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LGBT and Wikipedia

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There are various intersections of the LGBTQ+ community and Wikipedia. LGBTQ+ people who edit Wikipedia may face harassment, and Wikipedia content about LGBTQ+ individuals is often vandalized, but various Wikipedia user groups and the Wikimedia Foundation have endorsed campaigns to promote inclusion on Wikipedia, and its availability in nations that otherwise suppress information about LGBTQ+ issues has been praised.

In 2019, Rachel Wexelbaum wrote, "For LGBTIQ+ people and those searching for LGBTIQ+ information, Wikipedia has proven invaluable in countries where LGBTIQ+ publications, media, or visibility may be criminalized or cut short due to AIDS NGOs leaving those countries."[1]

The Croatian Wikipedia has come under scrutiny for promoting fascism, whitewashing World War II concentration camps, and anti-Serbian and anti-LGBT propaganda. At one point, the only active administrator of Amharic Wikipedia enforced the Ethiopian government's anti-LGBT laws on the wiki.[2]

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Wikipedia

Wikipedia

Wikipedia is a multilingual free online encyclopedia written and maintained by a community of volunteers, known as Wikipedians, through open collaboration and using a wiki-based editing system. Wikipedia is the largest and most-read reference work in history. It is consistently one of the 10 most popular websites ranked by Similarweb and formerly Alexa; as of 2022, Wikipedia was ranked the 5th most popular site in the world. It is hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, an American non-profit organization funded mainly through donations.

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying or cyberharassment is a form of bullying or harassment using electronic means. Cyberbullying and cyberharassment are also known as online bullying. It has become increasingly common, especially among teenagers, as the digital sphere has expanded and technology has advanced. Cyberbullying is when someone, typically a teenager, bullies or harasses others on the internet and other digital spaces, particularly on social media sites. Harmful bullying behavior can include posting rumors, threats, sexual remarks, a victims' personal information, or pejorative labels. Bullying or harassment can be identified by repeated behavior and an intent to harm. Victims of cyberbullying may experience lower self-esteem, increased suicidal ideation, and various negative emotional responses, including being anxious, frustrated, angry, or depressed.

Vandalism

Vandalism

Vandalism is the action involving deliberate destruction of or damage to public or private property.

Wikimedia Foundation

Wikimedia Foundation

The Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., or Wikimedia for short and abbreviated as WMF, is an American 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization headquartered in San Francisco, California and registered as a charitable foundation under local laws. Best known as the hosting platform for Wikipedia, a crowdsourced online encyclopedia, it also hosts other related projects and MediaWiki, a wiki software.

Croatian Wikipedia

Croatian Wikipedia

The Croatian Wikipedia is the Croatian version of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, started on February 16, 2003. This version has 213,511 articles and a total of 6.53 million edits have been made. It has 283,667 registered user accounts, out of which 551 are active, and 11 administrators.

Wikipedia administrators

Wikipedia administrators

On Wikipedia, trusted users may be appointed as administrators, following a successful request for adminship. Currently, there are 911 administrators on the English Wikipedia. Administrators have additional technical privileges compared with other editors, such as being able to protect and delete pages and being able to block users from editing pages.

Harassment

LGBT Wikipedia editors have experienced harassment, including deadnaming and doxxing. The Wikimedia Foundation has said it is seriously concerned about the idea that transgender editors could be repelled from Wikipedia due to online abuse.[3]

Editors in countries where it is more dangerous to be LGBT experience more virulent harassment. In one instance, an editor was blocked by an administrator since their username suggested they may be gay. The administrator was eventually blocked for those actions when Wikimedia’s Trust and Safety Team got involved. Amir Sarabadani, an editor, stated that in 12 years of editing Persian language Wikipedia, users were often hostile to articles related to homosexuality. Other editors often accused him of having a "homosexual agenda" and anonymous users posted lewd images to his user page. He said that his work as an administrator there helped make abuse less tolerable and that homophobic content that was previously acceptable now resulted in blocks.[3]

In 2022, a group of 40 French public figures signed an open letter to Wikipedia denouncing "stigmatizing behaviors" against transgender, non-binary, and intersex people on Wikipedia including misgendering, deadnaming, the use of pre-transition pictures, and harassment of openly trans editors.[4]

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Deadnaming

Deadnaming

Deadnaming is the act of referring to a transgender or non-binary person by a name they used prior to transitioning, such as their birth name. Deadnaming may be unintentional, or a deliberate attempt to deny, mock or invalidate a person's gender identity.

Gender transition

Gender transition

Gender transition is the process of changing one's gender presentation or sex characteristics to accord with one's internal sense of gender identity – the idea of what it means to be a man or a woman, or to be non-binary or genderqueer. For transgender and transsexual people, this process commonly involves reassignment therapy, with their gender identity being opposite that of their birth-assigned sex and gender. Transitioning might involve medical treatment, but it does not always involve it. Cross-dressers, drag queens, and drag kings tend not to transition, since their variant gender presentations are (usually) only adopted temporarily.

Transphobia

Transphobia

Transphobia is a collection of ideas and phenomena that encompass a range of negative attitudes, feelings, or actions towards transgender people or transness in general. Transphobia can include fear, aversion, hatred, violence or anger towards people who do not conform to social gender expectations. It is often expressed alongside homophobic views and hence is often considered an aspect of homophobia. Transphobia is a type of prejudice and discrimination, similar to racism and sexism, and transgender people of color are often subjected to all three forms of discrimination at once.

Names and pronouns

Articles about transgender and non-binary individuals are often subject to vandals who edit the article to misgender the subject, despite Wikipedia's guideline that articles should use the gender corresponding with the subject's most recently stated gender.[3] In August 2008, the page of trans CNET journalist Ina Fried was caught up in a edit war over the pronouns used on the page.[5][6]

After Chelsea Manning confirmed her preferred name and pronouns in 2013, editors debated the title of the entry about her. According to The Guardian, "The arbitration committee – in effect the site's supreme court – has banned a number of editors from working on articles related to transgender topics or individuals. But while some of those editors were banned for making transphobic comments about Manning, others were given the same punishment for pointing out the bigotry in the first place."[7]

Following Caitlyn Jenner's gender transition in 2015, Kat George of Bustle wrote, "We can start learning about the proper use of gender pronouns, with Caitlyn Jenner's Wikipedia page as a perfect example of the correct before and after language we should be employing."[8]

Editors had debated the name and pronouns to use in the article on Gloria Hemingway for 15 years. In February 2022, after a week of debate and long discussions, votes were evenly split between using Gloria and "she/her" pronouns or continuing to use her deadname. An editor closed the discussion in favor of renaming; the decision was appealed but upheld by an administrator.[9]

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Transgender

Transgender

A transgender person is someone whose gender identity or gender expression does not correspond with their sex assigned at birth. Many transgender people experience dysphoria, which they seek to alleviate through transitioning, often adopting a different name and set of pronouns in the process. Additionally, they may undergo sex reassignment therapies such as hormone therapy and sex reassignment surgery to more closely align their primary and secondary sex characteristics with their gender identity. Not all transgender people desire these treatments, however, and others may be unable to access them for financial or medical reasons. Those who do desire to medically transition to another sex may identify as transsexual.

CNET

CNET

CNET is an American media website that publishes reviews, news, articles, blogs, podcasts, and videos on technology and consumer electronics globally. CNET originally produced content for radio and television in addition to its website and now uses new media distribution methods through its Internet television network, CNET Video, and its podcast and blog networks.

Ina Fried

Ina Fried

Ina Fried, formerly Ian Fried, is an American journalist for Axios. Prior to that, she was senior editor for All Things Digital, a senior staff writer for CNET Network's News.com, and worked for Re/code. She is a frequent commenter on technology news on National Public Radio, local television news and for other print and broadcast outlets.

Chelsea Manning

Chelsea Manning

Chelsea Elizabeth Manning is an American activist and whistleblower. She is a former United States Army soldier who was convicted by court-martial in July 2013 of violations of the Espionage Act and other offenses, after disclosing to WikiLeaks nearly 750,000 classified, or unclassified but sensitive, military and diplomatic documents. She was imprisoned from 2010 until 2017 when her sentence was commuted by President Barack Obama. A trans woman, Manning stated in 2013 that she had a female gender identity since childhood and wanted to be known as Chelsea Manning.

The Guardian

The Guardian

The Guardian is a British daily newspaper. It was founded in 1821 as The Manchester Guardian, and changed its name in 1959. Along with its sister papers The Observer and The Guardian Weekly, The Guardian is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust. The trust was created in 1936 to "secure the financial and editorial independence of The Guardian in perpetuity and to safeguard the journalistic freedom and liberal values of The Guardian free from commercial or political interference". The trust was converted into a limited company in 2008, with a constitution written so as to maintain for The Guardian the same protections as were built into the structure of the Scott Trust by its creators. Profits are reinvested in its journalism rather than distributed to owners or shareholders. It is considered a newspaper of record in the UK.

Caitlyn Jenner

Caitlyn Jenner

Caitlyn Marie Jenner is an American media personality and retired Olympic gold medal-winning decathlete.

Bustle (magazine)

Bustle (magazine)

Bustle is an online American women's magazine founded in August 2013 by Bryan Goldberg. It positions news and politics alongside articles about beauty, celebrities, and fashion trends. By September 2016, the website had 50 million monthly readers.

Gloria Hemingway

Gloria Hemingway

Gloria Hemingway was an American physician and writer who was the third and youngest child of author Ernest Hemingway.

Wikimedia affiliate and content improvement campaigns

Wikimedia LGBT is a user group affiliate of the Wikimedia Foundation.[10]

The Wikimedia movement has seen campaigns to improve coverage of LGBT topics.[11][12][13] According to The Hindu, Wiki Loves Pride is "a global campaign to expand and improve LGBT-related content across Wikimedia projects. The campaign focuses on the June to October period, when LGBTs around the world celebrate their community."[14] Wiki Loves Pride has promoted coverage of notable LGBT people.[15] Art+Feminism has been described as "a campaign to improve the site's representation of women and nonbinary individuals".[3]

Discover more about Wikimedia affiliate and content improvement campaigns related topics

Wikimedia Foundation

Wikimedia Foundation

The Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., or Wikimedia for short and abbreviated as WMF, is an American 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization headquartered in San Francisco, California and registered as a charitable foundation under local laws. Best known as the hosting platform for Wikipedia, a crowdsourced online encyclopedia, it also hosts other related projects and MediaWiki, a wiki software.

Wikimedia movement

Wikimedia movement

According to the Wikimedia Foundation, the Wikimedia movement is the global community of contributors to the Wikimedia projects. This community directly builds and administers the projects. It is committed to using open standards and software.

The Hindu

The Hindu

The Hindu is an Indian English-language daily newspaper owned by The Hindu Group, headquartered in Chennai, Tamil Nadu. It began as a weekly in 1878 and became a daily in 1889. It is one of the Indian newspapers of record and the second most circulated English-language newspaper in India, after The Times of India. As of March 2018, The Hindu is published from 21 locations across 11 states of India.

Wiki Loves Pride

Wiki Loves Pride

Wiki Loves Pride is a campaign to improve LGBT-related content on Wikipedia and other projects in the Wikimedia movement.

Art+Feminism

Art+Feminism

Art and Feminism is an annual worldwide edit-a-thon to add content to Wikipedia about women artists, which started in 2014. The project has been described as "a massive multinational effort to correct a persistent bias in Wikipedia, which is disproportionately written by and about men".

Source: "LGBT and Wikipedia", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGBT_and_Wikipedia.

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References
  1. ^ Wexelbaum, Rachel (June 20, 2019). "Edit Loud, Edit Proud: LGBTIQ+ Wikimedians and Global Information Activism". Wikipedia @ 20. Archived from the original on November 15, 2022. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  2. ^ Song, Victoria (August 26, 2020). "A Teen Threw Scots Wiki Into Chaos and It Highlights a Massive Problem With Wikipedia". Gizmodo. Archived from the original on January 24, 2023. Retrieved January 24, 2023.
  3. ^ a b c d Jacobs, Julia (April 8, 2019). "Wikipedia Isn't Officially a Social Network. But the Harassment Can Get Ugly". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 12, 2023. Retrieved January 24, 2023.
  4. ^ Sierra, Laura Valentina Cortés; Constantino, Sophia; Hauger, Bertrand. "LGBTQ+ International: Chile's Non-Binary ID, Slovakia In Mourning, Mr Gay World — And The Week's Other Top News". Worldcrunch. Archived from the original on January 24, 2023. Retrieved January 24, 2023.
  5. ^ Fried, Ina (August 22, 2008). "Wikipedia changes my gender more than I do". CNET. Archived from the original on November 5, 2012. Retrieved January 25, 2023.
  6. ^ West, Jackson (August 22, 2008). "Transgender journalist caught in Wikipedia edit war". Valleywag. Archived from the original on October 30, 2008.
  7. ^ Hern, Alex (October 24, 2013). "Chelsea Manning name row: Wikipedia editors banned from trans pages". The Guardian. Archived from the original on January 17, 2023. Retrieved January 23, 2023.
  8. ^ George, Kat (June 1, 2015). "Bruce Jenner Wikipedia Page Now Uses The Name Caitlyn And Female Pronouns, And The Before And After Illustrates Language You Should Use". Bustle. Archived from the original on June 25, 2022. Retrieved January 23, 2023.
  9. ^ Cohen, Noam (2023-01-22). "The Culture Wars Look Different on Wikipedia". The Atlantic. Retrieved 2023-01-26.
  10. ^ Ehlers, Saskia; Abida, Houssem; Erhart, Ed (December 9, 2018). "Wikimedia LGBT group meets at EuroPride Stockholm to celebrate diversity". Wikimedia Foundation. Archived from the original on November 26, 2022. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  11. ^ Milliken, Alice (July 7, 2014). "Wikipedia holds Pride 'edit-a-thons' to improve LGBT-related content". PinkNews. Archived from the original on January 20, 2023. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  12. ^ Mehra, Bharat (May 1, 2019). LGBTQ+ Librarianship in the 21st Century: Emerging Directions of Advocacy and Community Engagement in Diverse Information Environments. Emerald Group Publishing. ISBN 978-1-78756-475-6.
  13. ^ Miquel-Ribé, Marc; Kaltenbrunner, Andreas; Keefer, Jeffrey M. (December 21, 2021). "Bridging LGBT+ Content Gaps Across Wikipedia Language Editions". The International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion (IJIDI). 5 (4): 90–131. doi:10.33137/ijidi.v5i4.37270. ISSN 2574-3430. Archived from the original on January 13, 2022. Retrieved January 18, 2022.
  14. ^ Phadnis, Renuka (July 6, 2014). "Wikipedia edit-a-thons to add content on LGBTs". The Hindu. ISSN 0971-751X. Archived from the original on May 7, 2021. Retrieved January 20, 2023.
  15. ^ Lapowsky, Issie (March 2015). "Meet the Editors Fighting Racism and Sexism on Wikipedia". Wired. ISSN 1059-1028. Archived from the original on November 14, 2015. Retrieved January 23, 2023.
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