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Jimmy White

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Jimmy White
MBE
Jimmy White PHC 2016-1.JPG
Born (1962-05-02) 2 May 1962 (age 60)
Tooting, London, England
Sport country England
NicknameThe Whirlwind[1]
Professional1980–present
Highest ranking2 (1987/881988/89)
Current ranking 87 (as of 23 January 2023)
Maximum breaks1
Century breaks324 (as of 22 January 2023)
Tournament wins
Ranking10

James Warren White MBE (born 2 May 1962) is an English professional snooker player who has won three seniors World titles. Nicknamed "The Whirlwind" because of his fluid, attacking style of play, White is the 1980 World Amateur Champion, 2009 Six-red World champion, a three-time World Seniors Champion (2010, 2019, 2020), 2019 Seniors 6-Red World Champion and 1984 World Doubles champion with Alex Higgins.

White has won two of snooker's three majors: the UK Championship (in 1992) and the Masters (in 1984) and a total of ten ranking events. He is currently tenth on the all-time list of ranking event winners. He reached six World Championship finals but never won the event; the closest he came was in 1994 when he lost in a final-frame decider against Stephen Hendry. He spent 21 seasons ranked in snooker's elite top 16. In team events, he won the Nations Cup and the World Cup with England. He is one of a select number of players to have made over 300 century breaks in professional competition. White was also the first left-handed player, and the second player overall, to record a maximum break at the World Championship.

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List of snooker player nicknames

List of snooker player nicknames

A nickname is a descriptive name given in place of or in addition to the actual name of a person. As in many sports, in snooker many players have nicknames.

IBSF World Snooker Championship

IBSF World Snooker Championship

The IBSF World Snooker Championship is the premier non-professional snooker tournament in the world. The event series is sanctioned by the International Billiards and Snooker Federation. A number of IBSF champions have gone on to successful careers in the Pro ranks, notably Jimmy White (1980), James Wattana (1988), Ken Doherty (1989), Stuart Bingham (1996), Marco Fu (1997), Stephen Maguire (2000) and Mark Allen (2004). Both Ken Doherty and Stuart Bingham have gone on to win the professional World Snooker Championship.

2009 Six-red World Grand Prix

2009 Six-red World Grand Prix

The 2009 Six-red World Grand Prix was a six-red snooker tournament held between 7 and 12 July 2009 at the Montien Riverside Hotel in Bangkok, Thailand.

2010 World Seniors Championship

2010 World Seniors Championship

The 2010 World Seniors Championship was a snooker tournament that took place between 5–7 November 2010 at the Cedar Court Hotel in Bradford, England.

2019 World Seniors Championship

2019 World Seniors Championship

The 2019 World Seniors Championship was a snooker tournament, that took place from 15 to 18 August 2019 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. It was the first event of the 2019–20 World Seniors Tour. It was the tenth World Seniors Championship, first held in 1991. The event had a total prize fund of £63,500 up from £18,000 the previous year, with £15,000 more for the winner, at £25,000.

2020 World Seniors Championship

2020 World Seniors Championship

The 2020 World Seniors Championship was a snooker tournament that took place from 19 to 22 August 2020 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. The last event of the 2019–20 World Seniors Tour, it was the 11th edition of the World Seniors Championship, first held in 1991. The event was played behind closed doors due to the COVID-19 pandemic and was broadcast by the BBC. The event featured sixteen players in a single-elimination tournament.

2019 Seniors 6-Red World Championship

2019 Seniors 6-Red World Championship

The 2019 Seniors 6-Red World Championship was a winner-takes-all seniors six-red snooker tournament, that took place on 3 March 2019 at the Waterfront Hall in Belfast, Northern Ireland. It was the third event on the 2018/2019 World Seniors Tour and the first edition of this tournament.

Alex Higgins

Alex Higgins

Alexander Gordon Higgins was a Northern Irish professional snooker player who is remembered as one of the most iconic figures in the game. Nicknamed "Hurricane Higgins" because of his fast play, he was World Champion in 1972 and 1982, and runner-up in 1976 and 1980. He became the first qualifier to win the world title in 1972, a feat only two players have achieved since – Terry Griffiths in 1979 and Shaun Murphy in 2005. He won the UK Championship in 1983 and the Masters in 1978 and 1981, making him one of eleven players to have completed snooker's Triple Crown. He was also World Doubles champion with Jimmy White in 1984, and won the World Cup three times with the All-Ireland team.

Masters (snooker)

Masters (snooker)

The Masters is a professional invitational snooker tournament. Held every year since 1975, it is the second-longest running professional tournament after the World Snooker Championship. It is one of the three Triple Crown events, and although not a ranking event, it is regarded as one of the most prestigious tournaments on the circuit. The reigning champion is Judd Trump.

List of snooker players by number of ranking titles

List of snooker players by number of ranking titles

This is a list of professional snooker players ordered by the number of "ranking titles" they have won. A ranking title is a tournament that counts towards the snooker world rankings. World rankings were introduced in the 1976–77 season, initially based on the results from the previous three World Championships. This meant that the 1974 World Championship retrospectively became the first ranking event, won by Ray Reardon.

1994 World Snooker Championship

1994 World Snooker Championship

The 1994 World Snooker Championship was a professional ranking snooker tournament that took place between 16 April and 2 May 1994 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England.

Century break

Century break

In snooker, a century break is a break of 100 points or more, compiled in one visit to the table. A century break requires potting at least 25 consecutive balls, and the ability to score centuries is regarded as a mark of the highest skill in snooker. Ronnie O'Sullivan has described a player's first century break as the "ultimate milestone for any snooker player".

Early life

White was born in Streathbourne Road, Tooting, London, England, and studied at Ernest Bevin School. He never achieved academic success, as he was often truant from school from the age of eight or nine, spending more and more time at Ted Zanoncelli's snooker hall. It was around this time that White met Tony Meo, with whom he would compete in money matches in many venues.[2] His natural aptitude for snooker led to a successful amateur career. After winning the English Amateur Championship in 1979, a year later he became the youngest ever winner of the World Amateur Snooker Championship, aged 18, a record since surpassed by Ian Preece and Hossein Vafaei.

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Tooting

Tooting

Tooting is a district in South London, forming part of the London Borough of Wandsworth and partly in the London Borough of Merton. It is located 5 miles south south-west of Charing Cross.

Ernest Bevin College

Ernest Bevin College

Ernest Bevin College is a secondary school for boys and a mixed sixth form located in Tooting, London, England. The school is all-boys for ages 11 through 18, and has a co-educational sixth form. It has about 1,173 pupils. The school was judged as 'requiring improvement' in a November 2018 report by Ofsted. The school was judged as "Good" in a June 2022 report by Ofsted.

Tony Meo

Tony Meo

Anthony Christian Meo is a retired English snooker player. He won the 1989 British Open by defeating Dean Reynolds 13–6 in the final, and was runner-up to Steve Davis at the 1984 Classic. He won four World Doubles Championship titles, partnering Davis, and the 1983 World Team Classic representing England alongside Davis and Tony Knowles.

Hustling

Hustling

Hustling is the deceptive act of disguising one's skill in a sport or game with the intent of luring someone of probably lesser skill into gambling with the hustler, as a form of both a confidence trick and match fixing. It is most commonly associated with, and originated in pocket billiards (pool), but also can be performed with regard to other sports and gambling activities. Hustlers may also engage in "sharking"—distracting, disheartening, enraging, or even threatening their opponents—to throw them off. Hustlers are thus often called "pool sharks". Professional and semi-pro hustlers sometimes work with a "stakehorse"—a person who provides the money for the hustler to bet with —in exchange for a substantial portion of all winnings. Another form of hustling is challenging "marks" to bet on trick shots that seem nearly impossible but at which the hustler is exceptionally skilled. Chess hustlers are quite common in urban areas in the United States and elsewhere, often offering speed chess against any takers. Unlike most hustlers however, chess hustlers are often assumed to be skilled and are seen as a challenge.

English Amateur Championship

English Amateur Championship

The English Amateur Championship, an annual snooker competition, is the highest-ranking and most prestigious amateur event in England. It is also the oldest and longest-running snooker tournament in the world, having been established in 1916, a full 11 years before the World Snooker Championship.

Ian Preece

Ian Preece

Ian Preece is a Welsh former professional snooker player, from the city of Newport.

Hossein Vafaei

Hossein Vafaei

Hossein Vafaei is an Iranian professional snooker player. He is the first professional player from Iran. He won his first ranking title at the 2022 Snooker Shoot Out, beating Mark Williams 1–0 (71–0) in the final. He dedicated this victory to his grandmother and mother because that day was mother's day in Iran.

Career

With a host of major titles and achievements, including ten ranking tournaments, White's overall record ranks him well up the list of snooker's most successful players. The BBC describes him as a "legend".[3] A left-hander, he reached the World Professional Championship Final on six occasions (1984, 1990–1994) but failed to win the sport's most prestigious title since his first attempt in 1981. Nonetheless, his consistency waned in the 2000s and a first-round defeat in the 2006 World Championship saw White drop out of the world's top 32 player rankings. White's continued slide down the rankings saw him drop to 65th but he recovered slightly to move up to no. 56 for the 2009–10 season. White is one of only seven players to have completed a maximum break at the Crucible Theatre, doing so in the 1992 World Snooker Championship. He has compiled more than 300 century breaks during his career.[4]

1976-1991

White's greatest achievement of his young career was in winning the English Amateur Championships. In the London Section, he beat M Goodchild 4–0, D Asbury 4–3, R Birt 4–0, Tony Meo 4–2 in the semi-finals and Danny Adds 4–1 in the final. This took him to the Southern Area proper where he beat Mark Wildman 4–3, Meirion Williams 4–3, George Eaton 5–3 and Cliff Wilson 8–5 in the final. Dave Martin, who won the Northern Section, was beaten 13–10 in the final itself. He suffered a couple of unexpected losses after this – to Walt Ley in the Westward Ho! Open semi-final, 2–3 and to Dave Gilbert, 2–3, in the London Final of the British Junior (U-19) Championships 1–3 (White made a break of 105 in an earlier round). He came back, however, by retaining the Wandsworth Classic beating Tony O'Beirne, Wally West and Dave Gilbert in the last three rounds and also reaching the final of the Pontins Spring Open (out of 1034 entries), beating Doug Mountjoy 4–1, Neville Suthers 4–1, John Howell 4–0 and Paul Medati 4–1 before losing 3–7 to Steve Davis, despite Davis giving White thirty points start per frame. He was knocked out of the 1st round of the Pontins junior competition by John Carney. In the Lucania Junior Masters, he was beaten on frame countback but showed his class to reach the final of the Warners Open, losing to Tony Meo 2–5, having beaten John Law, John Virgo and Nick Fairall. Steve Davis beat him again, this time 4–0 in the North Ormesby Invitation (after having beaten Willie Thorne 4–0 in the quarter-final) and then lost in the next three tournaments to Dennis Hughes 1–5 (Demmy Manchester Classic), B Jones (Pontins Autumn Open) and Roy Connor. In the Canadian Open, he defeated Tony Knowles 9–5 but lost 3–9 to Steve Davis in the last 16.

1980 opened with him winning the Demmy Pro-Am, defeating Tony Knowles 5–1, Willie Thorne 5–1, Dave Martin 5–1, Alex Higgins 5–3 and Steve Davis in the final 5–2. Davis beat White in the semi-finals of the Invitation tournament at Louth Town & Country Club. Having beaten Thorne, again, 5–3, David pipped White 6–5. White made an unsuccessful defence of his English Amateur title when he lost to Mike Darrington in the semi-finals of the Southern Area, 5–8, having beaten Dave Gilbert 8–5 and Geoff Foulds 8–2. Tony Knowles beat him in an early round of the Pegasus Snooker Club Pro-Am 3–1 and he had to scratch for being late in the London & South Area of the British Junior Championships having earlier beaten Neal Foulds 3–1. Charlie Gay knocked him out of the Westward Ho! tournament 2–0 and in a qualifying round of the Pontins Spring Open, he lost to Maurice Suckling. Defeats to Greg Baxter, in an early round of the Heineken Lager Open and to Joe Johnson in the North Ormesby Invitation preceded a trip to the Canadian Open where he beat Vic Harris 9–8 before losing to Alex Higgins 7–9. He was also beaten by Dave Gilbert, 0–3, in the Lucania Masters.

White established himself as a top professional in 1981. After losing 8–10 to eventual champion Steve Davis in the first round of the 1981 World Championship, White went on to win his first professional title, the Scottish Masters, beating Cliff Thorburn 9–4 in the final. Thorburn led 3–0 and 4–1 but then White won eight frames in succession to win the title and the £8,000 first prize.[5] Later in the year he also won the Northern Ireland Classic (defeating Davis).

The World Championship has provided the theatre for White's greatest disappointments. In 1982, he led Alex Higgins 15–14 in their semi-final, was up 59–0 in the penultimate frame and was a red and colour away from the final. After missing a red with the rest, however, he could only watch as Higgins compiled a frame-winning 69 break. Higgins won the deciding frame that followed to reach the final.[6]

In 1984 White won the Masters, beating Terry Griffiths 9–5 in the final.[7] He followed this success by reaching his first World Championship final. Trailing Steve Davis 4–12 after the first two sessions, White responded by reducing the deficit to 15–16. He then made an aggressive clearance of 65 to take the score to 16–17, but was unable to build upon a 40-point lead in the following frame, and lost 16–18. White did, however, become a World Doubles Champion later that year when he and Alex Higgins defeated Willie Thorne and Cliff Thorburn 10–2 in the final of the World Doubles Championship.

In 1986 White reached his second Masters final, but was defeated by Cliff Thorburn. However, he won the Classic and also retained the Irish Masters title he won in 1985. White won the Classic when he beat Thorburn in the final frame after needing a snooker. Later in the year, he overcame veteran Rex Williams 10–6 to win his first Grand Prix title.

White's third-ranking win – the 1987 British Open – helped him to end the 1986–87 season as World number 2, behind Steve Davis who defeated him 16–11 in the semi-finals of the 1987 World Championship. Later that year White and Davis contested a memorable 1987 UK Championship final which Davis won 16–14.

In 1988 he defeated John Campbell, Stephen Hendry and Tony Knowles to reach his fourth World Championship semi-final. He played Terry Griffiths and, trailing 11–13, lost a tied frame on a respotted black. Griffiths went on to reach the final courtesy of a 16–11 win. White did at least manage to consolidate his number-2 world ranking. However the 1988–89 season was less successful, and White's ranking slipped. He trailed John Virgo 11–12 in the second round of the 1989 World Championship and looked beaten when his opponent was on a break of 26 in the following frame. Virgo, however, called a foul on himself and White was able to win 13–12. The reprieve was short-lived as White was soundly beaten 7–13 by eventual finalist John Parrott in the quarter-finals. White avenged this defeat later in the year by beating Parrott 18–9 in the final of the invitational World Matchplay.

In 1990, White recorded a 16–14 victory over Steve Davis in the semi-finals of the World Championship. It was Davis's first defeat in the event in four years. White subsequently lost his second World Championship final 12–18 to Stephen Hendry. However, White beat Hendry 18–9 to retain his World Matchplay title later in the year and that win was followed by a 10–4 victory over Hendry (after leading 9–0) in the final of the 1991 Classic. White continued his run of success with victory in the short-lived World Masters, beating Tony Drago 10–6 in the final.

Steve James ended Hendry's reign as World Champion in the 1991 World Championship and White, in turn, defeated James to reach the final. He played John Parrott and was whitewashed in the first session 0–7. Although White managed to close the gap to 7–11, Parrott was able to seal an 18–11 victory. Parrott then overcame White 16–13 to win the 1991 UK Championship later in 1991.

1992–2002

White started 1992 positively and picked up his second British Open title, beating Steve Davis in the semi-finals and James Wattana in the final. He won another ranking title, the European Open, shortly after.

White was drawn against Tony Drago in the first round of the 1992 World Championship. After opening up an 8–4 lead, White made history in the 13th frame by becoming only the second player to make a maximum break in the World Championship. He won £100,000 in prize money for this achievement. Close wins over Alain Robidoux and Jim Wych followed before White met Alan McManus in the semi-finals, where he pulled away from 4–4 to win 16–7. He played Stephen Hendry in the final and won each of the first two sessions to open up a 10–6 lead, which he extended to 12–6 and 14–8. From 14–9, White lost three successive frames from commanding positions. At 14–12, White went in-off when compiling a potentially frame-winning break. Hendry drew level at 14–14 without conceding a further point and won the closely contested 29th and 30th frames to lead 16–14. Two century breaks completed Hendry's ten-frame winning streak and a remarkable 18–14 victory.

White responded well from this significant setback in the early part of the 1992–93 season. He defeated Ken Doherty 10–9 to claim his second 1992 Grand Prix title and followed this with an impressive victory in the 1992 UK Championship. After defeating Alan McManus 9–7 in the semi-finals, White opened up a commanding 6–1 lead in the first session of the final against John Parrott, from where he secured a 16–9 win. White has stated that this was among the best matches he has ever played.[2]

However White toiled for the remainder of the season, and his struggles continued at the 1993 World Championship. He did, however, manage to overcome Joe Swail, Doug Mountjoy and Dennis Taylor to reach the semi-finals. White lost the first five frames of his semi-final with James Wattana but, from 2–6, he won 12 successive frames en route to a 16–9 victory. However he proved no match for Stephen Hendry in the final, and Hendry's century break in his first visit to the table proved portentous, as White was beaten 18–5 with a session to spare. Only John Parrott (in 1989) has suffered a heavier defeat in a World Championship final. White did, however, manage to end the season on a high note when he beat Alan McManus to win the Matchroom League.

During a 1993 match against Ronnie O’Sullivan, White escaped a snooker by precisely backspinning the cue ball around the blue ball to safely hit the brown. This shot has often been described as “Shot Of The Century”.[8]

White endured a lacklustre campaign in the 1993–94 season, but reached the 1994 World Championship final for a fifth successive year, becoming only the second player after Steve Davis (1983–89) to achieve this. For the fourth time in five years, White's opponent in the final was Stephen Hendry and the defending champion opened up a 5–1 lead. White recovered well to lead 13–12 and made a break of 75 to take the match into a deciding frame. In the final frame, White was on a break of 29 and leading the frame by 37 points to 24 when he missed a straightforward black off its spot. Hendry cleared with a technically straightforward break of 58 to win the title.

White's form continued to decline the following season and he failed to reach a ranking final. However, his results on the table were greatly overshadowed, when he was diagnosed with testicular cancer during the season. He recovered after having his left testicle removed.[2]

At the 1995 World Championship, White was involved in a controversial first-round match against South African Peter Francisco. From 2–2 White was able to pull away and win convincingly by 10 frames to 2. Shortly after it emerged that large sums of money had been placed on White to win the match by the eventual scoreline. The ensuing investigation found Francisco guilty of misconduct and banned him for five years. However no evidence was found against White, and he was cleared of any wrongdoing.[2]

White put this controversy behind him and overcame David Roe and John Parrott to reach his tenth World Championship semi-final. In his match with Stephen Hendry, White could only watch as the defending champion made a 147 break to go 8–4 in front. White recovered well to 7–8 and won three successive frames to reduce his arrears from 9–14 to 12–14. However, Hendry proved too strong and ran out a 16–12 win.

White's ranking slipped from 7th to 13th at the end of the 1995–96 season and he was beaten 13–12 in a second-round encounter with Peter Ebdon in the 1996 World Championship. White endured further personal problems later in 1996 with the deaths of his brother Martin and mother Lil. His mother's death caused him to pull out of the 1996 Mosconi Cup pool competition.

In the 1996–97 season White failed to win a professional match until February and a first-round defeat at the 1997 World Championship against Anthony Hamilton (9–10, after leading 8–4) saw him drop out of the top-16 in the world rankings.

A run to the semi-finals of the 1997 Grand Prix helped to remedy this and White then enjoyed a great form at the 1998 World Championship. After qualifying to play Stephen Hendry in the first round, White opened with a century break and uncharacteristically shrewd matchplay enabled him to open up a 7–0 lead with only one further break over 50. Despite losing the next three frames from winning positions, White was able to seal a memorable 10–4 success and became the first player to beat Hendry twice at the World Championship. White followed this with a 13–3 win over Darren Morgan which included a break of 144. In his quarter-final against Ronnie O'Sullivan, however, White reverted to his more familiar all-out attacking style and lost the first session 1–7.[2] Although he fought back to 6–9, White succumbed to 7–13.

After regaining his top-16 ranking in the 1999–2000 season White started 2000 by reaching the semi-finals of the Welsh Open, where he lost 5–6 to Stephen Lee, despite leading 4–1 at one point of the match. He then defeated Marco Fu and John Higgins to reach the quarter-finals of the Masters, and he followed this up with a run to the quarter-finals of the World Championship. On both occasions, however, he was beaten by Matthew Stevens. Largely due to his poor form in the 1998–99 season, White also lost his top-16 place. He fought back the following season, reaching the final of the 2000 British Open (losing 6–9 to Peter Ebdon) and the semi-finals of the 2000 Grand Prix in the early part of the campaign. His only other victory of note, however, was a 6–2 defeat of Ronnie O'Sullivan in the 2001 Masters and White subsequently failed to qualify for the 2001 World Championship.

Ranked 11 at the start of the 2001–02 season, White performed steadily in the ranking events without reaching a semi-final. In the invitational 2002 Masters he beat Matthew Stevens 6–1 and came back from 2–5 behind to defeat O'Sullivan 6–5 in the quarter-finals. He similarly recovered from 2–5 down in his semi-final with Mark Williams but lost 5–6. He lost 3–13 in his second-round match with Matthew Stevens at the 2002 World Championship and issued an immediate apology after hitting the cue ball off the table in frustration when trailing 2–5.

2003–2009

White won only two ranking event matches in the 2002–03 season but was able to maintain his top-16 ranking. He came back from 1–5 down to defeat World Champion Peter Ebdon 6–5 in their first-round at the 2003 Masters.

In the 2003–04 season White produced his most consistent season in over a decade. After reaching the semi-finals of the 2003 UK Championship in November 2003, White defeated Neil Robertson, Stephen Hendry and Peter Ebdon to reach the semi-finals of the 2004 Masters – where he lost a tight match against Ronnie O'Sullivan. White followed this up with further victories over Hendry and Robertson en route to the final of the European Open in Malta, but was beaten 3–9 by world number 48 Stephen Maguire. His last ranking victory to date came in April 2004, when White defeated Shaun Murphy, John Parrott, Ian McCulloch, Peter Ebdon and Paul Hunter to win the Players Championship in Glasgow – his first ranking title in over 11 years. Victory in the 2004 World Championship could have given White the number-one ranking, but he was beaten 10–8 by qualifier Barry Pinches after leading 4–2.

White's consistency diminished in the 2004–05 season. Although his ranking rose to number 8 he was unable to reach the quarter-finals of any ranking event. However, he made two more memorable comebacks in the 2005 Masters. White trailed Matthew Stevens 2–5 in the first round and pulled back to 4–5 after needing two snookers in the ninth frame. White went on to win 6–5 and beat Stevens's compatriot Mark Williams by the same score in the quarter-finals after trailing 4–5. But White was beaten 6–1 by Ronnie O'Sullivan in the semi-finals.

White fell out of the top-32 at the end of the 2005–06 season and has not regained this status to date. He lost in the first round of the 2006 World Championship, although he did beat Stephen Hendry, Ding Junhui and World Champion Graeme Dott to reach the final of the 2006 Premier League.

In the 2006–07 season he qualified for only one ranking event, the 2007 China Open. He had a walkover of Stephen Lee before he lost 1–5 against John Higgins. After the season, he fell out of the top-48.

In the 2007–08 season he won 7 of his 16 qualifying matches. He won 4 straight matches at the 2007 Grand Prix and finished in the third place of his group, thus not qualifying for the main draw. He won one match at the 2008 Welsh Open and two matches at the 2008 World Championship. After the season, he fell out of the top-64 and remained on the tour only via the one year list.

He began the 2008–09 season by qualifying for the main draw of the 2008 Northern Ireland Trophy and the 2008 Shanghai Masters, but lost in the first round against Barry Hawkins 3–5 and Mark King 4–5 respectively. He won 4 of his next 7 qualifying matches (2 at the 2008 Grand Prix and at the 2008 UK Championship. After this he qualified for the main stage of the 2009 Welsh Open, but lost in the first round 1–5 against Ali Carter. He won his next qualifying match at the 2009 World Championship. In the second qualifying round he defeated Vincent Muldoon 10–8, but lost his next match 8–10 against Andy Hicks. At the end of the season he has the provisional ranking of No. 56.

2009-2016

Provisionally ranked number 47 for the 2009–10 season, White showed a surprising return to form at the start of the season when he reached the final of the Champion of Champions Challenge in Killarney, eventually losing 1–5 to Shaun Murphy.[9] His second tournament of the season was the Sangsom 6-red World Grand Prix in Bangkok, Thailand. He won the tournament, putting an end to his drought of titles by claiming his first since 2004. On his way to the final he defeated Shaun Murphy, defending champion Ricky Walden, Mark King, and Mark Williams, eventually beating Barry Hawkins in the final 8–6.[10] One month later, in the Paul Hunter Classic, White again reached the final but this time he lost to Shaun Murphy 0–4.[11] Two months later, on 18 October, he reached the final of the World Series of Snooker in Prague, his fourth final of the season. This time he was victorious, claiming his second title of the season by defeating Graeme Dott 5–3.[12]

In the Wembley Masters, White played Mark King in the wild card round, but lost the match 2–6.[13] Prior to the World Championship, he won only two of his six qualifying matches: he defeated Bjorn Haneveer 5–0 at the Shanghai Masters[14] and Jordan Brown 5–1 at the Welsh Open.[15] Due to this disappointment, and skipping the 2009 UK Championship for I'm a Celebrity...Get Me out of Here!, he was at risk of losing his Main Tour spot for the following season. However, he secured his place on the Main Tour for another season with a 10–8 victory over Mark Boyle at the World Championship Qualifiers. He then lost 3–10 against Ken Doherty in the next round.[16]

White started the 2010–11 season by entering the Players Tour Championship, his best performance coming in the first European event and at the sixth event in Sheffield, where he reached the quarter-finals each time.[17] After 12 out of 12 events White was ranked 34th in the Order of Merit.[18]

White also reached the quarter-finals of the Six-red World Championship, topping his qualifying group along the way.[19][20] He failed to qualify for the Shanghai Masters, losing his first qualifying match 3–5 against Liam Highfield.[21] He won his two qualification matches for the World Open; but lost 1–3 against Ronnie O'Sullivan in the last 32.[22][23]

White won the World Seniors Championship, defeating Steve Davis 4–1 in the final.[24] At the 2010 UK Championship in December, White lost 8–9 to Stephen Hendry in the first-round, after he had come through three qualifying rounds to get to Telford. It was only the fifth time in 24 years that White and Hendry had taken each other to the final frame and 16 years since Hendry's 18–17 win over White in the 1994 World Championship final.[25] He participated at qualifying stages of the German Masters, but lost in the second round 1–5 against Jimmy Robertson.[26] White reached the last qualifying round of the Welsh Open, but was whitewashed by Ryan Day,[27] and also qualified for the final stages of the China Open, by defeating Liu Chuang, Peter Lines and Dominic Dale,[28] but had to withdraw from the tournament due to visa problems.[29] White lost his first qualifying match for the World Championship 9–10 against Jimmy Robertson.[30]

White began the 2011–12 season ranked number 55.[31] At a Legends Tour event in June 2011, White compiled a maximum break, unusual for the fact that he potted the first ball off the break, meaning his opponent never played a shot in the frame.[32][33] White failed to qualify for the first two ranking events of the season, as he lost 3–5 against Rory McLeod at the Australian Goldfields Open and 0–5 against Nigel Bond at the Shanghai Masters[34] White failed to defend his World Seniors Championship title, as he lost in the semi-finals 0–2 against eventual champion Darren Morgan.[35] White failed to qualify for the next two ranking events, as he lost 5–6 against Jamie Jones at the 2011 UK Championship,[36] and 4–5 against Peter Ebdon at the German Masters.[37] After the FFB Snooker Open White was ranked number 47.[38]

At the 2013 World Seniors Championship, White lost to Stephen Hendry in the quarter-final.[39]

He finished the 2013–14 season ranked world number 64, almost losing his place on the professional World Snooker circuit. While White remained on the tour, however, fellow veteran Steve Davis lost his place, landing outside the top 64.

White started the season with a 2–5 loss to Fraser Patrick in the qualifying round of the Wuxi Classic, and a 4–5 second-round loss to Scott Donaldson in the Australian Goldfields Open. He then reached the last 64 of the next two European Tour Events, losing to Stuart Bingham and Stephen Maguire respectively.

He had a better result in the EPTC Event 3 where he progressed to the last 16 before losing 0–4 to Shaun Murphy, and in the APTC Event 2 where he made it to another last 16 before once again losing 0–4 to Matthew Selt. He also qualified for the International Championship where he lost 4–6 to Barry Hawkins.

White's season ended after an 8–10 defeat to Selt in the second round of qualifying for the 2014 World Championship.

The 2015/16 season ended in disappointment when White lost the deciding frame of his first-round World Championship Qualifier against Gerard Greene.

2016–2022

White made it to the quarter-final of a ranking event at the Paul Hunter Classic in Germany, his first for over ten years. Despite several good performances, he finished outside the top 64 and lost his tour card after 37 years as a professional. World Snooker, however, chose to give White and Ken Doherty a further two-year invitational tour card.

In White's first ranking event of the season, he made it to the last 16 having only made three breaks over 50. He subsequently lost 1–4 to Anthony McGill and then lost 0–5 to Ryan Day in the round of 128 in the China Championship.

White won his first professional title in seven years after winning the UK Seniors Championship as part of the World Seniors Tour. In the quarter-finals, he defeated amateur Les Dodd 3–1 and another amateur Jonathan Bagley by the same scoreline in the semi-finals. He met Ken Doherty in the final and won the match 4–2, thereby winning the first edition of the event.[40] White later played in the qualifiers for the 2018 World Snooker Championship, losing his second-round match to Joe Perry.

In the first Qualifying Round of the 2019 World Snooker Championship, White drew Ross Bulman, an unranked player who had achieved enough success to be selected by the WPBSA for a place in qualifying. White took a 6–3 lead at the end of the first session and won the opening frame of the second session to lead 7–3. Bulman took the following two frames to narrow the gap to 7–5. White won the following three frames in succession to come through the tie a comfortable 10–5 winner to set up a second-round match against Ali Carter. The opening session of White's second qualifying round match with Carter finished 5–4. White was unable to win another frame however in the second session and lost the match 4–10.

Winning the World Seniors Championship in August 2019, White qualified for the 2019 Champion of Champions tournament where he narrowly lost 3–4 to Ronnie O'Sullivan in the first round.[41] White recorded no wins in ranking events until the first round of qualifying for the 2020 European Masters, in which he beat Hammad Miah 5–4 after trailing 3–1 and being 4–3 up. White was beaten in Round Two by Mark Selby. In the 2020 World Seniors Championship, Jimmy White came back to beat Ken Doherty 5–4, after trailing 4–0, to retain his title.

In March 2021, White reached the fourth round of the Gibraltar Open, after defeating 2015 world champion, Stuart Bingham.

In May, at the World Seniors Championship, he reached the final, but failed to defend his title as he lost to David Lilley.

White lost in the semifinals of the 2022 UK Seniors Championship to eventual runner up and reigning seniors champion David Lilley, 4-2.

In May 2022, once again at the World Seniors Championship, White beat Wael Talaat and Rory McLeod, to advance to the semifinals for the fourth year in a row.

Discover more about Career related topics

2009–10 snooker season

2009–10 snooker season

The 2009–10 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between 16 May 2009 and 8 May 2010. There were six ranking events, two less than in the previous season. The Bahrain Championship was not held again, and the Northern Ireland Trophy was removed from the calendar too. The Jiangsu Classic was held for the first time.

Maximum break

Maximum break

A maximum break is the highest possible break in a single frame of snooker. A player compiles a maximum break by potting all 15 reds with 15 blacks for 120 points, followed by all six colours for a further 27 points. Compiling a maximum break is regarded as a highly significant achievement in the game of snooker, and may be compared to a nine-dart finish in darts or a 300 game in ten-pin bowling.

Crucible Theatre

Crucible Theatre

The Crucible Theatre is a theatre in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England which opened in 1971. Although it hosts regular theatrical performances, it is best known for hosting professional snooker's most prestigious tournament, the World Snooker Championship, which has been held annually at the venue since 1977. Its name is a reference to the local steel industry. In May 2022 plans were unveiled to build a new 3,000-seater venue nearby with a bridge connecting the two buildings.

1992 World Snooker Championship

1992 World Snooker Championship

The 1992 World Snooker Championship was a professional ranking snooker tournament that took place between 18 April and 4 May 1992 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England.

1981 World Snooker Championship

1981 World Snooker Championship

The 1981 World Snooker Championship, was a ranking professional snooker tournament which took place from 7 April to 20 April 1981 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. The tournament was the 1981 edition of the annual World Snooker Championship, a World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association (WPBSA)-sanctioned event which was first held in 1927. The 1981 tournament was the fifth consecutive world championship to take place at the Crucible Theatre since 1977. The total prize fund for the tournament was £75,000, of which £20,000 went to the winner.

1981 Scottish Masters

1981 Scottish Masters

The 1981 Langs Supreme Scottish Masters was the inaugural edition of the professional invitational snooker tournament, which took place from 22 to 25 September 1981. The tournament was played at the Kelvin Hall in Glasgow, Scotland, and featured nine professional players.

Cliff Thorburn

Cliff Thorburn

Clifford Charles Devlin Thorburn is a Canadian retired professional snooker player. Nicknamed "The Grinder" because of his slow, determined style of play, he won the World Snooker Championship in 1980, defeating Alex Higgins 18–16 in the final to become the first world champion in snooker's modern era from outside the United Kingdom. He remains the sport's only world champion from the Americas. He was runner-up in two other world championships, losing 21–25 to John Spencer in the 1977 final and 6–18 to Steve Davis in the 1983 final. Ranked world number one during the 1981–82 season, he was the first non-British player to top the world rankings.

1981 Northern Ireland Classic

1981 Northern Ireland Classic

The 1981 Northern Ireland Classic was a one-off invitational snooker tournament, held from 3 to 7 November 1981 at the Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Jimmy White defeated Steve Davis by elevenframes to nine (11–9) in the final. Dennis Taylor made the highest break with 112.

1982 World Snooker Championship

1982 World Snooker Championship

The 1982 World Snooker Championship was a professional snooker tournament that took place between 30 April and 16 May 1982 at the Crucible Theatre, in Sheffield, England. It was the only event of the 1981–82 snooker season which carried world ranking points. Embassy, a British cigarette company, sponsored the tournament, and the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association (WPBSA) governed the organisation of the event. It had a prize fund of £110,000, with the winner receiving £25,000.

Alex Higgins

Alex Higgins

Alexander Gordon Higgins was a Northern Irish professional snooker player who is remembered as one of the most iconic figures in the game. Nicknamed "Hurricane Higgins" because of his fast play, he was World Champion in 1972 and 1982, and runner-up in 1976 and 1980. He became the first qualifier to win the world title in 1972, a feat only two players have achieved since – Terry Griffiths in 1979 and Shaun Murphy in 2005. He won the UK Championship in 1983 and the Masters in 1978 and 1981, making him one of eleven players to have completed snooker's Triple Crown. He was also World Doubles champion with Jimmy White in 1984, and won the World Cup three times with the All-Ireland team.

1984 Masters (snooker)

1984 Masters (snooker)

The 1984 Masters was a professional non-ranking snooker tournament that took place between 22 and 29 January 1984 at the Wembley Conference Centre. The Masters, in its 10th year, changed the format into a championship for the game's top 16 ranked players. The BBC extended their television coverage to show all 8 days of the event and the prize money was more than double that of the previous year.

1984 World Snooker Championship

1984 World Snooker Championship

The 1984 World Snooker Championship was a ranking professional snooker tournament that took place between 21 April and 7 May 1984 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. The event was organised by the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association, and was the eighth consecutive World Snooker Championship to be held at the Crucible since the 1977 event. The event featured 94 participants, of which 78 players competed in a qualifying event held at the Redwood Lodge in Bristol from 1 to 13 April. Of these, 16 players qualified for the main stage in Sheffield, where they met 16 invited seeds. The total prize fund for the event was £200,000, the highest total pool for any snooker tournament at that time; the winner received £44,000.

Personal life

Neal Foulds and Jimmy White (left) in an interview with Shaun Murphy after his victory against Mark Allen at the 2015 German Masters
Neal Foulds and Jimmy White (left) in an interview with Shaun Murphy after his victory against Mark Allen at the 2015 German Masters

White has five children.[42] In 2005, as part of a sponsorship deal with HP Sauce, he changed his name by deed poll to "James Brown" for the Masters.[43] In his autobiography, released in November 2014, White revealed that he was addicted to crack cocaine during a three-month spell of his career. He said that he went from taking cocaine to crack following his defeat by Steve Davis in the 1984 World Championship final.[44] White lives in Epsom, Surrey.[1]

In the late 1990s, White's Bull Terrier, Splinter, was dognapped and held for ransom. Splinter became the first dog to have a colour poster on the front page of The Times. White paid the ransom, and Splinter was returned to him. Splinter went on to live for another three years.[45]

White is also a pool and poker player. Along with Steve Davis and Alex Higgins, White was a member of Europe's victorious Mosconi Cup pool team of 1995, and won the deciding match against Lou Butera.[46] He won the second Poker Million tournament, held in 2003, which also had Steve Davis at the final table.[47] He was also good friends with professional poker player, Dave "The Devilfish" Ulliott.

White is currently a commentator for snooker coverage on Eurosport-UK.[48]

In April 2015, he appeared as a guest at a campaign event when his friend Kim Rose was standing as the UK Independence Party candidate to be MP for Southampton Itchen.[49]

White has been a supporter of Chelsea F.C. since 1972.[50]

In 2018, White began a relationship with beauty queen Jade Slusarczyk, 23 years his junior.[51]

Discover more about Personal life related topics

Neal Foulds

Neal Foulds

Neal Foulds is an English former professional snooker player and six-time tournament winner, including the 1986 International Open, the 1988 Dubai Masters and the 1992 Scottish Masters, as well as the invitational Pot Black in 1992. He was the runner up at the 1986 UK Championship, the British Open in 1987 and reached the semi finals of the Masters on three occasions, as well as the World Championship. After his retirement, Foulds became a commentator for the BBC and is currently part of the presenting team for ITV and Eurosport.

2015 German Masters

2015 German Masters

The 2015 German Masters was a professional ranking snooker tournament that took place between 4–8 February 2015 at the Tempodrom in Berlin, Germany. It was the sixth ranking event of the 2014/2015 season.

HP Sauce

HP Sauce

HP Sauce is a British brown sauce, the main ingredients of which are tomatoes and tamarind extract. It was named after London's Houses of Parliament. After making its first appearance on British dinner tables in the late 19th century, HP Sauce went on to become an icon of British culture. It was the best-selling brand of brown sauce in the UK in 2005, with 73.8% of the retail market. The sauce was originally produced in the United Kingdom, but is now made by Heinz in the Netherlands.

2005 Masters (snooker)

2005 Masters (snooker)

The 2005 Masters was the 2005 edition of the non-ranking Masters professional snooker tournament. It was held from 13 to 20 February 2005 at the Wembley Conference Centre, London. The tournament was the 31st staging of the competition and was the sixth of nine World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association (WPBSA) main tour events in the 2004/2005 season. The tournament was broadcast in the United Kingdom on the BBC and by Eurosport in Europe.

Epsom

Epsom

Epsom is the principal town of the Borough of Epsom and Ewell in Surrey, England, about 13.5 miles south of central London. The town is first recorded as Ebesham in the 10th century and its name probably derives from that of a Saxon landowner. The earliest evidence of human activity is from the mid-Bronze Age, but the modern settlement probably grew up in the area surrounding St Martin's Church in the 6th or 7th centuries and the street pattern is thought to have become established in the Middle Ages. Today the High Street is dominated by the clock tower, which was erected in 1847–8.

Bull Terrier

Bull Terrier

The Bull Terrier is a breed of dog in the terrier family. There is also a miniature version of this breed which is officially known as the Miniature Bull Terrier.

Dognapping

Dognapping

Dognapping is the crime of taking a dog from its owner. The word is derived from the term kidnapping.

Poker

Poker

Poker is a family of comparing card games in which players wager over which hand is best according to that specific game's rules. It is played worldwide, however in some places the rules may vary. While the earliest known form of the game was played with just 20 cards, today it is usually played with a standard deck, although in countries where short packs are common, it may be played with 32, 40 or 48 cards. Thus poker games vary in deck configuration, the number of cards in play, the number dealt face up or face down, and the number shared by all players, but all have rules that involve one or more rounds of betting.

Mosconi Cup

Mosconi Cup

The Mosconi Cup is an annual nine-ball pool tournament contested since 1994 between teams representing Europe and the United States. Named after American pool player Willie Mosconi, the event is comparable to the Ryder Cup in golf and the Weber Cup in bowling.

1995 Mosconi Cup

1995 Mosconi Cup

The 1995 Interplay Mosconi Cup, the second edition of the annual nine-ball pool competition between teams representing Europe and the United States, took place 7–10 December 1995 at the Festival Hall in Basildon, England.

Lou Butera

Lou Butera

Lou Butera was an American professional pool player and an inductee into the Billiards Congress of America's Hall of Fame in 1986.

Dave Ulliott

Dave Ulliott

David A. Ulliott (1 April 1954 – 6 April 2015), was an English professional gambler and poker player. Formerly, Ulliott was a minor figure in the Hull underworld, but went on to become a World Series of Poker bracelet-winner, and a mainstay of televised poker. At the poker table, he was known for wearing orange-tinted prescription sunglasses, a sharp suit and gold knuckleduster rings reading "Devil" and "Fish", which he made himself. In 2017 he was elected to the Poker Hall of Fame.

In the media

White had a cameo role as himself (as the World Billiards Champion) in Stephen Chow's 1990 kung fu and billiards comedy film, Legend of the Dragon.

On the BBC game show Big Break, White was the first player to clear the table with 3 reds remaining in the final part of the challenge (thus winning the top prize for the contestant he was playing for). He was introduced to the studio audience on each appearance with the song "Jimmy Jimmy" by the Undertones. White was also the first (and only) winner of the ITV show Tenball, featuring a mix between pool and snooker.

In the film Jack Said (a prequel to Jack Says) White played the part of Vic Lee, a dodgy snooker club owner, in his first major film role for British cinema.

White appeared in the 9th series of I'm a Celebrity...Get Me Out of Here![52] He finished in third place on 4 December 2009,[53] with Gino D'Acampo the eventual winner.[54]

On September 23, 2019, Jimmy White published an apology to Kirk Stevens on White's official Facebook page stating that in his autobiography "Second Wind" he misremembered a few stories as occurring with Kirk Stevens that in fact did not. These events were widely broadcast in the media and White wanted to make the apology public to prevent them from being repeated. White further stated that he did not intend his words to be interpreted as meaning that Kirk Stevens introduced him to crack cocaine or that Kirk Stevens ever played WPBSA snooker under the influence of drugs.[55]

White has endorsed four computer games: Jimmy White's 'Whirlwind' Snooker, Jimmy White's 2: Cueball, Jimmy White's Cueball World and Pool Paradise. These games have been released for numerous machines, from 8 bits up to second-generation consoles and mobile phones. In June 2007, he was contracted to the online billiard website Play89.[46]

White was portrayed by James Bailey in the BBC film The Rack Pack, which focused on the rivalry between Alex Higgins and Steve Davis in the 1980s [56]

Discover more about In the media related topics

Cameo appearance

Cameo appearance

A cameo role, also called a cameo appearance and often shortened to just cameo, is a brief appearance of a well-known person in a work of the performing arts. These roles are generally small, many of them non-speaking ones, and are commonly either appearances in a work in which they hold some special significance or renowned people making uncredited appearances. Short appearances by celebrities, film directors, politicians, athletes or musicians are common. A crew member of the movie or show playing a minor role can be referred to as a cameo role as well, such as Alfred Hitchcock's frequent cameos.

Chinese martial arts

Chinese martial arts

Chinese martial arts, often called by the umbrella terms kung fu, kuoshu or wushu, are multiple fighting styles that have developed over the centuries in Greater China. These fighting styles are often classified according to common traits, identified as "families" of martial arts. Examples of such traits include Shaolinquan (少林拳) physical exercises involving All Other Animals (五形) mimicry or training methods inspired by Old Chinese philosophies, religions and legends. Styles that focus on qi manipulation are called internal, while others that concentrate on improving muscle and cardiovascular fitness are called external. Geographical association, as in northern and southern, is another popular classification method.

Cue sports

Cue sports

Cue sports are a wide variety of games of skill played with a cue, which is used to strike billiard balls and thereby cause them to move around a cloth-covered table bounded by elastic bumpers known as cushions.

BBC

BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national broadcaster of the United Kingdom, based at Broadcasting House in London. It is the world's oldest national broadcaster, and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees, employing over 22,000 staff in total, of whom approximately 19,000 are in public-sector broadcasting.

Big Break

Big Break

Big Break is a British television game show, created by Roger Medcalf, Mike Kemp and Terry Mardell, presented by comedian Jim Davidson and snooker commentator John Virgo, and broadcast on BBC One between 1991 and 2002. Inspired by ITV's Bullseye, the programme focuses on teams consisting of a contestant and a profesional snooker player competing in rounds that involve snooker, with the best team eventually seeing its player seeking to win prizes for their contestant. The series was notable for often featuring a unique round involving trick shots, and the chemistry between Davidson and Virgo.

Jimmy Jimmy (song)

Jimmy Jimmy (song)

"Jimmy Jimmy" is a Top 20 punk rock song originally written and recorded by Northern Irish band the Undertones in the spring of 1979. The song was written by the band's main songwriter, John O'Neill, it was the Undertones' third single and was released on 20 April 1979, reaching number 16 on the UK Singles Chart, making "Jimmy Jimmy" the Undertones' first Top 20 single. The song was included on both the original issue and subsequent reissue of the band's debut album, The Undertones.

ITV (TV network)

ITV (TV network)

ITV is a British free-to-air public broadcast television network. It was launched in 1955 as Independent Television to provide competition to BBC Television. ITV is the oldest commercial network in the UK. Since the passing of the Broadcasting Act 1990, it has been legally known as Channel 3 to distinguish it from the other analogue channels at the time: BBC One, BBC Two, and Channel 4.

Jack Said

Jack Said

Jack Said is a 2009 British thriller film, the prequel to Jack Says. It is written by Paul Tanter, and based on his graphic novel, illustrated by Oscar Alvarado. It stars Danny Dyer, David O'Hara, Simon Phillips, Ashlie Walker, Terry Stone and snooker player Jimmy White.

Jack Says

Jack Says

Jack Says is a 2008 British thriller film known particularly for being the last professional engagement of Mike Reid, who died shortly after filming in 2007. The film is a contemporary film noir, with comic book undertones that reflect its precursor graphic novel Jack Said, and is comparable in style to Sin City. The film also stars Simon Phillips, Rita Ramnani, Rula Lenska and Eric Cantona.

Cinema of the United Kingdom

Cinema of the United Kingdom

The United Kingdom has had a significant film industry for over a century. While film production reached an all-time high in 1936, the "golden age" of British cinema is usually thought to have occurred in the 1940s, during which the directors David Lean, Michael Powell, and Carol Reed produced their most critically acclaimed works. Many British actors have accrued critical success and worldwide recognition, such as Audrey Hepburn, Olivia de Havilland, Glynis Johns, Maggie Smith, Roger Moore, Michael Caine, Sean Connery, Joan Collins, Judi Dench, Julie Andrews, Daniel Day-Lewis, Gary Oldman, Emma Thompson, Hugh Grant and Kate Winslet. Some of the films with the largest ever box office returns have been made in the United Kingdom, including the third and sixth highest-grossing film franchises.

Gino D'Acampo

Gino D'Acampo

Gennaro Sheffield D'Acampo is an Italian celebrity chef and media personality based in the United Kingdom, best known for his food-focused television shows and cookbooks.

Jimmy White's 'Whirlwind' Snooker

Jimmy White's 'Whirlwind' Snooker

Jimmy White's 'Whirlwind' Snooker is a video game by Archer Maclean, released by Virgin Games in 1991 for the Amiga, Atari ST, and IBM PC compatibles. A port for the Atari Lynx was planned but never released. 'Whirlwind' Snooker is a realistic snooker simulator.

Performance and rankings timeline

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Ranking[57][nb 1] [nb 2] [nb 3] 21 10 11 7 7 5 2 2 4 4 3 3 3 4 7 13 21 18 16 18 11 10 15 11 8 35 60 65 56 60 55 46 55 64 [nb 4] 90 [nb 5] 72 [nb 5] 84 [nb 5] 90
Ranking tournaments
Championship League Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking Event RR RR WD
European Masters[nb 6] Tournament Not Held SF 3R 1R W 1R SF WD 1R 2R NH 1R Not Held QF 1R F 1R 2R LQ NR Tournament Not Held LQ LQ LQ LQ 1R LQ 1R
British Open[nb 7] Non-Ranking Event 2R 1R W QF WD 3R SF W SF 3R 3R 2R 1R 1R 2R 1R F 2R 2R 1R 1R Tournament Not Held 2R LQ
Northern Ireland Open Tournament Not Held 2R 3R 1R 1R 1R LQ 1R
UK Championship Non-Ranking Event QF SF 3R F 1R QF QF F W 3R 2R 3R 1R 2R 3R 3R 1R 3R 2R SF 2R 2R LQ LQ LQ A 1R LQ LQ 2R 2R 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R
Scottish Open[nb 8] Not Held NR 2R 1R QF F 1R 3R F QF Not Held A SF SF 1R QF 3R 2R 1R 1R QF 3R W Tournament Not Held MR Not Held 3R 2R 1R 1R 1R LQ LQ
English Open Tournament Not Held 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R LQ LQ
World Grand Prix Tournament Not Held NR DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
Shoot Out Tournament Not Held NR Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking Event 3R 2R 3R 1R 2R 1R 1R
German Masters[nb 9] Tournament Not Held 1R 1R 2R NR Tournament Not Held LQ LQ LQ 1R LQ LQ 1R LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ
Welsh Open Tournament Not Held A QF QF 2R 2R 1R 2R 2R SF LQ 2R 1R 3R 2R 2R LQ LQ 1R LQ LQ LQ LQ 1R 1R 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R 2R LQ
Players Championship[nb 10] Tournament Not Held DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
Tour Championship Tournament Not Held DNQ DNQ DNQ DNQ
World Championship A 1R SF 1R F QF QF SF SF QF F F F F F SF 2R 1R QF 1R QF LQ 2R 2R 1R 2R 1R LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ
Non-ranking tournaments
Hong Kong Masters[nb 11] Tournament Not Held A QF A QF SF W NH F SF Tournament Not Held A Tournament Not Held A
Champion of Champions NH A Tournament Not Held A A A A A A 1R 1R A A
The Masters A A 1R 1R W SF F 1R QF QF SF SF SF SF 1R SF QF 1R WR WR QF QF SF QF SF SF 1R WR LQ LQ WR A A A A A A A A A A A A A
Championship League Tournament Not Held RR A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
Six-red World Championship[nb 12] Tournament Not Held 2R W 2R NH 2R 2R RR A A A A 1R Not Held
World Seniors Championship Tournament Not Held A Tournament Not Held W SF QF QF 1R SF A Not Held W W F F
Former ranking tournaments
Canadian Masters[nb 13] Non-Ranking Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking Event W Tournament Not Held
Classic Non-Ranking Event 2R 2R W F 3R 1R WD W 3R Tournament Not Held
Dubai Classic[nb 14] Tournament Not Held NR A 2R 2R 3R 2R 2R 2R 1R Tournament Not Held
Malta Grand Prix Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking Event 2R NR Tournament Not Held
Thailand Masters[nb 15] Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking Event Not Held 1R 2R 1R SF SF 1R 2R 2R 1R LQ 2R 1R 2R NR Not Held NR Tournament Not Held
Irish Masters Non-Ranking Event 1R 2R 2R NH NR Tournament Not Held
Northern Ireland Trophy[nb 16] Not Held NR Tournament Not Held NR LQ LQ 1R Tournament Not Held
Bahrain Championship Tournament Not Held LQ Tournament Not Held
Wuxi Classic[nb 17] Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking Event LQ 1R LQ Tournament Not Held
Australian Goldfields Open[nb 18] Non-Ranking Event NH SF Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking Tournament Not Held LQ WD LQ LQ LQ Tournament Not Held
Shanghai Masters Tournament Not Held LQ 1R LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ Non-Ranking Not Held
Paul Hunter Classic[nb 19] Tournament Not Held Pro-am Event Minor-Ranking Event QF 1R A NR Not Held
Indian Open Tournament Not Held LQ LQ NH 1R LQ LQ Tournament Not Held
China Open[nb 20] Tournament Not Held NR LQ 1R 2R 2R Not Held 2R 1R 2R LQ LQ LQ WR 1R LQ 3R LQ LQ 1R LQ LQ Tournament Not Held
Riga Masters[nb 21] Tournament Not Held Minor-Rank A 3R 1R LQ Not Held
International Championship Tournament Not Held LQ 1R 1R LQ LQ LQ 1R LQ Not Held
China Championship Tournament Not Held NR LQ LQ LQ Not Held
World Open[nb 22] Not Held F 2R 2R 3R W 2R QF 3R SF 1R W 3R 2R QF 1R SF 1R 2R SF 2R 2R 3R 2R 3R LQ LQ LQ LQ 1R LQ LQ 1R Not Held LQ LQ LQ LQ Not Held
WST Pro Series Tournament Not Held RR Not Held
Turkish Masters Tournament Not Held LQ NH
Gibraltar Open Tournament Not Held MR 2R 2R 2R WD 4R 2R NH
Former non-ranking tournaments
Scottish Open[nb 8] Not Held LQ Ranking Event Not Held Ranking Event Tournament Not Held MR Not Held Ranking Event
Classic A A A 1R Ranking Event Tournament Not Held
Pontins Brean Sands Not Held RR Tournament Not Held
UK Championship A LQ SF QF SF Ranking Event
British Open[nb 7] A RR RR F RR Ranking Event Tournament Not Held Ranking
Tolly Cobbold Classic A A QF QF QF Tournament Not Held
Belgian Classic Tournament Not Held QF Tournament Not Held
Tokyo Masters Tournament Not Held SF Tournament Not Held
Canadian Masters[nb 13] 2R 2R Tournament Not Held QF QF F R Tournament Not Held
English Professional Championship NH A Not Held QF QF 2R 2R A Tournament Not Held
Dubai Classic[nb 14] Tournament Not Held QF Ranking Event Tournament Not Held
Matchroom Professional Championship Tournament Not Held A 2R SF Tournament Not Held
Carlsberg Challenge Tournament Not Held W W F A A Tournament Not Held
Hong Kong Gold Cup Tournament Not Held RR Tournament Not Held
International League Tournament Not Held F Tournament Not Held
New Zealand Masters Tournament Not Held W Not Held A A Tournament Not Held
Norwich Union Grand Prix Tournament Not Held F A QF Tournament Not Held
World Masters Tournament Not Held W Tournament Not Held
London Masters Tournament Not Held SF QF SF Tournament Not Held
European Masters League Tournament Not Held RR Tournament Not Held
Indian Challenge Tournament Not Held QF Tournament Not Held
Belgian Challenge Tournament Not Held SF Tournament Not Held
Kent Classic[nb 23] Tournament Not Held F A A A A NH QF Tournament Not Held
World Matchplay Tournament Not Held SF W W SF QF Tournament Not Held
European Challenge Tournament Not Held W QF QF Tournament Not Held
Tenball Tournament Not Held W Tournament Not Held
Belgian Masters Tournament Not Held F SF QF Not Held A Tournament Not Held
Malaysian Masters Tournament Not Held A NH W Tournament Not Held A Tournament Not Held
Australian Goldfields Open[nb 18] A A A A QF QF SF QF A NH R Tournament Not Held A A Tournament Not Held Ranking Event Tournament Not Held
Superstar International Tournament Not Held F Tournament Not Held
China Open[nb 20] Tournament Not Held F Ranking Event Not Held Ranking Event Tournament Not Held
Pontins Professional A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A W F Tournament Not Held
Malta Grand Prix Tournament Not Held A A A A QF R A Tournament Not Held
Champions Cup[nb 24] Tournament Not Held 1R QF 1R QF SF RR RR RR Tournament Not Held
Scottish Masters Not Held W QF QF F SF SF SF NH QF SF QF QF QF QF 1R 1R 1R QF 1R 1R 1R QF Tournament Not Held
Northern Ireland Trophy[nb 16] Not Held W Tournament Not Held LQ Ranking Event Tournament Not Held
Thailand Masters[nb 15] Tournament Not Held A W A A Not Held Ranking QF Ranking Event A Not Held A Tournament Not Held
Irish Masters A A A QF 1R W W QF QF QF SF SF QF QF SF QF 1R QF 1R SF QF 1R 1R Ranking Event NH RR Tournament Not Held
Euro-Asia Masters Challenge Tournament Not Held RR SF Not Held A Tournament Not Held
Pot Black A A A SF SF F W Tournament Not Held SF QF A Tournament Not Held QF A A Tournament Not Held
World Series Grand Final Tournament Not Held 2R Tournament Not Held
World Series Killarney Tournament Not Held F Tournament Not Held
World Series Prague Tournament Not Held W Tournament Not Held
Legends of Snooker Tournament Not Held QF Tournament Not Held
Power Snooker Tournament Not Held QF A Tournament Not Held
Premier League[nb 25] Tournament Not Held RR Not Held RR RR RR RR RR SF W SF SF RR RR F F RR RR SF RR RR RR RR F RR A A A RR A Tournament Not Held
General Cup[nb 26] Tournament Not Held A Tournament Not Held A NH A A A RR A Tournament Not Held
Shoot Out Tournament Not Held WD Tournament Not Held 1R 1R 1R 1R 2R A Ranking Event
Seniors Irish Masters Tournament Not Held W Tournament Not Held
Seniors 6-Red World Championship Tournament Not Held W Tournament Not Held
Seniors Masters Tournament Not Held A QF Tournament Not Held
UK Seniors Championship Tournament Not Held W QF F Not Held
Performance Table Legend
LQ lost in the qualifying draw #R lost in the early rounds of the tournament
(WR = Wildcard round, RR = Round robin)
QF lost in the quarter-finals
SF lost in the semi-finals F lost in the final W won the tournament
DNQ did not qualify for the tournament A did not participate in the tournament WD withdrew from the tournament
NH / Not Held means an event was not held.
NR / Non-Ranking Event means an event is/was no longer a ranking event.
R / Ranking Event means an event is/was a ranking event.
MR / Minor-Ranking Event means an event is/was a minor-ranking event.
PA / Pro-am Event means an event is/was a pro-am event.
  1. ^ From the 2010/2011 season it shows the ranking at the beginning of the season
  2. ^ He was an amateur
  3. ^ New players on the Main Tour do not have a ranking
  4. ^ Players qualified through European Tour Order of Merit started the season without prize money ranking points
  5. ^ a b c Players issued an invitational tour card began the season without ranking points
  6. ^ The event was called the European Open (1988/1989-1996/1997 and 2001/2002-2003/2004), the Irish Open (1998/1999), and the Malta Cup (2004/2005-2007/2008)
  7. ^ a b The event was called the British Gold Cup (1979/1980), the Yamaha Organs Trophy (1980/1981) and the International Masters (1981/1982-1983/1984)
  8. ^ a b The event was also called the International Open (1981/1982-1984/1985, 1986/1987-1989/1990 and 1992/1993-1996/1997), the Goya Matchroom Trophy (1985/1986) and the Players Championship (2003/2004)
  9. ^ The event was called the German Open (1995/1996-1997/1998)
  10. ^ The event was called the Players Tour Championship Grand Finals (2010/2011-2012/2013) and the Players Championship Grand Final (2013/2014-2015/2016)
  11. ^ The event was also called the Hong Kong Challenge (1990/1991–1991/1992)
  12. ^ The event was also called the Six-red Snooker International (2008/2009) and the Six-red World Grand Prix (2009/2010)
  13. ^ a b The tournament was called the Canadian Open (1979/1980–1980/1981)
  14. ^ a b The event was called the Dubai Masters (1988/1989), the Thailand Classic (1995/1996) and the Asian Classic (1996/1997)
  15. ^ a b The event was called the Asian Open (1989/1990-1992/1993) and the Thailand Open (1993/1994-1996/1997).
  16. ^ a b The tournament was called the Northern Ireland Classic (1981/1982)
  17. ^ The event was called the Jiangsu Classic (2008/2009-2009/2010)
  18. ^ a b The event was also called the Australian Masters (1979/1980-1987/1988 and 1995/1996), the Hong Kong Open (1989/1990) and the Australian Open (1994/1995)
  19. ^ The event was called the Grand Prix Fürth (2004/2005) and the Fürth German Open (2005/2006-2006/2007)
  20. ^ a b The event was called the China International (1997/1998-1998/1999)
  21. ^ The event was called the Riga Open (2014/2015-2015/2016)
  22. ^ The event was called the Professional Players Tournament (1982/1983-1983/1984), the Grand Prix (1984/1985-2000/2001 and 2004/2005-2009/2010), and the LG Cup (2001/2002-2003/2004)
  23. ^ The event was also called the Kent Cup (1986/1987–1987/1988 & 1989/1990–1990/1991)
  24. ^ The event was called the Charity Challenge (1994/1995–1998/1999)
  25. ^ The event was also called the Professional Snooker League (1983/1984), Matchroom League (1986/1987 to 1991/1992) and the European League (1992/1993 to 1996/1997)
  26. ^ The event was called the General Cup International (2004/2005–2011/2012)

Discover more about Performance and rankings timeline related topics

1979–80 snooker season

1979–80 snooker season

The 1979–80 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between 9 July 1979 and 17 May 1980. The following table outlines the results for the ranking and the invitational events.

1980–81 snooker season

1980–81 snooker season

The 1980–81 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between 18 June 1980 and 16 May 1981. The following table outlines the results for the ranking and the invitational events.

1981–82 snooker season

1981–82 snooker season

The 1981–82 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between 25 June 1981 and 1 June 1982. The following table outlines the results for ranking events and the invitational events.

1982–83 snooker season

1982–83 snooker season

The 1982–83 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between 7 July 1982 and 27 May 1983. The following table outlines the results for ranking events and the invitational events.

1983–84 snooker season

1983–84 snooker season

The 1983–84 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between 4 July 1983 and 19 May 1984. The following table outlines the results for the ranking and the invitational events.

1984–85 snooker season

1984–85 snooker season

The 1984–85 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between July 1984 and May 1985. The following table outlines the results for the ranking and the invitational events.

1985–86 snooker season

1985–86 snooker season

The 1985–86 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between July 1985 and May 1986. The following table outlines the results for ranking events and the invitational events.

1986–87 snooker season

1986–87 snooker season

The 1986–87 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between July 1986 and May 1987. The following table outlines the results for the ranking and invitational events.

1987–88 snooker season

1987–88 snooker season

The 1987–88 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between 29 June 1987 and 15 May 1988. The following table outlines the results for the ranking and invitational events.

1988–89 snooker season

1988–89 snooker season

The 1988–89 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between July 1988 and May 1989. The following table outlines the results for the ranking and invitational events.

1989–90 snooker season

1989–90 snooker season

The 1989–90 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between July 1989 and May 1990. The following table outlines the results for ranking and the invitational events.

1990–91 snooker season

1990–91 snooker season

The 1990–91 snooker season was a series of snooker tournaments played between August 1990 and May 1991. The following table outlines the results for ranking and the invitational events.

Career finals

[58]

Ranking finals: 24 (10 titles)

Legend
World Championship (0–6)
UK Championship (1–2)
Other (9–6)
Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score
Runner-up 1. 1982 Professional Players Tournament Wales Ray Reardon 5–10
Runner-up 2. 1984 World Snooker Championship England Steve Davis 16–18
Runner-up 3. 1985 Matchroom Trophy Canada Cliff Thorburn 10–12
Winner 1. 1986 The Classic Canada Cliff Thorburn 13–12
Winner 2. 1986 Grand Prix England Rex Williams 10–6
Runner-up 4. 1987 The Classic England Steve Davis 12–13
Winner 3. 1987 British Open England Neal Foulds 13–9
Runner-up 5. 1987 UK Championship England Steve Davis 14–16
Runner-up 6. 1988 International Open (2) England Steve Davis 6–12
Winner 4. 1988 Canadian Masters England Steve Davis 9–4
Runner-up 7. 1990 World Snooker Championship (2) Scotland Stephen Hendry 12–18
Winner 5. 1991 The Classic (2) Scotland Stephen Hendry 10–4
Runner-up 8. 1991 World Snooker Championship (3) England John Parrott 11–18
Runner-up 9. 1991 UK Championship (2) England John Parrott 13–16
Winner 6. 1992 European Open England Mark Johnston-Allen 9–3
Winner 7. 1992 British Open (2) Thailand James Wattana 10–7
Runner-up 10. 1992 World Snooker Championship (4) Scotland Stephen Hendry 14–18
Winner 8. 1992 Grand Prix (2) Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty 10–9
Winner 9. 1992 UK Championship England John Parrott 16–9
Runner-up 11. 1993 World Snooker Championship (5) Scotland Stephen Hendry 5–18
Runner-up 12. 1994 World Snooker Championship (6) Scotland Stephen Hendry 17–18
Runner-up 13. 2000 British Open England Peter Ebdon 6–9
Runner-up 14. 2004 European Open Scotland Stephen Maguire 3–9
Winner 10. 2004 Players Championship England Paul Hunter 9–7

Non-ranking finals: 49 (28 titles)

Legend
The Masters (1–1)
Premier League (1–3)
Other (26–17)
Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. 1981 Scottish Masters Canada Cliff Thorburn 9–4
Winner 2. 1981 Northern Ireland Classic England Steve Davis 11–9
Runner-up 1. 1983 International Masters Wales Ray Reardon 6–9
Winner 3. 1984 The Masters Wales Terry Griffiths 9–5
Winner 4. 1984 New Zealand Masters Canada Kirk Stevens 5–3
Winner 5. 1984 Thailand Masters Wales Terry Griffiths 4–3
Winner 6. 1984 Carlsberg Challenge England Tony Knowles 9–7
Runner-up 2. 1984 Scottish Masters England Steve Davis 4–9
Winner 7. 1985 Irish Masters Northern Ireland Alex Higgins 9–5
Runner-up 3. 1985 Pot Black Wales Doug Mountjoy 0–2
Winner 8. 1985 Carlsberg Challenge (2) Northern Ireland Alex Higgins 8–3
Runner-up 4. 1986 The Masters Canada Cliff Thorburn 5–9
Winner 9. 1986 Irish Masters (2) England Willie Thorne 9–5
Winner 10. 1986 Malaysian Masters Northern Ireland Dennis Taylor 2–1
Runner-up 5. 1986 Carlsberg Challenge Northern Ireland Dennis Taylor 3–8
Winner 11. 1986 Pot Black Canada Kirk Stevens 2–0
Runner-up 6. 1987 Kent Cup England Willie Thorne 2–5
Runner-up 7. 1987 Canadian Masters Northern Ireland Dennis Taylor 7–9
Winner 12. 1988 Hong Kong Masters England Neal Foulds 6–3
Runner-up 8. 1988 Norwich Union Grand Prix England Steve Davis 4–5
Winner 13. 1989 World Matchplay England John Parrott 18–9
Runner-up 9. 1990 Hong Kong Challenge Thailand James Wattana 3–9
Runner-up 10. 1990 Belgian Masters England John Parrott 6–9
Winner 14. 1990 World Matchplay (2) Scotland Stephen Hendry 18–9
Runner-up 11. 1990 Matchroom International League England Tony Meo Round-Robin
Winner 15. 1991 World Masters Malta Tony Drago 10–6
Winner 16. 1991 European Challenge England Steve Davis 4–1
Winner 17. 1993 European League Scotland Alan McManus 10–7
Winner 18. 1995 Tenball England Ronnie O'Sullivan 3–1
Runner-up 12. 1997 Superstar International England Ronnie O'Sullivan 3–5
Runner-up 13. 1997 China International England Steve Davis 4–7
Runner-up 14. 1998 Premier League Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty 2–10
Runner-up 15. 1999 Premier League (2) Scotland John Higgins 4–9
Winner 19. 1999 Pontins Professional Wales Matthew Stevens 9–5
Winner 20. 2000 Scottish Masters Qualifying Event Northern Ireland Joe Swail 5–2
Runner-up 16. 2000 Pontins Professional Wales Darren Morgan 2–9
Runner-up 17. 2006 Premier League (3) England Ronnie O'Sullivan 0–7
Runner-up 18. 2009 World Series of Snooker Killarney England Shaun Murphy 1–5
Winner 21. 2009 Six-red World Championship England Barry Hawkins 8–6
Winner 22. 2009 World Series of Snooker Prague Scotland Graeme Dott 5–3
Winner 23. 2010 World Seniors Championship England Steve Davis 4–1
Winner 24. 2017 UK Seniors Championship Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty 4–2
Winner 25. 2019 Seniors Irish Masters Republic of Ireland Rodney Goggins 4–1
Winner 26. 2019 Seniors 6-Red World Championship Jersey Aaron Canavan 4–2
Winner 27. 2019 World Seniors Championship (2) Wales Darren Morgan 5–3
Runner-up 19. 2019 UK Seniors Championship Republic of Ireland Michael Judge 2–4
Winner 28. 2020 World Seniors Championship (3) Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty 5–4
Runner-up 20. 2021 World Seniors Championship England David Lilley 3–5
Runner-up 21. 2022 World Seniors Championship Wales Lee Walker 4–5

Pro-am finals: 7 (1 title)

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. 1978 Pontins Autumn Open England Sid Hood 7–6
Runner-up 1. 1979 Pontins Spring Open England Steve Davis 3–7
Runner-up 2. 1979 Warners Open England Tony Meo 2–5[59]
Runner-up 3. 2004 Swiss Open England Ian McCulloch 1–5[60]
Runner-up 4. 2009 Paul Hunter Classic England Shaun Murphy 0–4
Runner-up 5. 2010 Pink Ribbon England Michael Holt 5–6
Runner-up 6. 2011 Cricket Club of India Open Invitational England Stephen Lee 7–10[61]

Team finals: 7 (4 titles)

Outcome No. Year Championship Team/partner Opponent(s) in the final Score
Runner-up 1. 1982 World Team Classic  England  Canada 2–4
Runner-up 2. 1983 World Doubles Championship England Tony Knowles England Steve Davis
England Tony Meo
2–10
Winner 1. 1984 World Doubles Championship Northern Ireland Alex Higgins Canada Cliff Thorburn
England Willie Thorne
10–2
Winner 2. 1988 World Cup  England  Australia 9–7
Winner 3. 1989 World Cup (2)  England Rest of the world 9–8
Runner-up 3. 1991 World Masters England Caroline Walch England Steve Davis
England Allison Fisher
3–6
Winner 4. 2000 Nations Cup  England  Wales 6–4

Amateur finals: 5 (4 titles)

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score
Runner-up 1. 1977 Pontins Junior Championship England Tony Meo 2–3[62]
Winner 1. 1978 Pontins Junior Championship Wales John Bennett 3–2[63]
Winner 2. 1979 English Amateur Championship England Dave Martin 13–10
Winner 3. 1980 IBSF World Amateur Championship Australia Ron Atkins 11–2
Winner 4. 1980 Indian Amateur Championship India Arvind Savur 9–7

Discover more about Career finals related topics

1982 Professional Players Tournament

1982 Professional Players Tournament

The 1982 Professional Players Tournament was a professional ranking snooker tournament that took place in two venues in the Birmingham area. One was at the La Reserve in Sutton Coldfield and the other was the International Snooker Club in Aston. It was the first tournament in a series which is now known as the World Open. The event was untelevised and unsponsored.

Ray Reardon

Ray Reardon

Raymond Reardon is a Welsh retired professional snooker player. He turned professional in 1967 aged 35 and dominated the sport in the 1970s, winning the World Snooker Championship six times and more than a dozen other tournaments. Reardon was World Champion in 1970, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976 and 1978, and runner-up in 1982. He won the inaugural Pot Black tournament in 1969, the 1976 Masters and the 1982 Professional Players Tournament.

1984 World Snooker Championship

1984 World Snooker Championship

The 1984 World Snooker Championship was a ranking professional snooker tournament that took place between 21 April and 7 May 1984 at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. The event was organised by the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association, and was the eighth consecutive World Snooker Championship to be held at the Crucible since the 1977 event. The event featured 94 participants, of which 78 players competed in a qualifying event held at the Redwood Lodge in Bristol from 1 to 13 April. Of these, 16 players qualified for the main stage in Sheffield, where they met 16 invited seeds. The total prize fund for the event was £200,000, the highest total pool for any snooker tournament at that time; the winner received £44,000.

England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

1985 Matchroom Trophy

1985 Matchroom Trophy

The 1985 Goya Matchroom Trophy was a professional ranking snooker tournament that took place between 23 September to 6 October 1985 at Trentham Gardens in Stoke-on-Trent, England.

Scottish Open (snooker)

Scottish Open (snooker)

The Scottish Open is a ranking professional snooker tournament held in the United Kingdom. The tournament had many name changes in its history, as the tournament was formerly called International Open, Matchroom Trophy and Players Championship. Apart from a hiatus in the 1990/1991 and 1991/1992 seasons, the tournament remained a ranking event until 2003/2004. In the 2012/2013 season the tournament was added back to the calendar as part of the Players Tour Championship minor-ranking series. The most recent champion is Luca Brecel.

Canada

Canada

Canada is a country in North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering over 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern and western border with the United States, stretching 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest binational land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Cliff Thorburn

Cliff Thorburn

Clifford Charles Devlin Thorburn is a Canadian retired professional snooker player. Nicknamed "The Grinder" because of his slow, determined style of play, he won the World Snooker Championship in 1980, defeating Alex Higgins 18–16 in the final to become the first world champion in snooker's modern era from outside the United Kingdom. He remains the sport's only world champion from the Americas. He was runner-up in two other world championships, losing 21–25 to John Spencer in the 1977 final and 6–18 to Steve Davis in the 1983 final. Ranked world number one during the 1981–82 season, he was the first non-British player to top the world rankings.

1986 Classic (snooker)

1986 Classic (snooker)

The 1986 Mercantile Credit Classic was the seventh edition of the professional snooker tournament. The tournament was played at the Spectrum Arena, Warrington, Cheshire, and was televised on ITV from the last 16 round which started on 3 January 1986.

Classic (snooker)

Classic (snooker)

The Classic was a professional snooker tournament, which began in 1980 and ended in 1992. It was originally a non-ranking event, but became ranking in 1984. Steve Davis won the event six times and was the last champion.

1986 Grand Prix (snooker)

1986 Grand Prix (snooker)

The 1986 Rothmans Grand Prix was held during October 1986 in the Hexagon Theatre in Reading.

Rex Williams

Rex Williams

Desmond Rex Williams is a retired English professional snooker and billiards player. He was the second player to make an official maximum break, achieving this in an exhibition match in December 1965. Williams won the World Professional Billiards Championship from Clark McConachy in 1968, the first time that the title had been contested since 1951. Williams retained the title in several challenge matches in the 1970s, and, after losing it to Fred Davis in 1980, regained it from 1982 to 1983.

Source: "Jimmy White", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_White.

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Further reading
External links

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