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Jeff Goldberg (writer)

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Jeff Goldberg is an American writer, who has published on the cultural history of psychoactive drugs, and how they work in the brain. He is the author of Flowers in the Blood, a history of opium, and Anatomy of a Scientific Discovery, an account of the race to discover endorphins, the body's own morphine.[1] He has also written numerous articles about science and medicine, for Life, Discover, Omni and other magazines internationally.

Discover more about Jeff Goldberg (writer) related topics

Opium

Opium

Opium is dried latex obtained from the seed capsules of the opium poppy Papaver somniferum. Approximately 12 percent of opium is made up of the analgesic alkaloid morphine, which is processed chemically to produce heroin and other synthetic opioids for medicinal use and for the illegal drug trade. The latex also contains the closely related opiates codeine and thebaine, and non-analgesic alkaloids such as papaverine and noscapine. The traditional, labor-intensive method of obtaining the latex is to scratch ("score") the immature seed pods (fruits) by hand; the latex leaks out and dries to a sticky yellowish residue that is later scraped off and dehydrated. The word meconium historically referred to related, weaker preparations made from other parts of the opium poppy or different species of poppies.

Life (magazine)

Life (magazine)

Life was an American magazine published weekly from 1883 to 1972, as an intermittent "special" until 1978, and as a monthly from 1978 until 2000. During its golden age from 1936 to 1972, Life was a wide-ranging weekly general-interest magazine known for the quality of its photography, and was one of the most popular magazines in the nation, regularly reaching one-quarter of the population.

Discover (magazine)

Discover (magazine)

Discover is an American general audience science magazine launched in October 1980 by Time Inc. It has been owned by Kalmbach Publishing since 2010.

Omni (magazine)

Omni (magazine)

Omni was a science and science fiction magazine published in its domestic American market as well as the UK. It contained articles on science, parapsychology, and short works of science fiction and fantasy. It was published as a print version between October 1978 and 1995. The first Omni e-magazine was published on CompuServe in 1986 and the magazine switched to a purely online presence in 1996. It ceased publication abruptly in late 1997, following the death of co-founder Kathy Keeton; activity on the magazine's website ended the following April.

Life and work

Goldberg began his career in New York City as a member of the circle of writers and artists surrounding William S. Burroughs (Junky, Naked Lunch). In 1978, Goldberg's role as the Press Liaison for the Nova Convention, a 3-day event honoring Burroughs, fostered an ongoing association with the author based on a common interest in the history of drugs, particularly opioids and the then-recently discovered endorphins. Goldberg was introduced to another important influence while working as an editor at High Times magazine, a publication devoted to recreational drugs and drug culture (1978–79), where he began a collaboration with Dean Latimer, alternate press journalist, best known for his reporting on the illegal drug trade.[2] A 1979 Oui magazine article about opium ("The Opium Reader"), written by Goldberg and edited by Latimer, became the basis of the book Flowers in the Blood: The Story of Opium, which they coauthored in 1980.[3][4]

After Flowers in the Blood, Goldberg turned his attention to "the body's own opiates". His next book, Anatomy of a Scientific Discovery, is an account of how endorphins were discovered at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland, by John Hughes and Hans Kosterlitz, in a race pitting them against American research teams and scientists at Sandoz, Roche, and other major pharmaceutical companies.[5] Anatomy of a Scientific Discovery continues to be regarded as an authoritative documentation of both the science and the scientists involved in the discovery of endorphins.[6][7]

His articles on science and medicine have covered pioneering attempts at gene therapy, and an oral history by the Apollo astronauts on the 20th anniversary of the Moon landing. His Life magazine article on the controversy over fetal cell transplantation, "Who Gets to Play God",[8] won the American Legion Auxiliary's Heart of America award.

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Endorphins

Endorphins

Endorphins are chemical signals in the brain that block the perception of pain and increase feelings of wellbeing. They are produced and stored in an area of the brain known as the pituitary gland.

High Times

High Times

High Times is an American monthly magazine and cannabis brand with offices in Los Angeles and New York City. Founded in 1974 by Tom Forçade, the magazine advocates the legalization of cannabis as well as other counterculture ideas.

Oui (magazine)

Oui (magazine)

Oui was a men's adult pornographic magazine published in the United States and featuring explicit nude photographs of models, with full page pin-ups, centerfolds, interviews and other articles, and cartoons. Oui ceased publication in 2007.

Opium

Opium

Opium is dried latex obtained from the seed capsules of the opium poppy Papaver somniferum. Approximately 12 percent of opium is made up of the analgesic alkaloid morphine, which is processed chemically to produce heroin and other synthetic opioids for medicinal use and for the illegal drug trade. The latex also contains the closely related opiates codeine and thebaine, and non-analgesic alkaloids such as papaverine and noscapine. The traditional, labor-intensive method of obtaining the latex is to scratch ("score") the immature seed pods (fruits) by hand; the latex leaks out and dries to a sticky yellowish residue that is later scraped off and dehydrated. The word meconium historically referred to related, weaker preparations made from other parts of the opium poppy or different species of poppies.

University of Aberdeen

University of Aberdeen

The University of Aberdeen is a public research university in Aberdeen, Scotland. It is an ancient university founded in 1495 when William Elphinstone, Bishop of Aberdeen and Chancellor of Scotland, petitioned Pope Alexander VI on behalf of James IV, King of Scots to establish King's College, making it Scotland's 3rd oldest university and the 5th oldest in the English-speaking world and the United Kingdom. Aberdeen is consistently ranked among the top 160 universities in the world and is ranked within the top 20 universities in the United Kingdom according to The Times and The Sunday Times, and 13th in the UK according to The Guardian.

John Hughes (neuroscientist)

John Hughes (neuroscientist)

John Hughes is a British neuroscientist who shared the 1978 Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research for the discovery of met-enkephalin and leu-enkephalin. This discovery demonstrated that opiate drugs exert their effects on the human brain by mimicking endogenous neurotransmitters, the opioid peptides.

Hans Kosterlitz

Hans Kosterlitz

Hans Walter Kosterlitz FRS was a German-born British biochemist.

Gene therapy

Gene therapy

Gene therapy is a medical field which focuses on the genetic modification of cells to produce a therapeutic effect or the treatment of disease by repairing or reconstructing defective genetic material. The first attempt at modifying human DNA was performed in 1980, by Martin Cline, but the first successful nuclear gene transfer in humans, approved by the National Institutes of Health, was performed in May 1989. The first therapeutic use of gene transfer as well as the first direct insertion of human DNA into the nuclear genome was performed by French Anderson in a trial starting in September 1990. It is thought to be able to cure many genetic disorders or treat them over time.

Apollo program

Apollo program

The Apollo program, also known as Project Apollo, was the third United States human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which succeeded in preparing and landing the first humans on the Moon from 1968 to 1972. It was first conceived in 1960 during President Dwight D. Eisenhower's administration as a three-person spacecraft to follow the one-person Project Mercury, which put the first Americans in space. Apollo was later dedicated to President John F. Kennedy's national goal for the 1960s of "landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth" in an address to Congress on May 25, 1961. It was the third US human spaceflight program to fly, preceded by the two-person Project Gemini conceived in 1961 to extend spaceflight capability in support of Apollo.

Life (magazine)

Life (magazine)

Life was an American magazine published weekly from 1883 to 1972, as an intermittent "special" until 1978, and as a monthly from 1978 until 2000. During its golden age from 1936 to 1972, Life was a wide-ranging weekly general-interest magazine known for the quality of its photography, and was one of the most popular magazines in the nation, regularly reaching one-quarter of the population.

Fetal tissue implant

Fetal tissue implant

Fetal tissue implant or fetal cell therapy is an experimental medical therapy where researchers implant tissue from a fetus into a person as treatment of a disease. In the case of Parkinson's disease, it is hoped that the fetal tissue would produce chemicals, specifically dopamine, which is lacking in the diseased brain. This therapy is also being investigated for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fetal tissue is unique since it is fast growing and has a lower possibility of rejection from the host's immune system than adult cells.

American Legion Auxiliary

American Legion Auxiliary

The American Legion Auxiliary (ALA) is a separate entity from the American Legion that shares the same values. Composed of spouses, mothers, daughters, granddaughters, and sisters of American war veterans. Founded in 1919, the ALA is dedicated to serving veterans, military, and their families.

Source: "Jeff Goldberg (writer)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Goldberg_(writer).

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References
  1. ^ Lesser, Frank (17 February 1990). "Addicted to research / Review of 'Brainstorming: The Science and Politics of Opiate Research' By Solomon Snyder and 'Anatomy of a Scientific Discovery' By Jeff Goldberg". New Scientist. Retrieved August 16, 2020.
  2. ^ Burroughs, William S. Introduction: God's Own Medicine, in Flowers in the Blood: The Story of Opium. Skyhorse Publishing. 2014.
  3. ^ "FLOWERS IN THE BLOOD: The Story of Opium by Dean & Jeff Goldberg Latimer". Kirkus Reviews.
  4. ^ "Books: Review/Commentary". Contemporary Drug Problems. HeinOnline. 11: 169. 1982.
  5. ^ Herron, Caroline Rand (17 July 1988). "IN SHORT; NONFICTION". New York Times.
  6. ^ "THE ANATOMY OF A SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY by Jeff Goldberg". Kirkus Reviews.
  7. ^ "Nonfiction Book Review: Anatomy of a Scientific Discovery by Jeff Goldberg, Author Bantam Books $17.95 (228p) ISBN 978-0-553-05261-9". PublishersWeekly.com.
  8. ^ "LIFE Magazine February 1992 @ Original LIFE Magazines.com, Unique Gift Idea, Vintage LIFE Magazine, Classic LIFE Magazine". Original Life Magazines.

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