39-member choir and 89-member orchestra.

A track "Mission Perpetual" was released as a single on June 3, 2022, and the score album was released in Dolby Atmos by Walt Disney Records on June 17, 2022.[3] The score received positive critical reviews, praising Giacchino's compositions.

Discover more about Lightyear (soundtrack) related topics

Soundtrack album

Soundtrack album

A soundtrack album is any album that incorporates music directly recorded from the soundtrack of a particular feature film or television show. The first such album to be commercially released was Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the soundtrack to the film of the same name, in 1938. The first soundtrack album of a film's orchestral score was that for Alexander Korda's 1942 film Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book, composed by Miklós Rózsa.

Pixar

Pixar

Pixar Animation Studios and stylized as P I X A R) is an American computer animation studio known for its critically and commercially successful computer animated feature films. It is based in Emeryville, California, United States. Since 2006, Pixar has been a subsidiary of Walt Disney Studios, which is another studio owned by The Walt Disney Company.

Lightyear (film)

Lightyear (film)

Lightyear is a 2022 American computer-animated science-fiction action-adventure film produced by Walt Disney Pictures and Pixar Animation Studios, and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. The film is a spin-off of the Toy Story film series, but does not take place in the same fictional universe as them; rather, it is presented as a film that some of the characters in the main Toy Story films have seen. Lightyear centers on the character Buzz Lightyear, who in this film is human and not a toy. The film was directed by Angus MacLane and produced by Galyn Susman, from a screenplay and story written by MacLane and Jason Headley, both of whom co-wrote the latter with Matthew Aldrich. It stars Chris Evans as the voice of the titular character, with Keke Palmer, Peter Sohn, Taika Waititi, Dale Soules, James Brolin, and Uzo Aduba in supporting roles. The film follows Buzz Lightyear (Evans) operating as a space ranger who, after being marooned on a hostile planet with his commander and crew, tries to find a way back home while encountering a threat to the universe's safety.

Michael Giacchino

Michael Giacchino

Michael Giacchino is an American composer of music for films, television and video games. He has also served as a director for television. He has received many awards, including an Oscar for his work on Up (2009), an Emmy for his work on Lost (2004), and three Grammys for his work on Ratatouille (2007) and Up (2009).

Space opera

Space opera

Space opera is a subgenre of science fiction that emphasizes space warfare, with use of melodramatic, risk-taking space adventures, relationships, and chivalric romance. Set mainly or entirely in outer space, it features technological and social advancements in faster-than-light travel, futuristic weapons, and sophisticated technology, on a backdrop of galactic empires and interstellar wars with fictional aliens, often in fictional galaxies. The term has no relation to opera music, but is instead a play on the terms "soap opera", a melodramatic television series, and "horse opera", which was coined during the 1930s to indicate a clichéd and formulaic Western film. Space operas emerged in the 1930s and continue to be produced in literature, film, comics, television, video games and board games.

COVID-19 pandemic

COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The novel virus was first identified in an outbreak in the Chinese city of Wuhan in December 2019. Attempts to contain it there failed, allowing the virus to spread to other areas of Asia and later worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern on 30 January 2020, and a pandemic on 11 March 2020. As of 1 February 2023, the pandemic had caused more than 670 million cases and 6.83 million confirmed deaths, making it one of the deadliest in history.

Warner Bros. Studios, Burbank

Warner Bros. Studios, Burbank

Warner Bros. Studios, Burbank, formerly known as First National Studio (1926–1929), Warner Bros.-Seven Arts Studios (1967–1970) and The Burbank Studios (1972–1990), is a major filmmaking facility owned and run by Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. in Burbank, California. First National Pictures built the 62-acre (25 ha) studio lot in 1926 as it expanded from a film distributor to film production.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, often referred to by its initials L.A., is the commercial, financial, and cultural center of Southern California. Los Angeles is the largest city in the state of California, the second most populous city in the United States after New York City, and one of the world's most populous megacities. With a population of roughly 3.9 million residents within the city limits as of 2020, Los Angeles is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic and cultural diversity, being the home of the Hollywood film industry, and its sprawling metropolitan area. The city lies in a basin in Southern California adjacent to the Pacific Ocean in the west and extending through the Santa Monica Mountains and north into the San Fernando Valley, with the city bordering the San Gabriel Valley to its east. It covers about 469 square miles (1,210 km2), and is the county seat of Los Angeles County, which is the most populous county in the United States with an estimated 9.86 million residents as of 2022.

Dolby Atmos

Dolby Atmos

Dolby Atmos is a surround sound technology developed by Dolby Laboratories. It expands on existing surround sound systems by adding height channels, allowing sounds to be interpreted as three-dimensional objects with neither horizontal nor vertical limitation. Following the release of Atmos for the cinema market, a variety of consumer technologies have been released under the Atmos brand, using in-ceiling and up-firing speakers.

Walt Disney Records

Walt Disney Records

Walt Disney Records is an American record label of the Disney Music Group. The label releases soundtrack albums from The Walt Disney Company's motion picture studios, television series, theme parks, and traditional studio albums produced by its roster of pop, teen pop, and country artists.

Production

Background

"Even though it was with a character that we knew, it was a different version of that character. It was a different world for that character. It was the real Buzz Lightyear, so we were able to take it in directions that [we] might not have, had we'd been dealing with the actual toy Buzz Lightyear, which is a very different character whom I love as well and who was lucky enough to have had Randy Newman write all his music for him, because Randy is one of the best. It was a fun challenge to go for it and create something fun that came truly from my 12-year-old heart."

Giacchino, on creating the theme for Lightyear[4]

On January 25, 2022, Michael Giacchino was announced to compose the film's score.[2] It eventually marked his first Toy Story-based theatrical feature, after previously scoring for the television specials based on the franchise, Toy Story of Terror! (2013) and Toy Story That Time Forgot (2014), the former was directed by Angus MacLane,[2] and is the second time, Giacchino eventually scored for an instalment that was previously composed by Randy Newman after Cars 2 (2011).[2] He stated the score is a blend of all the space opera films and television shows, including Star Trek, Star Wars and Alien franchise.[5]

Giacchino said that creating the film score was more about thinking about the science-fiction and adventure movies that he grew up loving.[4] Through this score, he wanted kids in the current generation to experience the way, he had during his childhood.[6]

Giacchino stated that the score made references to his earlier work, including a nod to the television series Star Trek in the first five minutes.[5] On using the references, Giacchino said "At some point, you put it out there. It's for fun; let's just see if they notice, and they do. But there's always a reason for the connections. If I do that, there's always a thematic reason for it. It's never just because; there's always a reason behind it."[5]

Recording

The scoring was held at the Eastwood Scoring Stage and Newman Scoring Stage in Los Angeles, mostly during the COVID-19 lockdown period in late-2021. 39 vocalists from Los Angeles Master Chorale and 89 musicians from the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, worked on the choral and orchestral pieces used in the score. The recording was split into multiple sessions. Giacchino had to record the orchestral pieces separately, as he could not bring the ensemble together due to lockdown restrictions.[7] The musicians had to be separated by 6 to 10 feet distance while recording, and had to manually record the score on a day basis. By this, Giacchino took about 15–18 days on working on the score, as normally, he would finish scoring for a film within 5 days.[7] He also faced several challenges during recording, with woodwinds had to be placed in plastic boxes in front of them and brass instruments being surrounded in plastic shower curtains, as a result, "the musicians could not hear each other while recording or even notice their body language".[7]

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Buzz Lightyear

Buzz Lightyear

Buzz Lightyear is the main character in the Toy Story franchise created by Disney and Pixar mainly voiced by Tim Allen. He is a Superhero toy action figure based on the in-universe media franchise consisting of a blockbuster feature film and animated series, a Space Ranger. He is the only Toy Story character in all of the franchise's animated films, including spin-offs, although his friend Woody is the main protagonist in all of the four films of the series. In Toy Story (1995), unlike most other toys, Buzz initially believes himself to be the "real" Buzz Lightyear, and comes to terms with actually being just a toy; in Toy Story 2 (1999), Buzz encounters other Buzz Lightyear action figures from the toyline who similarly believe themselves to be "real", including one of the character's in-universe archenemy and father: Emperor Zurg; in Toy Story 3 (2010), set ten years later, Buzz explores a romance with cowgirl figure Jessie, while his Spanish mode is also uncovered; while in Toy Story 4 (2019), Buzz finds his inner voice and bids farewell to Woody, who leaves to be with Bo Peep.

Randy Newman

Randy Newman

Randall Stuart Newman is an American singer-songwriter, arranger, composer, and pianist known for his non-rhotic Southern-accented singing style, early Americana-influenced songs, and various film scores. His best-known songs as a recording artist are "Short People" (1977), "I Love L.A." (1983), and "You've Got a Friend in Me" (1995) with Lyle Lovett, while other artists have enjoyed more success with cover versions of his "Mama Told Me Not to Come" (1966), "I Think It's Going to Rain Today" (1968) and "You Can Leave Your Hat On" (1972).

Michael Giacchino

Michael Giacchino

Michael Giacchino is an American composer of music for films, television and video games. He has also served as a director for television. He has received many awards, including an Oscar for his work on Up (2009), an Emmy for his work on Lost (2004), and three Grammys for his work on Ratatouille (2007) and Up (2009).

Angus MacLane

Angus MacLane

Angus MacLane is an American animator, storyboard artist, character designer, screenwriter, film director, and voice actor currently working at Pixar. He co-directed the film Finding Dory (2016) and made his solo feature directorial debut with the Toy Story spin-off film Lightyear (2022). MacLane is also a Lego enthusiast and created the CubeDudes building format and designed a LEGO WALL-E that has become an official set from The Lego Group.

Cars 2

Cars 2

Cars 2 is a 2011 American computer-animated spy comedy film produced by Pixar Animation Studios for Walt Disney Pictures. It is the sequel to Cars (2006), the second film in the Cars franchise, and the 12th animated film from the studio. The film was directed by John Lasseter, co-directed by Brad Lewis, and produced by Denise Ream, from a screenplay written by Ben Queen, and a story by Lasseter, Lewis, and Dan Fogelman. In the film's ensemble voice cast, Owen Wilson, Larry the Cable Guy, Tony Shalhoub, Guido Quaroni, Bonnie Hunt, and John Ratzenberger reprise their roles from the first film. Paul Newman, who voiced Doc Hudson in the previous film, died in September 2008, so his character was written out of the film; George Carlin, who previously voiced Fillmore, died during the same year, and his role was passed to Lloyd Sherr. The returning cast is joined by Michael Caine, Emily Mortimer, John Turturro, Eddie Izzard, and Thomas Kretschmann, who voice the new characters introduced in this film.

Alien (franchise)

Alien (franchise)

Alien is a science-fiction horror and action media franchise centered on the film series which depicts warrant officer Ellen Ripley and her battles with an extraterrestrial lifeform, commonly referred to as "the Alien" or Xenomorph.

Science fiction

Science fiction

Science fiction is a genre of speculative fiction, which typically deals with imaginative and futuristic concepts such as advanced science and technology, space exploration, time travel, parallel universes, and extraterrestrial life. Science fiction can trace its roots to ancient mythology. It is related to fantasy, horror, and superhero fiction and contains many subgenres. Its exact definition has long been disputed among authors, critics, scholars, and readers.

Adventure film

Adventure film

An adventure film is a form of adventure fiction, and is a genre of film. Subgenres of adventure films include swashbuckler films, pirate films, and survival films. Adventure films may also be combined with other film genres such as action, animation, comedy, drama, fantasy, science fiction, family, horror, or war.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, often referred to by its initials L.A., is the commercial, financial, and cultural center of Southern California. Los Angeles is the largest city in the state of California, the second most populous city in the United States after New York City, and one of the world's most populous megacities. With a population of roughly 3.9 million residents within the city limits as of 2020, Los Angeles is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic and cultural diversity, being the home of the Hollywood film industry, and its sprawling metropolitan area. The city lies in a basin in Southern California adjacent to the Pacific Ocean in the west and extending through the Santa Monica Mountains and north into the San Fernando Valley, with the city bordering the San Gabriel Valley to its east. It covers about 469 square miles (1,210 km2), and is the county seat of Los Angeles County, which is the most populous county in the United States with an estimated 9.86 million residents as of 2022.

COVID-19 lockdowns

COVID-19 lockdowns

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a number of non-pharmaceutical interventions colloquially known as lockdowns have been implemented in numerous countries and territories around the world. These restrictions were established with the intention to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. By April 2020, about half of the world's population was under some form of lockdown, with more than 3.9 billion people in more than 90 countries or territories having been asked or ordered to stay at home by their governments. Although similar disease control measures have been used for hundreds of years, the scale of those implemented in the 2020s is thought to be unprecedented.

Los Angeles Master Chorale

Los Angeles Master Chorale

The Los Angeles Master Chorale is a professional chorus in Los Angeles, California, and one of the resident companies of both The Music Center and Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. It was founded in 1964 by Roger Wagner to be one of the three original resident companies of the Music Center of Los Angeles County. Grant Gershon has been its music director since 2001, replacing Paul Salamunovich.

Los Angeles Philharmonic

Los Angeles Philharmonic

The Los Angeles Philharmonic, commonly referred to as the LA Phil, is an American orchestra based in Los Angeles, California. It has a regular season of concerts from October through June at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, and a summer season at the Hollywood Bowl from July through September. Gustavo Dudamel is the current Music Director, Esa-Pekka Salonen is Conductor Laureate, Zubin Mehta is Conductor Emeritus, and Susanna Mälkki is Principal Guest Conductor. John Adams is the orchestra's current Composer-in-Residence.

Release

"Mission Perpetual", a track from the score album was released as a single on June 3, 2022.[1] Commenting on the track, Giacchino stated it as one of his favourite tracks to work on the film, while further saying in an interview to Variety: "It was an exciting challenge to work for me because there were so many things the music needed to convey: Buzz’s frustration with himself and the sadness of being alone in his pursuit, but also his undying ambition and drive to achieve his goal."[8] He opined that, he went through a similar "mission" on the track, which was "incredibly rewarding".[8] The album was released through Dolby Atmos on June 17, 2022, by Walt Disney Records.[3]

Reception

The score was positively received by critics and was acclaimed in the film reviews. David Rooney of The Hollywood Reporter stated Giacchino's "robust orchestral score", ranges from "quiet, intimate moments through hard-charging suspense to triumphal jubilation".[9] RogerEbert.com-based critic Odie Henderson called it as "one of Giacchino's best scores" and "a delectable spoof of bombastic space movie music that elevates every scene it plays under". He further added that, the composition in the film's opening scene, was reminiscent of his work similar to the opening sequence in Up (2009), which fetched him the Academy Award for Best Original Score.[10]

Star Tribune-based Chris Hewitt stated the score as "sensitive".[11] Dana Stevens of Slate complimented "Giacchino’s score soars movingly or bounces merrily as required by the story".[12] In a more contrasting review, The Denver Post's John Wenzel, though calling the score as "stirring", had attributed that "it never justifies beyond commercial expansion".[13] DiscussingFilm's Aaron Escobar wrote "Giacchino produces a score for the hero that might sound a little familiar to fans of the Toy Story series, though in actuality, is made completely from scratch. Giacchino creates a brass-infused theme that with each build-up makes the viewer want to buckle up next to these Space Rangers for the ride ahead, proving once again what a good luck charm he’s become for Pixar."[14]

About the first track "Mission Perpetual", Collider's Ryan O'Rourke had stated "The track fits the vibe of a grand space adventure, sounding like the background music to the start of a mission to the stars. With how it swells and dips, it represents the possible success and failure Buzz and company could face. For as whimsical as it is and how much it builds towards its energetic end, there are some darker notes throughout that could indicate the danger of the mission and general fear and frustration over failure."[1]

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The Hollywood Reporter

The Hollywood Reporter

The Hollywood Reporter (THR) is an American digital and print magazine which focuses on the Hollywood film, television, and entertainment industries. It was founded in 1930 as a daily trade paper, and in 2010 switched to a weekly large-format print magazine with a revamped website. As of 2020, the day-to-day operations of the company are handled by Penske Media Corporation through a joint venture with Eldridge Industries.

RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com is an American film review website that archives reviews written by film critic Roger Ebert for the Chicago Sun-Times and also shares other critics' reviews and essays. The website, underwritten by the Chicago Sun-Times, was launched in 2002. Ebert handpicked writers from around the world to contribute to the website. After Ebert died in 2013, the website was relaunched under Ebert Digital, a partnership founded between Ebert, his wife Chaz, and friend Josh Golden.

Up opening sequence

Up opening sequence

The opening sequence to the 2009 Disney-Pixar film Up has become known as a cultural milestone and a key element to the film's success.

Up (2009 film)

Up (2009 film)

Up is a 2009 American computer-animated film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The film was directed by Pete Docter, co-directed by Bob Peterson, and produced by Jonas Rivera. Docter and Peterson also wrote the film's screenplay and story, with Tom McCarthy co-writing the latter. The film stars the voices of Ed Asner, Christopher Plummer, Jordan Nagai, and Peterson. The film centers on Carl Fredricksen (Asner), an elderly widower who travels to South America with wilderness explorer Russell (Nagai) in order to fulfill a promise that Carl made to his late wife Ellie. Along the way, they meet a talking dog named Dug (Peterson) and encounter a giant bird named Kevin, who is being hunted by the explorer Charles Muntz (Plummer), whom Carl had idolized in childhood.

Academy Award for Best Original Score

Academy Award for Best Original Score

The Academy Award for Best Original Score is an award presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to the best substantial body of music in the form of dramatic underscoring written specifically for the film by the submitting composer. Some pre-existing music is allowed, though, but a contending film must include a minimum of original music. This minimum since 2021 is established in 35% of the music, which is raised to 80% for sequels and franchise films. Fifteen scores are shortlisted before nominations are announced.

Star Tribune

Star Tribune

The Star Tribune is the largest newspaper in Minnesota. It originated as the Minneapolis Tribune in 1867 and the competing Minneapolis Daily Star in 1920. During the 1930s and 1940s, Minneapolis's competing newspapers were consolidated, with the Tribune published in the morning and the Star in the evening. They merged in 1982, creating the Star and Tribune, and it was renamed to Star Tribune in 1987. After a tumultuous period in which the newspaper was sold and re-sold and filed for bankruptcy protection in 2009, it was purchased by local businessman Glen Taylor in 2014.

Dana Stevens (critic)

Dana Stevens (critic)

Dana Shawn Stevens is an American film critic who writes for Slate. She is also a cohost of the magazine's weekly cultural podcast, the Culture Gabfest. She is the author of a 2022 book about Buster Keaton and the 20th century titled Camera Man: Buster Keaton, the Dawn of Cinema, and the Invention of the Twentieth Century.

Slate (magazine)

Slate (magazine)

Slate is an online magazine that covers current affairs, politics, and culture in the United States. It was created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley, initially under the ownership of Microsoft as part of MSN. In 2004, it was purchased by The Washington Post Company, and since 2008 has been managed by The Slate Group, an online publishing entity created by Graham Holdings. Slate is based in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C.

The Denver Post

The Denver Post

The Denver Post is a daily newspaper and website published in Denver, Colorado. As of June 2022, it has an average print circulation of 57,265. In 2016, its website received roughly six million monthly unique visitors generating more than 13 million page views, according to comScore.

Collider (website)

Collider (website)

Collider is an entertainment website and digital video production company, with a focus on the film industry, television series, and video games.

Track listing

All tracks are written and composed by Michael Giacchino.[15]

No.TitleLength
1."Mission Log"2:23
2."Initial Greetings"4:13
3."Lightyear"2:45
4."The Best Laid Flight Plans of Space and Men"1:15
5."Blown on Course"1:37
6."A Hyper Failure"0:55
7."Lightyear's Behind"1:45
8."Mission Perpetual"2:41
9."The Lone Space Ranger"2:24
10."Afternoon Delight Speed"4:13
11."Light Speed at the End of the Tunnel"0:34
12."Relative Success"0:41
13."Zurg Awakens"1:53
14."Operation Surprise Party"0:44
15."A Good Day to Not Die"2:38
16."Zurg's Displeasure"0:30
17."Space Afraiders"3:57
18."Zurg-onomics"2:00
19."Oh, Hover"2:57
20."Mistake It All In"1:33
21."Buzz, Meet Zurg"1:33
22."To Infinity and Be Gone"4:13
23."Hawthorn in Her Side"0:59
24."World’s Worst Self-Destruct Sequence"1:39
25."Time to Space Your Fears"4:01
26."Hiding from Yourself"1:21
27."Improv-Izzy-tion"0:50
28."Back to Buzzness"3:10
29."Home on Space Range"2:59
30."Infinite MOEtion"2:06
31."One Suite Buzz"12:19

Additional music

The track "Starman" by David Bowie was featured in the first trailer of the film,[16] and The Black Keys' "Lonely Boy" was featured in the special look trailer.[17] The tracks were used for promotional purposes, and was neither featured in the soundtrack, nor in the film.[17]

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Starman (song)

Starman (song)

"Starman" is a song by English musician David Bowie. It was released on 28 April 1972 by RCA Records as the lead single of his fifth studio album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. Co-produced by Ken Scott, Bowie recorded the song on 4 February 1972 at Trident Studios in London with his backing band known as the Spiders from Mars – comprising guitarist Mick Ronson, bassist Trevor Bolder and drummer Mick Woodmansey. The song was a late addition to the album, written as a direct response to RCA's request for a single; it replaced the Chuck Berry cover "Round and Round" on the album. The lyrics describe Ziggy Stardust bringing a message of hope to Earth's youth through the radio, salvation by an alien 'Starman'. The chorus is inspired by "Over the Rainbow", sung by Judy Garland, while other influences include T. Rex and the Supremes.

David Bowie

David Bowie

David Robert Jones, known professionally as David Bowie, was an English singer-songwriter and actor. A leading figure in the music industry, he is regarded as one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. Bowie was acclaimed by critics and musicians, particularly for his innovative work during the 1970s. His career was marked by reinvention and visual presentation, and his music and stagecraft had a significant impact on popular music.

The Black Keys

The Black Keys

The Black Keys are an American rock duo formed in Akron, Ohio, in 2001. The group consists of Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney (drums). The duo began as an independent act, recording music in basements and self-producing their records, before they eventually emerged as one of the most popular garage rock artists during a second wave of the genre's revival in the 2000s. The band's raw blues rock sound draws heavily from Auerbach's blues influences, including Junior Kimbrough, R.L. Burnside, Howlin' Wolf, and Robert Johnson.

Lonely Boy (The Black Keys song)

Lonely Boy (The Black Keys song)

"Lonely Boy" is a song by American rock band the Black Keys. It is the opening track from their 2011 studio album El Camino and was released as the record's lead single on October 26, 2011. The song is also the A-side of a promotional 12-inch single that was released in commemoration of Record Store Day's "Back to Black" Friday event. The single was accompanied by a popular one-shot music video of a man dancing and lip-synching the lyrics.

Chart performance

Chart (2022) Position
US Soundtrack Albums (Billboard)[18] 5

Personnel

Credits adapted from Spotify.[15]

  • Marshall Bowen – orchestra conductor
  • Connie Boylan – assistant orchestra contractor, assistant score contractor
  • Aleta Braxton – score vocalist
  • Warren Brown – score mixing
  • Reid Bruton – score vocalist
  • Amick Byram – score vocalist
  • Alvin Chea – score vocalist
  • Stephen M. Davis – music editor
  • George Doering – guitar
  • Monique Donnelly – score vocalist
  • Dylan Gentile – score vocalist
  • William Kenneth Goldman – score vocalist
  • Curtis Green – additional music
  • Emma Gunn – score vocalist
  • Levi Gunn – score vocalist
  • Vangie Gunn – vocal contractor, soloist, choir conductor
  • Christine Guter – score vocalist
  • Tom Hardisty – score recordist
  • Ayana Haviv – score vocalist
  • Jeff Kryka – orchestrator
  • Keri Larson – score vocalist
  • William Wells Learned III – music editor
  • Edie Lehmann Boddicker – score vocalist
  • Mark LeVang – piano, celeste
  • Ben Han-Wei Lin – score vocalist
  • Rick Logan – score vocalist
  • David Loucks – score vocalist
  • Tom MacDougall – executive music producer
  • Sara Mann – score vocalist
  • Baraka May – score vocalist
  • Tonoccus McClain – score vocalist
  • Martin McClellan – music preparation
  • Claude McKnight – score vocalist
  • Aaron Meyer – music preparation
  • Charissa Nielsen – score vocalist
  • Pedro Osuna–orchestrator
  • Jasper Randall – score vocalist
  • Erin Michael Rettig – scoring stage engineer
  • Hannah Marie Ruston – score vocalist
  • Ann Marie Sheridan – score vocalist
  • Fletcher Sheridan – score vocalist
  • Connor Warren Smith – score vocalist
  • Beinn-Mhor Logan Stewart – score vocalist
  • Joe Stone–oboe and English horn
  • Todd Strange – score vocalist
  • Ellena Taylor – score vocalist
  • Natalie Babbitt Taylor – score vocalist
  • Andrew James Thomas – score vocalist
  • Suzanne Waters – score vocalist
  • John West – score vocalist
  • Greg Whipple – score vocalist
  • Booker White – music preparation
  • Gerald White–score vocalist
  • Elyse Willis–score vocalist
  • Reggie Wilson – orchestra contractor, score contractor

Source: "Lightyear (soundtrack)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightyear_(soundtrack).

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References
  1. ^ a b c O'Rourke, Ryan (June 3, 2022). "'Lightyear': Listen to the First Track From Michael Giacchino's Score Ahead of the Film". Collider. Archived from the original on June 13, 2022. Retrieved January 1, 2023.
  2. ^ a b c d "Michael Giacchino Scoring Pixar's Lightyear". Film Music Reporter. January 25, 2022. Archived from the original on January 25, 2022. Retrieved January 25, 2022.
  3. ^ a b "'Lightyear' Soundtrack Album Details". Film Music Reporter. Archived from the original on June 17, 2022. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  4. ^ a b Vinney, Cynthia (June 17, 2022). "Why Lightyear Is Composer Michael Giacchino's 'Love Letter' From His '12-Year-Old Heart' – Exclusive". Looper.com. Archived from the original on June 21, 2022. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
  5. ^ a b c Ash Crossan (June 17, 2022). "Michael Giacchino Interview: Lightyear". ScreenRant. Archived from the original on June 17, 2022. Retrieved January 1, 2023.
  6. ^ Vinney, Cynthia (June 16, 2022). "Michael Giacchino On The 'Fun Challenge' Of Composing Music For Pixar's Lightyear And More – Exclusive Interview". Looper.com (Interview). Archived from the original on June 17, 2022. Retrieved June 17, 2022.
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