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Kang and Kodos

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Kang and Kodos Johnson
The Simpsons characters
THOH Kang and Kodos.png
First appearance
Created by
Designed byMatt Groening
Voiced by
In-universe information
Full name
  • Kang Johnson
  • Kodos Johnson
SpeciesRigellians
GenderFemale[1][a]
TitleKang the Conqueror
Kodos the Conqueror
OccupationPlotting galactic conquest and trying to understand human culture
Significant otherSelma Bouvier (Kang)
Patricia "Patty" Bouvier (Kodos)

Kang and Kodos Johnson[1] are a duo of fictional recurring characters in the animated television series The Simpsons. Kang is voiced by Harry Shearer and Kodos by Dan Castellaneta. They are green, perpetually drooling, octopus-like aliens from the fictional planet Rigel VII and appear almost exclusively in the "Treehouse of Horror" episodes. The duo has appeared in at least one segment of all thirty-three Treehouse of Horror episodes. Sometimes, their appearance is the focus of a plot. Other times, it is a brief cameo. Kang and Kodos are often bent on the conquest of Earth and are usually seen working on sinister plans to invade and subjugate humanity.

The duo first appeared in season two's "Treehouse of Horror". The first drawing of Kang and Kodos came from writers Jay Kogen and Wallace Wolodarsky. The finished design was based on an EC Comics issue cover. Kang and Kodos had brief cameo appearances in several non-"Treehouse of Horror" episodes and have appeared as villains in several of The Simpsons video games.

Discover more about Kang and Kodos related topics

Character (arts)

Character (arts)

In fiction, a character is a human or other entity in a narrative. The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made. Derived from the Ancient Greek word χαρακτήρ, the English word dates from the Restoration, although it became widely used after its appearance in Tom Jones by Henry Fielding in 1749. From this, the sense of "a part played by an actor" developed. Character, particularly when enacted by an actor in the theatre or cinema, involves "the illusion of being a human person". In literature, characters guide readers through their stories, helping them to understand plots and ponder themes. Since the end of the 18th century, the phrase "in character" has been used to describe an effective impersonation by an actor. Since the 19th century, the art of creating characters, as practiced by actors or writers, has been called characterisation.

The Simpsons

The Simpsons

The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series is a satirical depiction of American life, epitomized by the Simpson family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture and society, television, and the human condition.

Harry Shearer

Harry Shearer

Harry Julius Shearer is an American actor, comedian, writer, musician, radio host, director and producer. Born in Los Angeles, California, Shearer began his career as a child actor. From 1969 to 1976, Shearer was a member of The Credibility Gap, a radio comedy group. Following the breakup of the group, Shearer co-wrote the film Real Life (1979) with Albert Brooks and worked as a writer on Martin Mull's television series Fernwood 2 Night.

Dan Castellaneta

Dan Castellaneta

Daniel Louis Castellaneta is an American actor. He is best known for voicing Homer Simpson on the animated series The Simpsons. Castellaneta is also known for voicing Grandpa in Nickelodeon's Hey Arnold!, and has had voice roles in several other programs, including Futurama, Sibs and Darkwing Duck, The Adventures of Dynamo Duck, The Batman, Back to the Future: The Animated Series, Aladdin, Earthworm Jim, and Taz-Mania.

Octopus

Octopus

An octopus is a soft-bodied, eight-limbed mollusc of the order Octopoda. The order consists of some 300 species and is grouped within the class Cephalopoda with squids, cuttlefish, and nautiloids. Like other cephalopods, an octopus is bilaterally symmetric with two eyes and a beaked mouth at the center point of the eight limbs. The soft body can radically alter its shape, enabling octopuses to squeeze through small gaps. They trail their eight appendages behind them as they swim. The siphon is used both for respiration and for locomotion, by expelling a jet of water. Octopuses have a complex nervous system and excellent sight, and are among the most intelligent and behaviourally diverse of all invertebrates.

Extraterrestrial life

Extraterrestrial life

Extraterrestrial life, colloquially referred to as alien life, is life that may occur outside of Earth and which did not originate on Earth. No extraterrestrial life has yet been conclusively detected, although efforts are underway. Such life might range from simple forms like prokaryotes to intelligent beings, possibly bringing forth civilizations that might be far more advanced than humankind. The Drake equation speculates about the existence of sapient life elsewhere in the universe. The science of extraterrestrial life is known as astrobiology.

Treehouse of Horror

Treehouse of Horror

Treehouse of Horror is an annual series of special Halloween-themed episodes of the animated sitcom The Simpsons, with 33 anthology episodes between 1990 and 2022. Also known as The Simpsons Halloween Specials, each episode typically consists of three separate, self-contained segments. Each segment involves the Simpson family in some comical horror, science fiction, or supernatural setting; plot elements operate beyond the show's normal continuity, with segments exaggeratedly more morbid and violent than a typical Simpsons episode.

The Simpsons (season 2)

The Simpsons (season 2)

The second season of the animated television series The Simpsons originally aired on the Fox network between October 11, 1990, and July 11, 1991, and contained 22 episodes, beginning with "Bart Gets an "F". Another episode, "Blood Feud", aired during the summer after the official season finale. The executive producers for the second production season were Matt Groening, James L. Brooks, and Sam Simon, who had also been EPs for the previous season. It was produced by Gracie Films and 20th Century Fox Television. The DVD box set was released on August 6, 2002, in Region 1, July 8, 2002 in Region 2 and in September 2002 in Region 4. The episode "Homer vs. Lisa and the 8th Commandment" won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Animated Program, and was also nominated in the "Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special" category.

Treehouse of Horror (The Simpsons episode)

Treehouse of Horror (The Simpsons episode)

"Treehouse of Horror" is the third episode of the second season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 25, 1990. The episode was inspired by 1950s horror comics, and begins with a disclaimer that it may be too scary for children. It is the first Treehouse of Horror episode. These episodes do not obey the show's rule of realism and are not treated as canon. The opening disclaimer and a panning shot through a cemetery with humorous tombstones were features that were used sporadically in the Treehouse of Horror series and eventually dropped. This is also the first episode to have the music composed by Alf Clausen.

Jay Kogen

Jay Kogen

Jay Kogen is an American comedy writer, producer, actor and director.

Wallace Wolodarsky

Wallace Wolodarsky

Wallace Wolodarsky, also billed as Wally Wolodarsky, is an American actor, screenwriter, television producer, and film director known for being one of the writers for The Simpsons during the first four seasons with his writing partner Jay Kogen.

EC Comics

EC Comics

Entertaining Comics, more commonly known as EC Comics, was an American publisher of comic books, which specialized in horror fiction, crime fiction, satire, military fiction, dark fantasy, and science fiction from the 1940s through the mid-1950s, notably the Tales from the Crypt series. Initially, EC was owned by Maxwell Gaines and specialized in educational and child-oriented stories. After Max Gaines' death in a boating accident in 1947, his son William Gaines took over the company and began to print more mature stories, delving into genres of horror, war, fantasy, science-fiction, adventure, and others. Noted for their high quality and shock endings, these stories were also unique in their socially conscious, progressive themes that anticipated the Civil Rights Movement and dawn of 1960s counterculture. In 1954–55, censorship pressures prompted it to concentrate on the humor magazine Mad, leading to the company's greatest and most enduring success. Consequently, by 1956, the company ceased publishing all of its comic lines except Mad.

Role in The Simpsons

Speaking "Rigellian", which coincidentally sounds exactly like English, Kang and Kodos are Rigellians from the planet Rigel VII. Virtually identical in appearance, wearing breathing helmets, one of the few distinguishing characteristics is the duo's voices as Kang's is deeper. In most appearances they are antagonistic towards humanity. One exception is Kang and Kodos's first appearance in segment "Hungry are the Damned" of the episode "Treehouse of Horror", where they capture the Simpson family and feed them exquisite cuisine.[2] Lisa becomes suspicious of their intentions and accuses Kang and Kodos of wanting to eat the Simpson family. Kang and Kodos deny this accusation and are outraged. Afterwards both take the Simpsons back to Earth.[2]

Kang and Kodos have invaded the Earth on several occasions, with varying results. In 1996, Kang and Kodos impersonated Bill Clinton and Bob Dole and ran against each other in the 1996 election. At first, Americans declared they would vote for a third party candidate, but Kang convinced them that that option would be a waste of a vote. As a result, Kang was elected president.[3] In their second appearance, they decided to take over the Earth after citizens had declared world peace, but ultimately failed.[4] Kang and Kodos's religion is "Quantum Presbyterianism",[5] although Kodos later claims to be Jewish.[6] Other Rigellians that have appeared include Serak the Preparer, who was voiced by James Earl Jones and only appeared in "Treehouse of Horror".[2]

Kang and Kodos have appeared in every "Treehouse of Horror" episode to date, and have played major roles in "Treehouse of Horror I",[2] "Treehouse of Horror II",[4] "Treehouse of Horror VII", "Treehouse of Horror IX", "Treehouse of Horror XVII",[7] "Treehouse of Horror XVIII".[6] " Treehouse of Horror XXII, and "Treehouse of Horror XXX". The rest of their appearances were cameos, although both appeared in the opening segment of "Treehouse of Horror X",[8] "Treehouse of Horror XIV",[9] "Treehouse of Horror XV"[10] and "Treehouse of Horror XVI".[11] In Treehouse of Horror XXXI, Kang and Kodos appeared in flashback segments at the end of the episode and as candidates on a voting ballot. Kang and Kodos's cameo appearances normally occur in the midst of segments, which will suddenly cut away to the duo. For example, Kang and Kodos observe zombies attacking Earth from space. The duo laugh maniacally at the Earthlings' suffering, before the scene is switched back from space to Earth.[12] Kang and Kodos have made rare appearances in non-"Treehouse of Horror" episodes, such as "Behind the Laughter"[13] and "Gump Roast",[5] and had a non-speaking cameo in "The Springfield Files" on a line-up with other aliens.[14]

Discover more about Role in The Simpsons related topics

Treehouse of Horror (The Simpsons episode)

Treehouse of Horror (The Simpsons episode)

"Treehouse of Horror" is the third episode of the second season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 25, 1990. The episode was inspired by 1950s horror comics, and begins with a disclaimer that it may be too scary for children. It is the first Treehouse of Horror episode. These episodes do not obey the show's rule of realism and are not treated as canon. The opening disclaimer and a panning shot through a cemetery with humorous tombstones were features that were used sporadically in the Treehouse of Horror series and eventually dropped. This is also the first episode to have the music composed by Alf Clausen.

Simpson family

Simpson family

The Simpson family are the fictional characters featured in the animated television series The Simpsons. The Simpsons are a nuclear family consisting of married couple Homer and Marge and their three children, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. They live at 742 Evergreen Terrace in the fictional town of Springfield, United States, and they were created by cartoonist Matt Groening, who conceived the characters after his own family members, substituting "Bart" for his own name. The family debuted on Fox on April 19, 1987, in The Tracey Ullman Show short "Good Night" and were later spun off into their own series, which debuted on Fox in the U.S. on December 17, 1989.

Lisa Simpson

Lisa Simpson

Lisa Marie Simpson is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons. She is the middle child and most accomplished of the Simpson family. Voiced by Yeardley Smith, Lisa was born as a character in The Tracey Ullman Show short "Good Night" on April 19, 1987. Cartoonist Matt Groening created and designed her while waiting to meet James L. Brooks. Groening had been invited to pitch a series of shorts based on his comic Life in Hell, but instead decided to create a new set of characters. He named the older Simpson daughter after his younger sister Lisa Groening Bartlett. After appearing on The Tracey Ullman Show for three years, the Simpson family were moved to their own series on Fox, which debuted on December 17, 1989.

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton

William Jefferson Clinton is an American retired politician who served as the 42nd president of the United States from 1993 to 2001. He previously served as governor of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981 and again from 1983 to 1992, and as attorney general of Arkansas from 1977 to 1979. A member of the Democratic Party, Clinton became known as a New Democrat, as many of his policies reflected a centrist "Third Way" political philosophy. He is the husband of Hillary Clinton, who was a U.S. senator from New York from 2001 to 2009, secretary of state from 2009 to 2013 and the Democratic nominee for president in the 2016 presidential election.

Bob Dole

Bob Dole

Robert Joseph Dole was an American politician and attorney who represented Kansas in the United States Senate from 1969 to 1996. He was the Republican Leader of the Senate during the final 11 years of his tenure, including three non-consecutive years as Senate Majority Leader. Prior to his 27 years in the Senate, he served in the United States House of Representatives from 1961 to 1969. Dole was also the Republican presidential nominee in the 1996 election and the vice presidential nominee in the 1976 election.

Presbyterianism

Presbyterianism

Presbyterianism is a part of the Reformed tradition within Protestantism that broke from the Roman Catholic Church. Presbyterian churches derive their name from the presbyterian form of church government by representative assemblies of elders. Many Reformed churches are organised this way, but the word Presbyterian, when capitalized, is often applied to churches that trace their roots to the Church of Scotland or to English Dissenter groups that formed during the English Civil War.

James Earl Jones

James Earl Jones

James Earl Jones is an American actor. He has been described as "one of America's most distinguished and versatile" actors for his performances in film, television, and theater, and "one of the greatest actors in American history". With a career spanning seven decades, Jones is among the few performers awarded an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony (EGOT). Jones's voice has been praised as a "a stirring basso profondo that has lent gravel and gravitas" to his projects, including live-action acting, voice acting, and commercial voice-overs.

Treehouse of Horror II

Treehouse of Horror II

"Treehouse of Horror II" is the seventh episode of the third season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 31, 1991. It is the second annual Treehouse of Horror episode, consisting of three self-contained segments, told as dreams of Lisa, Bart and Homer and is the only Treehouse of Horror episode to date where each segment name is not stated inside the episode. In the first segment, which was inspired by W. W. Jacobs's short story The Monkey's Paw and The New Twilight Zone episode "A Small Talent for War", Homer buys a Monkey's Paw that has the power to grant wishes, although all the wishes backfire. In the second part, which parodies the Twilight Zone episode "It's a Good Life", Bart is omnipotent, and turns Homer into a jack-in-the-box, resulting in the two spending more time together. In the final segment, Mr. Burns attempts to use Homer's brain to power a giant robotic laborer.

Treehouse of Horror VII

Treehouse of Horror VII

"Treehouse of Horror VII" is the first episode of the eighth season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 27, 1996. In the seventh annual Treehouse of Horror episode, Bart discovers his long-lost twin, Lisa grows a colony of small beings, and Kang and Kodos impersonate Bill Clinton and Bob Dole in order to win the 1996 presidential election. It was written by Ken Keeler, Dan Greaney, and David X. Cohen, and directed by Mike B. Anderson. Phil Hartman provided the voice of Bill Clinton. This is the first Treehouse of Horror episode to be a season premiere.

Treehouse of Horror IX

Treehouse of Horror IX

"Treehouse of Horror IX" is the fourth episode of the tenth season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 25, 1998. This is the ninth Treehouse of Horror episode, and, like the other "Treehouse of Horror" episodes, contains three self-contained segments: In "Hell Toupée", Homer gets a hair transplant and is possessed by the spirit of an executed criminal; in "Terror of Tiny Toon", Bart and Lisa are trapped in a special, extremely violent episode of The Itchy & Scratchy Show; and in "Starship Poopers", Marge reveals that Maggie is the product of a one-night stand with the alien Kang.

Treehouse of Horror XVII

Treehouse of Horror XVII

"Treehouse of Horror XVII" is the fourth episode of the eighteenth season of the American animated television series The Simpsons, and the seventeenth Treehouse of Horror episode. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on November 5, 2006. In "Married to the Blob", Homer eats green extraterrestrial slime and morphs into a rampaging blob with an insatiable appetite; in "You Gotta Know When to Golem", Bart uses Krusty's golem to wreak havoc on his tormentors; and in "The Day the Earth Looked Stupid", the residents of a late-1930s Springfield refuse to believe news of an actual alien invasion after being duped by Orson Welles's The War of the Worlds radio broadcast.

Treehouse of Horror X

Treehouse of Horror X

"Treehouse of Horror X" is the fourth episode of the eleventh season of the American animated television series The Simpsons, and the tenth annual Treehouse of Horror episode, consisting of three self-contained segments. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on Halloween 1999. In "I Know What You Diddily-Iddily-Did", the Simpsons cover up a murder and are haunted by an unseen witness. In "Desperately Xeeking Xena", Lisa and Bart gain superpowers and must rescue Xena star Lucy Lawless from the Comic Book Guy's alter ego The Collector, and in "Life's a Glitch, Then You Die", Homer causes worldwide destruction thanks to the Y2K bug.

Characters

Creation

Harry Shearer, the voice of Kang
Harry Shearer, the voice of Kang
Dan Castellaneta, the voice of Kodos
Dan Castellaneta, the voice of Kodos

Kang and Kodos first appeared in the second season in "Treehouse of Horror". The idea of Kang and Kodos came from Jay Kogen and Wallace Wolodarsky, writers of "Hungry are the Damned".[15] In the script, Kang and Kodos were shown as "an octopus in a space helmet with a trail of goo".[15] The finished design was based on EC Comics cover issue.[16][17] Although originally designed to constantly drool, Matt Groening suggested that they not drool all the time to make the animation process easier. However, the animators did not mind the work, leading to the drooling staying in the script.[18] Kang and Kodos's names are derived from two Star Trek characters. Kang was a Klingon captain portrayed by actor Michael Ansara in "Day of the Dove", whereas Kodos the Executioner was a human villain from "The Conscience of the King".[19] Harry Shearer voices Kang, and Dan Castellaneta voices Kodos.[18] An unofficial rule for the writers is that Kang and Kodos must appear in every Halloween episode.[20] Despite this rule, the writers say the duo will often be forgotten and are only added at the last second, leading to brief appearances.[18]

Development

Traditionally, Kang and Kodos appeared in every single Treehouse of Horror episode as a part of a story's plotline or as cameos. They almost did not make the cut in "Treehouse of Horror VIII", but David X. Cohen managed to persuade the producers to keep the scene.[21] Kang however didn't appear in Treehouse of Horror XXI. Kang and Kodos were originally going to make regular appearances in the show. One idea was only Homer would be able to see them and everyone else thinking Homer is crazy when he talked about the aliens. However the concept was "too far out", leading to characters only featured in the "Treehouse of Horror" specials.[22] In some appearances, Kang and Kodos will laugh hysterically for several seconds. This was suggested by Sam Simon. During production, the episodes would often be too short; so to make more time, their laughter was lengthened.[23]

Kodos' gender has come into debate from fans. In "Treehouse of Horror VII", Kang introduces Kodos with "This is my sister Kodos". The line was pitched by George Meyer[24] and was even somewhat followed in later episodes as the writers tried to make Kang the more dominant of the two.[25] In previous and subsequent episodes, Kodos has been referred to as a male.[6] In The Simpsons: Tapped Out video game, Kodos, but not Kang, is sent on a mission that only female characters are allowed to complete. In the Futurama crossover episode "Simpsorama", Kang and Kodos, referred to as "the Johnsons", visit recurring Futurama characters Lrrr and Ndnd for dinner in the 31st century, and both identify themselves as female. In an interview after the episode aired, producer Al Jean confirmed that Kang and Kodos Johnson are "a gay female couple in their species".[1]

Other appearances

Kang and Kodos have appeared in several different The Simpsons video games. The duo appear in The Simpsons: Road Rage ending, and Kang appears as the final boss character in The Simpsons Wrestling game. Kang and Kodos appear in cut scenes as the main villains in 2003's The Simpsons: Hit & Run. In an attempt to collect new material for their failing reality TV show, Foolish Earthlings, Kang and Kodos plan to drug Springfield with a mind-control serum distributed through their "New and Improved Buzz Cola" product. After drinking the cola, the brainwashed people performed stupid stunts under the watchful view of wasp-like surveillance cameras, all for the sake of better ratings.[26] They also appeared as villains in The Simpsons Game along with an army of other Rigellians, but like Hit & Run, Kang and Kodos only appear in cutscenes. In The Simpsons Tapped Out, Kang was a premium character for 2012 Halloween and Kodos followed in the 2013 Halloween.[27]

In 2001, Kang and Kodos were made into separate action figures in the World of Springfield toy line. Along with their spaceship, Kang and Kodos were included with the "Treehouse of Horror II" set exclusive to Toys-R-Us.[28][29][30] The two also have a brief cameo in The Simpsons Ride.[31] In 2013, a separate ride called Kang & Kodos' Twirl 'n' Hurl was added in the vicinity of The Simpsons Ride in Universal Studios Florida park.[32]

In 2009, Kang and Kodos were also made into 6" collectible vinyl art toys by Kidrobot x The Simpsons. Kang was sculpted salivating and included as an accessory the book How to Cook for Forty Humans. Kodos was the chase figure in the release, and the accessory included was a space gun. Both have been released again by Kidrobot x The Simpsons for The Treehouse of Horrors 3" Blind Box release, along with 10 other characters from the Treehouse series, in September 2013.[33]

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Harry Shearer

Harry Shearer

Harry Julius Shearer is an American actor, comedian, writer, musician, radio host, director and producer. Born in Los Angeles, California, Shearer began his career as a child actor. From 1969 to 1976, Shearer was a member of The Credibility Gap, a radio comedy group. Following the breakup of the group, Shearer co-wrote the film Real Life (1979) with Albert Brooks and worked as a writer on Martin Mull's television series Fernwood 2 Night.

Dan Castellaneta

Dan Castellaneta

Daniel Louis Castellaneta is an American actor. He is best known for voicing Homer Simpson on the animated series The Simpsons. Castellaneta is also known for voicing Grandpa in Nickelodeon's Hey Arnold!, and has had voice roles in several other programs, including Futurama, Sibs and Darkwing Duck, The Adventures of Dynamo Duck, The Batman, Back to the Future: The Animated Series, Aladdin, Earthworm Jim, and Taz-Mania.

Jay Kogen

Jay Kogen

Jay Kogen is an American comedy writer, producer, actor and director.

EC Comics

EC Comics

Entertaining Comics, more commonly known as EC Comics, was an American publisher of comic books, which specialized in horror fiction, crime fiction, satire, military fiction, dark fantasy, and science fiction from the 1940s through the mid-1950s, notably the Tales from the Crypt series. Initially, EC was owned by Maxwell Gaines and specialized in educational and child-oriented stories. After Max Gaines' death in a boating accident in 1947, his son William Gaines took over the company and began to print more mature stories, delving into genres of horror, war, fantasy, science-fiction, adventure, and others. Noted for their high quality and shock endings, these stories were also unique in their socially conscious, progressive themes that anticipated the Civil Rights Movement and dawn of 1960s counterculture. In 1954–55, censorship pressures prompted it to concentrate on the humor magazine Mad, leading to the company's greatest and most enduring success. Consequently, by 1956, the company ceased publishing all of its comic lines except Mad.

Matt Groening

Matt Groening

Matthew Abram Groening is an American cartoonist, writer, producer, and animator. He is the creator of the comic strip Life in Hell (1977–2012) and the television series The Simpsons (1989–present), Futurama, and Disenchantment (2018–present). The Simpsons is the longest-running U.S. primetime-television series in history and the longest-running U.S. animated series and sitcom.

Star Trek: The Original Series

Star Trek: The Original Series

Star Trek is an American science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry that follows the adventures of the starship USS Enterprise (NCC-1701) and its crew. It later acquired the retronym of Star Trek: The Original Series (TOS) to distinguish the show within the media franchise that it began.

Klingon

Klingon

The Klingons are a fictional species in the science fiction franchise Star Trek.

Michael Ansara

Michael Ansara

Michael George Ansara was an American actor. He portrayed Cochise in the television series Broken Arrow, Kane in the 1979–1981 series Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Commander Kang in Star Trek: The Original Series, Deputy U.S. Marshal Sam Buckhart in the NBC series Law of the Plainsman, and provided the voice for Mr. Freeze in Batman: The Animated Series and several of its spin-offs. Ansara received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work in the television industry, located at 6666 Hollywood Boulevard.

Day of the Dove

Day of the Dove

"Day of the Dove" is the seventh episode of the third season of the American science fiction television series Star Trek. Written by Jerome Bixby and directed by Marvin Chomsky, it was first broadcast November 1, 1968.

David X. Cohen

David X. Cohen

David Samuel Cohen, better known as David X. Cohen, is an American television writer. He began working on Beavis and Butt-Head, has written for The Simpsons, and served as the head writer, showrunner and executive producer of Futurama and a producer of Disenchantment.

Homer Simpson

Homer Simpson

Homer Jay Simpson is a fictional character and the main protagonist of the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. He is voiced by Dan Castellaneta and first appeared, along with the rest of his family, in The Tracey Ullman Show short "Good Night" on April 19, 1987. Homer was created and designed by cartoonist Matt Groening while he was waiting in the lobby of producer James L. Brooks's office. Groening had been called to pitch a series of shorts based on his comic strip Life in Hell but instead decided to create a new set of characters. He named the character after his father, Homer Groening. After appearing for three seasons on The Tracey Ullman Show, the Simpson family got their own series on Fox, which debuted December 17, 1989. The show was later acquired by Disney in 2019.

Sam Simon

Sam Simon

Samuel Michael Simon was an American director, producer, writer, animal rights activist and philanthropist, who co-developed the television series The Simpsons.

Reception

Several of the "Treehouse of Horror" episodes featuring the duo have been well received. In 2006, James Earl Jones, voice of Serak the Preparer in "Treehouse of Horror", was named seventh on IGN's "Top 25 Simpsons Guest Appearances" list.[34] Jones also appeared on AOL's list of their favorite 25 Simpsons guest stars.[35] "Treehouse of Horror VII" is Simpsons creator Matt Groening's seventh favorite episode. Groening's favorite line from the episode is from Kodos; "We have reached the limits of what rectal probing can teach us."[36] In 2006, IGN.com published a list of the top ten Treehouse of Horror segments, and several segments that feature Kang and Kodos were placed, including "Hungry Are The Damned", "Citizen Kang" and "Starship Poopers".[37]

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James Earl Jones

James Earl Jones

James Earl Jones is an American actor. He has been described as "one of America's most distinguished and versatile" actors for his performances in film, television, and theater, and "one of the greatest actors in American history". With a career spanning seven decades, Jones is among the few performers awarded an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony (EGOT). Jones's voice has been praised as a "a stirring basso profondo that has lent gravel and gravitas" to his projects, including live-action acting, voice acting, and commercial voice-overs.

Treehouse of Horror (The Simpsons episode)

Treehouse of Horror (The Simpsons episode)

"Treehouse of Horror" is the third episode of the second season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 25, 1990. The episode was inspired by 1950s horror comics, and begins with a disclaimer that it may be too scary for children. It is the first Treehouse of Horror episode. These episodes do not obey the show's rule of realism and are not treated as canon. The opening disclaimer and a panning shot through a cemetery with humorous tombstones were features that were used sporadically in the Treehouse of Horror series and eventually dropped. This is also the first episode to have the music composed by Alf Clausen.

AOL

AOL

AOL is an American web portal and online service provider based in New York City. It is a brand marketed by the current incarnation of Yahoo! Inc.

Treehouse of Horror VII

Treehouse of Horror VII

"Treehouse of Horror VII" is the first episode of the eighth season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 27, 1996. In the seventh annual Treehouse of Horror episode, Bart discovers his long-lost twin, Lisa grows a colony of small beings, and Kang and Kodos impersonate Bill Clinton and Bob Dole in order to win the 1996 presidential election. It was written by Ken Keeler, Dan Greaney, and David X. Cohen, and directed by Mike B. Anderson. Phil Hartman provided the voice of Bill Clinton. This is the first Treehouse of Horror episode to be a season premiere.

IGN

IGN

IGN is an American video game and entertainment media website operated by IGN Entertainment Inc., a subsidiary of Ziff Davis, Inc. The company's headquarters is located in San Francisco's SoMa district and is headed by its former editor-in-chief, Peer Schneider. The IGN website was the brainchild of media entrepreneur Chris Anderson and launched on September 29, 1996. It focuses on games, films, anime, television, comics, technology, and other media. Originally a network of desktop websites, IGN is now also distributed on mobile platforms, console programs on the Xbox and PlayStation, FireTV, Roku, and via YouTube, Twitch, Hulu, and Snapchat.

Treehouse of Horror IX

Treehouse of Horror IX

"Treehouse of Horror IX" is the fourth episode of the tenth season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 25, 1998. This is the ninth Treehouse of Horror episode, and, like the other "Treehouse of Horror" episodes, contains three self-contained segments: In "Hell Toupée", Homer gets a hair transplant and is possessed by the spirit of an executed criminal; in "Terror of Tiny Toon", Bart and Lisa are trapped in a special, extremely violent episode of The Itchy & Scratchy Show; and in "Starship Poopers", Marge reveals that Maggie is the product of a one-night stand with the alien Kang.

Source: "Kang and Kodos", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kang_and_Kodos.

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Notes
  1. ^ Due to the purposly inconsistent nature of the show, the gender of these characters has varied throughout the series.

    Kodos was originally introduced as Kang's sister, but has been referred to as "he" multiple times.

    In 2014, Al Jean, the show's executive producer, stated that the two are "a gay female couple in their species."
References
  1. ^ a b c Snierson, Dan (November 10, 2014). "'Simpsons' producer on the surprising Kang and Kodos revelation, 'death' of Ralph Wiggum". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d Swartzwelder, John; Kogen, Jay; Wolodarsky, Wallace; Simon, Sam; Archer, Wes; Moore, Rich; Silverman, David (October 25, 1990). "Treehouse of Horror". The Simpsons. Season 2. Episode 03. Fox.
  3. ^ Keeler, Ken; Greaney, Dan; Cohen, David S.; Anderson, Mike B. (October 27, 1996). "Treehouse of Horror VII". The Simpsons. Season 08. Episode 01. Fox.
  4. ^ a b Swartzwelder, John; Meyer, George; Reiss, Mike; Jean, Al; Martin, Jeff; Simon, Sam; Reardon, Jim (October 31, 1991). "Treehouse of Horror II". The Simpsons. Season 3. Episode 07. Fox.
  5. ^ a b Lacusta, Deb; Castellaneta, Dan; Kirkland, Mark (April 21, 2002). "Gump Roast". The Simpsons. Season 13. Episode 17. Fox.
  6. ^ a b c Wilmore, Marc; Sheetz, Chuck (November 4, 2007). "Treehouse of Horror XVIII". The Simpsons. Season 19. Episode 05. Fox.
  7. ^ Gaffney, Peter; Silverman, David; Faughnan, Matthew (November 5, 2006). "Treehouse of Horror XVII". The Simpsons. Season 18. Episode 04. Fox.
  8. ^ Cary, Donick; Long, Tim; Hauge, Ron; Michels, Pete (October 31, 1999). "Treehouse of Horror X". The Simpsons. Season 11. Episode 04. Fox.
  9. ^ Swartzwelder, John; Moore, Steven Dean (November 2, 2003). "Treehouse of Horror XIV". The Simpsons. Season 15. Episode 01. Fox.
  10. ^ Odenkirk, Bill; Silverman, David (November 4, 2004). "Treehouse of Horror XV". The Simpsons. Season 16. Episode 01. Fox.
  11. ^ Wilmore, Marc; Silverman, David (November 6, 2005). "Treehouse of Horror XVI". The Simpsons. Season 17. Episode 04. Fox.
  12. ^ Jean, Al; Reiss, Mike; Kogen, Jay; Wolodarsky, Wallace; Simon, Sam and Vitti, Jon (October 29, 1992). "Treehouse of Horror III". The Simpsons. Season 04. Episode 05. Fox.
  13. ^ Long, Tim; Meyer, George; Scully, Mike; Selman, Matt; Kirkland, Mark (May 21, 2000). "Behind the Laughter". The Simpsons. Season 11. Episode 22. Fox.
  14. ^ Harrison, Reis; Moore, Steven Dean (January 12, 1997). "The Springfield Files". The Simpsons. Season 08. Episode 10. Fox.
  15. ^ a b Kogen, Jay (2002). The Simpsons season 2 DVD commentary for the episode 'Treehouse of Horror' (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  16. ^ Reiss, Mike (2003). The Simpsons season 3 DVD commentary for the episode 'Treehouse of Horror II' (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  17. ^ Reiss, Mike; Klickstein, Mathew (2018). Springfield confidential: jokes, secrets, and outright lies from a lifetime writing for the Simpsons. New York City: Dey Street Books. p. 102. ISBN 978-0062748034.
  18. ^ a b c Groening, Matt (2002). The Simpsons season 2 DVD commentary for the episode 'Treehouse of Horror' (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  19. ^ Reiss, Mike (2003). The Simpsons season 3 DVD commentary for the episode 'Treehouse of Horror' (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  20. ^ Jean, Al (2002). The Simpsons season 2 DVD commentary for the episode 'Treehouse of Horror' (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  21. ^ Cohen, David X. (2006). The Simpsons season 9 DVD commentary for the episode 'Treehouse of Horror VIII' (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  22. ^ Rhodes, Joe (October 21, 2000). "Flash! 24 Simpsons Stars Reveal Themselves". TV Guide.
  23. ^ Jean, Al (2006). The Simpsons season 9 DVD commentary for the episode 'Treehouse of Horror II' (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  24. ^ Cohen, David X. (2006). The Simpsons season 9 DVD commentary for the episode 'Treehouse of Horror VII' (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  25. ^ Cohen, David X. (2006). The Simpsons season 9 DVD commentary for the episode 'Treehouse of Horror IX' (DVD). 20th Century Fox.
  26. ^ Perry, Douglass C. (August 23, 2008). "The Simpsons: Hit and Run". IGN. Retrieved May 11, 2008.
  27. ^ "Everything Marvel's Kang Has in Common with the Simpsons' Version". Screen Rant. October 15, 2021.
  28. ^ "Kang". Simpsons Collectors. Retrieved May 11, 2008.
  29. ^ "Kodos". Simpsons Collectors. Retrieved May 11, 2008.
  30. ^ "THOH II, Alien Ship". Simpsons Collectors. Archived from the original on May 24, 2006. Retrieved May 11, 2008.
  31. ^ MacDonald, Brady (April 9, 2008). "Simpsons ride features 29 characters, original voices". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved May 11, 2008.
  32. ^ "Kang & Kodos' Twirl 'n' Hurl". Universal Studios. Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  33. ^ "The Rarest the Simpsons Toys and What They're Worth". November 2, 2018.
  34. ^ Goldman, Eric; Dan Iverson, Brian Zoromski. "Top 25 Simpsons Guest Appearances". IGN.com. Retrieved November 9, 2007.
  35. ^ Potts, Kimberly. "Favorite 'Simpsons' Guest Stars". AOL. Archived from the original on September 24, 2010. Retrieved November 24, 2008.
  36. ^ Snierson, Dan (January 14, 2000). "Springfield of Dreams". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved November 9, 2007.
  37. ^ Goldman, Eric; Iverson, Dan; Zoromski, Brian (October 30, 2006). "Top 10 Segments from The Simpsons' Treehouse of Horror". IGN. Retrieved November 25, 2006.
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