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Lanark Sheriff Court

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Lanark Sheriff Court
Lanark Sherriff Court (geograph 5594575).jpg
Lanark Sheriff Court
LocationHope Street, Lanark
Coordinates55°40′30″N 3°46′52″W / 55.6749°N 3.7812°W / 55.6749; -3.7812Coordinates: 55°40′30″N 3°46′52″W / 55.6749°N 3.7812°W / 55.6749; -3.7812
Built1836
ArchitectHugh Marr
Architectural style(s)Neoclassical style
Listed Building – Category B
Official nameLanark Sheriff Court and Justice of the Peace Court, including boundary wall, gatepiers and railings, and excluding 2-storey, flat-roofed extension to east, Hope Street, Lanark
Designated12 January 1971
Reference no.LB37016
Lanark Sheriff Court is located in South Lanarkshire
Lanark Sheriff Court
Shown in South Lanarkshire

Lanark Sheriff Court is a judicial building in Hope Street, Lanark, South Lanarkshire, Scotland. The building, which continues to serve as the local courthouse, is a Category B listed building.[1]

History

The original venue for the administration of justice in the town was Lanark Castle.[2] In the 14th century, the castle was destroyed and both judicial and municipal business moved to the tolbooth in the High Street, with prison cells on the ground floor and a courtroom on the first floor. The building, in its present incarnation, dates from 1778.[3][4] By the 1830s, the tolbooth was dilapidated and it was decided to commission new public buildings: a site was selected in Hope Street.[5] The new building was designed by Hugh Marr in the neoclassical style, built in ashlar stone and was completed in 1836.[1][6]

The design involved a symmetrical main frontage of seven bays facing onto Hope Street. The central section of three bays, which was slightly projected forward, featured a round headed doorway flanked by two round headed windows. On the first floor there was a tetrastyle portico formed by Doric order columns supporting an entablature and a pediment. The outer sections of two bays each were fenestrated by sash windows on both floors and on the first floor, at the corners, there were Doric order pilasters supporting an entablature and a cornice. The building when completed was referred to as the "County Buildings".[1][a]

The building was extended significantly to the south, by the addition of a courthouse building, in 1868. The design of the courthouse involved a symmetrical main frontage of five bays facing onto Hope Street. The central section of three bays, which was slightly projected forward, featured three round headed windows on the ground floor. On the first floor there were three sash windows with brackets supporting cornices or, in the case of the central window, a pediment. The windows were flanked by Doric order pilasters supporting an entablature, a cornice and a balustraded parapet. The outer bays were fenestrated in a similar style and, at the corners, there were rusticated pilasters also supporting the entablature, cornice and balustraded parapet. Internally, the principal room was the main courtroom.[1]

The complex continued to serve as the meeting place of Lanark Burgh Council for much of the 20th century but ceased to be the local seat of government when the enlarged Lanark District Council was formed at the council offices in South Vennel in 1975.[9][10] The complex also continued to serve as the local sheriff court throughout the 20th century and into the 21st century. In 2002, the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service acquired County Buildings and implemented a major programme of refurbishment works which involved the conversion of County Buildings to create a second courtroom. The new courtroom entered service in 2004.[11]

Discover more about History related topics

Lanark Castle

Lanark Castle

Lanark Castle was the origin and heart of what later became the royal burgh of Lanark, Scotland. The town grew up outside the castle walls. Long since demolished, the castle lay high on the east bank of the River Clyde, near the confluence with the Mouse Water. The site is designated a scheduled monument.

Lanark Tolbooth

Lanark Tolbooth

Lanark Tolbooth is a municipal building in Hope Street, Lanark, South Lanarkshire, Scotland. The building, which now operates as an arts and heritage centre, is a Category B listed building.

Neoclassical architecture

Neoclassical architecture

Neoclassical architecture is an architectural style produced by the Neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century in Italy and France. It became one of the most prominent architectural styles in the Western world. The prevailing styles of architecture in most of Europe for the previous two centuries, Renaissance architecture and Baroque architecture, already represented partial revivals of the Classical architecture of ancient Rome and ancient Greek architecture, but the Neoclassical movement aimed to strip away the excesses of Late Baroque and return to a purer and more authentic classical style, adapted to modern purposes.

Ashlar

Ashlar

Ashlar is finely dressed stone, either an individual stone that has been worked until squared, or a structure built from such stones. Ashlar is the finest stone masonry unit, generally rectangular cuboid, mentioned by Vitruvius as opus isodomum, or less frequently trapezoidal. Precisely cut "on all faces adjacent to those of other stones", ashlar is capable of very thin joints between blocks, and the visible face of the stone may be quarry-faced or feature a variety of treatments: tooled, smoothly polished or rendered with another material for decorative effect.

Doric order

Doric order

The Doric order was one of the three orders of ancient Greek and later Roman architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. The Doric is most easily recognized by the simple circular capitals at the top of columns. Originating in the western Doric region of Greece, it is the earliest and, in its essence, the simplest of the orders, though still with complex details in the entablature above.

Entablature

Entablature

An entablature is the superstructure of moldings and bands which lies horizontally above columns, resting on their capitals. Entablatures are major elements of classical architecture, and are commonly divided into the architrave, the frieze, and the cornice. The Greek and Roman temples are believed to be based on wooden structures, the design transition from wooden to stone structures being called petrification.

Pediment

Pediment

Pediments are gables, usually of a triangular shape. Pediments are placed above the horizontal structure of the lintel, or entablature, if supported by columns. Pediments can contain an overdoor and are usually topped by hood moulds. A pediment is sometimes the top element of a portico. For symmetric designs, it provides a center point and is often used to add grandness to entrances.

Cornice

Cornice

In architecture, a cornice is generally any horizontal decorative moulding that crowns a building or furniture element—for example, the cornice over a door or window, around the top edge of a pedestal, or along the top of an interior wall. A simple cornice may be formed just with a crown, as in crown moulding atop an interior wall or above kitchen cabinets or a bookcase.

Bracket (architecture)

Bracket (architecture)

A bracket is an architectural element: a structural or decorative member. It can be made of wood, stone, plaster, metal, or other media. It projects from a wall, usually to carry weight and sometimes to "...strengthen an angle". A corbel or console are types of brackets.

Baluster

Baluster

A baluster is an upright support, often a vertical moulded shaft, square, or lathe-turned form found in stairways, parapets, and other architectural features. In furniture construction it is known as a spindle. Common materials used in its construction are wood, stone, and less frequently metal and ceramic. A group of balusters supporting a handrail, coping, or ornamental detail are known as a balustrade.

Parapet

Parapet

A parapet is a barrier that is an upward extension of a wall at the edge of a roof, terrace, balcony, walkway or other structure. The word comes ultimately from the Italian parapetto. Where extending above a roof, a parapet may simply be the portion of an exterior wall that continues above the edge line of the roof surface, or may be a continuation of a vertical feature beneath the roof such as a fire wall or party wall. Parapets were originally used to defend buildings from military attack, but today they are primarily used as guard rails, to conceal rooftop equipment, reduce wind loads on the roof, and to prevent the spread of fires. In the Bible the Hebrews are obligated to build a parapet on the roof of their houses to prevent people falling.

Clydesdale (district)

Clydesdale (district)

Clydesdale was a local government district in the Strathclyde region of Scotland from 1975 to 1996. The district was initially called Lanark when created in 1975, but changed its name to Clydesdale in 1980. Clydesdale was an old name for the county of Lanarkshire, one of the historic counties of Scotland. Both the names Clydesdale and Strathclyde reference the area's position in the valley of the River Clyde.

Source: "Lanark Sheriff Court", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 19th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lanark_Sheriff_Court.

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Notes
  1. ^ Until 1890, Lanarkshire was divided into three administrative wards: lower (Glasgow), middle (Hamilton) and upper (Lanark) and this building was the meeting place for the upper ward.[7] After the formation of Lanarkshire County Council in 1890, the county council also sometimes met in the Hope Street building.[8]
References
  1. ^ a b c d Historic Environment Scotland. "Lanark Sheriff Court and Justice of the Peace Court, including boundary wall, gatepiers and railings, and excluding 2-storey, flat-roofed extension to east, Hope Street, Lanark (LB37016)". Retrieved 1 January 2023.
  2. ^ Davidson, Hugh (1910). Lanark, a series of papers. Edinburgh. The Castle of Lanark was the original headquarters of the Courts of Justice and of municipal business.
  3. ^ Historic Environment Scotland. "2–8 High Street (LB36997)". Retrieved 1 January 2023.
  4. ^ "Tolbooth Heritage and Arts Hub". Lanark.co.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2023.
  5. ^ "The Tolbooth: From Jail to Jewel of Lanark". Wilson Leitch. Retrieved 1 January 2023.
  6. ^ "County Buildings". Dictionary of Scottish Architects. Retrieved 1 January 2023.
  7. ^ "Old County of Lanarkshire". Gazetteer for Scotland. Retrieved 1 January 2023.
  8. ^ Robson, Peter; Rodger, Johnny (2017). The Spaces of Justice: The Architecture of the Scottish Court. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press. p. 72. ISBN 978-1683930891.
  9. ^ "Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973". Legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 1 January 2023.
  10. ^ "No. 20420". The Edinburgh Gazette. 12 January 1979. p. 31.
  11. ^ "Lanark Sheriff Court and Justice of the Peace Court". Scottish Courts and Tribunals. Retrieved 1 January 2023.
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