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John McFall (athlete)

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John McFall
ESA astronaut announcement Class of 2022 (52519696304) (cropped).jpg
Personal information
Born (1981-04-25) 25 April 1981 (age 41)
Frimley, Surrey, England, UK
Sport
Country Wales
 Great Britain
Turned pro2005
Achievements and titles
World finals100 m (T42): gold – 2007 IWAS World Wheelchair and Amputee Games; silver – 2007 Visa Paralympic World Cup; silver – 2006 IPC World C'ships
200 m (T42): gold – 2007 IWAS World Wheelchair and Amputee Games; gold – 2007 Visa Paralympic World Cup; bronze – 2006 IPC World C'ships; bronze – 2005 IPC Open European C'ships
Paralympic finals2008 Summer Paralympics: 100 m – Bronze
Highest world ranking100 m: 2nd (2007)[1]
200 m: 1st (2007)[2]
Personal best(s)60 m: 8.55 s (2005)[3]

100 m: 12.70 s (2007)[4]

200 m: 26.02 s (2006)[4]
Updated on 14 September 2008.

John McFall (born 25 April 1981) is a British Paralympic sprinter and ESA astronaut. In November 2022, he was selected by the European Space Agency to become the first "parastronaut". ESA will do a feasability study on him flying to space and what needs to be adapted for people with disabilities.[5] In 2000, when he was 19 years old, his right leg was amputated above the knee following a serious motorcycle accident. He took up running again after being fitted with a prosthesis, and participated in his first race in 2004. The following year, he was selected to represent Great Britain at the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) European Championships, and took the bronze medal in the 200 metres (sport class T42).

In the 100-metre sprint, McFall subsequently won silver medals at the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) World Championships in 2006 and the Visa Paralympic World Cup in 2007. On 6 July 2007, he was placed third at the Meeting Gaz de France in Paris, part of the ÅF Golden League; and achieved his personal best time (as at 30 May 2008) in the 100 metres of 12.70 seconds by winning silver at the Bayer International Track and Field Competition in Leverkusen on 10 August of that year. In his other main event, the 200 metres, he achieved a bronze in the 2006 IPC World Championships, and a gold at the 2007 Visa Paralympic World Cup with a competition record time of 26.84 seconds. In September 2007, McFall was champion in both the 100 metres and 200 metres at the International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS) World Wheelchair and Amputee Games. He was ranked first in the world in 2007 for the 200 metres, and second for the 100 metres.

McFall, who has been called one of the fastest men in the world over 100 metres and 200 metres in the class of above-the-knee amputees, competed for Great Britain in the 100 metres (T42) at the 2008 Summer Paralympics in Beijing, winning the bronze in a time of 13.08 seconds. On 23 November 2022, John McFall was selected to be the first ESA parastronaut.[6]

Discover more about John McFall (athlete) related topics

Paralympic Games

Paralympic Games

The Paralympic Games or Paralympics, also known as the Games of the Paralympiad, is a periodic series of international multisport events involving athletes with a range of physical disabilities, including impaired muscle power and impaired passive range of movement, limb deficiency, leg length difference, short stature, hypertonia, ataxia, athetosis, vision impairment and intellectual impairment. There are Winter and Summer Paralympic Games, which since the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea, are held almost immediately following the respective Olympic Games. All Paralympic Games are governed by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).

Astronaut

Astronaut

An astronaut is a person trained, equipped, and deployed by a human spaceflight program to serve as a commander or crew member aboard a spacecraft. Although generally reserved for professional space travelers, the term is sometimes applied to anyone who travels into space, including scientists, politicians, journalists, and tourists.

European Space Agency

European Space Agency

The European Space Agency is an intergovernmental organisation of 22 member states dedicated to the exploration of space. Established in 1975 and headquartered in Paris, ESA has a worldwide staff of about 2,200 in 2018 and an annual budget of about €7.2 billion in 2022.

Prosthesis

Prosthesis

In medicine, a prosthesis, or a prosthetic implant, is an artificial device that replaces a missing body part, which may be lost through trauma, disease, or a condition present at birth. Prostheses are intended to restore the normal functions of the missing body part. Amputee rehabilitation is primarily coordinated by a physiatrist as part of an inter-disciplinary team consisting of physiatrists, prosthetists, nurses, physical therapists, and occupational therapists. Prostheses can be created by hand or with computer-aided design (CAD), a software interface that helps creators design and analyze the creation with computer-generated 2-D and 3-D graphics as well as analysis and optimization tools.

International Paralympic Committee

International Paralympic Committee

The International Paralympic Committee is an international non-profit organisation and the global governing body for the Paralympic Movement. The IPC organizes the Paralympic Games and functions as the international federation for nine sports. Founded on 22 September 1989 in Düsseldorf, West Germany, its mission is to "enable Paralympic athletes to achieve sporting excellence and inspire and excite the world". Furthermore, the IPC wants to promote the Paralympic values and to create sport opportunities for all persons with a disability, from beginner to elite level.

Bronze medal

Bronze medal

A bronze medal in sports and other similar areas involving competition is a medal made of bronze awarded to the third-place finisher of contests or competitions such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. The outright winner receives a gold medal and the second place a silver medal. More generally, bronze is traditionally the most common metal used for all types of high-quality medals, including artistic ones. The practice of awarding bronze third place medals began at the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis, Missouri, before which only first and second places were awarded.

Paris

Paris

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an estimated population of 2,165,423 residents in 2019 in an area of more than 105 km², making it the 30th most densely populated city in the world in 2020. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of the world's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, gastronomy, and science. For its leading role in the arts and sciences, as well as its very early system of street lighting, in the 19th century it became known as "the City of Light". Like London, prior to the Second World War, it was also sometimes called the capital of the world.

Leverkusen

Leverkusen

Leverkusen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on the eastern bank of the Rhine. To the south, Leverkusen borders the city of Cologne and to the north is the state capital Düsseldorf.

Gold medal

Gold medal

A gold medal is a medal awarded for highest achievement in a non-military field. Its name derives from the use of at least a fraction of gold in form of plating or alloying in its manufacture.

International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation

International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation

The International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS) is an international sports organisation that governs sports for athletes with physical impairments.

2008 Summer Paralympics

2008 Summer Paralympics

The 2008 Summer Paralympic Games, the 13th Summer Paralympic Games, took place in Beijing, China from September 6 to 17, 2008. As with the 2008 Summer Olympics, equestrian events were held in Hong Kong and sailing events in Qingdao. It was first time the new Paralympic logo featured in the Summer Paralympics since its rebranding after the 2004 Summer Paralympics.

Beijing

Beijing

Beijing, alternatively romanized as Peking, is the capital of the People's Republic of China. It is the center of power and development of the country. Beijing is the world's most populous national capital city, with over 21 million residents. It has an administrative area of 16,410.5 km2 (6,336.1 sq mi), the third in the country after Guangzhou and Shanghai. It is located in Northern China, and is governed as a municipality under the direct administration of the State Council with 16 urban, suburban, and rural districts. Beijing is mostly surrounded by Hebei Province with the exception of neighboring Tianjin to the southeast; together, the three divisions form the Jingjinji megalopolis and the national capital region of China.

Early years and education

John McFall was born on 25 April 1981[7] in Frimley, Surrey,[8][9] in England. Between 1994 and 1997, he attended school at Millfield in Street, Somerset,[10] where as a teenager he was a runner and hockey player.[11] In August 2000, while on a gap-year trip to Ko Samui, Thailand, after his A-levels,[10] he was involved in a serious motorcycle accident. While riding a moped, he went round a corner too quickly and skidded. He put out his leg to stop the motorcycle from falling over, and smashed his knee. The motorcycle then fell on him, resulting in the chain severing major blood vessels in his leg.[12] He was flown to a hospital in Bangkok, but as he had damaged his lower right leg so severely it had to be amputated above the knee after three days.[13] Upon returning to the UK, he spent about seven weeks undergoing rehabilitation at Queen Mary's Hospital in Roehampton, London.[12]

McFall spent the next year at home, during which he took up mountain biking and climbing and worked as a fitness instructor at his local leisure centre.[12] He also started running in the summer of 2003[10] as soon as he had his prosthesis fitted: "I love that sound of air rushing past your ears and the freedom of it. I missed that and I wanted to get that back."[13] After taking up his place at Swansea University[11] to pursue a Bachelor of Science (BSc) in sport and exercise science,[10] he practised on the university's running track and also trained with a local running club, the Swansea Harriers Athletic Club.[14] However, he found running difficult and uncomfortable as his prosthesis was not designed for the purpose, and frequently got damaged. Upon making inquiries at the Federation of Disability Sport Wales (FDSW), he was introduced to carbon-fibre running "blades".[12][13] He graduated from university with an upper second-class honours degree in summer 2004,[10][12] taking part in his first race at the Disability Sports Events (DSE) Championships in the UK[15] the same year.[11]

In September 2004, McFall embarked on postgraduate studies in sport and exercise science at the University of Wales Institute, Cardiff (UWIC), subsequently graduating with a Master of Science (MSc).[4][10] He took pre-medical examinations in 2008, and planned to retire from athletics after his 2009 season to train as a doctor.[16]

In 2014, McFall graduated with a Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery from the Cardiff University School of Medicine. In 2016, he became a member of the Royal College of Surgeons. Between 2016 and 2018, he completed Core Surgical Training covering General Surgery, Urology and Trauma and Orthopaedics in the Wessex Deanery of Health Education England. He is currently a Trauma and Orthopaedic Specialist Registrar.[17]

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Frimley

Frimley

Frimley is a town in the Borough of Surrey Heath in Surrey, England, approximately 30 mi (48 km) southwest of central London. The town is of Saxon origin, although it is not listed in Domesday Book of 1086.

England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Millfield

Millfield

Millfield is a public school located in Street, Somerset, England. It was founded in 1935.

Field hockey

Field hockey

Field hockey is a team sport structured in standard hockey format, in which each team plays with ten outfield players and a goalkeeper. Teams must drive a round hockey ball by hitting it with a hockey stick towards the rival team's shooting circle and then into the goal. The match is won by the team that scores the most goals. Matches are played on grass, watered turf, artificial turf, synthetic field, or indoor boarded surface.

Gap year

Gap year

A gap year, also known as a sabbatical year, is typically a year-long break before or after college/university during which students engage in various educational and developmental activities, such as travel or some type of regular work. Gap years usually occur between high school and college, or after graduating from college and before entry into graduate school. Students undertaking a gap year might, for example, take advanced courses in mathematics or language studies, learn a trade, study art, volunteer, travel, take internships, play sports, or participate in cultural exchanges. Studies indicate that students who take a gap year perform better academically than those who do not, however, many parents worry that their children will defer continuation of their education. Many student have even decided against going to university after taking time to reflect during their gap year.

Ko Samui

Ko Samui

Ko Samui is an island off the east coast of Thailand. Geographically in the Chumphon Archipelago, it is part of Surat Thani Province, though as of 2012, Ko Samui was granted municipal status and thus is now locally self-governing. Ko Samui, with an area of 228.7 square kilometres (88.3 sq mi), is Thailand's second largest island after Phuket. In 2018, it was visited by 2.7 million tourists.

Moped

Moped

A moped is a type of small motorcycle, generally having a less stringent licensing requirement than full motorcycles or automobiles. The term used to mean a similar vehicle except with both bicycle pedals and a motorcycle engine. Mopeds typically travel only a bit faster than bicycles on public roads. Mopeds are distinguished from motor scooters in that the latter tend to be more powerful and subject to more regulation.

Bangkok

Bangkok

Bangkok, officially known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon and colloquially as Krung Thep, is the capital and most populous city of Thailand. The city occupies 1,568.7 square kilometres (605.7 sq mi) in the Chao Phraya River delta in central Thailand and has an estimated population of 10.539 million as of 2020, 15.3 percent of the country's population. Over 14 million people lived within the surrounding Bangkok Metropolitan Region at the 2010 census, making Bangkok an extreme primate city, dwarfing Thailand's other urban centres in both size and importance to the national economy.

Amputation

Amputation

Amputation is the removal of a limb by trauma, medical illness, or surgery. As a surgical measure, it is used to control pain or a disease process in the affected limb, such as malignancy or gangrene. In some cases, it is carried out on individuals as a preventive surgery for such problems. A special case is that of congenital amputation, a congenital disorder, where fetal limbs have been cut off by constrictive bands. In some countries, amputation is currently used to punish people who commit crimes. Amputation has also been used as a tactic in war and acts of terrorism; it may also occur as a war injury. In some cultures and religions, minor amputations or mutilations are considered a ritual accomplishment. When done by a person, the person executing the amputation is an amputator. The oldest evidence of this practice comes from a skeleton found buried in Liang Tebo cave, East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo dating back to at least 31,000 years ago, where it was done when the amputee was a young child.

London

London

London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom, with a population of just under 9 million. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the head of a 50-mile (80 km) estuary down to the North Sea, and has been a major settlement for two millennia. The City of London, its ancient core and financial centre, was founded by the Romans as Londinium and retains its medieval boundaries. The City of Westminster, to the west of the City of London, has for centuries hosted the national government and parliament. Since the 19th century, the name "London" has also referred to the metropolis around this core, historically split between the counties of Middlesex, Essex, Surrey, Kent, and Hertfordshire, which largely comprises Greater London, governed by the Greater London Authority.

Mountain biking

Mountain biking

Mountain biking is a sport of riding bicycles off-road, often over rough terrain, usually using specially designed mountain bikes. Mountain bikes share similarities with other bikes but incorporate features designed to enhance durability and performance in rough terrain, such as air or coil-sprung shocks used as suspension, larger and wider wheels and tires, stronger frame materials, and mechanically or hydraulically actuated disc brakes. Mountain biking can generally be broken down into five distinct categories: cross country, trail riding, all mountain, downhill, and freeride.

Climbing

Climbing

Climbing is the activity of using one's hands, feet, or any other part of the body to ascend a steep topographical object. It is done for locomotion, recreation and competition, and within trades that rely on ascension; such as emergency rescue and military operations. It is done indoors and out, on natural and man-made structures.

Athletics career

McFall with the gold medal he won for the 200 metres sprint at the Visa Paralympic World Cup in Manchester, England, on 13 May 2007
McFall with the gold medal he won for the 200 metres sprint at the Visa Paralympic World Cup in Manchester, England, on 13 May 2007

With his sprinting prosthesis, McFall began training with an ex-Paralympian. In early 2005 former Welsh international athlete Darrell Maynard[18] took over as his coach and he began training with an able-bodied squad. He was selected to represent Great Britain at the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) European Championships which took place in August 2005 in Espoo, Finland,[12] a decision that greatly surprised him as he had not achieved the qualifying standard in races that summer.[15] In the Championships, his first international competition, he took the bronze medal in the 200 metres[11] and came fourth in the 100-metre race,[19] having competed in sport class T42 (single amputation above the knee).[20] McFall was subsequently placed on a funding programme, enabling him to become a full-time athlete.[12]

At the end of January 2006, two weeks before the Sparkassen Cup in Stuttgart, Germany, McFall's car was stolen from the car park of the Welsh Institute of Sport where he worked part-time and trained. His customized running prosthesis worth £3,000 was in the boot.[21] Following his appeal for the return of the prosthesis, he received a telephone call from two youths who said they "might be able to recover the lost leg" but asked "What is it worth?" Infuriated, McFall refused to pay anything and asked the youths whether they had considered what being an amputee was like. After McFall agreed to take no further action against them, the youths anonymously returned the prosthesis to the Institute a week later.[22][23] McFall went on to achieve a personal best of 8.55 seconds in the 60 metres race, and 28.21 seconds in the 200 metres on 4 February.[3][23]

McFall's next major races were in September 2006 at the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) World Championships, where he was awarded a silver medal in the 100 metres[7] and a bronze in the 200 metres.[7][24] The following year, on 13 May 2007, McFall struck gold and achieved a competition record time of 26.84 seconds in the 200 metres in his début at the Visa Paralympic World Cup in Manchester, England;[25] he also garnered a silver in the 100 metres.[26] Subsequently, on 6 July 2007, he was placed third at the Meeting Gaz de France in Paris, part of the ÅF Golden League.[27]

McFall achieved his personal best time (as at 30 May 2008) in the 100 metres of 12.70 seconds by winning silver at the Bayer International Track and Field Competition in Leverkusen, Germany, on 10 August 2007.[1] Later that year he was champion in both the 100 metres and 200 metres at the International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS) World Wheelchair and Amputee Games in Chinese Taipei held from 9 to 19 September 2007.[28] In 2007, he was ranked first in the world for the 200 metres, and second for the 100 metres.[1][2]

McFall, who has been called "one of the fastest men in the world over 100m and 200m in the class of above-the-knee amputees",[29] made his Paralympic début for Great Britain in the 100 metres (T42) at the 2008 Summer Paralympics in Beijing. After a false start,[30] he took the bronze medal in 13.08 seconds behind Canada's Earle Connor (12.32 seconds) and Germany's Heinrich Popow (12.98 seconds).[31] Despite McFall's plans to retire from athletics after his 2009 season to study medicine, he did not rule out competing at the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London. He has said, "It would be nice to do 2012. I'm interested in cycling and rowing, and I won't qualify as a doctor till 2013, so it wouldn't be impossible. We'll see. It's that constant striving for excellence, the hunger to do more."[16]

Although McFall was born in England, he lives in Cardiff and competes professionally for Wales. He has said, "Wales has been very good to me and I want to put something back. So I'm very proud to run for Wales." According to him, his motorcycle accident "has been, in some ways, the best thing that ever happened to me. It's given me a focus, a drive, every day is a new challenge. ... I always had a list of goals and aspirations which didn't change after my accident – they just changed direction. Losing my leg has changed my life, but it hasn't changed who I am."[14]

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Gold medal

Gold medal

A gold medal is a medal awarded for highest achievement in a non-military field. Its name derives from the use of at least a fraction of gold in form of plating or alloying in its manufacture.

200 metres

200 metres

The 200 metres, or 200-meter dash, is a sprint running event. On an outdoor 400 metre racetrack, the race begins on the curve and ends on the home straight, so a combination of techniques is needed to successfully run the race. A slightly shorter race, called the stadion and run on a straight track, was the first recorded event at the ancient Olympic Games. The 200 m places more emphasis on speed endurance than shorter sprint distances as athletes predominantly rely on anaerobic energy system during the 200 m sprint. Similarly to other sprint distances, the 200 m begins from the starting blocks. When the sprinters adopt the 'set' position in the blocks they are able to adopt a more efficient starting posture and isometrically preload their muscles. This enables them to stride forwards more powerfully when the race begins and start faster.

Manchester

Manchester

Manchester is a city in Greater Manchester, England. It had a population of 552,000 in 2021. It is bordered by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and the neighbouring city of Salford to the west. The two cities and the surrounding towns form one of the United Kingdom's most populous conurbations, the Greater Manchester Built-up Area, which has a population of 2.87 million.

England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Paralympic Games

Paralympic Games

The Paralympic Games or Paralympics, also known as the Games of the Paralympiad, is a periodic series of international multisport events involving athletes with a range of physical disabilities, including impaired muscle power and impaired passive range of movement, limb deficiency, leg length difference, short stature, hypertonia, ataxia, athetosis, vision impairment and intellectual impairment. There are Winter and Summer Paralympic Games, which since the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea, are held almost immediately following the respective Olympic Games. All Paralympic Games are governed by the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).

International Paralympic Committee

International Paralympic Committee

The International Paralympic Committee is an international non-profit organisation and the global governing body for the Paralympic Movement. The IPC organizes the Paralympic Games and functions as the international federation for nine sports. Founded on 22 September 1989 in Düsseldorf, West Germany, its mission is to "enable Paralympic athletes to achieve sporting excellence and inspire and excite the world". Furthermore, the IPC wants to promote the Paralympic values and to create sport opportunities for all persons with a disability, from beginner to elite level.

Espoo

Espoo

Espoo is a city and municipality in the region of Uusimaa in the Republic of Finland. It is located on the northern shore of the Gulf of Finland, bordering the cities of Helsinki, Vantaa, Kirkkonummi, Vihti and Nurmijärvi while surrounding the enclaved town of Kauniainen. The city covers 528.03 square kilometres (203.9 sq mi) with a population of about 300 000 residents in 2022, making it the 2nd-most populous city in Finland. Espoo forms a major part of a substantially larger metropolitan area known as Greater Helsinki, home to over 1.5 million people in 2020.

Finland

Finland

Finland, officially the Republic of Finland, is a Nordic country in Northern Europe. It shares land borders with Sweden to the northwest, Norway to the north, and Russia to the east, with the Gulf of Bothnia to the west and the Gulf of Finland across Estonia to the south. Finland covers an area of 338,455 square kilometres (130,678 sq mi) with a population of 5.6 million. Helsinki is the capital and largest city, forming a larger metropolitan area with the neighbouring cities of Espoo, Kauniainen, and Vantaa. The vast majority of the population are ethnic Finns. Finnish, alongside Swedish, are the official languages. Swedish is the native language of 5.2% of the population. Finland's climate varies from humid continental in the south to the boreal in the north. The land cover is primarily a boreal forest biome, with more than 180,000 recorded lakes.

Bronze medal

Bronze medal

A bronze medal in sports and other similar areas involving competition is a medal made of bronze awarded to the third-place finisher of contests or competitions such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. The outright winner receives a gold medal and the second place a silver medal. More generally, bronze is traditionally the most common metal used for all types of high-quality medals, including artistic ones. The practice of awarding bronze third place medals began at the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis, Missouri, before which only first and second places were awarded.

Germany

Germany

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central Europe. It is the second most populous country in Europe after Russia, and the most populous member state of the European Union. Germany is situated between the Baltic and North seas to the north, and the Alps to the south; it covers an area of 357,022 square kilometres (137,847 sq mi), with a population of almost 84 million within its 16 constituent states. Germany borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, and France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands to the west. The nation's capital and most populous city is Berlin and its financial centre is Frankfurt; the largest urban area is the Ruhr.

Pound sterling

Pound sterling

Sterling is the currency of the United Kingdom and nine of its associated territories. The pound is the main unit of sterling, and the word "pound" is also used to refer to the British currency generally, often qualified in international contexts as the British pound or the pound sterling.

Silver medal

Silver medal

A silver medal in sports and other similar areas involving competition is a medal made of, or plated with, silver awarded to the second-place finisher, or runner-up, of contests or competitions such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. The outright winner receives a gold medal and the third place a bronze medal. More generally, silver is traditionally a metal sometimes used for all types of high-quality medals, including artistic ones.

Medals

Time
(s)
Medal Date Event
100 m (sport class T42)
12.70[1]
(personal best)
Silver 10 August 2007 Bayer International Track and Field Competition
Leverkusen, Germany
12.79[27] Bronze 6 July 2007 Meeting Gaz de France, ÅF Golden League
Paris, France
12.83[28] Gold 13 September 2007 International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS) World Wheelchair and Amputee Games
Chinese Taipei
12.98[32] Gold 20 May 2006 ParalympicChallenge
Duderstadt, Lower Saxony, Germany
13.02[26] Silver 13 May 2007 2007 Visa Paralympic World Cup
Manchester, England, UK
13.08[31] Bronze 14 September 2008 2008 Summer Paralympics
Beijing, People's Republic of China
13.55[33] Silver 9 September 2006 International Paralympic Committee (IPC) World Championships
Assen, Netherlands
200 m (sport class T42)
26.02[2]
(personal best)
Unknown 11 June 2006 [Not yet ascertained]
Manchester, England
26.08[34] Gold 17 June 2007 World Athletics Championships for the Disabled
Stadskanaal, Netherlands
26.20[35] Gold 14 September 2007 IWAS World Wheelchair and Amputee Games
Chinese Taipei
26.40[7] Bronze 5 September 2006 IPC World Championships
Assen, Netherlands
26.84[25]
(competition record)
Gold 13 May 2007 2007 Visa Paralympic World Cup
Manchester, England, UK
27.04[36] Bronze 14 August 2005 [Not yet ascertained]
Berlin, Germany
28.08[37] Bronze 26 August 2005 IPC Open European Championships
Espoo, Finland

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Leverkusen

Leverkusen

Leverkusen is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on the eastern bank of the Rhine. To the south, Leverkusen borders the city of Cologne and to the north is the state capital Düsseldorf.

Germany

Germany

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central Europe. It is the second most populous country in Europe after Russia, and the most populous member state of the European Union. Germany is situated between the Baltic and North seas to the north, and the Alps to the south; it covers an area of 357,022 square kilometres (137,847 sq mi), with a population of almost 84 million within its 16 constituent states. Germany borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, and France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands to the west. The nation's capital and most populous city is Berlin and its financial centre is Frankfurt; the largest urban area is the Ruhr.

Bronze medal

Bronze medal

A bronze medal in sports and other similar areas involving competition is a medal made of bronze awarded to the third-place finisher of contests or competitions such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. The outright winner receives a gold medal and the second place a silver medal. More generally, bronze is traditionally the most common metal used for all types of high-quality medals, including artistic ones. The practice of awarding bronze third place medals began at the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis, Missouri, before which only first and second places were awarded.

Paris

Paris

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an estimated population of 2,165,423 residents in 2019 in an area of more than 105 km², making it the 30th most densely populated city in the world in 2020. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of the world's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, gastronomy, and science. For its leading role in the arts and sciences, as well as its very early system of street lighting, in the 19th century it became known as "the City of Light". Like London, prior to the Second World War, it was also sometimes called the capital of the world.

France

France

France, officially the French Republic, is a transcontinental country predominantly located in Western Europe and spanning overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Due to its several coastal territories, France has the largest exclusive economic zone in the world. France borders Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland, Monaco, Italy, Andorra, and Spain in continental Europe, as well as the Netherlands, Suriname, and Brazil in the Americas via its overseas territories in French Guiana and Saint Martin. Its eighteen integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 km2 (248,573 sq mi) and contain close to 68 million people. France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre; other major urban areas include Marseille, Lyon, Toulouse, Lille, Bordeaux, and Nice.

Gold medal

Gold medal

A gold medal is a medal awarded for highest achievement in a non-military field. Its name derives from the use of at least a fraction of gold in form of plating or alloying in its manufacture.

International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation

International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation

The International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS) is an international sports organisation that governs sports for athletes with physical impairments.

Chinese Taipei

Chinese Taipei

"Chinese Taipei" is the term used in various international organizations and tournaments for groups or delegations representing the Republic of China (ROC), a sovereign state commonly known as Taiwan.

Duderstadt

Duderstadt

Duderstadt is a city in southern Lower Saxony, Germany, located in the district of Göttingen.

Lower Saxony

Lower Saxony

Lower Saxony is a German state (Land) in northwestern Germany. It is the second-largest state by land area, with 47,614 km2 (18,384 sq mi), and fourth-largest in population among the 16 Länder federated as the Federal Republic of Germany. In rural areas, Northern Low Saxon and Saterland Frisian are still spoken, albeit in declining numbers.

Manchester

Manchester

Manchester is a city in Greater Manchester, England. It had a population of 552,000 in 2021. It is bordered by the Cheshire Plain to the south, the Pennines to the north and east, and the neighbouring city of Salford to the west. The two cities and the surrounding towns form one of the United Kingdom's most populous conurbations, the Greater Manchester Built-up Area, which has a population of 2.87 million.

England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Personal life

Following the 2008 Paralympic Games, McFall returned to the UK from Beijing overland via the Trans-Siberian Railway.[11] He travelled from China to Mongolia and Russia, across Russia to Ukraine, then to Hungary, Croatia and the Dalmatian coast. From there he took a ferry to Italy to meet his girlfriend in Rome. They then travelled by train across Italy and Austria, eventually returning to the UK around the middle of November 2008.[38] McFall hopes one day to take up his childhood plans of studying medicine, running across the Sahara Desert, crossing the Atlantic Ocean by rowing boat, and obtaining a free-fall parachute licence.[11][14]

In his free time, McFall enjoys playing the guitar.[39]

Discover more about Personal life related topics

Trans-Siberian Railway

Trans-Siberian Railway

The Trans-Siberian Railway connects European Russia to the Russian Far East. Spanning a length of over 9,289 kilometers, it is the longest railway line in the world. It runs from the city of Moscow in the west to the city of Vladivostok in the east.

Mongolia

Mongolia

Mongolia is a landlocked country in East Asia, bordered by Russia to the north and China to the south. It covers an area of 1,564,116 square kilometres, with a population of just 3.3 million, making it the world's most sparsely populated sovereign nation. Mongolia is the world's largest landlocked country that does not border a closed sea, and much of its area is covered by grassy steppe, with mountains to the north and west and the Gobi Desert to the south. Ulaanbaatar, the capital and largest city, is home to roughly half of the country's population.

Russia

Russia

Russia, or the Russian Federation, is a transcontinental country spanning Eastern Europe and Northern Asia. It is the largest country in the world, covering over 17,098,246 square kilometres (6,601,670 sq mi), and encompassing one-eighth of Earth's inhabitable landmass. Russia extends across eleven time zones and shares land boundaries with fourteen countries, more than any other country but China. It is the world's ninth-most populous country and Europe's most populous country, with a population of 146 million people. The country's capital and largest city is Moscow, the largest city entirely within Europe. Saint Petersburg is Russia's cultural centre and second-largest city. Other major urban areas include Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg, Nizhny Novgorod, and Kazan.

Ukraine

Ukraine

Ukraine is a country in Eastern Europe. It is the second-largest European country after Russia, which it borders to the east and northeast. Ukraine covers approximately 600,000 square kilometres (230,000 sq mi). Prior to the ongoing Russo-Ukrainian War, it was the eighth-most populous country in Europe, with a population of around 41 million people. It is also bordered by Belarus to the north; by Poland, Slovakia, and Hungary to the west; and by Romania and Moldova to the southwest; with a coastline along the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov to the south and southeast. Kyiv is the nation's capital and largest city. Ukraine's official and national language is Ukrainian; most people are also fluent in Russian.

Hungary

Hungary

Hungary is a landlocked country in Central Europe. Spanning 93,030 square kilometres (35,920 sq mi) of the Carpathian Basin, it is bordered by Slovakia to the north, Ukraine to the northeast, Romania to the east and southeast, Serbia to the south, Croatia and Slovenia to the southwest, and Austria to the west. Hungary has a population of nearly 10 million, mostly ethnic Hungarians and a significant Romani minority. Hungarian, the official language, is the world's most widely spoken Uralic language and among the few non-Indo-European languages widely spoken in Europe. Budapest is the country's capital and largest city; other major urban areas include Debrecen, Szeged, Miskolc, Pécs, and Győr.

Croatia

Croatia

Croatia, officially the Republic of Croatia, is a country at the crossroads of Central and Southeast Europe. It shares a coastline along the Adriatic Sea. It borders Slovenia to the northwest, Hungary to the northeast, Serbia to the east, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro to the southeast, and shares a maritime border with Italy to the west and southwest. Croatia's capital and largest city, Zagreb, forms one of the country's primary subdivisions, with twenty counties. The country spans an area of 56,594 square kilometres, hosting a population of nearly 3.9 million.

Dalmatia

Dalmatia

Dalmatia is now one of the four historical regions of Croatia, alongside Croatia proper, Slavonia, and Istria. Between 1420 and 1797 most of it was part of Venice.

Italy

Italy

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a country located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, in Southern Europe; its territory largely coincides with the homonymous geographical region. Italy is also considered part of Western Europe. A unitary parliamentary republic with Rome as its capital and largest city, the country covers a total area of 301,230 km2 (116,310 sq mi) and shares land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates of Vatican City and San Marino. Italy has a territorial exclave in Switzerland, Campione. With over 60 million inhabitants, Italy is the third-most populous member state of the European Union.

Austria

Austria

The Republic of Austria, commonly just Austria, is a country in the southern part of Central Europe, lying in the Eastern Alps. It is a federation of nine states, one of which is the capital, Vienna, the most populous city and state. A landlocked country, Austria is bordered by Germany to the northwest, the Czech Republic to the north, Slovakia to the northeast, Hungary to the east, Slovenia and Italy to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west. The country occupies an area of 83,871 km2 (32,383 sq mi) and has a population of 9 million.

Atlantic Ocean

Atlantic Ocean

The Atlantic Ocean is the second-largest of the world's five oceans, with an area of about 106,460,000 km2 (41,100,000 sq mi). It covers approximately 20% of Earth's surface and about 29% of its water surface area. It is known to separate the "Old World" of Africa, Europe and Asia from the "New World" of the Americas in the European perception of the World.

Parachuting

Parachuting

Parachuting, including also skydiving, is a method of transiting from a high point in the atmosphere to the surface of Earth with the aid of gravity, involving the control of speed during the descent using a parachute or parachutes.

2022 ESA Astronaut Group

On 23 November 2022, McFall was announced to be one of the astronauts in the 2022 European Space Agency Astronaut Group.[5]

Source: "John McFall (athlete)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_McFall_(athlete).

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Notes
  1. ^ a b c d World wide ranking: T42 Male 100 2007, International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation, retrieved 30 May 2008; see also "Victorious Connor just off his record", Edmonton Journal, 11 August 2007, archived from the original on 14 May 2009, retrieved 14 May 2009.
  2. ^ a b c World wide ranking: T42 Male 200 2006, International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation, retrieved 30 May 2008.
  3. ^ a b Sparkassen-Cup 2006, Stuttgart, 04.02.2006 (PDF), Leichtathletik.de, 4 February 2006, archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2008, retrieved 30 May 2008.
  4. ^ a b c John McFall: Profile, UK Athletics, archived from the original on 5 June 2008, retrieved 26 May 2008.
  5. ^ a b "John McFall". www.esa.int. Retrieved 23 November 2022.
  6. ^ "Pride of Britain! Paralympic star John McFall to become first disabled astronaut in space". express.co.uk. Retrieved 23 November 2022.
  7. ^ a b c d Athletics, Men's 100m – T42, Final| (PDF), International Paralympic Committee, 9 September 2006, archived from the original (PDF) on 18 December 2008.
  8. ^ Athlete biography: McFALL John, Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games, Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, 2008, archived from the original on 7 September 2008, retrieved 14 September 2008.
  9. ^ Some sources indicate that McFall was born in Hampshire: see, for instance, Carolyn Hitt (23 January 2006), "Disabled athlete left without a leg to run on", Western Mail and "Amputee races on to chase dreams", South Wales Evening Post, 26 April 2008.
  10. ^ a b c d e f Triumph over adversity, Old Millfieldian Society, 2008, retrieved 28 May 2008.
  11. ^ a b c d e f Simon Hart (18 April 2008), "Road to Beijing Olympics: John McFall", The Daily Telegraph, London, archived from the original on 31 May 2008, retrieved 6 August 2021.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Julia Stuart [interviewer] (15 April 2007), "Personal column: Walking tall", The Independent, London, archived from the original on 20 April 2013 {{citation}}: |author= has generic name (help).
  13. ^ a b c Carolyn Hitt (23 January 2006), "Disabled athlete left without a leg to run on", Western Mail.
  14. ^ a b c "Amputee races on to chase dreams", South Wales Evening Post, 26 April 2008.
  15. ^ a b John McFall (18 June 2008), Beijing Diary by John McFall, UK Athletics, archived from the original on 3 August 2008, retrieved 4 August 2008.
  16. ^ a b Sheryl Garratt (26 July 2008), "Britain's Olympic athletes: Crunch time", The Daily Telegraph (Telegraph Magazine), London, archived from the original on 4 August 2008, retrieved 6 August 2021.
  17. ^ John McFall, biography, ESA, 2022-11-23
  18. ^ Athlete: John McFall, Disability Sport Wales, 2007, archived from the original on 9 November 2007, retrieved 25 May 2008.
  19. ^ Martin McElhatton (25 August 2005), Gold for GB at IPC Open European Athletics Champs, SportFocus, retrieved 26 May 2008.
  20. ^ IPC Athletics Classification Handbook 2006 (PDF), International Paralympic Committee, 2006, p. 15, archived from the original (PDF) on 24 January 2011, para. 18.7; see also Noel Thatcher (15 July 2002), "A classy system explained", BBC Sport, retrieved 27 May 2008.
  21. ^ "Athlete's prosthetic leg stolen", BBC News, 21 January 2006.
  22. ^ "Athlete's stolen leg is returned", BBC News, 26 January 2006.
  23. ^ a b "John loses a leg – and finds two!" (PDF), Insight, Otto Bock: 11, June 2006.
  24. ^ Tony Garrett (14 September 2006), "Encouraging signs", BBC Sport.
  25. ^ a b T42–200 metres, Men, Event 2, Results (PDF), International Paralympic Committee, 13 May 2007, archived from the original (PDF) on 31 March 2012, retrieved 27 May 2008.
  26. ^ a b T42–100 metres, Men, Event 15, Results (PDF), International Paralympic Committee, 13 May 2007, archived from the original (PDF) on 31 March 2012, retrieved 27 May 2008. See also Elizabeth Hudson (13 May 2007), "GB's Rushgrove breaks world mark", BBC Sport.
  27. ^ a b Men – National – 100m T42, Meeting Gaz de France, July 2007, retrieved 28 May 2008. See also Elizabeth Hudson (5 July 2007), "McFall aims to grab Golden chance", BBC Sport; "McFall claims third in Paris race", BBC Sport, 6 July 2007.
  28. ^ a b McFall has golden fortunes in Taiwan, Disability Sport Wales, September 2007, archived from the original on 17 October 2007, retrieved 28 May 2008. See also Medals for Britain at IWAS World Games, ParalympicsGB, British Paralympic Association, September 2007, archived from the original on 9 June 2011, retrieved 28 May 2008; Bob Cypher (17 September 2007), "Athletics: McFall strikes double sprint gold in Taiwan", South Wales Echo; John McFall does the double in Taiwan, Sports Council Wales, 14 September 2007, archived from the original on 11 December 2007, retrieved 28 May 2008; Early success for Brits in Taipei, UK Athletics, September 2007, retrieved 28 May 2008; McFall does the Golden Double in Taiwan, Welsh Athletics, September 2007, archived from the original on 13 October 2008, retrieved 28 May 2008 .
  29. ^ Sheryl Garratt (29 March 2008), "Final countdown [online version: Beijing 2008 Olympics: Final countdown for six British hopefuls]", The Daily Telegraph (Telegraph Magazine), London: 28 at 32–35.
  30. ^ "GB's McFall grabs sprint bronze", BBC Sport, 14 September 2008, retrieved 17 September 2008.
  31. ^ a b Athletics Day 7 morning session review: Eight of the best at the Bird's Nest, Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games, Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad, 14 September 2008, archived from the original on 21 September 2008, retrieved 14 September 2008.
  32. ^ Results for the ParalympicChallenge: Men's 100 m final race, starting class 42, ParalympicChallenge, Duderstadt 2006, 2006, archived from the original on 7 September 2007, retrieved 26 May 2008; "Stolen leg runner wins first race", BBC Sport, 22 May 2006.
  33. ^ Athletics, Men's 100m – T42, Final (PDF), International Paralympic Committee, 9 September 2006, archived from the original (PDF) on 18 December 2008, retrieved 27 May 2008.
  34. ^ World wide ranking: T42 Male 200 2007, International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation, retrieved 30 May 2008. See also Bayer disabled athletes hope for World Championship tickets: Mester shines with new world record, Bayer, 17 June 2007.
  35. ^ E-mail communication on 29 May 2008 between Jacklee and the Chinese Taipei Sports Federation for the Disabled (now the Chinese Taipei Paralympic Committee), organizers of the 2007 IWAS World Wheelchair and Amputee Games. See also IWAS World Championship, 9/13/2007, Taiwan, WCRacing.net, retrieved 9 November 2009.
  36. ^ World wide ranking: T42 Male 200 2005, International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation, retrieved 30 May 2008.
  37. ^ IPC Athletics Open European Championships, Espoo, 22.8.2005–27.8.2005 (PDF), International Paralympic Committee, August 2005, archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2008, retrieved 27 May 2008
  38. ^ John McFall (29 July 2008), John McFall's Beijing diary, UK Athletics, archived from the original on 5 August 2008, retrieved 4 August 2008
  39. ^ "Life's a beach", video diary at Simon Hart (18 April 2008), "Road to Beijing Olympics: John McFall", The Daily Telegraph.
References
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