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Joe Tex discography

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Joe Tex discography
Joe Tex.png
Joe Tex in 1965
Studio albums18
Compilation albums47
Singles81
B-sides3

This article contains comprehensive discography information related to Joe Tex.

Albums

[1]

  • 1965 Hold What You've Got (Dial Records, distributed by Atlantic Records)[2] - US Pop #124, US R&B #2
  • 1965 Hold On! It's Joe Tex (Checker)[3]
  • 1965 The Best of Joe Tex (King)[4]
  • 1965 The Best of Joe Tex (Parrot)[5]
  • 1965 Joe Tex (Pickwick)[6]
  • 1965 The New Boss (Dial/Atlantic) - US #142, US R&B #3
  • 1966 The Love You Save (Dial/Atlantic) - US #108
  • 1966 I've Got to Do a Little Better (Dial/Atlantic)
  • 1967 The Best of Joe Tex (Dial/Atlantic)[7]
  • 1968 Live and Lively (Dial/Atlantic) - US #84
  • 1968 Soul Country (Dial/Atlantic) - US #154
  • 1969 Happy Soul (Dial/Atlantic)
  • 1969 Buying a Book (Dial/Atlantic) - US #190
  • 1969 You Better Get It (Dial/Atlantic)[8]
  • 1970 With Strings and Things (Dial/Atlantic)
  • 1972 From the Roots Came the Rapper (Dial/Atlantic)[9]
  • 1972 I Gotcha (Dial) - US #17
  • 1972 The History of...Joe Tex (Pride)[10]
  • 1972 Spill the Beans (Dial)
  • 1973 The Best of Joe Tex (Citation)[11]
  • 1977 Bumps & Bruises (Epic) - US #108
  • 1977 Another Woman's Man (Power Pak)[12]
  • 1978 Rub Down (Epic)
  • 1979 He Who Is Without Funk Cast the First Stone (Dial)
  • 1979 Super Soul (Parrot/London)[13]
  • 1982 J.T.'s Funk (Accord)[14]
  • 1984 Ain't I a Mess (Chess)[15]
  • 1985 The Best of Joe Tex (Atlantic)[16]
  • 1988 I Believe I'm Gonna Make It: The Best of Joe Tex 1964-1972 (Rhino)[17]
  • 1988 The Best of Joe Tex (Charly)[17]
  • 1989 Different Strokes (Charly)[18]
  • 1989 Stone Soul Country (Charly)[19]
  • 1991 Greatest Hits (Curb)[20]
  • 1999 His Greatest Hits (Charly)[21]
  • 2000 25 All Time Greatest Hits (Varèse)[22]
  • 2000 Golden Legends (Direct Source)
  • 2000 Greatest Hits!!! (7-N/Buddha)
  • 2001 Show Me the Hits (Malaco)
  • 2001 Oh Boy Classics Presents Joe Tex (Oh Boy)[23][24]
  • 2001 Hold On to What You've Got/The New Boss (Connoisseur Collection)[25]
  • 2001 The Love You Save/I've Got to Do a Little Bit Better (Connoisseur Collection)[26]
  • 2002 Buying a Book (includes bonus tracks)
  • 2002 The Masters (Eagle Rock Entertainment)
  • 2002 12 Hits: Five Star Collection (Varese)
  • 2002 Ain't Gonna Bump No More (Southbound)
  • 2002 David Allan Coe Presents Joe Tex (Coe Pop)[27]
  • 2002 The Complete Dial Recordings, Volume 3: Live and Lively/Soul Country (RPM)
  • 2002 The Complete Dial Recordings, Volume 4: Happy Soul/Buying a Book (RPM)
  • 2002 Testifyin': The Essential Joe Tex (Castle Select)
  • 2003 Classic Masters (Capitol)[28]
  • 2004 This Is Gold (Disky)
  • 2006 The Very Best of, Volume 1 (Sony)
  • 2006 The Very Best of, Volume 2 (Sony)
  • 2006 Yum Yum Yum (HHO Licensing)
  • 2006 The Best of Joe Tex (Platinum Disc)
  • 2006 Golden Soul Hits (CBujEnt.)
  • 2006 Nothing But a Joe Tex Party (Legacy)
  • 2007 The One That You Love (KRB Music)
  • 2007 Greatest Hits (Collectables)
  • 2007 Greatest Hits (Neon)[29]
  • 2008 The Best of Joe Tex (Gusto)[30]
  • 2008 The Love You Save (Roots and Rhythm)
  • 2008 First on the Dial: Early Singles and Rare Gems (Shout)[31]
  • 2008 Get Way Back: The 1950s Recordings (Ace)[32]

Discover more about Albums related topics

Dial Records (1964)

Dial Records (1964)

Dial Records was a Nashville-based soul label established by music promoter, publisher and producer Buddy Killen in 1961.

Atlantic Records

Atlantic Records

Atlantic Recording Corporation is an American record label founded in October 1947 by Ahmet Ertegun and Herb Abramson. Over its first 20 years of operation, Atlantic earned a reputation as one of the most important American labels, specializing in jazz, R&B, and soul by Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, Sam and Dave, Ruth Brown and Otis Redding. Its position was greatly improved by its distribution deal with Stax. In 1967, Atlantic became a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Bros.-Seven Arts, now the Warner Music Group, and expanded into rock and pop music with releases by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Led Zeppelin, and Yes.

Checker Records

Checker Records

Checker Records is an inactive record label that was started in 1952 as a subsidiary of Chess Records in Chicago, Illinois. The label was founded by the Chess brothers, Leonard and Phil, who ran the label until they sold it to General Recorded Tape (GRT) in 1969, shortly before Leonard's death.

Epic Records

Epic Records

Epic Records is an American record label owned by Sony Music Entertainment, a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, the North American division of Japanese conglomerate Sony. The label was founded predominantly as a jazz and classical music label in 1953, but later expanded its scope to include a more diverse range of genres, including pop, R&B, rock, and hip hop.

Charly Records

Charly Records

Charly Records is a British record label that specialises in reissued material.

Curb Records

Curb Records

Curb Records is an American record label started by Mike Curb, originally as Sidewalk Records in 1963. From 1969 to 1973, Curb merged with MGM Records where Curb served as President of MGM and Verve Records.

Buddah Records

Buddah Records

Buddah Records was an American record label founded in 1967 in New York City. The label was born out of Kama Sutra Records, an MGM Records-distributed label, which remained a key imprint following Buddah's founding. Buddah handled a variety of music genres, including bubblegum pop, folk rock (Melanie), experimental music, and soul.

Malaco Records

Malaco Records

Malaco Records is an American independent record label based in Jackson, Mississippi, United States, that has been the home of various major blues and gospel acts, such as Johnnie Taylor, Bobby Bland, Mel Waiters, Z. Z. Hill, Denise LaSalle, Latimore, Dorothy Moore, Little Milton, Shirley Brown, Tyrone Davis, Marvin Sease, and the Mississippi Mass Choir. It has received an historic marker issued by the Mississippi Blues Commission to commemorate its important place on the Mississippi Blues Trail.

Oh Boy Records

Oh Boy Records

Oh Boy Records is an independent American record label founded in 1981 by singer John Prine, his manager Al Bunetta, and their friend Dan Einstein. The label has released more than 40 audio and video recordings by singer-songwriters Prine, Kris Kristofferson, Daniel "Slick" Ballinger, Shawn Camp, Dan Reeder, and Todd Snider, along with a dozen reissues of classic country music artists. Oh Boy Records also manages two subsidiary labels, Steve Goodman's Red Pajamas Records and specialty label Blue Plate Music. Oh Boy is based in Nashville, Tennessee.

Eagle Rock Entertainment

Eagle Rock Entertainment

Eagle Rock Entertainment is an international producer and distributor of music films and programming. It operates two record labels, a full-service production company and a music publishing subsidiary.

David Allan Coe

David Allan Coe

David Allan Coe is an American singer and songwriter. Coe took up music after spending much of his early life in reform schools and prisons, and first became notable for busking in Nashville. He initially played mostly in the blues style, before transitioning to country music, becoming a major part of the 1970s outlaw country scene. His biggest hits include "You Never Even Called Me by My Name", "Longhaired Redneck", "The Ride", "Mona Lisa Lost Her Smile", and "She Used to Love Me a Lot".

Capitol Records

Capitol Records

Capitol Records, LLC is an American record label distributed by Universal Music Group through its Capitol Music Group imprint. It was founded as the first West Coast-based record label of note in the United States in 1942 by Johnny Mercer, Buddy DeSylva, and Glenn E. Wallichs. Capitol was acquired by British music conglomerate EMI as its North American subsidiary in 1955. EMI was acquired by Universal Music Group in 2012, and was merged with the company a year later, making Capitol and the Capitol Music Group both distributed by UMG. The label's circular headquarters building is a recognized landmark of Hollywood, California. Capitol is well known as the U.S. record label of the Beatles, especially during the years of Beatlemania in America from 1964 to 1967.

Singles

[33]

Year Titles (A-side, B-side)
Both sides from same album except where indicated
Chart positions Certifications Album
US
[34]
US R&B
[34]
AUS
[35]
UK
[36]
1955 "Come in This House"
b/w "Davy, You Upset My Home"
The Best of Joe Tex (King)
1956 "My Biggest Mistake"
b/w "Right Back to My Arms"
"She's Mine"
b/w "I Had to Come Back to You"
"Get Way Back"
b/w "Pneumonia"
1957 "Ain't Nobody's Business"
b/w "I Want to Have a Talk with You"
1958 "Cut It Out"
b/w "Just for You and Me"
Non-album tracks
"Open the Door"
b/w "Teenage Rock"
By "Little Booker, featuring Joe Tex, vocals"
[37][38]
"You Little Baby Face Thing"
b/w "Mother's Advice"
1959 "Don't Hold It Against Me"
b/w "Yum, Yum, Yum"
"Charlie Brown Got Expelled"
b/w "Blessed Are These Tears"
By "Joe Tex and His X Class Mates"
1960 "Boys Will Be Boys"
b/w "Grannie Stole the Show"
"I'll Never Break Your Heart (Part 1)"
b/w "Part 2"
By "Joe Tex and The Vibrators"
Hold On!
"All I Could Do Was Cry (Part 1)"
b/w "Part 2"
102
"Goodbye My Love"
b/w "Wicked Woman"
Turn Back the Hands of Time
1961 "Baby You're Right"
b/w "Ain't I a Mess"[39]
Hold On!
"The Only Girl (I've Ever Loved)"
b/w "What Should I Do"
The Best of Joe Tex (Parrot)
"One Giant Step"
b/w "The Rib"
Non-album tracks
1962 "I Let Her Get Away"
b/w "The Peck"
The Best of Joe Tex (Parrot)
"Hand-Shakin', Love Makin', Girl Takin'
Son-of-a-Gun"
b/w "Popeye Johnny" (Non-album track)
"Meet Me in Church"
b/w "Be Your Own Judge" (Non-album track)
1963 "Someone to Take Your Place"
b/w "I Should Have Kissed Her More" (Non-album track)
"You Keep Her"
b/w "Don't Play" (from Hold On!)
Non-album track
"I Wanna Be Free"
b/w "Blood's Thicker Than Water" (Non-album track)
The Best of Joe Tex (Parrot)
1964 "Say Thank You"
b/w "Looking for My Pig" (Non-album track)
"I Had a Good Home But I Left (Part 1)"
b/w "Part 2"
"The Next Time She's Mine"
b/w "I've Got a Song"
Non-album tracks
"Sit Yourself Down"
b/w "Get Closer Together"
Hold On!
"I'd Rather Have You"
b/w "Old Time Lover" (from The Best of Joe Tex (Parrot))
44 Non-album tracks
"Hold What You've Got"
b/w "Fresh Out of Tears"
5 1 Hold What You've Got
1965 "Boys Will Be Boys"
b/w "Baby You're Right (I'm Gonna Hold What I Got)"
Non-album tracks
"You Got What It Takes" / 51 10 Hold What You've Got
"You Better Get It" 46 15
"A Woman Can Change a Man" / 56 12 The New Boss
"Don't Let Your Left Hand Know" 95 The Love You Save
"One Monkey Don't Stop No Show"
b/w "Build Your Love on a Solid Foundation" (from The Love You Save)
65 20 Hold What You've Got
"I Want To (Do Everything For You)"
b/w "Funny Bone" (from The Love You Save)
23 1 The New Boss
1966 "A Sweet Woman Like You"
b/w "Close the Door"
29 1 The Love You Save
"The Love You Save (May Be Your Own)"
b/w "If Sugar Was as Sweet as You"
56 2
"S.Y.S.L.J.F.M. (The Letter Song)"
b/w "I'm a Man" (from The Love You Save)
39 9 I've Got to Do a Little Bit Better
"I Believe I'm Gonna Make It"
b/w "You Better Believe It Baby" (from The Love You Save)
67 8
"I've Got to Do a Little Bit Better"
b/w "What in the World" (from The New Boss)
64 20
"Papa Was Too"
b/w "The Truest Woman in the World"
44 15
1967 "Show Me"
b/w "A Woman Sees a Hard Time (When Her Man Is Gone)" (from I've Got to Do a Little Bit Better)
35 24 The Best of Joe Tex (Atlantic)
"Woman Like That, Yeah"
b/w "I'm Going and Get It"
54 24 Non-album tracks
"A Woman's Hands"
b/w "C.C. Rider" (from The New Boss)
63 24 Live and Lively
"Skinny Legs and All"
b/w "Watch the One (That Brings the Bad News)" (from I've Got to Do a Little Bit Better)
10 2
"I'll Make Every Day Christmas (For My Woman)"
b/w "Don't Give Up" (from Live and Lively)
Non-album tracks
1968 "Men Are Gettin' Scarce"
b/w "You're Gonna Thank Me Woman" (from Live and Lively)
33 7
"I'll Never Do You Wrong"
b/w "Wooden Spoon" (from Live and Lively)
59 26 Soul Country
"Soul Meeting"
b/w "That's How It Feels"
By "The Soul Clan" (Joe Tex, Solomon Burke, Arthur Conley, Don Covay and Ben E. King)
[40]
91 34 Non-album tracks
"Betwixt and Between"
b/w "Chocolate Cherry"
By "The Joe Tex Band"
"Keep the One You Got"
b/w "Go Home and Do It"
52 13 Happy Soul
"You Need Me, Baby"
b/w "Baby, Be Good"
81 29
"That's Your Baby"
b/w "Sweet, Sweet Woman"
1969 "Buying a Book"
b/w "Chicken Crazy" (from Happy Soul)
47 10 Buying a Book
"Say Thank You"
b/w "Looking for My Pig" (Non-album track)
Reissue
The Best of Joe Tex (Parrot)
"That's the Way"
b/w "Anything You Wanna Know"
94 46 Buying a Book
"It Ain't Sanitary"
b/w "We Can't Sit Down Now"
117
"(When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again) I Can't See You No More"
b/w "Sure Is Good" (from Buying a Book)
105 Joe Tex Sings with Strings & Things
1970 "You're Right, Ray Charles"
b/w "Everything Happens on Time"
"I'll Never Fall in Love Again"
b/w "The Only Way I Know to Love You"
From the Roots Came the Rapper
1971 "Bad Feet"
b/w "I Knew Him" (Non-album track)
I Gotcha
"Papa's Dream"
b/w "I'm Comin' Home" (Non-album track)
Joe Tex Spills the Beans
"Give the Baby Anything the Baby Wants"
b/w "Takin' a Chance"
102 20 I Gotcha
1972 "I Gotcha" / 2 1
"A Mother's Prayer" 41 Joe Tex Spills the Beans
"You Said a Bad Word"
b/w "It Ain't Gonna Work Baby"
41 12 I Gotcha
1973 "King Thaadeus"
b/w "Rain Go Away"
Joe Tex Spills the Beans
"Woman Stealer"
b/w "Cat's Got Her Tongue"
103 41
"All the Heaven a Man Really Needs"
b/w "Let's Go Somewhere and Talk"
"Trying to Win Your Love"
b/w "I've Seen Enough" (Non-album track)
1975 "Under Your Powerful Love"
b/w "Sassy Sexy Wiggle"
27 Non-album tracks
"I'm Going Back Again"
b/w "My Body Wants You"
"Have You Ever"
b/w "Baby, It's Rainin'"
74
"Love Shortage"
b/w "Mama Red"
1977 "Ain't Gonna Bump No More (With No Big Fat Woman)"
b/w "I Mess Up Everything I Get My Hands On"
12 7 2 2 Bumps & Bruises
"Hungry for Your Love"
b/w "I Almost Got to Heaven Once"
84
"Rub Down"
b/w "Be Kind to Old People"
70 Rub Down
1978 "Get Back, Leroy"
b/w "You Can Be My Star"
1979 "Loose Caboose"
b/w "Music Ain't Got No Color"
48 He Who Is Without Funk Cast the First Stone
"Who Gave Birth to the Funk"
b/w "If You Don't Want the Man (Don't Take the Money)"
"Discomonia"
b/w "Fat People"
Non-album tracks
1980 "Stick Your Key In (and Start Your Car)"
b/w "Lady J. (I Love You)"
1981 "Don't Do Da Do"
b/w "Here Comes No. 34 (Do the Earl Campbell)" (first pressings)
"Loose Caboose" (later pressings)[42]
"—" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that territory.

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Billboard Hot 100

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Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs

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The Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart ranks the most popular R&B and hip hop songs in the United States and is published weekly by Billboard. Rankings are based on a measure of radio airplay, sales data, and streaming activity. The chart had 100 positions but was shortened to 50 positions in October 2012.

Kent Music Report

Kent Music Report

The Kent Music Report was a weekly record chart of Australian music singles and albums which was compiled by music enthusiast David Kent from May 1974 through to January 1999. The chart was re-branded the Australian Music Report (AMR) in July 1987. From June 1988, the Australian Recording Industry Association, which had been using the top 50 portion of the report under licence since mid-1983, chose to produce their own listing as the ARIA Charts.

Hold What You've Got

Hold What You've Got

"Hold What You've Got" is a 1964 single by Joe Tex. The single was his second chart release and first to reach the Billboard Hot 100. "Hold What You've Got" went to number one on the Cash Box R&B chart, and reached number five in 1965, on the pop chart.

A Sweet Woman Like You

A Sweet Woman Like You

"A Sweet Woman Like You" is a 1965 single written and performed by Joe Tex. The single is the follow-up to his crossover hit, "I Want To ". Like its predecessor, "A Sweet Woman Like You" made the Top 40 and hit number-one on the R&B singles chart, becoming Joe Tex's third release to hit the top spot.

Show Me (Joe Tex song)

Show Me (Joe Tex song)

"Show Me" is a title track of the 1967 album by Joe Tex, who also wrote the song. The single was Joe Tex's fourteenth release to make the US R&B chart. "Show Me" went to #24 on the R&B chart and #35 on the Hot 100.

Arthur Conley

Arthur Conley

Arthur Lee Conley, also known in later years as Lee Roberts, was an American soul singer, best known for the 1967 hit "Sweet Soul Music".

Don Covay

Don Covay

Donald James Randolph, better known by the stage name Don Covay, was an American R&B, rock and roll, and soul singer-songwriter most active from the 1950s to the 1970s.

Ben E. King

Ben E. King

Benjamin Earl King was an American soul and R&B singer and record producer. He is best known as the singer and co-composer of "Stand by Me"—a U.S. Top 10 hit, both in 1961 and later in 1986, a number one hit in the United Kingdom in 1987, and number 25 on the RIAA's list of Songs of the Century—and as one of the principal lead singers of the R&B vocal group The Drifters, notably singing the lead vocals of one of their biggest global hit singles, "Save the Last Dance for Me". Besides "Stand By Me”, his songs "There Goes My Baby" and "Spanish Harlem" also appeared on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's list of 500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll.

I Gotcha (Joe Tex song)

I Gotcha (Joe Tex song)

"I Gotcha" is a song by Joe Tex. Originally intended for King Floyd, instead Tex recorded it himself in the late 1960s, but did not release it at that time. He decided to re-record it in late 1971 and released it as the B-side of "A Mother's Prayer", the first single from his 1972 album "I Gotcha". Mostly spoken in the form of an early rap song, with few singing passages, "I Gotcha" has the singer admonishing a woman for playing with his affections: "You never shouldn't have promised if you weren't gonna do it".

Ain't Gonna Bump No More (With No Big Fat Woman)

Ain't Gonna Bump No More (With No Big Fat Woman)

"Ain't Gonna Bump No More " was a composition by Joe Tex and Buddy Killen, and released by Tex as a single in 1977, bringing the musician back to the top 40 of the US pop and R&B charts simultaneously for the first time since 1972's "I Gotcha". Tex used his aunt Bennie Lee McGinty's name as composer for tax reasons.

British Phonographic Industry

British Phonographic Industry

British Phonographic Industry (BPI) is the British recorded music industry's Trade association. It runs the BRIT Awards, the Classic BRIT Awards, National Album Day, is home to the Mercury Prize, and co-owns the Official Charts Company with the Entertainment Retailers Association, and awards UK music sales through the BRIT Certified Awards.

Soundtrack Inclusions (Joe Tex performances)

[43]

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The Boys in the Band (1970 film)

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Serving Sara

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Source: "Joe Tex discography", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Tex_discography.

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References
  1. ^ Primarily from Rolling Stone Joe Tex Discography; www.rollingstone.com, AllMusic Joe Tex Discography; www.allmusic.com, Yahoo Music Joe Tex Discography; www.new.music.yahoo.com and James Porter with John Battles and Waymon Timbsdayle, Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, 2003; www.roctober.com.
  2. ^ This was Tex's first album release, despite having released over thirty singles during the previous decade.
  3. ^ Early recordings, released to capitalize on the success of Hold On to What You've Got. Includes "Baby, You're Right", written by Joe Tex and a hit for James Brown in 1962. Also includes "You Keep Her", written by Joe Tex in relation to wife leaving Tex for James Brown. See James Porter et al., Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, 2003; www.roctober.com.
  4. ^ Also early recordings, released to capitalize on the success of Hold On to What You've Got. Also in 1965, a record containing no more than four Joe Tex songs and filled with other recordings represented to be Tex was released by Pickwick Records as Joe Tex. See James Porter et al., Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, 2003; www.roctober.com; commentary by Greg Burgess.
  5. ^ More early recordings. Includes "Meet Me in Church", later recorded by Solomon Burke.
  6. ^ Another release of early Joe Tex material, most songs being previously unreleased, intended to capitalize on Tex's newfound national success.
  7. ^ "No filler, no fat. Can't argue with this one, as it has all of his hits up to then. No B-sides, no album cuts. However, Atlantic should have put together a "Vol. 2", because his biggest hit of the sixties was right around the corner." James Porter with John Battles and Waymon Timbsdayle, Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, 2003; www.roctober.com.
  8. ^ Re-release of his first album Hold What You've Got.
  9. ^ Containing previously unreleased material of varying quality, released after Tex had left the label. See James Porter et al., Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, 2003, commentary by Waymon Timbsdayle; www.roctober.com.
  10. ^ Containing early, pre-"Hold On" material, without disclaimer, though the collection is considered to be quite worthwhile. According to John Battles, "These tracks were largely recorded during Joe's "Little Richard" phase, which wielded some wild, unruly rockers, of which some of the best are included here. ...All that screamin' and beamin' and steamin' makes me wanna wreck a room, just like Richard's most frantic sides (i.e. "Keep A Knockin'" or "Bama Lama Bama Loo", which hadn't been recorded yet). ...make no mistake, Tex wasn't just copying pre-established artists, he was getting his own thing together, and learning from the best. That said, Tex was already a highly respected performer without a hit when he was doing opening spots for Brown and Richard in the late Fifties. Little Richard himself went so far as to say that James Brown got much of his stage act from watching Joe Tex on stage. All in all, this is a cool compilation, but there's enough material from this period for a nice CD (Or maybe even a double CD) retrospective." Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, commentary by John Battles; www.roctober.com.
  11. ^ Being a direct re-release of the 1965 release of The Best of Joe Tex on Parrot Records.
  12. ^ Rerelease of pre-1965 King Records material, previously released in 1965 as The Best of Joe Tex.
  13. ^ Criticised as being another re-release of Tex's pre-Dial material, but again excluding the "lost 45, 'Looking for My Pig'". Released as part of the London Records Collectors' Series, which also included releases of London material by Thin Lizzy, Genesis and David Bowie. See James Porter with John Battles and Waymon Timbsdayle, Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, 2003; www.roctober.com.
  14. ^ Another release of pre-1965 material.
  15. ^ Being primarily a re-release of Hold On! It's Joe Tex (1965), though with detailed liner notes by legendary DJ Bill "Hoss" Allen.
  16. ^ Printed for release in 1984, but actually released in 1985. The album is similar to the original Atlantic 1967 release of The Best of Joe Tex, except that Tex's No. 1 R & B chart hit in 1965, "I Want to Do Everything for You", is inexplicably replaced with the non-single, "Build Your Love On A Solid Foundation". Also criticised for not including other Joe Tex hits, such as "Skinny Legs and All". See James Porter with John Battles and Waymon Timbsdayle, Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, 2003; www.roctober.com.
  17. ^ a b Both the Rhino and Charly releases are considered to be definitive "best of" releases of Joe Tex material, superior to reissues by his long-time label, Atlantic: "Now this is more like it. All the hits from all the labels, plus comprehensive liner notes that tell you what's what. At the time, Rhino (US) and Charly (UK) were setting the standard for reissue labels, and they gave Joe's legacy the royal treatment it deserved." James Porter with John Battles and Waymon Timbsdayle, Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, 2003; www.roctober.com.
  18. ^ Rare and previously unissued Joe Tex material, including "I Can See Everybody's Baby But Mine".
  19. ^ Reissue of Soul Country (1968), with bonus tracks.
  20. ^ The release of Greatest Hits on Curb Records marked the beginning of a series of reissues of Joe Tex material on various discount record labels. This led to speculation that Buddy Killen, who had formed Dial Records explicitly to record Joe Tex and then licensed the recordings to Atlantic Records, must have regained the rights to his Dial Records masters of Joe Tex recordings. See James Porter with John Battles and Waymon Timbsdayle, Joe Tex Album Guide Archived 2015-10-26 at the Wayback Machine, 2003; www.roctober.com.
  21. ^ A major collection, containing 44 tracks. Track listing is here.
  22. ^ According to reviewer Richie Unterberger, "If you're set on having the best available Joe Tex CD anthology...this definitely supersedes others as the greatest-hits collection of choice. ...There's no telling if this will remain the definitive Tex compilation if his catalog continues to get passed around, but there's a good chance that it won't be surpassed." Review of Joe Tex, 25 All Time Greatest Hits; www.allmusic.com.
  23. ^ An independent record label started by singer John Prine.
  24. ^ As described by reviewer Dave Marsh, "Fourteen fundamental hits, mainly from the Atlantic soul period, starting with 'Hold What You've Got' and with a brief diversion to the disco-funk of 'I Gotcha.' This is Tex as pared down to his essence as you'll find. Notes are by the great Memphis producer/songwriter Chips Moman, but, unfortunately, they're just one paragraph long." Review of Oh Boy Classics Presents Joe Tex; www.allmusic.com.
  25. ^ As described by reviewer Mark Deming, "Stylistically, both albums were just a bit off the beaten path from the bulk of Tex's mid-1960s work; his sense of humor (always bubbling beneath the surface) came into the forefront on Hold On to What You've Got, while The New Boss focused new emphasis on Tex's obvious fondness for country music." Review of Hold On to What You've Got/The New Boss; www.allmusic.com.
  26. ^ As described by reviewer Mark Deming, "Two of Joe Tex's finest albums from his tenure as the in-house 'advice columnist' of Southern soul are paired up on this superior CD reissue. ...Buddy Killen's production is the ideal match for Tex's often witty, always heartfelt stories about finding and holding on to love." Review of The Love You Save/I've Got to Do a Little Bit Better; www.allmusic.com.
  27. ^ Being the only soul record in the "David Allan Coe Presents" series. As noted by reviewer Wade Kergan, "Tex was among the grittier songwriters of '60s Southern soul, so the fact that the irascible redneck Coe would pick him as the lone soul artist in his mostly traditional country David Allan Coe Presents series isn't a surprise." Review of David Allan Coe Presents Joe Tex; www.allmusic.com.
  28. ^ Criticised by reviewer Tim Sendra as excluding too much "classic" Joe Tex, such as "'One Monkey Don't Stop No Show' and the timeless disco classic 'Ain't Gonna Bump No More With No Big Fat Woman'." Review of Classic Masters; www.allmusic.com.
  29. ^ Being a collection of Dial Records material from the 1960s. As noted by reviewer Steve Leggett, "Whatever else Joe Tex has been in his long career, and that includes being a charismatic showman, singer, and performer, he has always been a fine songwriter, and this generous 20-track set of his key 1960s Dial Records sides has plenty to prove the point." Steve Leggett, Review of Greatest Hits (Neon); www.allmusic.com.
  30. ^ Being the complete recordings Tex completed for King Records (owned by Syd Nathan) during 1955-1957, involving no album release at the time. According to reviewer Steve Leggett, the material is considered to be "derivative...sounding a bit like Tex trying to emulate Sam Cooke. It's pleasant enough, but it wasn't until the next decade that he would find his own voice." Steve Leggett, Review of The Best of Joe Tex (Gusto); www.allmusic.com.
  31. ^ Being exclusively Dial Records material, almost all cut between 1961 and 1964, just before Tex's 1965 breakthrough. According to reviewer Richie Unterberger, the album contains "arrangements similar to those heard in early-'60s 45s by poppy early soul singers like Marv Johnson and Dee Clark; and hints of Clyde McPhatter, Sam Cooke, and doo wop. Yet at the same time, there are also strong pleading ballads much closer to the Southern soul style with which he became identified, all of them written by Tex himself, the slightly James Brown-ish "Blood's Thicker Than Water" being a particular highlight in that regard." See Richie Unterberger, Review of First on the Dial: Early Singles and Rare Gems; www.allmusic.com.
  32. ^ Reviewer Richie Unterberger commented in relation to Get Way Back as follows: "Get Way Back: The 1950s Recordings...collects 27 tracks he recorded between 1955 and 1960 for the King and Ace labels, none of which were hits. It says something for both Tex's talent and perseverance that he was able to issue so much material without making a commercial impact, but it also says something about the derivative nature of that material." See Richie Unterberger, Review of Get Way Back: The 1950s Recordings; www.allmusic.com.
  33. ^ Primarily from a highly detailed singles discography, including particulars of B-sides, by Bosko Asanovic, with additions by Greg Burgess, Joe Tex Singles Discography; www.soulfulkindamusic.net.
  34. ^ a b "Joe Tex - Awards". AllMusic. Archived from the original on November 3, 2012. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  35. ^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (illustrated ed.). St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. p. 307. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  36. ^ Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 55. ISBN 1-904994-10-5.
  37. ^ B-side to the instrumental "Teenage Rock".
  38. ^ New Orleans pianist Little Booker (1939-1983), not to be confused with jazz trumpeter Booker Little, was generally known professionally by his given names of James Booker. He was a childhood classmate of Allen Toussaint and Art Neville and in his later years worked with Dr. John. Through the introduction of Joe Tex and while still legally a minor, he had been signed to a three year contract with Ace Records. He terminated the arrangement after three songs, when he discovered that Joe Tex's vocals were being dubbed over his own. See Greg Johnson, Biography of James Booker Archived 2008-04-20 at the Wayback Machine, Cascade Blues Association, Blues Notes, February, 2002; www.cascadeblues.org. See also James Booker.
  39. ^ Recorded by and a hit for James Brown in 1962.
  40. ^ Te Soul Clan was a one-off group, consisting of Joe Tex, Solomon Burke, Arthur Conley, Don Covay and Ben E. King, all at the time Atlantic-related artists. An album, Soul Clan was later released, though the only true Soul Clan performances were "Soul Meeting" and its b-side, "That's How I Feel", written by Don Covay and Bobby Womack. The balance of the album was simply a compilation of previous hits of the various artists. Joe Tex was represented by "Skinny Legs and All" and "Hold What You've Got". See Mark Deming, Review of Soul Clan; www.allmusic.com.
  41. ^ "Joe Tex - Ain't Gonna Bump No More". bpi.co.uk. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  42. ^ This single was released three times in 1981. Two versions, one on Columbia and the other on Handshake Records, had "Here Comes No. 34 (Do the Earl Campbell)" as the b-side, with reference to Earl Campbell, football star of the University of Texas Longhorns and the Houston Oilers. The third release of the song, on Handshake Records, had "Loose Caboose", a 1979 single, as the b-side. See Bosko Asanovic, with additions by Greg Burgess, Joe Tex Singles Discography; www.soulfulkindamusic.net.
  43. ^ In contrast to Joe Tex songs performed by others. Information primarily from www.allmusic.com and www.imdb.com.

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