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John Sheridan (footballer)

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John Sheridan
Sheridan, John.jpg
Sheridan pictured in 2010
Personal information
Full name John Joseph Humphery Sheridan[1]
Date of birth (1964-10-01) 1 October 1964 (age 58)[2]
Place of birth Stretford,[2] England
Height 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)[3]
Position(s) Midfielder
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1981–1982 Manchester City 0 (0)
1982–1989 Leeds United 230 (47)
1989 Nottingham Forest 0 (0)
1989–1996 Sheffield Wednesday 199 (25)
1996Birmingham City (loan) 2 (0)
1996Bolton Wanderers (loan) 6 (3)
1996–1998 Bolton Wanderers 33 (0)
1998 Doncaster Rovers 7 (0)
1998–2004 Oldham Athletic 144 (14)
Total 621 (89)
International career
1985–1987 Republic of Ireland U21 2 (0)
1988–1995 Republic of Ireland 34 (5)
1994 Republic of Ireland B 1 (0)
Managerial career
2001 Oldham Athletic (co-caretaker)
2003–2004 Oldham Athletic (caretaker)
2006–2009 Oldham Athletic
2009–2012 Chesterfield
2013–2015 Plymouth Argyle
2015–2016 Newport County
2016 Oldham Athletic
2016–2017 Notts County
2017 Oldham Athletic
2018 Fleetwood Town
2018–2019 Carlisle United
2019–2020 Chesterfield
2020 Waterford
2020 Wigan Athletic
2020–2021 Swindon Town
2022-2022 Oldham Athletic
*Club domestic league appearances and goals

John Joseph Sheridan (born 1 October 1964) is an Irish football former football player and manager who was last head coach of National League club Oldham Athletic.

A midfielder, he began his playing career with Manchester City and then moved to Leeds United, where he scored 47 league goals in 230 appearances. He played for Nottingham Forest briefly, under the management of Brian Clough, and then joined Sheffield Wednesday, for whom he scored the winning goal in the 1991 Football League Cup Final at Wembley Stadium. Near the end of his time with the club, he played for Birmingham City and Bolton Wanderers on loan before joining the latter permanently. Sheridan made 199 league appearances for Wednesday and scored 25 goals. He won the First Division title with Bolton in 1997. Sheridan then played for Doncaster Rovers after leaving Bolton and then joined Oldham Athletic, where he spent the last six years of his playing career, scoring 14 league goals in 144 appearances.

He played international football for the Republic of Ireland, for whom he won 34 caps and scored five goals over a seven-year period. Having been included in the Republic's squad for UEFA Euro 1988, Sheridan went on to play one game at the 1990 FIFA World Cup and four in the 1994 tournament.

He became Oldham's manager in 2006, having served as caretaker twice during his time as an Oldham player. Sheridan left the club in 2009, having spent more than ten years there as a player, coach and manager. He joined Chesterfield later that year, where he achieved success in league and cup competition. Sheridan was next Plymouth Argyle manager from 2013 to 2015, and then had a succession of short-lived managerial positions, including spells at Newport County, Oldham (thrice more), Notts County, Fleetwood Town, Carlisle United, Chesterfield (again), Waterford, Wigan Athletic and Swindon Town.

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Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played between two teams of 11 players who primarily use their feet to propel a ball around a rectangular field called a pitch. The objective of the game is to score more goals than the opposite team by moving the ball beyond the goal line into a rectangular-framed goal defended by the opposing side. Traditionally, the game has been played over two 45 minute halves, for a total match time of 90 minutes. With an estimated 250 million players active in over 200 countries and territories, it is considered the world's most popular sport.

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Brian Clough

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Birmingham City F.C.

Birmingham City Football Club is a professional football club based in Birmingham, England. Formed in 1875 as Small Heath Alliance, it was renamed Small Heath in 1888, Birmingham in 1905, and Birmingham City in 1943. Since 2011, the first team have competed in the EFL Championship, the second tier of English football.

Bolton Wanderers F.C.

Bolton Wanderers F.C.

Bolton Wanderers Football Club is a professional football club based in Horwich, Bolton, Greater Manchester, England, which competes in EFL League One. The club played at Burnden Park for 102 years from 1895 after moving from their original home at Pike's Lane. On 9 March 1946, thirty-three Bolton fans lost their lives in a human crush, the Burnden Park disaster. In 1997, Bolton moved to what is now known as the University of Bolton Stadium. They have spent more seasons, 73, than any other club in the top-flight without winning the title.

Doncaster Rovers F.C.

Doncaster Rovers F.C.

Doncaster Rovers Football Club is a professional association football club based in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. The team compete in League Two, the fourth tier of the English football league system. The club play their home games at The Eco-Power Stadium, having moved from Belle Vue in 2007. Their home strip consists of red and white hoops, which has been the main design of the club's home shirt since 2001 through different variations. Rovers often sport a third kit each season promoting mental health charity Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM), with proceeds of the particular home games being donated to said charity.

Cap (sport)

Cap (sport)

In sport, a cap is a player's appearance in a game at international level. The term dates from the practice in the United Kingdom of awarding a cap to every player in an international match of rugby football and association football. In the early days of football, the concept of each team wearing a set of matching shirts had not been universally adopted, so each side would distinguish itself from the other by wearing a specific sort of cap.

1990 FIFA World Cup

1990 FIFA World Cup

The 1990 FIFA World Cup was the 14th FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams. It was held from 8 June to 8 July 1990 in Italy, the second country to host the event for a second time. Teams representing 116 national football associations entered and qualification began in April 1988. 22 teams qualified from this process, along with host nation Italy and defending champions Argentina.

1994 FIFA World Cup

1994 FIFA World Cup

The 1994 FIFA World Cup was the 15th FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national soccer teams. It was hosted by the United States and took place from June 17 to July 17, 1994, at nine venues across the country. The United States was chosen as the host by FIFA on July 4, 1988. Despite soccer's relative lack of popularity in the host nation, the tournament was the most financially successful in World Cup history. It broke tournament records with overall attendance of 3,587,538 and an average of 68,991 per game, marks that stood unsurpassed as of 2022 despite the expansion of the competition from 24 to 32 teams starting with the 1998 World Cup.

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Caretaker manager

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Chesterfield F.C.

Chesterfield F.C.

Chesterfield Football Club is an English professional association football club based in the town of Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England. The team competes in the National League, the fifth tier of the English football league system. Chesterfield play their home games at the 10,500 capacity Technique Stadium, having moved from their historic home of Saltergate during the summer of 2010. Notable former players include record appearance holder Dave Blakey, who played in 617 of Chesterfield's league games, and 162 league goal club record holder Ernie Moss. The club contests numerous local rivalries, most notably with Nottinghamshire club Mansfield Town.

Fleetwood Town F.C.

Fleetwood Town F.C.

Fleetwood Town Football Club is an English professional association football club based in the town of Fleetwood, Lancashire. Established in 1997, the current Fleetwood Town F.C. is the fourth incarnation of the club; it was originally formed in 1908. The team compete in League One, the third tier of the English football league system. Their home strip is red shirts with white sleeves and white shorts, their home ground is Highbury Stadium in Fleetwood and the supporters of the club are affectionately known as the Cod Army, which is also used as a nickname for the club alongside The Fishermen, the club's traditional nickname. They contest a rivalry with nearby Blackpool known as the Fylde Coast derby.

Carlisle United F.C.

Carlisle United F.C.

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Playing career

Club career

Born in Stretford, Lancashire, in 1964, Sheridan joined Manchester City in 1981, but never played for the first team, before moving to Leeds United in July 1982. He made his debut for Leeds in the Football League Second Division on 20 November 1982 in a goalless home draw with Middlesbrough. He appeared 27 times in the league that season, scoring twice. He was rarely out of the side at Elland Road, and was a hugely popular player with the fans. His best season with the club was the 1986–87 season, when Leeds reached the semi-finals of the FA Cup and finished fourth in the Second Division—their highest finish since relegation from the First Division in 1982. He scored 15 goals in the league, but Leeds were beaten in the FA Cup semi-finals by eventual winners Coventry City and lost the Second Division promotion/First Division relegation playoff final to Charlton Athletic, and therefore stayed in the Second Division.

However, he remained loyal to the club until 3 August 1989, when after seven years in the Leeds first team (during which he played 230 league games and scored 47 goals) he fell out with manager Howard Wilkinson (who succeeded Billy Bremner the previous autumn) and joined First Division club Nottingham Forest for £650,000.[4]

He made only one appearance for Forest (in a League Cup tie against Huddersfield) before joining Sheffield Wednesday on 3 November 1989. It was with Sheffield Wednesday that Sheridan played arguably the best football of his career, scoring 33 goals in 243 appearances. Sheridan scored a "rocket" goal in Wednesday's 1–0 win over Manchester United in the 1991 Football League Cup Final. He also helped Sheffield Wednesday win promotion that season, while they were managed by Ron Atkinson. Atkinson then departed to Aston Villa in June 1991 and veteran player Trevor Francis took over as manager. Sheridan remained a key part of the team under Francis, helping them finish third in the league in 1992, reach both domestic cup finals in 1993 (where they were beaten 2–1 by Arsenal in both finals) and also reached the League Cup semi-finals in the 1993–94 season.

However, Francis was sacked at the end of the 1994–95 season and new manager David Pleat picked Sheridan less often than Atkinson and Francis had. He played just 17 times in the 1995–96 campaign, and made his final two appearances for Sheffield Wednesday early in the 1996–97 season.

Sheridan himself says that he supported Manchester City despite growing up in Stretford, on the doorstep of Manchester United.[5]

He was loaned to Birmingham City for a four-match spell in the autumn of 1996 (where he once again played under Trevor Francis) before finally exiting Hillsborough on 13 November 1996 in a £180,000 move to Division One leaders Bolton Wanderers.[6]

He played 20 times for the Trotters in the 1996–97 season and scored twice as they were promoted to the FA Premier League as Division One champions with 100 goals and 98 points. He played 12 times in the 1997–98 season, as his side were relegated on the last day of the season.

He then made a surprise move to Doncaster Rovers, the crisis-ridden club who had just been relegated from the Football League to the Football Conference. He made eight appearances in the 1998–99 before making a Football League comeback with Division Two side Oldham Athletic, where he would remain for the rest of his playing career. Over six seasons in Division Two, he played 114 games and scored 14 league goals as Latics managed to avoid falling into Division Three but never quite made it to Division One, the closest they came being a playoff semi-final defeat in the 2002–03 season. Sheridan finally retired at the end of the 2003–04 season, a few months short of his 40th birthday.

International career

Sheridan played for the Republic of Ireland national under-19 football team that qualified for the 1982 UEFA European Under-18 Football Championship. In the finals he scored against Austria.

In the 1983 UEFA European Under-18 Football Championship he scored the winner against Belgium.

Sheridan also won 34 caps for the Republic of Ireland, scoring five times. He also scored the 100th Irish international goal at Lansdowne Road in 1994 against Bolivia.[7]

Sheridan was part of the squad that travelled to UEFA Euro 1988 but didn't feature in any of Ireland's three games. Sheridan was also part of Ireland's squads for the 1990 FIFA World Cup and the 1994 FIFA World Cup. He played just one game as a substitute in 1990 [1] but started in all 4 matches in 1994 including a 1–0 win over Italy in the opening game in which Sheridan hit the bar. Ireland won thanks to a goal from Ray Houghton.

In qualifying Sheridan scored one goal against Spain,[8] but as a result of goal difference this was actually an important goal despite Ireland losing 3–1. Had Ireland lost 3–0 they wouldn't have qualified.

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Football League Second Division

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FA Cup

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Charlton Athletic F.C.

Charlton Athletic F.C.

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Howard Wilkinson

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Billy Bremner

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Aston Villa F.C.

Aston Villa F.C.

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Managerial career

Oldham Athletic

Following the departure of Iain Dowie to Crystal Palace in late 2003, Sheridan took over the coaching of the Oldham first team, along with fellow-veteran David Eyres, before they were both replaced by Brian Talbot. On 1 June 2006, Talbot's successor, Ronnie Moore, was himself sacked and Sheridan stepped in to fill in the manager's position on a permanent basis.[9]

On 7 December 2006, Sheridan was named Football League One Manager of the Month.[10] He guided Oldham to sixth place in League One in 2006–07, and their promotion challenge was ended in the play-off semi-finals by eventual winners Blackpool.[11]

They finished eighth the following season, but had made a far more convincing bid for promotion during the 2008–09 season. On 9 March 2009, reports surfaced of a fight involving players and Sheridan at a racetrack,[12] which Sheridan described as being "overblown".[13] Sheridan remained with the club for the next game, a 6–2 defeat at Milton Keynes Dons.[14] The following day, Sheridan agreed to leave the club after a discussion with Oldham managing director Simon Corney.[15] He was immediately replaced with former Oldham manager Joe Royle.[16] Sheridan later admitted that a series of poor results had led to his departure from Oldham.[17]

Chesterfield

On 9 June 2009, Sheridan was named as manager of Chesterfield in League Two. Signing a three-year contract with the club, he brought assistant Tommy Wright and goalkeeper Mark Crossley along with him.[18]

Sheridan's second season with the club saw him bringing in his own players, and on 22 April 2011 a draw between Torquay United and Wycombe Wanderers meant Chesterfield were promoted without even kicking a ball in League Two.[19] On 7 May 2011, Chesterfield were confirmed as champions of League Two after a 3–1 victory over play-off contenders Gillingham in their last match of the season.[20] Sheridan's side won the Football League Trophy the following season but the club's league campaign ended in relegation back to League Two.[21]

On 28 August 2012, it was announced that Sheridan had been relieved of his duties after the team gained two points from the opening three league games of the 2012–13 season.[21] After five weeks on gardening leave, a club statement on 3 October announced that Sheridan had resigned with effect from 18 September 2012.[22]

Plymouth Argyle

Sheridan was appointed manager of Plymouth Argyle on 6 January 2013.[23][24] "There have been one or two other jobs while I've been out of work that I didn't go for. But as soon as Plymouth came up, a lot of people told me how good it is," said Sheridan, who signed a contract until the end of the 2012–13 season.[25][26] "I have been in Yorkshire for the majority of my career and it's a change for me. It's a big upheaval for me to come to Plymouth, but I'm really excited."[27] He was named Football League Two Manager of the Month for March after Argyle won four and drew one of their six matches.[28][29] By the end of the season, the club had won eight and drawn four of Sheridan's 19 games in charge and avoided relegation from the Football League.[30][31] Sheridan signed a new three-year contract with the club in May.[32] "Obviously, now the hard work starts. I keep saying it – I'm ready to get this club pushed up the league and that's what I am going to try to do," he said.[33]

Sheridan improved the fortunes of Plymouth Argyle in 2013–14, leading the club to a 10th-placed finish in League Two,[34] the first time the club has finished higher than 21st in league competition since 2007–08. However, the season ended on a negative note, as following a 2–1 victory over Sheridan's former club Chesterfield which put the Pilgrims into the play off positions,[35] the team then self capitulated and only won one of the final nine games. This led to Sheridan deciding against renewing the contracts of seven professionals, including former player of the year Maxime Blanchard and Plymouth-born midfielder Luke Young,[36] with promotion the target for 2014–15.[37]

Sheridan's Plymouth finished in seventh place in 2014–15, securing a place in the League Two playoffs following a 2–0 win at Shrewsbury Town on the final day of the regular season.[38][39] However they were defeated by fourth placed Wycombe Wanderers over the two-legged semi final, with the Pilgrims succumbing to a 5–3 defeat on aggregate.[40]

On 28 May 2015, Plymouth announced that Sheridan had left the club by mutual consent after expressing a desire to return to the north of England for family reasons.[41]

Newport County

On 2 October 2015, Sheridan was confirmed as the new manager of Newport County replacing Terry Butcher who had been sacked the previous day.[42] Sheridan took over the role with Newport bottom of League Two, having gained five points from the first ten matches of the 2015–16 season. Sheridan managed to secure only one point from his first three games, but then took the side on a ten-game unbeaten run and led the side to an FA Cup 3rd round appearance against EFL Championship club Blackburn Rovers in January 2016. He would finish the season with a record of five wins, seven draws, and five defeats, producing 20 of a possible 51 points.

He left the club in January 2016 to join Oldham for a fourth spell. His departure nearly led to a complaint by Newport County, who were unhappy at images which emerged on social media of Sheridan allegedly meeting with Oldham staff prior to Newport being approached.[43] Club director Gavin Foxall wished Sheridan "all the best" but noted that "the manner of his departure has not been right". Oldham officially maintained that they had contacted Newport prior to the meeting.[43]

Return to Oldham Athletic

On 13 January 2016, Sheridan was confirmed to be returning to Oldham Athletic for a second spell as full-time manager having resigned from his position as Newport County manager after just four months. He managed to save Oldham from relegation to League Two.

Notts County

On 27 May 2016, Sheridan was appointed as manager of Notts County on a three-year contract.

On 2 January 2017, equalling a club record of nine successive defeats, Sheridan was sacked for gross misconduct as manager shortly after losing 4–0 to Cambridge United.[44] Sheridan left the club with them just one point above the relegation zone with just 22 points from 24 games.

Third spell at Oldham Athletic

On 12 January 2017, Sheridan became manager of Oldham Athletic for a third time, he replaced Steve Robinson at the League One club.[45][46] On 25 September 2017 he left Oldham by mutual consent.[47]

Fleetwood Town

On 22 February 2018, Sheridan was appointed manager of League One club Fleetwood Town until the end of the 2017–18 season, replacing Uwe Rosler. He joined with the club 20th in the league having lost their last eight games in all competitions, but successfully guided them to safety finishing in 14th place.

Carlisle United

In June 2018, Sheridan was appointed manager of Carlisle United replacing Keith Curle. He resigned on 4 January 2019.[48]

Second spell at Chesterfield

On 9 January 2019, Sheridan was reappointed as manager of National League club Chesterfield, returning to the club he left in August 2012. He joined with Chesterfield 22nd in the fifth tier having won just one of their last twenty-five league games. On 2 January 2020, following a 3–0 defeat at Solihull Moors that left Chesterfield in 22nd place with only 17 games of the season left, Sheridan's contract was terminated.[49]

Waterford

In July 2020 Sheridan was named manager of League of Ireland Premier Division club Waterford.[50] He left the role after just eight games in charge of the team to return to England.

Wigan Athletic

Sheridan was appointed manager of League One club Wigan Athletic by the administrators on 11 September 2020.[51] He only lasted fifteen games in charge before making another move.

Swindon Town

On 11 November 2020, Sheridan was approached by Swindon Town to become their next manager following the departure of Richie Wellens.[52] On 13 November 2020, he signed a contract with the Wiltshire club until the end of the season,[53] but left on 17 April 2021.[54]

Fourth spell at Oldham Athletic

On 22 January 2022, Sheridan returned to Oldham Athletic as head coach with the club bottom of the Football League.[55] He could not halt the slide towards the National League. Oldham were relegated from the English Football League following a 2-1 home defeat by Salford City on 23 April 2022, a match interrupted by an on-pitch protest by fans against the club's owners.[56] Sheridan said he would stay at Oldham with the aim of an immediate return to the English Football League in the next season.[57] On 15 September 2022 it was announced that he would step aside after their match on 17 September.[58]

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Iain Dowie

Iain Dowie

Iain Dowie is a football manager, former professional footballer and sports television pundit.

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Crystal Palace Football Club is a professional football club based in Selhurst in the Borough of Croydon, South London, England, who compete in the Premier League, the highest level of English football. Although formally created as a professional outfit in 1905, the club's origins can be traced as far back as 1861, when an amateur Crystal Palace football team was established at the Crystal Palace Exhibition building. This has led to claims by the club that Crystal Palace should be recognised as the oldest professional football club in the world, after historians discovered a lineage through the Crystal Palace Company. Both the amateur and professional clubs played inside the grounds of the Palace, with the professional club using the FA Cup Final stadium for its home games until 1915, when they were forced to leave due to the outbreak of the First World War. In 1924, they moved to their current home at Selhurst Park.

David Eyres

David Eyres

David Eyres is an English former professional footballer who played as a midfielder.

Brian Talbot

Brian Talbot

Brian Ernest Talbot is an English former football player and manager. He was capped six times for the England national team.

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Blackpool F.C.

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2007–08 in English football

2007–08 in English football

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2008–09 in English football

2008–09 in English football

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Milton Keynes Dons F.C.

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Joe Royle

Joe Royle

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Chesterfield F.C.

Chesterfield F.C.

Chesterfield Football Club is an English professional association football club based in the town of Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England. The team competes in the National League, the fifth tier of the English football league system. Chesterfield play their home games at the 10,500 capacity Technique Stadium, having moved from their historic home of Saltergate during the summer of 2010. Notable former players include record appearance holder Dave Blakey, who played in 617 of Chesterfield's league games, and 162 league goal club record holder Ernie Moss. The club contests numerous local rivalries, most notably with Nottinghamshire club Mansfield Town.

Mark Crossley

Mark Crossley

Mark Geoffrey Crossley is a football coach and former professional footballer.

Career statistics

Playing statistics

Club Years League FA Cup League Cup Total
Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Manchester City 1981–1982 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Leeds United 1982–1989 230 47 18 3 24 3 272 53
Nottingham Forest 1989 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
Sheffield Wednesday 1989–1996 199 25 20 3 24 3 243 31
Birmingham City 1996 2 0 0 0 2 0 4 0
Bolton Wanderers 1996 6 3 0 0 1 0 7 3
Bolton Wanderers 1996–1998 33 0 2 0 1 0 36 0
Doncaster Rovers 1998 7 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
Oldham Athletic 1998–2004 144 14 15 2 4 0 163 16
Total 621 89 55 8 57 6 733 103

Managerial statistics

As of match played on 13 September 2022[59]
Managerial record by team and tenure
Team From To Record
G W D L Win %
Oldham Athletic (co-caretaker) 31 October 2001 7 November 2001 1 0 1 0 000.00
Oldham Athletic (caretaker) 20 December 2003 10 March 2004 13 3 6 4 023.08
Oldham Athletic 1 June 2006 15 March 2009 151 61 43 47 040.40
Chesterfield 9 June 2009 28 August 2012 160 63 38 59 039.38
Plymouth Argyle 6 January 2013 28 May 2015 126 48 31 47 038.10
Newport County 2 October 2015 13 January 2016 17 5 7 5 029.41
Oldham Athletic 13 January 2016 27 May 2016 22 9 6 7 040.91
Notts County 27 May 2016 2 January 2017 32 8 6 18 025.00
Oldham Athletic 12 January 2017 25 September 2017 33 10 9 14 030.30
Fleetwood Town 22 February 2018 1 June 2018 13 6 3 4 046.15
Carlisle United 5 June 2018 4 January 2019 32 15 4 13 046.88
Chesterfield 9 January 2019 2 January 2020 52 17 13 22 032.69
Waterford 8 July 2020 11 September 2020 8 3 2 3 037.50
Wigan Athletic 11 September 2020 13 November 2020 15 3 2 10 020.00
Swindon Town 13 November 2020 18 April 2021 33 8 4 21 024.24
Oldham Athletic 22 January 2022 17 September 2022 30 8 7 15 026.67
Total 738 267 182 289 036.18

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FA Cup

FA Cup

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Manchester City F.C.

Manchester City F.C.

Manchester City Football Club are an English football club based in Manchester that competes in the Premier League, the top flight of English football. Founded in 1880 as St. Mark's , they became Ardwick Association Football Club in 1887 and Manchester City in 1894. The club's home ground is the Etihad Stadium in east Manchester, to which they moved in 2003, having played at Maine Road since 1923. Manchester City adopted their sky blue home shirts in 1894, in the first season with the current name. Over the course of its history, the club has won eight league titles, six FA Cups, eight League Cups, six FA Community Shields, and one European Cup Winners' Cup.

Leeds United F.C.

Leeds United F.C.

Leeds United Football Club is a professional football club based in Leeds, West Yorkshire in England. The club competes in the Premier League, the highest level of the English football league system, and plays its home matches at Elland Road.

Nottingham Forest F.C.

Nottingham Forest F.C.

Nottingham Forest Football Club is an association football club based in West Bridgford, Nottinghamshire, England. The club was founded in 1865 and have played their home games at the City Ground, on the banks of the River Trent, since 1898. Forest are one of four English clubs to have won the European Cup/UEFA Champions League more than once and one of two English clubs to have won the competition back-to-back. Forest have two stars above their club crest to commemorate their two European Cup victories. The club competes in the Premier League, the top division of the English football league system.

Birmingham City F.C.

Birmingham City F.C.

Birmingham City Football Club is a professional football club based in Birmingham, England. Formed in 1875 as Small Heath Alliance, it was renamed Small Heath in 1888, Birmingham in 1905, and Birmingham City in 1943. Since 2011, the first team have competed in the EFL Championship, the second tier of English football.

Bolton Wanderers F.C.

Bolton Wanderers F.C.

Bolton Wanderers Football Club is a professional football club based in Horwich, Bolton, Greater Manchester, England, which competes in EFL League One. The club played at Burnden Park for 102 years from 1895 after moving from their original home at Pike's Lane. On 9 March 1946, thirty-three Bolton fans lost their lives in a human crush, the Burnden Park disaster. In 1997, Bolton moved to what is now known as the University of Bolton Stadium. They have spent more seasons, 73, than any other club in the top-flight without winning the title.

Doncaster Rovers F.C.

Doncaster Rovers F.C.

Doncaster Rovers Football Club is a professional association football club based in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. The team compete in League Two, the fourth tier of the English football league system. The club play their home games at The Eco-Power Stadium, having moved from Belle Vue in 2007. Their home strip consists of red and white hoops, which has been the main design of the club's home shirt since 2001 through different variations. Rovers often sport a third kit each season promoting mental health charity Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM), with proceeds of the particular home games being donated to said charity.

Oldham Athletic A.F.C.

Oldham Athletic A.F.C.

Oldham Athletic Association Football Club is a professional football club in Oldham, Greater Manchester, England, which competes in the National League, the fifth tier of the English football league system.

Chesterfield F.C.

Chesterfield F.C.

Chesterfield Football Club is an English professional association football club based in the town of Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England. The team competes in the National League, the fifth tier of the English football league system. Chesterfield play their home games at the 10,500 capacity Technique Stadium, having moved from their historic home of Saltergate during the summer of 2010. Notable former players include record appearance holder Dave Blakey, who played in 617 of Chesterfield's league games, and 162 league goal club record holder Ernie Moss. The club contests numerous local rivalries, most notably with Nottinghamshire club Mansfield Town.

Newport County A.F.C.

Newport County A.F.C.

Newport County Association Football Club is a professional football club in the city of Newport, South Wales. The team compete in EFL League Two, the fourth tier of the English football league system. The club's usual home colours are amber shirts and black shorts.

Notts County F.C.

Notts County F.C.

Notts County Football Club is a professional association football club based in Nottingham, England. The team participate in the National League, the fifth tier of the English football league system. Founded on 25 November 1862, it is the oldest professional association football club in the world and predates the Football Association itself. The club became one of the 12 founder members of the Football League in 1888. They are nicknamed the "Magpies" due to the black and white colour of their home strip, which inspired Italian club Juventus to adopt the colours for their kit in 1903. After playing at different home grounds during its first fifty years, including Trent Bridge, the club moved to Meadow Lane in 1910 and remains there. Notts County has a local rivalry with city neighbour Nottingham Forest, as well as with other nearby clubs such as Mansfield Town.

Fleetwood Town F.C.

Fleetwood Town F.C.

Fleetwood Town Football Club is an English professional association football club based in the town of Fleetwood, Lancashire. Established in 1997, the current Fleetwood Town F.C. is the fourth incarnation of the club; it was originally formed in 1908. The team compete in League One, the third tier of the English football league system. Their home strip is red shirts with white sleeves and white shorts, their home ground is Highbury Stadium in Fleetwood and the supporters of the club are affectionately known as the Cod Army, which is also used as a nickname for the club alongside The Fishermen, the club's traditional nickname. They contest a rivalry with nearby Blackpool known as the Fylde Coast derby.

Honours

As a player

Sheffield Wednesday

Bolton Wanderers

Individual

As a manager

Chesterfield

Individual

Discover more about Honours related topics

Football League First Division

Football League First Division

The Football League First Division was a division of the Football League in England from 1888 until 2004. It was the top division in the English football league system from the season 1888–89 until 1991–92, a century in which the First Division's winning club became English men's football champions.

1996–97 Football League

1996–97 Football League

The 1996–97 Football League was the 98th completed season of The Football League.

PFA Team of the Year

PFA Team of the Year

The Professional Footballers' Association Team of the Year is an annual award given to a set of 55 footballers across the top four tiers of men's English football; the Premier League, the Championship, League One and League Two, as well as the women's FA WSL, who are seen to be deserving of being named in a "Team of the Year". Peter Shilton currently holds the most appearances in the PFA Team of the Year in the top division with 10 appearances. Steven Gerrard currently holds the most appearances in the PFA Team of the Year in the Premier League era with eight appearances.

2010–11 Football League

2010–11 Football League

The 2010–11 Football League was the 112th completed season of the Football League. It began in August 2010 and concluded in May 2011, with the promotion play-off finals.

2011–12 Football League Trophy

2011–12 Football League Trophy

The 2011–12 Football League Trophy, known as the Johnstone's Paint Trophy for sponsorship reasons, is the 28th season in the history of the competition. It is a knock-out tournament for English football clubs in League One and League Two, the third and fourth tiers of the English football.

EFL League One Manager of the Month

EFL League One Manager of the Month

The Manager of the Month is an association football award that recognises the manager adjudged best for each month of the season in the Football League One, the third tier of English football. The recipient is chosen by a panel assembled by the League's sponsor and announced alongside The Championship and League Two Manager of the Month awards at the beginning of the following month. For sponsorship reasons, from its inception in 2004 until 2010 it was known as the Coca-Cola Manager of the Month award, with the Coca-Cola company sponsoring the league during that period. From the 2010–11 season until the end of the 2012–13 season the league was sponsored by npower and the award was known as the npower Manager of the Month. In July 2013, it was announced that Sky Bet would become the new sponsor of the English Football League, and since August 2013 the award has been known as the Sky Bet Manager of the Month. In November 2017 it was announced that Sky Bet and the EFL had agreed for Sky Bet to continue its sponsorship up until 2024.

EFL League Two Manager of the Month

EFL League Two Manager of the Month

The EFL League Two Manager of the Month is a monthly association football award to recognise the outstanding team manager in EFL League Two, the fourth tier of English football. The recipient is chosen by a panel assembled by the League's sponsor, Sky Bet, and the award is announced alongside those for the EFL Championship and EFL League One Manager of the Month at the beginning of the following month. The League Two award was introduced in February 2005 when Coca-Cola was the sponsor. Their sponsorship ended in 2010.

Source: "John Sheridan (footballer)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Sheridan_(footballer).

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