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Kenaston, Saskatchewan

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Kenaston
Village of Kenaston
Kenaston's Business District (2008)
Kenaston's Business District (2008)
Motto(s): 
Heritage, Spirit, Vision
Kenaston is located in Saskatchewan
Kenaston
Kenaston
Location of Kenaston in Saskatchewan
Kenaston is located in Canada
Kenaston
Kenaston
Kenaston (Canada)
Coordinates: 51°30′N 106°17′W / 51.500°N 106.283°W / 51.500; -106.283
Country Canada
Provinces and territories of Canada Saskatchewan
Census division11
Rural MunicipalityMcCraney No. 282
Settled1902
Bonnington, NWT Post Office FoundedOctober 1, 1904
Kenaston, SK Post office FoundedJanuary 1, 1906
Government
 • TypeMunicipal
 • Governing bodyKenaston Village Council
 • MayorDallas Lowdermilk
 • AdministratorCarman Fowler
Area
 • Land1.17 km2 (0.45 sq mi)
Population
 (2016)
 • Total282
 • Density240.9/km2 (624/sq mi)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-6 (CST)
Postal code
S0G 2N0
Highways Hwy 11 / Hwy 15
RailwaysCanadian National Railway
Last Mountain Railway
WebsiteOfficial website
[1][2][3][4]

Kenaston (2016 population: 282) is a village in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan within the Rural Municipality of McCraney No. 282 and Census Division No. 11. Kenaston is located on Highway 11 (Louis Riel Trail) at the junction of Highway 15 and is also near Highway 19. This is a scenic area of Saskatchewan situated within the rolling Allan Hills. Kenaston is located between Danielson Provincial Park and Blackstrap Provincial Park.

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Village

Village

A village is a clustered human settlement or community, larger than a hamlet but smaller than a town, with a population typically ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand. Though villages are often located in rural areas, the term urban village is also applied to certain urban neighborhoods. Villages are normally permanent, with fixed dwellings; however, transient villages can occur. Further, the dwellings of a village are fairly close to one another, not scattered broadly over the landscape, as a dispersed settlement.

Provinces and territories of Canada

Provinces and territories of Canada

Within the geographical areas of Canada, the ten provinces and three territories are sub-national administrative divisions under the jurisdiction of the Canadian Constitution. In the 1867 Canadian Confederation, three provinces of British North America—New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Province of Canada —united to form a federation, becoming a fully independent country over the next century. Over its history, Canada's international borders have changed several times as it has added territories and provinces, making it the world's second-largest country by area.

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan is a province in western Canada, bordered on the west by Alberta, on the north by the Northwest Territories, on the east by Manitoba, to the northeast by Nunavut, and on the south by the U.S. states of Montana and North Dakota. Saskatchewan and Alberta are the only landlocked provinces of Canada. In 2022, Saskatchewan's population was estimated at 1,194,803. Nearly 10% of Saskatchewan’s total area of 651,900 square kilometres (251,700 sq mi) is fresh water, mostly rivers, reservoirs and lakes.

Rural Municipality of McCraney No. 282

Rural Municipality of McCraney No. 282

The Rural Municipality of McCraney No. 282 is a rural municipality (RM) in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan within Census Division No. 11 and SARM Division No. 5. It is located in the south-central portion of the province.

Division No. 11, Saskatchewan

Division No. 11, Saskatchewan

Division No. 11 is one of eighteen census divisions in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the central part of the province and includes the largest city in the province, Saskatoon.

Saskatchewan Highway 11

Saskatchewan Highway 11

Highway 11 is a major north-south highway in Saskatchewan, Canada that connects the province's three largest cities: Regina, Saskatoon and Prince Albert. It is a structural pavement major arterial highway which is approximately 391 kilometres (243 mi) long. It is also known as the Louis Riel Trail (LRT) after the 19th century Métis leader. It runs from Highway 1 in Regina until Highway 2 south of Prince Albert. Historically the southern portion between Regina and Saskatoon was Provincial Highway 11, and followed the Dominion Survey lines on the square, and the northern portion between Saskatoon and Prince Albert was Provincial Highway 12.

Saskatchewan Highway 15

Saskatchewan Highway 15

Highway 15 is a highway in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. It runs from Highway 4, five kilometres (3 mi) south of Rosetown, to Highway 16, four kilometres (2 mi) southeast of Bredenbury. Highway 15 is about 450 km (280 mi) long. The Outlook Bridge carries Highway 15 across the South Saskatchewan River.

Saskatchewan Highway 19

Saskatchewan Highway 19

Highway 19 is a highway in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan connecting Highway 15 northern extremity near Hawarden to Highway 18 at the southern extremity near Mankota. Highway 19 passes through major communities of Elbow, and Central Butte all in the south west section of Saskatchewan; it is about 269 km (167 mi) long.

Danielson Provincial Park

Danielson Provincial Park

Danielson Provincial Park is located at the northern end of Lake Diefenbaker in the southern part of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. The park surrounds the Gardiner Dam, which was built in 1967 and is among the largest embankment dams in Canada and the world. The South Saskatchewan River flows north beyond the park, towards Outlook and Saskatoon. Saskatchewan Highways 44, 45, and 219 provide access to the park. SaskPower's Coteau Creek Hydroelectric Station is located near the park.

Blackstrap Provincial Park

Blackstrap Provincial Park

Blackstrap Provincial Park is a provincial park in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan in the RM of Dundurn. Prior to the park's establishment in 1986, it was a provincial recreation site. The park runs along the eastern shore of Blackstrap Lake and consists of a conservation area, campground, beaches, Mount Blackstrap, cross country ski trails, biking and hiking trails, and several picnicking areas. It is located at LSD 32-3 W3, east of Dundurn and accessed via Highway 211. Mount Blackstrap is a man-made mountain built as a ski hill for the 1971 Canada Winter Games. It continued to operated as a ski hill until 2007.

History

First known as Bonnington Springs in the District of Assiniboia in the Northwest Territories, the settlement was usually referred to as "Bonnington". In late 1905, when Saskatchewan became a province, the name was changed to "Kenaston", honouring F.E. Kenaston, who was the Vice President of the Saskatchewan Valley Land Company.[5][6] The railroad reached Bonnington in late 1889, but there is no record of any permanent residents until 1902. In that year the Saskatchewan Valley Land Company was formed made up of wealthy men from the United States.[7] The president was Colonel Andrew Duncan Davidson[8] and F. E. Kenaston was vice-president.

The Saskatchewan Valley Land Company purchased 839,000 acres (3,400 km2) of land from the railway for $1.53 an acre and another 250,000 acres (1,000 km2) from the Dominion Government for $1.00 an acre. By adopting spectacular methods of advertising and employing dozens of land agents, the wide open spaces between Regina and Saskatoon were peopled with hundreds of settlers in the time between 1902 and 1910.

Needs of settlers created a necessity for business places and the settlement grew. Kenaston incorporated as a village on July 18, 1910.[9] The Kenaston School opened its doors to its first fourteen pupils in August 1905, while the town was still officially known as Bonnington. The first store was built in 1903, the post office and hotel were established in 1904, the first telephone installed in 1909, and the first of Kenaston's grain elevator was built in 1906 by the Canadian Elevator Company. In 1910, the 40,000 gallon water tower was built by CNR in proximity to the train station and just across from the first hotel.

Demographics

Population history
(1981–2016)
YearPop.±%
1981345—    
1986359+4.1%
1991309−13.9%
1996323+4.5%
2001282−12.7%
2006259−8.2%
2011285+10.0%
2016282−1.1%
Source: Statistics Canada via Saskatchewan Bureau of Statistics[10][11]

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Kenaston had a population of 292 living in 130 of its 153 total private dwellings, a change of 3.5% from its 2016 population of 282. With a land area of 1.14 km2 (0.44 sq mi), it had a population density of 256.1/km2 (663.4/sq mi) in 2021.[12]

In the 2016 Census of Population, the Village of Kenaston recorded a population of 282 living in 126 of its 131 total private dwellings, a -1.1% change from its 2011 population of 285. With a land area of 1.17 km2 (0.45 sq mi), it had a population density of 241.0/km2 (624.3/sq mi) in 2016.[13]

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Attractions

Kenaston hosts a sporting facility named Kenaston Place which brings to the village the event Super Draft. Kenaston Snowman Park is near the historic water tower restoration. Kenaston's large roadside attraction is a Snowman which is 18 Feet (5.5 Metres) in height and honours the nickname of Kenaston being the Blizzard capital of Saskatchewan. Bonnington Springs is the name of the campground at Kenaston. Kenaston Recreation Site is a conservation area near Kenaston at 17-29-2-W3.[14][15][16]

Education

Kenaston is part of the Sun West School Division. It's also Home to the Distance Learning Center which provides education to the province through online studies.

Media

Transportation

Canadian National Railway currently serves Kenaston; however the line terminates at Davidson where the Last Mountain Railway (Craik subdivision) begins and takes over the remainder of the line.[17][18]

Notable people

J. Powells Farm, Kenaston, SK (1907)
J. Powells Farm, Kenaston, SK (1907)
Grain elevators
Grain elevators

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Source: "Kenaston, Saskatchewan", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenaston,_Saskatchewan.

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References
  1. ^ National Archives, Archivia Net, Post Offices and Postmasters, archived from the original on October 6, 2006, retrieved May 26, 2007
  2. ^ Government of Saskatchewan, MRD Home, Municipal Directory System (village of Kenaston), archived from the original on January 15, 2016, retrieved September 24, 2013
  3. ^ Canadian Textiles Institute. (2005), CTI Determine your provincial constituency, archived from the original on September 11, 2007, retrieved May 26, 2007
  4. ^ Commissioner of Canada Elections, Chief Electoral Officer of Canada (2005), Elections Canada On-line, archived from the original on April 21, 2007, retrieved April 24, 2007
  5. ^ Kenaston History Committee (1980), Kith 'n kin : the history of Kenaston and district, Altona, Manitoba: Friesen Printers, ISBN 0-88925-085-5, 066533950X
  6. ^ "Kenaston, Saskatchewan". Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Center, University of Regina. 2006. Retrieved September 23, 2013.
  7. ^ "Peel's Prairie Provinces (Saskatchewan Valley Land Co.)". c. 1906. Retrieved September 23, 2013.
  8. ^ "The Canadian Encyclopedia (DAVIDSON, ANDREW DUNCAN)". 1911–1920. Retrieved September 23, 2013.
  9. ^ "Urban Municipality Incorporations". Saskatchewan Ministry of Government Relations. Archived from the original on October 15, 2014. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  10. ^ "Saskatchewan Census Population" (PDF). Saskatchewan Bureau of Statistics. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 24, 2015. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  11. ^ "Saskatchewan Census Population". Saskatchewan Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  12. ^ "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, census divisions and census subdivisions (municipalities), Saskatchewan". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved April 1, 2022.
  13. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Saskatchewan)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  14. ^ Kenaston Recreation Site, archived from the original on June 8, 2011, retrieved May 27, 2007
  15. ^ LARGE CANADIAN ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS, Snowman, Kenaston, archived from the original on June 9, 2007, retrieved May 27, 2007
  16. ^ BIG THINGS IN SASKATCHEWAN, Village of Kenaston, retrieved May 27, 2007
  17. ^ Gov't Rail Map 2010
  18. ^ Canadian Maps: January 1925 Waghorn's Guide. Post Offices in Man. Sask. Alta. and West Ontario.
  19. ^ "Lynne Yelich - MP Blackstrap - Election 2008". Archived from the original on October 4, 2008. Retrieved July 11, 2022.
External links

Coordinates: 51°30′N 106°17′W / 51.500°N 106.283°W / 51.500; -106.283 (Kenaston, Saskatchewan)

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