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John Sanderson

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John Sanderson
29th Governor of Western Australia
In office
18 August 2000 – 31 October 2005
MonarchElizabeth II
PremierRichard Court
Geoff Gallop
Preceded byMichael Jeffery
Succeeded byKen Michael
Personal details
Born (1940-11-04) 4 November 1940 (age 82)
Geraldton, Western Australia
Alma materRoyal Military College, Duntroon
Military service
AllegianceAustralia
Branch/serviceAustralian Army
Years of service1958–1998
RankLieutenant General
CommandsChief of Army (1995–98)
United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (1992–93)
1st Brigade (1987–89)
1st Field Engineer Regiment (1979–80)
Battles/warsMalayan Emergency
Vietnam War
United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia
AwardsCompanion of the Order of Australia

Lieutenant General John Murray Sanderson, AC (born 4 November 1940) is a retired senior Australian Army officer and vice-regal representative. He served as Force Commander of the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia from 1992 to 1993, Chief of Army from 1995 to 1998, and was the 29th Governor of Western Australia from 2000 to 2005.

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Lieutenant general (Australia)

Lieutenant general (Australia)

Lieutenant general is the second-highest active rank of the Australian Army. It was created as a direct equivalent of the British military rank of lieutenant general, and is considered a three-star rank.

Australian Army

Australian Army

The Australian Army is the principal land warfare force of Australia, a part of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) along with the Royal Australian Navy and the Royal Australian Air Force. The Army is commanded by the Chief of Army (CA), who is subordinate to the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) who commands the ADF. The CA is also directly responsible to the Minister for Defence, with the Department of Defence administering the ADF and the Army.

United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia

United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia

The United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC) was a United Nations peacekeeping operation in Cambodia in 1992–93 formed following the 1991 Paris Peace Accords. This was the first occasion in which the UN directly assumed responsibility for the administration of an outright independent state, rather than simply monitoring or supervising the area. The UN transitional authority organised and ran elections, had its own radio station and jail, and was responsible for promoting and safeguarding human rights at the national level.

Chief of Army (Australia)

Chief of Army (Australia)

The Chief of Army is the most senior appointment in the Australian Army, responsible to both the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) and the Secretary, Department of Defence (SECDEF). The rank associated with the position is lieutenant general (3-star).

Governor of Western Australia

Governor of Western Australia

The governor of Western Australia is the representative in Western Australia of the monarch of Australia, currently King Charles III. As with the other governors of the Australian states, the governor of Western Australia performs constitutional, ceremonial and community functions, including:presiding over the Executive Council; proroguing and dissolving the Legislative Assembly and the Legislative Council; issuing writs for elections; and appointing Ministers, Judges, Magistrates and Justices of the Peace.

Early life

Born in Geraldton, Western Australia on 4 November 1940, John Sanderson completed his secondary education at Bunbury High School in 1957 before entering the Royal Military College, Duntroon in 1958. He graduated in 1961 and was commissioned into the Royal Australian Engineers in December 1961.

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Bunbury Senior High School

Bunbury Senior High School

Bunbury Senior High School is a comprehensive public co-educational high day school, located in Bunbury, a regional centre in the South West region, 175 kilometres (109 mi) south of Perth, Western Australia.

Royal Military College, Duntroon

Royal Military College, Duntroon

The Royal Military College, Duntroon, also known simply as Duntroon, is the Australian Army's officer training establishment. It was founded at Duntroon, in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, in 1911 and is at the foot of Mount Pleasant near Lake Burley Griffin, close to the Department of Defence headquarters at Russell Hill. It is comparable to the United Kingdom's Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and the United States Military Academy at West Point. Duntroon is adjacent to the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA), which is Australian Defence Force's tri-service military academy that provides military and tertiary academic education for junior officers of the Australian Army, Royal Australian Air Force and the Royal Australian Navy.

Royal Australian Engineers

Royal Australian Engineers

The Royal Australian Engineers (RAE) is the military engineering corps of the Australian Army. The RAE is ranked fourth in seniority of the corps of the Australian Army, behind the Staff Cadets, Armoured and Artillery Corps. The corps was formed by the amalgamation of the various colonial engineer corps of the states and territories of Australia in 1902 and since then has served in various conflicts including World War I, World War II and the Vietnam War. The corps has also served on numerous peacekeeping operations and was heavily involved in the Australian contribution to the war in Afghanistan.

Military career

After completing a Fellowship Diploma in civil engineering at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Sanderson had a series of regimental postings. These included second in command of the 10th Field Squadron and troop commander and construction officer of the 21st Construction Squadron on operational service in Sabah, Malaysia. He was promoted to captain in 1965.

Following eighteen months as a staff officer in the Office of the Engineer in Chief, he was posted as the exchange instructor at the Royal School of Military Engineering in Chattenden, United Kingdom from 1967 to 1969. He returned to Australia to command the 23rd Construction Squadron at Holsworthy Barracks, prior to taking up command of the 17th Construction Squadron in South Vietnam at the end of 1970.[1]

Returning to Australia in late 1971, he was the senior instructor at the School of Military Engineering throughout 1972 before attending the Army Command and Staff College at Fort Queenscliff in 1973.

Sanderson was promoted to lieutenant colonel in 1975 after serving for a short period as a Staff Officer at the Headquarters of Field Force Command. His initial appointment as Staff Officer Grade 1 at the Directorate of Engineers was followed by two years (1976–1978) as the Exchange Instructor at the British Army's Staff College, Camberley.

Sanderson commanded the 1st Field Engineer Regiment from 1979 to 1980,[2] and then attended the Joint Services Command and Staff College in 1981. Sanderson was appointed as the military assistant to the Chief of the General Staff in late 1981, serving in that capacity until being promoted to colonel as director of army plans in 1983.

From June 1985 to the middle of 1986, he attended the U.S. Army War College, returning to Australia with the rank of brigadier. After a six-month period as chairman of the Army Reserve Review Committee, he assumed command of the 1st Brigade at Holsworthy.

Sanderson served as chief of staff, land command, for a brief period in 1989 and was then promoted to major general and appointed as assistant chief of defence policy. In this role he was tasked to develop and carry out major reforms to the Higher Australian Defence Force Staff, which resulted in him becoming the first assistant chief of defence force development at the end of 1989.

From October 1991, Sanderson became engaged directly in the United Nations process to bring peace to Cambodia, first as adviser to the Secretary General of the United Nations, and then from March 1992, in the rank of lieutenant general, as the commander of the 16,000-strong international military component of the United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC).

After the successful completion of the UN mission in October 1993, Sanderson returned to Australia to be appointed as the first commander, Joint Forces Australia, (now Chief of Joint Operations), and developed this role until becoming Chief of the General Staff in June 1995. This position was renamed to Chief of Army in 1997, and Sanderson continued in this position until his retirement from the army on 23 June 1998.

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RMIT University

RMIT University

RMIT University, officially the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, is a public research university in Melbourne, Australia.

Royal School of Military Engineering

Royal School of Military Engineering

The Royal School of Military Engineering (RSME) Group provides a wide range of training for the British Army and Defence. This includes; Combat Engineers, Carpenters, Chartered Engineers, Musicians, Band Masters, Sniffer Dogs, Veterinary Technicians, Ammunition Experts, Bomb Disposal Operators, and Counter Chemical Warfare experts, as well as Command and Leadership.

Holsworthy Barracks

Holsworthy Barracks

Holsworthy Barracks is an Australian Army military barracks, located in the Heathcote National Park in Holsworthy approximately 25 km (16 mi) from the central business district, in south-western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The barracks is part of the Holsworthy military reserve, which is 22,000 ha (54,000-acre) training area and artillery range for the Australian Army, established in the 1880s and been in active use since World War I. Following World War II it became a major base for the permanent component of the Australian Army in New South Wales. Holsworthy Military Airport is also located in the reserve. Activities carried out on the base include the use of firing ranges, chemical weapons testing, fire training, vehicle maintenance, and bulk chemical storage and distribution from numerous above ground and underground storage tanks.

Fort Queenscliff

Fort Queenscliff

Fort Queenscliff, in Victoria, Australia, dates from 1860 when an open battery was constructed on Shortland's Bluff to defend the entrance to Port Phillip. The Fort, which underwent major redevelopment in the late 1870s and 1880s, became the headquarters for an extensive chain of forts around Port Phillip Heads. Its garrison included volunteer artillery, engineers, infantry and naval militia, and it was manned as a coastal defence installation continuously from 1883 to 1946. The other fortifications and armaments around the Heads were completed by 1891, and together made Port Phillip one of the most heavily defended harbours in the British Empire.

Lieutenant colonel

Lieutenant colonel

Lieutenant colonel is a rank of commissioned officers in the armies, most marine forces and some air forces of the world, above a major and below a colonel. Several police forces in the United States use the rank of lieutenant colonel. The rank of lieutenant colonel is often shortened to simply "colonel" in conversation and in unofficial correspondence. Sometimes, the term 'half-colonel' is used in casual conversation in the British Army. In the United States Air Force, the term 'light bird' or 'light bird colonel' is an acceptable casual reference to the rank but is never used directly towards the rank holder. A lieutenant colonel is typically in charge of a battalion or regiment in the army.

Joint Services Command and Staff College

Joint Services Command and Staff College

Joint Services Command and Staff College (JSCSC) is a British military academic establishment providing training and education to experienced officers of the Royal Navy, Army, Royal Air Force, Ministry of Defence Civil Service, and serving officers of other states.

Chief of Army (Australia)

Chief of Army (Australia)

The Chief of Army is the most senior appointment in the Australian Army, responsible to both the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) and the Secretary, Department of Defence (SECDEF). The rank associated with the position is lieutenant general (3-star).

Brigadier

Brigadier

Brigadier is a military rank, the seniority of which depends on the country. In some countries, it is a senior rank above colonel, equivalent to a brigadier general or commodore, typically commanding a brigade of several thousand soldiers. In other countries, it is a non-commissioned rank.

Major general (Australia)

Major general (Australia)

Major general is a senior rank of the Australian Army, and was created as a direct equivalent of the British military rank of major general. It is the third-highest active rank of the Australian Army, and is considered to be equivalent to a two-star rank. A major general commands a division or the equivalent.

Australian Defence Force

Australian Defence Force

The Australian Defence Force (ADF) is the military organisation responsible for the defence of the Commonwealth of Australia and its national interests. It consists of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), Australian Army, Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) and several "tri-service" units. The ADF has a strength of just over 85,000 full-time personnel and active reservists and is supported by the Department of Defence and several other civilian agencies.

Cambodia

Cambodia

Cambodia, officially the Kingdom of Cambodia, is a country located in the southern portion of the Indochinese Peninsula in Southeast Asia, spanning an area of 181,035 square kilometres, bordered by Thailand to the northwest, Laos to the north, Vietnam to the east, and the Gulf of Thailand to the southwest. The capital and largest city is Phnom Penh.

Lieutenant general (Australia)

Lieutenant general (Australia)

Lieutenant general is the second-highest active rank of the Australian Army. It was created as a direct equivalent of the British military rank of lieutenant general, and is considered a three-star rank.

Governor of Western Australia

On 18 August 2000, Sanderson was sworn in as 29th governor of Western Australia.[3]

Sanderson retired as Governor of Western Australia in June 2005 after his term of office expired, but agreed to stay on until 31 October 2005 to assist with the transition to the new governor. His successor, Ken Michael, was sworn in on 18 January 2006.

Publications

  • 1999 "Australia's role in Asia"
  • 1999 "International humanitarian law and the Balkans : the dilemma of a superpower"
  • 2005 "Ride the whirlpool : selected speeches of Lieutenant General John Sanderson AC Governor of Western Australia 2000–2005", University of Western Australia Press. (Table of Contents, Catalogue entries: NLA[1][2])
  • 2009 "The reconciliation journey"

Honours and awards

Order of Australia (Military) ribbon.png Order of St John (UK) ribbon -vector.svg

Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75 ribbon.png General Service Medal 1962 BAR.svg Vietnam Medal BAR.svg Australian Active Service Medal ribbon.png

AUS Centenary Medal ribbon.svg DFSM with Fed Star.png National Medal (Australia) ribbon.jpg Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon.png

Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal ribbon, with 60- clasp.svg UNTAC Medal bar.gif KHM Ordre Royal du Cambodge - Grand Croix BAR.svg US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon.png

AUS Meritorious Unit Citation with Federation Star.png

Order of Australia (Military) ribbon.png Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) 26 January 1994[4] For eminent service and exceptional performance of duty to the Australian Defence Force particularly as the Commander UNTAC – United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia.
Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) 26 January 1991[5]
Member of the Order of Australia (AM) 26 January 1985[6] For service as Director of Plans – Army Office.
Order of St John (UK) ribbon -vector.svg Knight of the Order of St John 27 November 2003[7]
Australian Active Service Medal 1945-75 ribbon.png Australian Active Service Medal 1945–1975 With the clasp VIETNAM
General Service Medal 1962 BAR.svg General Service Medal
Vietnam Medal BAR.svg Vietnam Medal
Australian Active Service Medal ribbon.png Australian Active Service Medal
AUS Centenary Medal ribbon.svg Centenary Medal 1 January 2001[8]
DFSM with Fed Star.png Defence Force Service Medal with Federation Star for 40 years of service
National Medal (Australia) ribbon.jpg National Medal with Federation Star for 15 years of service (14 July 1977)[9]
Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon.png Australian Defence Medal
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal ribbon, with 60- clasp.svg Vietnam Campaign Medal (South Vietnam)
UNTAC Medal bar.gif United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia Medal UNTAC (United Nations)
KHM Ordre Royal du Cambodge - Grand Croix BAR.svg Grand Cross of the Royal Order of Cambodia (Cambodia) 2006[10]
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon.png Commander of the Legion of Merit (United States)[3] for his service to the region and the alliance.
Ribbon of the Meritorious Unit Citation Meritorious Unit Citation with Federation Star 2014[11]

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United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia

United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia

The United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC) was a United Nations peacekeeping operation in Cambodia in 1992–93 formed following the 1991 Paris Peace Accords. This was the first occasion in which the UN directly assumed responsibility for the administration of an outright independent state, rather than simply monitoring or supervising the area. The UN transitional authority organised and ran elections, had its own radio station and jail, and was responsible for promoting and safeguarding human rights at the national level.

Australian Active Service Medal 1945–1975

Australian Active Service Medal 1945–1975

The Australian Active Service Medal 1945–1975 recognises the service of Australian Defence Force and certain other persons in prescribed warlike operations in the period after World War II, and prior to February 1975. The medal was established in December 1997. The Australian Active Service Medal recognises warlike service after February 1975 until 2012 when the Australian Operational Service Medal was instituted.

General Service Medal (1962)

General Service Medal (1962)

The General Service Medal, is a campaign medal of the United Kingdom introduced in 1962 to replace both the General Service Medal (1918), as awarded to the Army and RAF, and the Naval General Service Medal (1915). The 1962 GSM was awarded until 2007, when it was replaced by the Operational Service Medal. In 2015 the General Service Medal (2008) was introduced.

Australian Active Service Medal

Australian Active Service Medal

The Australian Active Service Medal (AASM) is an Australian military decoration. It was authorised on 13 September 1988 to recognise prescribed service in "warlike" operations, backdated to February 1975. It is awarded with a clasp to denote the prescribed operation and subsequent awards of the medal are made in the form of additional clasps. In 2012, it was announced that the medal would no longer be issued for future operations, with the AASM and the Australian Service Medal being replaced by the Australian Operational Service Medal.

Centenary Medal

Centenary Medal

The Centenary Medal is an award which was created by the Australian Government in 2001. It was established to commemorate the centenary of the Federation of Australia and to recognise "people who made a contribution to Australian society or government". It was also awarded to centenarians, Australian citizens born on or before 31 December 1901 who lived to celebrate the centenary of federation on 1 January 2001. Nominations were assessed by a panel chaired by historian Geoffrey Blainey.

Defence Force Service Medal

Defence Force Service Medal

The Defence Force Service Medal (DFSM) is an Australian Military award given for long service by permanent members of the Australian Defence Force. It is part of the suite of defence force service awards introduced in 1982, which also included the Reserve Force Decoration and the Reserve Force Medal.

National Medal (Australia)

National Medal (Australia)

The National Medal is an Australian award given for long service by operational members of specified eligible organisations. It was introduced in 1975, as an original component of the new Australian honours system, and replaced a range of medals available to military and civilian uniformed services for long service and good conduct. The eligible groups have in common that their members serve or protect the community at the risk of death, injury or trauma, hence it is only available to members of the eligible organisations who are operationally deployed. In the case of corrective services, eligibility is restricted to officers with custodial duties.

Australian Defence Medal

Australian Defence Medal

The Australian Defence Medal is an Australian military decoration which recognises current and former Australian Defence Force personnel who completed an initial enlistment period, or four years' service. It was established on 20 March 2006; however, it recognises qualifying efficient service of current and former Australian Defence Force Regular and Reserve personnel, including National Servicemen, who have served since 3 September 1945. It is estimated that up to one million current and ex-serving personnel are eligible for the award. At 30 June 2010, a total of 242,576 had been awarded.

United Nations Medal

United Nations Medal

A United Nations Medal is an international decoration awarded by the United Nations (UN) to the various world countries members for participation in joint international military and police operations such as peacekeeping, humanitarian efforts, and disaster relief. The medal is ranked in militaries and police forces as a service medal. The United Nations awarded its first medal during the Korean War (1950–1953). Since 1955, many additional United Nations medals have been created and awarded for participation in various United Nations missions and actions around the world.

Royal Order of Cambodia

Royal Order of Cambodia

The Royal Order of Cambodia was a colonial order of chivalry of French Cambodia, and is still in use as an order of chivalry in the present-day Kingdom of Cambodia.

Legion of Merit

Legion of Merit

The Legion of Merit (LOM) is a military award of the United States Armed Forces that is given for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. The decoration is issued to members of the eight uniformed services of the United States as well as to military and political figures of foreign governments.

Meritorious Unit Citation

Meritorious Unit Citation

The Meritorious Unit Citation is a collective group decoration awarded to members of Australian military units. It recognises sustained outstanding service in warlike operations. The Meritorious Unit Citation was created in 1991, along with the Unit Citation for Gallantry.

Source: "John Sanderson", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Sanderson.

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References
  1. ^ Vietnam War Nominal Roll
  2. ^ "Lieutenant General John Murray Sanderson, AC". Australian War Museum.
  3. ^ a b Lieutenant-General John M. Sanderson 2000–2005, Governors of Western Australia, The Constitutional Centre of Western Australia. Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  4. ^ It's an Honour – Companion of the Order of Australia, 26 January 1994, Citation: For eminent service and exceptional performance of duty to the Australian Defence Force particularly as the Commander UNTAC – United Nations Transitional Authority in Cambodia.
  5. ^ It's an Honour – Officer of the Order of Australia, 26 January 1991.
  6. ^ It's an Honour – Member of the Order of Australia, 26 January 1985, Citation: For service as Director of Plans – Army Office.
  7. ^ St John volunteers awarded Archived 4 May 2012 at the Wayback Machine, www.avonadvocate.com.au
  8. ^ It's an Honour – Centenary Medal, 1 January 2001
  9. ^ It's an Honour – National Medal, 14 July 1977
  10. ^ Indigenous Implementation Board members Archived 23 August 2011 at the Wayback Machine, Department of Indigenous Affairs, Govt of WA
  11. ^ "MERITORIOUS UNIT CITATION" (PDF). Website of the Governor General of Australia. Australian Honours and Awards Secretariat. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 January 2014. Retrieved 27 January 2014.
External links
Government offices
Preceded by
Major General Michael Jeffery
Governor of Western Australia
2000–2006
Succeeded by
Military offices
New command
Position replaces Chief of the General Staff
Chief of Army
1997–1998
Succeeded by
Lieutenant General Frank Hickling
Preceded by
Lieutenant General John Grey
Chief of the General Staff
1995–1997
Position replaced by Chief of Army

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