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Khouri

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Khouri or Khoury (Arabic: خوري, Greek: Χούρι or Ḫūrī), is a Levantine surname of Latin origin that is common to Christians in the Near East. The term Khoury means "priest" in Levantine Arabic, and derives from the Latin word curia.

The last name is the most popular and the most common name amongst the Christian population in Lebanon.

Since the late 19th century, the name has acquired different variants among the Lebanese diaspora and is also commonly spelled: Coury, Kouri, Couri, Koury, Kourie, Koory, Koorey, Kuri, Khuri, Khury, Kury, Xouri, Curi, Cury, Coorey, Courey, Korey, Kory, Corey, Chory, Correy, El Khouri, El Khoury, Elkhori, Elkouri, and in Latin America as Xuri, Kure, Cure, Correa, Juri, Jury, Cura, Jure, Eljure, Elcure, Aljure and Alcuri.

The name can also be found within Christian communities in Israel, Syria, Palestine, and Jordan.

The name is often given as a last name to a new priest or minister, replacing the old one if there already was one, and it is given to the children of the married priest and their descendants.[1] The Maronite Church, which is in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church, allows married men to become priests.

It is common for a family to keep the Khoury surname for generations past the life of the priest. Catholic and Orthodox clergy (particularly Maronite Catholic, Greek Orthodox, Melkite Catholic and Syriac Orthodox) are the largest numbers of people with this name; all four rites having a married priesthood according to Catholic and Orthodox norms. Khoury/Khouri is uncommon as a given name. In the Eastern Christian Churches, "Khoury" or "El-Khoury" means Corepiscopos, which is an honorary rank above a priest.

Discover more about Khouri related topics

Greek language

Greek language

Greek is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece, Cyprus, southern Italy, southern Albania, and other regions of the Balkans, the Black Sea coast, Asia Minor, and the Eastern Mediterranean. It has the longest documented history of any Indo-European language, spanning at least 3,400 years of written records. Its writing system is the Greek alphabet, which has been used for approximately 2,800 years; previously, Greek was recorded in writing systems such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin, Cyrillic, Armenian, Coptic, Gothic, and many other writing systems.

Levant

Levant

The Levant is an approximate historical geographical term referring to a large area in the Eastern Mediterranean region of Western Asia. In its narrowest sense, which is in use today in archaeology and other cultural contexts, it is equivalent to a stretch of land bordering the Mediterranean in southwestern Asia, i.e. the historical region of Syria, which includes present-day Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria and most of Turkey southwest of the middle Euphrates. Its overwhelming characteristic is that it represents the land bridge between Africa and Eurasia. In its widest historical sense, the Levant included all of the Eastern Mediterranean with its islands; that is, it included all of the countries along the Eastern Mediterranean shores, extending from Greece to Cyrenaica in eastern Libya.

Latin

Latin

Latin is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. Latin was originally a dialect spoken in the lower Tiber area around present-day Rome, but through the power of the Roman Republic it became the dominant language in the Italian region and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Even after the fall of Western Rome, Latin remained the common language of international communication, science, scholarship and academia in Europe until well into the 18th century, when other regional vernaculars supplanted it in common academic and political usage, and it eventually became a dead language in the modern linguistic definition.

Curia

Curia

Curia in ancient Rome referred to one of the original groupings of the citizenry, eventually numbering 30, and later every Roman citizen was presumed to belong to one. While they originally likely had wider powers, they came to meet for only a few purposes by the end of the Republic: to confirm the election of magistrates with imperium, to witness the installation of priests, the making of wills, and to carry out certain adoptions.

Lebanon

Lebanon

Lebanon, officially the Republic of Lebanon or the Lebanese Republic, is a country in Western Asia. It is located between Syria to the north and east and Israel to the south, while Cyprus lies to its west across the Mediterranean Sea; its location at the crossroads of the Mediterranean Basin and the Arabian hinterland has contributed to its rich history and shaped a cultural identity of religious diversity. It is part of the Levant region of the Middle East. Lebanon is home to roughly five million people and covers an area of 10,452 square kilometres (4,036 sq mi), making it the second smallest country in continental Asia. The official language of the state is Arabic, while French is also formally recognized; Lebanese Arabic is used alongside Modern Standard Arabic throughout the country.

Lebanese diaspora

Lebanese diaspora

Lebanese diaspora refers to Lebanese migrants and their descendants who emigrated from Lebanon and now reside in other countries. There are more Lebanese living outside Lebanon, than within the country. The diaspora population consists of Christians, Muslims, Druze, and Jewish. The Christians trace their origin to several waves of emigration, starting with the exodus that followed the 1860 Lebanon conflict in Ottoman empire.

Coury

Coury

Coury is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:Al Coury (1934–2013), vice-president of American record label Capitol Records Dick Coury (1929–2020), American football coach Fred Coury, American musician Gabriel Coury (1896–1956), British Army officer and Victoria Cross recipient Steve Coury, American football player and coach Tino Coury, American singer, songwriter, producer Mike Courey (1959–2007), American football player

Coorey

Coorey

Coorey is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:C.A. Coorey (1921–2004), Sri Lankan civil servant Matthew Coorey, Australian conductor Michael Coorey, rugby player Phil Coorey, Australian journalist

Israel

Israel

Israel, officially the State of Israel, is a country in Western Asia. Situated between the Eastern Mediterranean and the Red Sea, it is bordered by Lebanon to the north, by Syria to the northeast, by Jordan to the east, by Egypt to the southwest, and by the Palestinian territories — the West Bank along the east and the Gaza Strip along the southwest — with which it shares legal boundaries. Tel Aviv is the economic and technological center of the country, while its seat of government is in its proclaimed capital of Jerusalem, although Israeli sovereignty over East Jerusalem is unrecognized internationally.

Jordan

Jordan

Jordan, officially the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, is a country in Western Asia. It is situated at the crossroads of Asia, Africa, and Europe, within the Levant region, on the East Bank of the Jordan River. Jordan is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the south and east, Iraq to the northeast, Syria to the north, and the Palestinian West Bank, Israel, and the Dead Sea to the west. It has a 26 km (16 mi) coastline in its southwest on the Gulf of Aqaba's Red Sea, which separates Jordan from Egypt. Amman is Jordan's capital and largest city, as well as its economic, political, and cultural centre.

Given name

Given name

A given name is the part of a personal name that identifies a person, potentially with a middle name as well, and differentiates that person from the other members of a group who have a common surname. The term given name refers to a name usually bestowed at or close to the time of birth, usually by the parents of the newborn. A Christian name is the first name which is given at baptism, in Christian custom.

Chorbishop

Chorbishop

A chorbishop is a rank of Christian clergy below bishop. The name chorepiscope or chorepiscopus is taken from the Greek χωρεπίσκοπος and means "rural bishop".

People

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Amin Khoury

Amin Khoury

Amin J. Khoury is an American businessman who has founded and developed companies in the scientific instrument, medical services, medical devices and semiconductor process equipment businesses. He co-founded B/E Aerospace, an S&P 400 and NASDAQ listed manufacturer of aircraft passenger cabin interior products for the commercial and business jet aircraft markets that employs approximately 9,600 people.

Callie Khouri

Callie Khouri

Carolyn Ann "Callie" Khouri is an American film and television screenwriter, producer, and director. She is best known for writing Thelma & Louise , which won the Academy Award for Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen and a Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay for the film. Thelma & Louise has become a classic, and was inducted into the Library of Congress National Film Registry in December 2016.

Ana Khouri

Ana Khouri

Ana Khouri is a New York-based jewellery designer.

Carlos Cure

Carlos Cure

Carlos Cure Cure is the Ambassador of Colombia to Venezuela. A civil engineer, Cure has also served as chair of Bavaria, S.A., the biggest brewery of Colombia and second largest in South America before its merger, and Avianca, S.A., the national flag carrier of Colombia.

Al Coury

Al Coury

Albert Eli Coury was an American music record executive and producer who was vice-president of Capitol Records, co-founder of RSO Records, founder of Network Records and general manager of Geffen Records.

Commonwealth of Nations

Commonwealth of Nations

The Commonwealth of Nations, simply referred to as the Commonwealth, is a political association of 56 member states, the vast majority of which are former territories of the British Empire. The chief institutions of the organisation are the Commonwealth Secretariat, which focuses on intergovernmental aspects, and the Commonwealth Foundation, which focuses on non-governmental relations among member states. Numerous organisations are associated with and operate within the Commonwealth.

Augusto Cury

Augusto Cury

Augusto Cury is a Brazilian physician, psychiatrist, psychotherapist and writer. He developed the Multifocal Theory, about the functioning of the mind and the construction process of thought. His books have sold over 30 million copies in his country and is Brazil's most read author.

Andrée Chedid

Andrée Chedid

Andrée Chedid, born Andrée Saab Khoury, was an Egyptian-French poet and novelist of Syrian/Lebanese descent. She is the recipient of numerous literary awards and was made a Grand Officer of the French Legion of Honour in 2009.

EarthCam

EarthCam

EarthCam, Inc., based in Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, United States, provides webcam content, technology and services. Founded in 1996, EarthCam.com is a network of scenic webcams offering a complete searchable database of views of places around the world.

Clara Khoury

Clara Khoury

Clara Khoury is an Israeli Arab actress. She works in film, television and theater.

Elias James Corey

Elias James Corey

Elias James Corey is an American organic chemist. In 1990, he won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his development of the theory and methodology of organic synthesis", specifically retrosynthetic analysis. Regarded by many as one of the greatest living chemists, he has developed numerous synthetic reagents, methodologies and total syntheses and has advanced the science of organic synthesis considerably.

Elias Khoury

Elias Khoury

Elias Khoury is a Lebanese novelist and public intellectual. His novels and literary criticism have been translated into several languages. In 2000, he won the Prize of Palestine for his book Gate of the Sun, and he won the Al Owais Award for fiction writing in 2007. Khoury has also written three plays and two screenplays.

Source: "Khouri", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khouri.

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References
  1. ^ Gale, Thomson. "Priesthood: An overview". Encyclopedia of Religion.

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