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Jay Cutler

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Jay Cutler
refer to caption
Cutler with the Chicago Bears in 2015
No. 6
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born: (1983-04-29) April 29, 1983 (age 39)
Santa Claus, Indiana, U.S.
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:231 lb (105 kg)
Career information
High school:Heritage Hills (Lincoln City, Indiana)
College:Vanderbilt (2001–2005)
NFL Draft:2006 / Round: 1 / Pick: 11
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com

Jay Christopher Cutler (born April 29, 1983) is an American former professional football player who was a quarterback in the National Football League (NFL) for 12 seasons, primarily with the Chicago Bears. He played college football for the Vanderbilt Commodores and was selected by the Denver Broncos in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft, who he was a member of for three seasons. In 2009, he was traded to the Bears, where he played eight seasons. Cutler retired after being released by Chicago in 2017, but returned for an additional season with the Miami Dolphins. He retired a second and final time following the 2017 season.

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American football

American football

American football, also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, the team with possession of the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with the ball or passing it, while the defense, the team without possession of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs or plays; if they fail, they turn over the football to the defense, but if they succeed, they are given a new set of four downs to continue the drive. Points are scored primarily by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Quarterback

Quarterback

The quarterback, colloquially known as the "signal caller", is a position in gridiron football. Quarterbacks are members of the offensive platoon and mostly line up directly behind the offensive line. In modern American football, the quarterback is usually considered the leader of the offense, and is often responsible for calling the play in the huddle. The quarterback also touches the ball on almost every offensive play, and is almost always the offensive player that throws forward passes. When the QB is tackled behind the line of scrimmage, it is called a sack.

National Football League

National Football League

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league that consists of 32 teams, divided equally between the American Football Conference (AFC) and the National Football Conference (NFC). The NFL is one of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada and the highest professional level of American football in the world. Each NFL season begins with a three-week preseason in August, followed by the 18-week regular season which runs from early September to early January, with each team playing 17 games and having one bye week. Following the conclusion of the regular season, seven teams from each conference advance to the playoffs, a single-elimination tournament that culminates in the Super Bowl, which is contested in February and is played between the AFC and NFC conference champions. The league is headquartered in New York City.

Chicago Bears

Chicago Bears

The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago. The Bears compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The Bears have won nine NFL Championships, including one Super Bowl, and hold the NFL record for the most enshrinees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the most retired jersey numbers. The Bears have also recorded the second-most victories of any NFL franchise, only behind the Green Bay Packers.

College football

College football

College football refers to gridiron football played by teams of student athletes. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

Vanderbilt Commodores football

Vanderbilt Commodores football

The Vanderbilt Commodores football program represents Vanderbilt University in the sport of American football. The Commodores compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the East Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). They are led by head coach Clark Lea. Vanderbilt plays their home games at FirstBank Stadium, located on the university's Nashville, Tennessee campus.

Denver Broncos

Denver Broncos

The Denver Broncos are a professional American football franchise based in Denver. The Broncos compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division. The team is headquartered in Dove Valley, Colorado.

2006 NFL Draft

2006 NFL Draft

The 2006 National Football League Draft, the 71st in league history, took place in New York City, New York, at Radio City Music Hall on April 29 and April 30, 2006. For the 27th consecutive year, the draft was telecast on ESPN and ESPN2, with additional coverage offered by ESPNU and, for the first time, by NFL Network. Having signed a contract with the Houston Texans on the evening before the draft, Mario Williams, a defensive end from North Carolina State, became the draft's first pick. The selection surprised many commentators, who predicted that the Texans would draft Southern California running back Reggie Bush or Texas quarterback Vince Young. Ohio State produced the most first round selections (five), while Southern California produced the most overall selections (eleven). Twenty-seven compensatory and supplemental compensatory selections were distributed amongst seventeen teams; Tampa Bay, Baltimore, and Tennessee each held three compensatory picks. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

Miami Dolphins

Miami Dolphins

The Miami Dolphins are a professional American football team based in the Miami metropolitan area. The Dolphins compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. The team plays its home games at Hard Rock Stadium, located in the northern suburb of Miami Gardens, Florida. The team is currently owned by Stephen M. Ross. The Dolphins are the oldest professional sports team in Florida. Of the four AFC East teams, the Dolphins are the only team in the division that was not a charter member of the American Football League (AFL). The Dolphins were also one of the first professional football teams in the southeast, along with the Atlanta Falcons.

Early years

Cutler was born in Santa Claus, Indiana in 1983. Cutler attended Heritage Hills High School in Lincoln City, Indiana.[3] He started three years as a quarterback for the Patriots football team, amassing a combined 26–1 record in his junior and senior years, including a perfect 15–0 during his senior year. Cutler and his team outscored opponents 746–85, including a 90–0 shutout at Pike Central. During his senior year, Cutler connected on 122 of 202 passes (60.4%) for 2,252 yards with 31 touchdowns, while rushing 65 times for 493 yards with 11 touchdowns.[4] He also started at safety for three years, intercepting nine passes as a senior, 12th overall in the state.[4] His team's perfect record during his senior year included the school's first 3A state championship, where Heritage Hills beat Zionsville in overtime, 27–24. The most notable play of the game occurred when Cutler lateraled the ball to the halfback, Cole Seifrig, who then passed it to Cutler who ran it into the end zone.[5] Cutler also played strong safety in the state championship and made 19 tackles.[6]

Cutler was named a first-team All-State selection by the Associated Press as a senior.[4] In addition to playing football in high school, he was a first-team all-state selection in basketball, scoring 1,131 points;[7] he co-holds the school record for FGs made (16) in a game[8] and garnered honorable mention all-state accolades as a shortstop in baseball.[4]

Cutler grew up as a Chicago Bears fan during his youth in Indiana.[9]

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Heritage Hills High School

Heritage Hills High School

Heritage Hills High School is a public high school located in Lincoln City, Indiana, United States. It serves students in grades 9-12 for the North Spencer School Corporation.

Lincoln City, Indiana

Lincoln City, Indiana

Lincoln City is an unincorporated community in Carter Township, Spencer County in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Indiana. It lies five minutes south of Interstate 64, northeast of Evansville, and approximately twenty miles north of the Ohio River.

Interception

Interception

In ball-playing competitive team sports, an interception or pick is a move by a player involving a pass of the ball—whether by foot or hand, depending on the rules of the sport—in which the ball is intended for a player of the same team but caught by a player of the team on defense, who thereby usually gains possession of the ball for their team. It is commonly seen in football, including American and Canadian football, as well as association football, rugby league, rugby union, Australian rules football and Gaelic football, as well as any sport by which a loose object is passed between players toward a goal. In basketball, a pick is called a steal.

Overtime (sports)

Overtime (sports)

Overtime or extra time is an additional period of play specified under the rules of a sport to bring a game to a decision and avoid declaring the match a tie or draw where the scores are the same. In some sports, this extra period is played only if the game is required to have a clear winner, as in single-elimination tournaments where only one team or players can advance to the next round or win the tournament.

Lateral pass

Lateral pass

In gridiron football, a lateral pass or lateral occurs when the ball carrier throws the football to a teammate in a direction parallel to or away from the opponents' goal line. A lateral pass is distinguished from a forward pass, in which the ball is thrown forward, towards the opposition's end zone. In a lateral pass the ball is not advanced, but unlike a forward pass a lateral may be attempted from anywhere on the field by any player to any player at any time.

Halfback (American football)

Halfback (American football)

A halfback (HB) is an offensive position in American football, whose duties involve lining up in the offensive backfield and carrying the ball on most rushing plays, i.e. a running back. When the principal ball carrier lines up deep in the backfield, and especially when that player is placed behind another player, as in the I formation, that player is instead referred to as a tailback.

End zone

End zone

The end zone is the scoring area on the field, according to gridiron-based codes of football. It is the area between the end line and goal line bounded by the sidelines. There are two end zones, each being on an opposite side of the field. It is bordered on all sides by a white line indicating its beginning and end points, with orange, square pylons placed at each of the four corners as a visual aid. Canadian rule books use the terms goal area and dead line instead of end zone and end line respectively, but the latter terms are the more common in colloquial Canadian English. Unlike sports like association football and ice hockey which require the ball/puck to pass completely over the goal line to count as a score, both Canadian and American football merely need any part of the ball to break the vertical plane of the outer edge of the goal line.

Associated Press

Associated Press

The Associated Press (AP) is an American non-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Founded in 1846, it operates as a cooperative, unincorporated association, and produces news reports that are distributed to its members, U.S. newspapers and broadcasters. Since the award was established in 1917, the AP has earned 56 Pulitzer Prizes, including 34 for photography. It is also known for publishing the widely used AP Stylebook.

American football

American football

American football, also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, the team with possession of the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with the ball or passing it, while the defense, the team without possession of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs or plays; if they fail, they turn over the football to the defense, but if they succeed, they are given a new set of four downs to continue the drive. Points are scored primarily by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Basketball

Basketball

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop, while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one, two or three one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

Baseball

Baseball

Baseball is a bat-and-ball sport played between two teams of nine players each, taking turns batting and fielding. The game occurs over the course of several plays, with each play generally beginning when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball that a player on the batting team, called the batter, tries to hit with a bat. The objective of the offensive team is to hit the ball into the field of play, away from the other team's players, allowing its players to run the bases, having them advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases. A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate.

Chicago Bears

Chicago Bears

The Chicago Bears are a professional American football team based in Chicago. The Bears compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The Bears have won nine NFL Championships, including one Super Bowl, and hold the NFL record for the most enshrinees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the most retired jersey numbers. The Bears have also recorded the second-most victories of any NFL franchise, only behind the Green Bay Packers.

College career

Cutler attended Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.[10] He redshirted in his 2001 freshman season, and subsequently started all 45 career games that he played for the Commodores, the most starts by a quarterback in school history. He did not miss a game in college due to injury.[4] The Commodores were 11–35 during his tenure, including going 5–27 versus the SEC.[11] In 2002, Cutler set the school record for touchdowns and rushing yards by a freshman and rushed for more yards than any other Southeastern Conference quarterback that year. The Associated Press honored him with a first-team freshman All-SEC selection.[4] In 2004, as a junior, Cutler completed 61.0 percent of his passes, setting a school record, while throwing for 1,844 yards with 10 touchdowns and a career-low five interceptions.[4]

Cutler being sacked by Navy linebacker Jeremy Chase during 2004 season
Cutler being sacked by Navy linebacker Jeremy Chase during 2004 season

The 2005 season, Cutler's final year of play at Vanderbilt, was his most successful. As an 11-game starter, he completed 273 of 462 passes (59.1%) for 3,073 yards, 21 touchdowns and nine interceptions, as he became the first Commodore to win the SEC Offensive Player of the Year (coaches and media) since 1967.[4][12] With his senior-season performance, Cutler became the second Commodore to throw for more than 3,000 yards in a season, while his 273 completions and 21 touchdowns ranked second on the school's single-season list.[4] He led the Commodores to victories over Wake Forest, Arkansas, Ole Miss, Richmond and Tennessee.[13][14][15][16] The Commodores also scored the second most points ever (42) laid upon the Florida Gators at their current home field at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium. Vanderbilt nearly upset the 13th-ranked Gators before falling 49–42 in the second overtime after a controversial excessive celebration call prevented the Commodores from going for 2 at the end of regulation.[17] Reflecting on Cutler's college career, former Denver Broncos safety John Lynch said, "If this guy can take a bunch of future doctors and lawyers and have them competing against the Florida Gators, this guy is a stud."[18]

Cutler ended his career by leading Vanderbilt past Tennessee 28–24, their first over the Volunteers since 1982 (the year before Cutler was born), and the first in Knoxville since 1975.[19] Cutler passed for three touchdowns and 315 yards, becoming the first quarterback in school history to record four consecutive 300-yard passing performances.[4] Cutler's final play in college was the game-winning (and streak-ending) touchdown pass to teammate Earl Bennett against Tennessee. A finalist for the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award (nation's top senior quarterback), Cutler was a first-team All-SEC pick by the league's coaches and led the conference with a school-record 3,288 yards of total offense.[4][20]

While at Vanderbilt, Cutler was a three-year captain and four-year starter, setting school career records for total offense (9,953 yards), touchdown passes (59), passing yards (8,697), pass completions (710), pass attempts (1,242), and combined touchdowns (76).[21]

Cutler graduated from Vanderbilt in 2005 with a Bachelor's degree in human and organizational development.[4]

College statistics

Season Passing Rushing
Cmp Att Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Sck Eff[22] Att Yds Avg TD
2002 103 212 48.6 1,433 6.8 10 9 17 112.4 123 393 3.2 9
2003 187 327 57.2 2,347 7.2 18 13 16 127.7 115 299 2.6 1
2004 147 241 61.0 1,844 7.7 10 5 24 134.8 109 349 3.2 6
2005 273 462 59.1 3,073 6.7 21 9 23 126.1 106 215 2.0 1
Career 710 1,242 57.2 8,697 7.0 59 36 80 125.9 453 1,256 2.8 17

Awards and honors

Records

Vanderbilt University school career records:

  • Total offense: 9,953
  • Combined touchdowns: 76

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Nashville, Tennessee

Nashville, Tennessee

Nashville is the capital city of the U.S. state of Tennessee and the seat of Davidson County. With a population of 689,447 at the 2020 U.S. census, Nashville is the most populous city in the state, 21st most-populous city in the U.S., and the fourth most populous city in the southeastern U.S. Located on the Cumberland River, the city is the center of the Nashville metropolitan area, which is one of the fastest growing in the nation.

Injury

Injury

An injury is any physiological damage to living tissue caused by immediate physical stress. An injury can occur intentionally or unintentionally and may be caused by blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, burning, toxic exposure, asphyxiation, or overexertion. Injuries can occur in any part of the body, and different symptoms are associated with different injuries.

Southeastern Conference

Southeastern Conference

The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is an American college athletic conference whose member institutions are located primarily in the South Central and Southeastern United States. Its fourteen members include the flagship public universities of ten states, three additional public land-grant universities, and one private research university. The conference is headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama. The SEC participates in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I in sports competitions; for football it is part of the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), formerly known as Division I-A.

Quarterback sack

Quarterback sack

In gridiron football, a sack occurs when the quarterback is tackled behind the line of scrimmage before throwing a forward pass, when the quarterback is tackled behind the line of scrimmage in the "pocket" and without clear intent, or when a passer runs out of bounds behind the line of scrimmage due to defensive pressure. This often occurs if the opposing team's defensive line, linebackers or defensive backs are able to apply pass pressure to quickly get past blocking players of the offensive team, or if the quarterback is unable to find a back to hand the ball off to or an available eligible receiver to catch the ball, allowing the defense a longer opportunity to tackle the quarterback.

Navy Midshipmen football

Navy Midshipmen football

The Navy Midshipmen football team represents the United States Naval Academy in NCAA Division I FBS college football. The Naval Academy completed its final season as an FBS independent school in 2014, and became a single-sport member of the American Athletic Conference beginning in the 2015 season. The team is currently coached by Brian Newberry, who was promoted in 2022, following his stint as the Midshipmen defensive coordinator. Navy has 19 players and three coaches in the College Football Hall of Fame and won the college football national championship in 1926 according to the Boand and Houlgate poll systems. The 1910 team also was undefeated and unscored upon. The mascot is Bill the Goat.

Linebacker

Linebacker

Linebacker (LB) is a playing position in gridiron football. Linebackers are members of the defensive team, and line up three to five yards behind the line of scrimmage and the defensive linemen. They are the "middle ground" of defenders, playing closer to the line of scrimmage than the defensive backs (secondary), but farther back than the defensive linemen.

Arkansas Razorbacks football

Arkansas Razorbacks football

The Arkansas Razorbacks football program represents the University of Arkansas in the sport of American football. The Razorbacks compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The program has one national championship awarded by the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) and Helms Athletic Foundation (HAF) in 1964, and one national championship awarded by the Rothman Foundation for the Analysis of Competitions and Tournaments in 1977. The school does not claim the 1977 title. Arkansas has won 13 conference championships, includes 58 All-Americans amongst its list of players, and holds an all-time record of 736–531–40. Home games are played at stadiums on or near the two largest campuses of the University of Arkansas System: Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, and War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock.

Ole Miss Rebels football

Ole Miss Rebels football

The Ole Miss Rebels football program represents the University of Mississippi, also known as "Ole Miss". The Rebels compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Rebels play their home games at Vaught–Hemingway Stadium on the university's campus in Oxford, Mississippi.

Florida Gators football

Florida Gators football

The Florida Gators football program represents the University of Florida (UF) in American college football. Florida competes in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). They play their home games in Steve Spurrier-Florida Field at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium on the university's Gainesville campus.

Ben Hill Griffin Stadium

Ben Hill Griffin Stadium

Ben Hill Griffin Stadium, popularly known as "The Swamp", is a football stadium on the campus of the University of Florida in Gainesville and the home field of the Florida Gators football team. It was originally known as Florida Field when it opened as a 22,000 seat facility in 1930, and it has been expanded and renovated many times over the ensuing decades. Most of the university's athletic administrative offices, along with most football-related offices and training areas, have been located in the stadium since the 1960s. Most of the football program's facilities are slated to move to a nearby $60 million building that began construction in 2020.

Denver Broncos

Denver Broncos

The Denver Broncos are a professional American football franchise based in Denver. The Broncos compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division. The team is headquartered in Dove Valley, Colorado.

John Lynch (American football)

John Lynch (American football)

John Terrence Lynch Jr. is an American football executive and former strong safety who is the current general manager of the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Stanford University, and was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the third round of the 1993 NFL Draft.

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Height Weight Arm length Hand span 40-yard dash 10-yard split 20-yard split 20-yard shuttle Three-cone drill Bench press Wonderlic
6 ft 3+14 in
(1.91 m)
226 lb
(103 kg)
31+12 in
(0.80 m)
9+38 in
(0.24 m)
4.77 s 1.62 s 2.78 s 4.26 s 7.10 s 23 reps 26[23]
All values from NFL Combine[24][25][26][27]

Cutler was ranked by many experts as the third-best quarterback prospect in the 2006 NFL Draft, after Matt Leinart of USC and Vince Young of Texas. ESPN's Chris Mortensen and Ron Jaworski tabbed him as the best quarterback available in the draft, and some scouts believed he had better arm strength than Young and Leinart, and compared him to Brett Favre for his gunslinger attitude.[28][29] At the 2006 NFL Scouting Combine, Cutler completed 23 repetitions of a 225-pound bench press (more than some linemen) and ran a 40-yard dash in 4.77 seconds.[26]

Cutler was selected, with the 11th pick of the first round of the draft, by the Denver Broncos, who traded their 1st and 3rd round picks to the St. Louis Rams to move up.[30] Many believed Cutler was chosen by the Broncos due to the lackluster performance in the previous season's AFC Championship Game of Jake Plummer.[31] After the pick by Denver, Cutler said, "We had no warning. I think I knew about 15 seconds before everyone else did."[32] Cutler, as predicted by most, was the third quarterback chosen, after Young (3rd overall) and Leinart (10th). He is the third first-round pick to come from Vanderbilt, preceded by Will Wolford and Bill Wade. On July 27, 2006, Cutler agreed to terms on a six-year $48 million contract, which included $11 million in bonuses.[33]

Denver Broncos

2006 season

After a strong training camp in 2006, Cutler was promoted from third to second on the Broncos' quarterback depth chart ahead of Bradlee Van Pelt. He passed for more yards than any other rookie in the preseason.

On November 27, head coach Mike Shanahan officially announced that Cutler would replace Jake Plummer as starting quarterback despite a 7–4 record because, "I think he gives us the best chance to win now."[34][35] The controversial decision capped weeks of speculation and rumors about Cutler's impending promotion to a starting role.[36]

Cutler took his first NFL snap on December 3 (Week 13), and after some initial jitters (0-3 with sack and fumble) completed his first touchdown to tight end Stephen Alexander in the second quarter.[37] In the fourth quarter, he threw a memorable 71-yard touchdown to fellow-rookie Brandon Marshall to tie the game 20–20. It was one of the longest touchdown passes for a debut in NFL history and was also the second-longest pass play between two rookies in Broncos history.[4] He also had two interceptions and took three sacks in the loss.[38]

On December 10, in a road loss against the San Diego Chargers, Cutler connected with tight end Tony Scheffler for two touchdowns in a span of 48 seconds, which is tied for fastest, in league history that two rookies produced a pair of scoring passes.[4]

Cutler's first win came in his third start on December 17, which was a 37–20 road victory over the Arizona Cardinals.[39] He finished the game 21-of-31 with 261 yards, two touchdowns, an interception and a QB rating of 101.7, the highest for a Broncos rookie since John Elway in 1983.[4] One touchdown traveled 65 yards in the air, and was recorded as a 54-yard touchdown to Javon Walker on the Broncos' third play of the game. Shanahan said to the media, "You saw what he could do today. It doesn't take a genius out there to figure out this guy is very composed, can make all the throws and plays with a lot of confidence."[40]

Cutler then led the Broncos to a Christmas Eve win over the Cincinnati Bengals, 24–23, in his fourth start on the season.[41] He went 12-of-23 with 179 yards, two touchdowns and one interception. He also directed the Broncos on a 99-yard drive in the third quarter that culminated on a Mike Bell two-yard touchdown run. As a result of the two passing touchdowns in the game against the Bengals, Cutler became the first rookie QB in NFL history to throw for at least two touchdowns in each of his first four games played.[4] He also became the second rookie in league history (fifth player overall) to throw at least two touchdown passes in each of his first four starts.[4][42]

The Broncos' quest to clinch a playoff berth came up short in the final game of the season, when they fell at home 26–23 in overtime to the San Francisco 49ers. The loss dropped the Broncos to a 9–7 overall record and 4–4 at home. Despite sustaining a concussion in the first half, Cutler finished 21 of 32 with 230 yards and a touchdown, and led Denver on a game-tying touchdown drive in the closing minutes of regulation to force overtime.[43]

In five games played on the season, Cutler finished with a record of 2–3, and went 81-of-137 for 1,001 yards, nine touchdowns, and five interceptions, earning a franchise rookie record passer rating of 88.5.[44] He posted the second-highest touchdown percentage (6.6) and third-highest TD-to-INT ratio (1.8) among NFL rookies since 1970 with at least 125 passing attempts.[4]

2007 season

Cutler preparing for the Titans in a 2007 MNF game.
Cutler preparing for the Titans in a 2007 MNF game.

The 2007 NFL season marked Cutler's first full season as the starting quarterback for the Denver Broncos. In the first game of the season against the Buffalo Bills, Cutler led Denver to a comeback win on a 12-play, 42-yard drive culminating in a Jason Elam 42-yard field goal as time expired.[4] Cutler's pass attempts (39), completions (23), and yards (304) for the game were career-highs at the time.[4] He led Denver to their second straight comeback win the next week in the home opener against the Oakland Raiders. Late in regulation, Cutler moved the team 78 yards in 15 plays for the game-tying field goal with 2:18 remaining.[4] The game went into overtime, where he engineered a 52-yard drive that led to another game-winning field goal by Elam. Cutler had a touchdown pass during the game, making him the first Broncos passer to begin his Broncos career with at least one touchdown pass in his first seven starts.[4] The streak reached nine games through losses to Jacksonville and at Indianapolis (which featured his first career rushing touchdown), but ended with a 41–3 home loss to the San Diego Chargers in the fifth game of the season.[4]

After the bye week in Week 6, the 2-3 Broncos beat the 4–1 Pittsburgh Steelers, 31–28 (all three wins on last-second Elam field goals). Cutler had a QB rating of 106.7, and career highs of 75.9% passes completed, three touchdowns, 41 rushing yards and a long run of 31 yards, earning NBC Sunday Night Football's Horse Trailer Player of the Game (with Elam).[45][4] Cutler finally had an interception-free game in his 12th start against the 6–1 Green Bay Packers, in which he drove 89-yards for a game-tying field goal in the last 2:27 of regulation, before losing in overtime, 19–13, on Green Bay's first play from scrimmage.[46] In week 8, Cutler had just four attempts against the Detroit Lions before leaving with a leg injury; backup Patrick Ramsey floundered in a 44–7 loss. Cutler returned the next week in a 27–11 victory at Kansas City.[47]

In Week 10, the 4-5 Broncos faced the 6-3 Tennessee Titans (and fellow 2006 draftee Vince Young for the first time) in a MNF game.[48] Cutler posted a career-second-best 137.0 passer rating in a 34–20 victory.[49] He was the first Broncos quarterback since Elway in 1995 to throw two 40+ yard touchdowns in a game (of the team's franchise-record four 40+ yard touchdowns that night), and the 5–5 Broncos moved into a tie with San Diego atop the AFC West. However, the Broncos won only one of the next five games, a 41–7 Chiefs blowout. In that game, Cutler passed for four touchdowns and a then-career-best rating of 141.0.[50] But that bright spot came between two pairs of losses; in the four games Cutler had five interceptions, took 12 sacks, twice had a rating under 50.0, and culminated in 23–3 loss to San Diego that eliminated the Broncos from the playoffs.[51] Cutler salvaged a 7–9 record with a 22–19 overtime win over Minnesota, eliminating them as well.[52]

Denver missed the playoffs for a second straight year. Cutler started all 16 games, completing 297-of-467 passes (63.6%) for 3,497 yards, 20 touchdowns and 14 interceptions. He was the NFL's 12th-ranked passer (88.1) and also had the tenth-most passing yards (3,497). Furthermore, Cutler was the league's ninth-best third-down passer, with a 92.1 passer rating (73-of-125 for 901 yards, eight touchdowns, and three interceptions). It was the seventh most passing yards in Broncos history, and third-best completion percentage.[4] Like his predecessor Plummer, Cutler showed mobility with 44 rushes for 205 yards (4.7 yards per carry) and a touchdown on the season.[53]

In late 2007, various experts suggested Cutler was the young quarterback most likely to reach the elite status along the lines of Peyton Manning and Tom Brady.[54] Cutler, Brandon Marshall and Tony Scheffler went to Atlanta together to train and work on timing for the 2008 season.[55]

2008 season

Before the 2008 regular season began, Cutler and tight end Daniel Graham were voted offensive captains by Broncos teammates.[56]

Cutler started the season with a 41-14 Monday Night Football victory over Oakland. He completed 16-of-24 passes for 300 yards and two touchdowns,[57][58] The next week, Cutler and the Broncos defeated the San Diego Chargers in Denver, 39–38.[59] Cutler went 36-of-50, with 350 yards passing and a career-best-tying four touchdowns, including one to Eddie Royal on 4th and Goal with 0:24 left, followed by a game-winning two-point conversion again to Royal. This occurred one play after Cutler fumbled, but an inadvertent whistle by referee Ed Hochuli before the Chargers recovered gave the Broncos the ball back.[60] In Week 3, Cutler had 264 yards and two touchdowns in a 34–22 home win over New Orleans.[61] Cutler threw two interceptions for the first time in the Broncos first defeat, 33–19 at Kansas City.[62] Despite this, he finished September first in the AFC in completions (102), passing yards (1,275), and attempts (157), second in yards per attempt (8.12), third in passing touchdowns (9) and quarterback rating (98.6), and fifth in completion percentage (65.0%), winning AFC Offensive Player of the Month honors for the first time in his career.[63]

Cutler with the Denver Broncos in 2008
Cutler with the Denver Broncos in 2008

The Broncos edged Tampa Bay 16–13 behind Cutler's 23-of-34 performance with 227 yards, one touchdown and no interceptions.[64] The Broncos were 4–1 and leading AFC West. But then followed a 24–17 loss to Jacksonville Jaguars, where Cutler passed for just 192 yards, two touchdowns and one interception.[65] Next, Cutler injured his index finger on the first play of a 41-7 drubbing at New England; he ended the night with 168 yards and two interceptions.[66] After a bye week, the Broncos suffered their third straight defeat, 26–17 to Miami, behind Cutler's 24-of-46 passing for 307 yards, two touchdowns and season-high three interceptions.[67] During the 1-4 skid, Cutler had all seven of the Broncos touchdowns.

In game 9, the Broncos found themselves down 23–10 at Cleveland, but in the 4th quarter Cutler threw a career-long 93-yard touchdown to Eddie Royal, followed by a touchdown passes to Daniel Graham and the game-winner to Brandon Marshall with 1:14 left.[68] Cutler finished the game going 24-of-42 with 447 yards (career-high), three touchdowns and one interception,[68] and received AFC Offensive Player of the Week honors for the first time in his career.[69] The next week, Cutler threw another late 4th quarter touchdown to Daniel Graham for a 24–20 win at Atlanta.[70]

In game 11, Cutler's streak of games with a touchdown ended at 11 as he went 16-of-37 for 204 yards and an interception in a 31–10 loss to Oakland.[71] He did, however, reach 3,000 yards on the season, tying John Elway by reaching this mark in 11 games. In a windy game 12 at the New York Jets, Cutler went 27-of-43 with 357 yards, two touchdowns and one interception in the 34–17 victory.[72] The 7-5 Broncos had a 3-game road win streak, 3 game home loss streak, and 3 game lead on San Diego (who had their own 3 game loss streak) with four games remaining.

Cutler began December completing a season high 80% of his 40 passes for 286 yards, two touchdowns, and one interception in a 24–17 win over the Chiefs.[73] The win came via a 95-yard drive and go-ahead touchdown pass to Brandon Marshall for Cutler's fourth rally of the season.[74] However, Cutler was just 21-of-33 with 172 yards, one touchdown, and one interception in a 20–30 loss at Carolina,[75] and despite 359 yards and 2 rushing touchdowns, had no passing touchdowns and one interception in a 30–23 loss to Buffalo.[76][77] This set up a winner-takes-the-division season finale against the San Diego Chargers. Cutler went 33-of-49 with 316 yards, one touchdown, and two interceptions, but it wasn't enough to counteract the Chargers seven touchdowns and Denver lost 52–21, failing to reach the playoffs for the third straight season.[78]

Cutler finished the season with career-highs in passing completions (384), passing attempts (616), passing yards (4,526), passing touchdowns (25), interceptions (18), rushing attempts (57) and rushing touchdowns (2).[79] At the time, his passing yards, completions and attempts were all single-season franchise records for the Broncos. He also had the most 300-yard passing games (8) in team history.[4] For the season, Cutler ranked third in the NFL in completions (first in the AFC), second in passing attempts (first in the AFC), third in passing yards (first in the AFC) and seventh in passing touchdowns (third in the AFC).[80] He was selected as the FedEx Air Player of the Week for his performances during Weeks 10, 13 and 14. He finished third in fan voting for AFC quarterbacks in the 2009 Pro Bowl,[81] and was officially selected as a reserve.[82] Before the game in Hawaii, fellow Pro Bowlers Peyton Manning, Nick Mangold, and Kris Dielman threw him into a pool, ruining his blood sugar monitor. A replacement one was found at a drugstore, and Cutler played without incident.[83]

Chicago Bears

2009 season

Cutler points out the mike linebacker during training camp, 2009
Cutler points out the mike linebacker during training camp, 2009

Cutler was traded with the Broncos' fifth-round selection in the 2009 NFL Draft pick to the Chicago Bears for quarterback Kyle Orton, the Bears' first- and third-round selections in 2009, and first-round pick in the 2010 NFL Draft on April 3, 2009.[84] On October 20, Cutler and the Bears came to terms on a two-year contract extension worth $30 million, running through 2013.[85]

Cutler passes in a game against the San Francisco 49ers
Cutler passes in a game against the San Francisco 49ers

Cutler was the subject of most of the praise and criticism during the Chicago Bears' mercurial season. He began the season with 4 INTs in a loss to Green Bay, followed by seven touchdowns to one interception in three straight wins with a 100+ QB Rating.[86] The Bears lost eight of the next ten games behind Cutler's 11 touchdowns vs NFL-leading 20 interceptions. This included a Week 9 loss to San Francisco where Cutler threw a career-high five interceptions and no touchdowns, and Game 14 loss at Baltimore where Cutler had career-worsts of 94 yards[87] and a passer rating of 7.9.[88][89] But Cutler again reversed direction in Game 15 against Brett Favre's division rival Vikings, where he threw four touchdowns, including a go-ahead late in the 4th quarter, and 31-yard game-winner in overtime.[90] He earned Offensive Player of the Week for his effort against the Vikings.[91] He then ended the season with another four-touchdown outing and win over Detroit. Cutler finished the season with 27 touchdowns, league-leading 26 interceptions, 3,666 yards passing, and career-worst passer rating of 76.8.[92]

2010 season

The Bears hired Mike Martz (famed for developing the St. Louis Rams' "Greatest Show on Turf") as offensive coordinator. Though Martz was critical of Cutler as an analyst, both professed excitement about working together.[93]

Cutler led the Bears to a 3–0 start, throwing six touchdowns and only two interceptions. However, in week 4, Cutler was sacked nine times in the first half against the New York Giants, missing the rest of that game and the next with a concussion.[94] He returned to six sacks in a loss to Seattle and 4 interceptions in a loss to Washington, leaving the Bears at 4–3 at their bye week.[95][96]

Cutler in 2010
Cutler in 2010

Martz retooled the offensive line and showed more commitment to the running game, allowing Cutler to escape the next three games with just six sacks total. He won those three, followed by then-career-bests of four touchdowns and rating of 146.2 in a win over the 7–3 Eagles (winning NFC Player of the Week), and an 80.8% completion percentage in a win over Detroit.[97][98][99] After a 152-yard, no touchdown, two interception loss to New England, Cutler won back-to-back games with three touchdowns, one interception, and 100+ ratings in each, before dropping the season finale to Green Bay.[100][101] The Bears finished with an 11–5 record, an NFC North title, and a first-round bye. Despite taking a league-leading 52 sacks, Cutler finished the season with 3,274 passing yards, 23 touchdowns, 16 interceptions, 232 rushing yards, and 4 comeback victories.[102]

Cutler on January 2, 2011, against the Green Bay Packers.
Cutler on January 2, 2011, against the Green Bay Packers.

In Cutler's playoff debut against the Seattle Seahawks, he had 274 passing yards, two passing touchdowns, 43 rushing yards, and two rushing touchdowns in the Bears 35–24 win, making him the second quarterback in NFL history since Otto Graham in 1954 and 1955 to score two touchdown passes and two touchdown runs in a playoff game.[103]

In the NFC Championship Game, Cutler completed 6-of-14 passes for 80 yards and an interception, before a knee injury sidelined him early in the third quarter of a 21–14 loss to Green Bay.[104] The Bears did not make an immediate announcement about Cutler's condition, allowing speculation to grow.[105] In possibly the NFL's first player-on-player social media attack, Cutler was being criticized seconds after the injury by Maurice Jones-Drew, Darnell Dockett, Deion Sanders, and Mark Schlereth.[106][107][108] Bears coach Lovie Smith later clarified that he, and not Cutler, made the decision after consulting the medical and training staff.[105][109] The following day, an MRI revealed Cutler had sprained his MCL.[110] Hall of Fame quarterback Troy Aikman commented that the widespread reaction reflected hostility towards Cutler's career-long polarizing attitude.[111] Bears teammates defended Cutler, and his critics themselves became the targets of insults from other players, including Packers Aaron Rodgers ("disrespectful"),[112] LeRoy Butler ("stupid"),[113] and B. J. Raji ("pretty wrong and a lot times it has a lot to do with jealousy").[114]

2011 season

Throughout 2011, offensive coordinator Mike Martz was commonly criticized for aggressive play-calling in a pass-happy offense, leading to unnecessary wear on a quarterback returning from injury. In the season opener against the Atlanta Falcons, Cutler started the season off on a good note with 312 passing yards, two touchdowns, and one interception in the 30–12 win.[115] In Week 2 against the New Orleans Saints, Cutler was sacked 6 times and kicked in the throat.[116] During Week 6, Cutler was caught on microphone asking a player to go to Martz on the sideline, and, "Tell him I said fuck him!"[117] Despite these incidents, by Week 10, Cutler had a QB rating of 85.7 (12th in the league) and the Bears were 6–3. However, on November 20, Cutler broke the thumb on his throwing hand tackling San Diego's Antoine Cason after an interception. He played through the final drive for the win, but the injury required season-ending surgery.[118] Under backups Caleb Hanie and Josh McCown, the Bears lost six of their remaining seven games, and missed the playoffs. Overall, in his shortened 2011 season, Cutler had 2,319 passing yards, 13 touchdowns, and seven interceptions.[119]

2012 season

Before the season, the Bears replaced Martz with Mike Tice, hired Cutler's former coach Jeremy Bates from the Broncos,[120] and acquired his former teammate, wide receiver Brandon Marshall from the Miami Dolphins.[121] Unlike Martz, Tice allowed Cutler to call audibles at the line of scrimmage.[122]

Cutler talking to Brandon Marshall at Bears Training Camp in 2012
Cutler talking to Brandon Marshall at Bears Training Camp in 2012

Cutler started his season by throwing an interception returned for a touchdown by the Colts' Jerrell Freeman. He bounced back from a passer rating 4.9 first quarter passer rating.[123] to finish the game 21-of-35 for 333 yards, two touchdowns, and a 98.9 passer rating, in a 41–21 victory.[124] In week 2, Cutler was sacked seven times and threw four interceptions against Green Bay, yelling at his porous offensive line and bumping left tackle J'Marcus Webb[125] on his way to a 28.2 passer rating in a 23–10 loss.[126] The line responded by surrendering just 5 sacks in the next three games, all wins, the second a 34–18 win over Dallas where Cutler was 18 of 24 for 275 yards, two touchdowns, no interceptions, and the third-best passer rating of his career (140.1).[127] After close wins over Detroit and Carolina, Cutler had three touchdowns and no interceptions with a rating of 138.1 in a 51–20 blowout of Tennessee, bringing the Bears to 7–1 on the season, and Cutler's personal record in games with a 100+ QB rating to 25–0.[128]

In Week 10 against the Houston Texans, Cutler joined Michael Vick and Alex Smith as the third NFL quarterback out with a concussion that day.[129] His replacement Jason Campbell lost that game and the next.[130] Cutler returned for a Week 12 win over the Minnesota Vikings.[131] Despite a 119.6 passer rating against the Seattle Seahawks in week 13, the Bears lost in overtime,[132] which was followed by two close losses to Minnesota and Green Bay. Cutler finished the season with two solid performances in easy wins over the Cardinals and Lions. Despite a 10–6 record, the Bears missed the playoffs.[133]

Cutler again finished the season in the top 5 for times sacked, but nevertheless lead the league in fourth-quarter passer rating with 114.7.[134] In just four seasons, he was already the Bears all-time team leader in passer rating (81.9) and completions (1,034), and second in yards (12,292), touchdowns (82), and completion percentage (59.6%).[135] His reunion with Brandon Marshall led to franchise records of 118 receptions for 1,508 yards, and the 7th-year receiver's first All-Pro selection.[136]

2013 season

New head coach Marc Trestman developed a successful strategy to better protect his quarterback, and in the first six games Cutler was sacked only 9 times compared to 23, 19, and 19 in the previous three seasons.[137] Under the new scheme, Cutler began the season with three consecutive games with a 90+ passer rating for the first time since 2009. In each of those wins, he threw touchdowns in the 4th quarter, including game-winners in week 1 against Cincinnati and week 2 against Minnesota. He threw three interceptions in a week 4 loss to Detroit. In week five, Cutler was sacked three times and fumbled in the first 16 minutes of the game, then rebounded for 358 yards, two touchdowns, and a season-high 128.1 passer rating in defeat.[138] He threw 2 touchdowns in a Week 6 win over the New York Giants. Through the first six games, he had a career best 95.2 passer rating, five multiple touchdown games, and a franchise-record 1,630 passing yards.[139][140]

However, against the Washington Redskins the following week, his 100th career start, Cutler tore a groin muscle when sacked by Chris Baker, breaking Jim Harbaugh's franchise record for most times sacked.[141][142][143] Josh McCown was solid in relief, barely losing that Redskins game in a 45–41 shootout, and after the bye-week tossing two touchdowns in a 27–21 win at Green Bay.[144] Cutler was medically cleared to return early for the week 10 game against Detroit,[145] where he had 250 yards, one touchdown, and one interception before a hit from Stephen Tulloch in the second quarter finally drove him from the game on the Bears last drive.[146] McCown drove 74 yards in 90 seconds for a touchdown, but the two-point conversion failed and the Bears lost 21–19.[147]

Cutler missed the next four games with his injury and McCown played well in his absence, leading to some controversy when Cutler was reinstated as the starting QB in Week 15.[146][148][149] Cutler threw two interceptions in the first half against the Cleveland Browns, one returned for a touchdown, but ended with a 102.2 passer rating and three touchdowns.[150] In the next week's 54–11 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles, Cutler ended up with 14,687 career passing yards for the Bears, one more than Sid Luckman's franchise record.[151] The season finale was a winner-takes-the-division matchup at home against Green Bay. Despite Cutler's 15-of-24 passing for 226 yards, two touchdowns, and one interception for a 103.8 passer rating, the Bears lost 33–28 on a last-minute Hail Mary, missing the playoffs with an 8–8 record.[152] Cutler ended the season completing 224 of 355 passes for 2,621 yards, 19 touchdowns, 12 interceptions, and a career-high 89.2 passer rating.[153][154]

On January 2, 2014, Cutler signed a seven-year deal, keeping him with the Bears through the 2020 NFL season.[155]

2014 season

Marc Trestman looks on as Cutler practices in 2014.
Marc Trestman looks on as Cutler practices in 2014.

Cutler and the Bears struggled to a 5–11 record in Trestman's second year as head coach.[156] The Bears opened the season with an overtime loss to the Buffalo Bills, in which Cutler threw two touchdowns and interceptions for 349 yards.[157] The next week, the team overcame a 17-point deficit behind Cutler's four touchdown passes to defeat the San Francisco 49ers.[158] The next week, he led the Bears to a 27–19 victory against the New York Jets, tallying 225 passing yards, two touchdowns and no interceptions.[159]

In both weeks 4 and 5, Cutler threw two touchdowns and two interceptions in defeats to the Packers and Panthers.[160][161] In week 6, Cutler recorded a career-high 381 passing yards, defeating Atlanta 27–13.[162] Cutler recorded just 190 yards in a loss to Miami, then threw three touchdowns but suffered a lopsided 51–23 defeat to the New England Patriots, and threw two interceptions in an even worse 55–14 loss to the Packers.[163][164][165] The 3–6 Bears drew criticism from former Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher, who suggested that Phil Emery shouldn't have re-signed Cutler. "Financially, he is one of the elite guys in the NFL... He just hasn't produced like an elite quarterback."[166]

Cutler and the Bears rebounded with two consecutive wins. He threw three touchdowns, two interceptions, and 330 yards against the Vikings, and 130 yards and one passing touchdown against Tampa Bay.[167][168] That would be the last win of the season. Cutler started the Thanksgiving Day game against Detroit with two passing touchdowns, but the Bears stumbled for the remainder of the game en route to 34–17 loss. He finished the game with two touchdowns, two interceptions, and 280 yards.[169] The Bears suffered their eighth loss of the season to the Dallas Cowboys, in which Cutler threw 341 yards, two touchdowns and one interception, mathematically eliminating the Bears from the playoffs.[170] Under criticism, offensive coordinator Aaron Kromer partially blamed Cutler's audibles and impromptu play calling for the poor record, but later apologized to Cutler and the Bears organization in a press conference.[171] The next week, Cutler threw two touchdowns, three interceptions, and just 194 yards for a season-low 55.8 passer rating in a loss to the Saints.[172] Trestman demoted Cutler in favor of Jimmy Clausen,[173] but Cutler returned when Clausen suffered a concussion in the loss to Detroit. In the Bears' season finale against the Vikings, Cutler completed 23 of 36 passes for 172 yards, and a 63 passer rating in the loss.[174] He accrued 3,812 passing yards, a career-high 28 passing touchdowns, but led the NFL with 18 interceptions.[175]

2015 season

The Bears hired John Fox as their new head coach on January 19. Both Fox and GM Ryan Pace were initially lukewarm on Cutler,[176] but reluctantly decided to keep Cutler as the starter.[177] Tight end Martellus Bennett indicated his teammates were similarly unenthusiastic.[178]

Cutler began the season with a lackluster 225 yards in a loss to Green Bay, tossing a last-minute touchdown to Bennett to bring his rating up to 67.5.[179] He began Week 2 against the Cardinals with 8 straight completions, but then threw an interception and injured his hamstring failing to stop safety Tony Jefferson from returning it for a touchdown.[180] Without Cutler, the Bears lost 48–23 to the Cardinals, and were shutout 26–0 in Week 3 at Seattle.[181] Cutler returned against Oakland, throwing two first half touchdowns, and drove 48 yards in the last 2:05 to set-up a game-winning field goal.[182] In Week 5, Cutler threw two touchdowns in the final 3:05 for a dramatic 18–17 victory over the Chiefs and a tie of Jim McMahon's record for the most wins in team history.[183] In Week 6, Cutler was just short of a third consecutive comeback: despite a season-best 353 yards, a 4th quarter touchdown and 2-point conversion, followed by a 69-yard drive in 17 seconds for a game-tying field goal, the Bears lost in overtime to the Lions.[184] After the bye, in Week 8 Cutler again scored a go-ahead touchdown late in the 4th quarter, but the Vikings rallied for two late scores and a 23–20 win.[185] In Week 9 against San Diego, Cutler threw yet another late 4th quarter touchdown, which both won the game 22–19, and set the Bears franchise record (139).[186] In Week 10, Cutler had a stellar performance in a 37–13 win St. Louis, going 19-for-24 for 258 yards, three touchdowns (two of them for 80+ yards for the only time in franchise history)[187] and no interceptions; his 151.0 passer rating was a career-best.[188]

That would be the season high-point for both the 4–5 Bears and Cutler. The Bears went 2–5 the rest of the season, four of the losses by less than 7 points. Cutler had three unremarkable games in narrow losses to Denver and San Francisco and a narrow win at Green Bay. In the Broncos game, Cutler led a 65-yard, potential game-tying drive, but Bears running back Jeremy Langford was stopped on the two point conversion attempted, and the Bears lost 17–15.[189] In Week 14, Cutler threw for 315 yards and two touchdowns against Washington, including a 50-yard completion with two minutes remaining, but Robbie Gould missed the game-tying field goal for a 24–21 loss.[190] The next week, Cutler was sacked five times and threw an interception in a 38–17 loss to Minnesota,[191] then had just 156 yards but a 100.2 passer rating in a win over Tampa Bay.[192] In the season finale against Detroit, Cutler had two touchdowns, but three interceptions including one deep in Lions territory at the 2 minute warning to seal the 24–20 loss.[193]

Despite his receiving unit being plagued by injuries, Cutler had one of his best seasons as he ended 2015 with 3,629 passing yards, 21 touchdowns, 11 interceptions,[194] and career highs in passer rating (92.3)[195] and completion percentage (64.4). The 11 interceptions were the lowest in his career[196] and resulted in an interception percentage of 2.3, the lowest in a season when he has started at least 12 games,[197] while 21 touchdowns were his second-most since 2011 and the 3,629 yards were the third-most in his career.[196] On third down, Cutler had a 103.2 passer rating (fourth in the NFL) after completing 91 of 141 passes for 1,242 yards, seven touchdowns and two interceptions.[198]

2016 season

With Adam Gase's departure to become the head coach of the Miami Dolphins, Dowell Loggains became the Bears' offensive coordinator.[199] In Cutler's first two games, he was sacked eight times and had two interceptions in losses to the Houston Texans[200] (where he injured his right thumb but completed the game),[201] and Philadelphia Eagles (where he re-aggravated his injury and was replaced by Brian Hoyer).[202] He missed the next five games before making his return against the Vikings, where he completed 20 of 31 passes for 252 yards, a touchdown and a 100.5 passer rating en route to a 20–10 victory.[203] Zach Miller praised Cutler's performance in his return, even adding that he delivered a half-time speech to motivate his teammates.[204] Cutler fumbled and threw two interceptions (including a pick-6) in a loss to Tampa Bay.[205] Cutler sustained a labrum injury in his throwing shoulder on November 20, 2016, in a loss to the Giants, and missed the rest of the season.[206][207] In his five games in 2016, Cutler recorded 1,059 passing yards, four touchdowns, five interceptions, and a 78.1 passer rating.[208]

On March 9, 2017, Cutler was released by the Bears through a $2 million buyout clause, after the guaranteed years in his seven-year contract had run out. After Cutler's lackluster performances and injuries, the move was expected for months, as the Bears decided to award a $45 million contract to Mike Glennon.[209] In May 2017, Cutler announced his retirement from professional football and was hired by Fox Sports to be a commentator.[210][211][212]

Miami Dolphins

On August 3, 2017, Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill suffered a season-ending injury, and the team reached out to the retired Cutler.[213] On August 7, Cutler signed a one-year, $10 million contract with the Dolphins, reuniting him with former Bears offensive coordinator Adam Gase, who was hired as Miami's head coach in 2016.[214][215]

In Week 2, the Dolphins won their first game against the Los Angeles Chargers, 19–17. Cutler was 24-of-33 for 230 yards with a touchdown to wide receiver Kenny Stills in the road victory.[216] In a Week 7 game against the New York Jets, Cutler suffered multiple cracked ribs.[217] He was replaced by Matt Moore during the game and was ruled out for the following week's game against the Baltimore Ravens.[218] He returned in Week 9 to face the Oakland Raiders. In the 27–24 loss, he was very efficient going 34-of-42 for 311 yards and a touchdown.[219] In the Week 11 game, Cutler suffered a concussion, which caused him to miss the team's next game.[220] Cutler had his best performance of the year in a Monday Night Football game against New England where he outplayed Tom Brady and the Dolphins upset the Patriots. Cutler threw three touchdowns in the win.[221]

On December 27, he said he would probably only continue his NFL career if he can be a starter, stating, "I wouldn't want to move again or go somewhere just to back up."[222][223] He started 14 games and finished with 2,666 passing yards, 19 touchdowns, and 14 interceptions for the Dolphins in the 2017 season.[224] The Dolphins did not make the playoffs and Cutler went 6–8 as a starter. Many teammates, including receiver Kenny Stills, praised Cutler during the season; Stills described him as "a good man." "People in other places have kind of given him a hard time. I got to know him as a man and as a player and I appreciate him. I like him. I'm thankful for the experience of playing with him, catching some balls from him."[225]

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NFL career statistics

Legend
Led the league
Bold Career high
Year Team Games Passing Rushing Sacks Fumbles
GP GS Record Cmp Att Pct Yds Avg TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD Sck Yds Fum Lost
2006 DEN 5 5 2−3 81 137 59.1 1,001 7.3 9 5 88.5 12 18 1.5 0 13 85 8 2
2007 DEN 16 16 7−9 297 467 63.6 3,497 7.5 20 14 88.1 44 205 4.7 1 27 153 11 4
2008 DEN 16 16 8−8 384 616 62.3 4,526 7.3 25 18 86.0 57 200 3.5 2 11 69 5 2
2009 CHI 16 16 7−9 336 555 60.5 3,666 6.6 27 26 76.8 40 173 4.3 1 35 204 9 1
2010 CHI 15 15 10−5 261 432 60.4 3,274 7.6 23 16 86.3 50 232 4.6 1 52 352 10 6
2011 CHI 10 10 7−3 182 314 58.0 2,319 7.4 13 7 85.7 18 55 3.1 1 23 159 7 3
2012 CHI 15 15 10−5 255 434 58.8 3,033 7.0 19 14 81.3 41 233 5.7 0 38 250 8 4
2013 CHI 11 11 5−6 224 355 63.1 2,621 7.4 19 12 89.2 23 118 5.1 0 19 132 5 3
2014 CHI 15 15 5−10 370 561 66.0 3,812 6.8 28 18 88.6 39 191 4.9 2 38 223 12 6
2015 CHI 15 15 6−9 311 483 64.4 3,659 7.6 21 11 92.3 38 201 5.3 1 29 150 8 5
2016 CHI 5 5 1−4 81 137 59.1 1,059 7.7 4 5 78.1 5 24 4.8 0 17 104 6 2
2017 MIA 14 14 6−8 266 429 62.0 2,666 6.2 19 14 80.8 15 25 1.7 0 20 154 6 0
Career 153 153 74−79 3,048 4,920 62.0 35,133 7.1 227 160 85.3 382 1,675 4.4 9 322 2,035 95 38

Awards and honors

Chicago Bears franchise records

As of 2022, Jay Cutler held at least 14 Bears franchise records, including:

  • Completions: career (2,020), season (384 in 2008)
  • Pass Attempts: career (3,271), season (615 in 2008)
  • Passing Yards: career (23,443)
  • Passing TDs: career (154), playoff game (2 on January 16, 2011, against the Seattle Seahawks; with 3 others)
  • Sacked: career (251), season (52 in 2010), game (9 on October 3, 2010, against the New York Giants; with 2 others)
  • Pass Yds/Game: career (229.8)
  • 300+ yard passing games: career (16), season (4 in 2014; with Brian Hoyer and Mitchell Trubisky)

Other franchise records (as of 2022)

  • Highest Completion Percentage in a Single Season: 66.0% (2014) (15 starts)
  • Most 4th Quarter Comeback Wins in a Single Season: 4 (2010 and 2015)
  • Most Career 4th Quarter Comeback Wins: 16 (2009–2016)
  • Most Game Winning Drives in a Single Season: 4 (2009 and 2010 and 2015) (tied with Bill Wade and Bob Avellini)
  • Most Career Game Winning Drives: 18 (2009–2016)
  • Most Wins: 51 (2009–2016)

Discover more about NFL career statistics related topics

2006 NFL season

2006 NFL season

The 2006 NFL season was the 87th regular season of the National Football League. Regular season play was held from September 7 to December 31, 2006.

2006 Denver Broncos season

2006 Denver Broncos season

The 2006 season was the Denver Broncos' 37th in the National Football League (NFL) and their 47th overall. Following a 7–2 start, the team collapsed down the stretch as the team failed to improve on their 13–3 record from 2005 and they finished the season with a 9–7 record, missing the playoffs for the first time since 2002, due to a 23–26 overtime loss to the San Francisco 49ers and allowing the Kansas City Chiefs to win the tiebreaker, by beating the Jacksonville Jaguars 35–30.

2007 NFL season

2007 NFL season

The 2007 NFL season was the 88th regular season of the National Football League.

2007 Denver Broncos season

2007 Denver Broncos season

The 2007 season was the Denver Broncos' 38th in the National Football League (NFL) and their 48th overall. A loss to the Houston Texans in Week 15 and a win by the San Diego Chargers the following Sunday knocked them out of playoff contention, marking the second year in a row they failed to make the playoffs. The Broncos' 7–9 record was their worst since 1999, their last losing season.

2008 NFL season

2008 NFL season

The 2008 NFL season was the 89th regular season of the National Football League, themed with the slogan "Believe in Now."

2008 Denver Broncos season

2008 Denver Broncos season

The 2008 season was the Denver Broncos' 39th in the National Football League (NFL), their 49th overall and their 25th under the ownership of Pat Bowlen. The Broncos improved from their 7–9 record from 2007, but failed to make the playoffs with an 8–8 record.

2009 NFL season

2009 NFL season

The 2009 NFL season was the 90th season in the history of the National Football League (NFL). The 50th anniversary of the original eight charter members of the American Football League was celebrated during this season.

2009 Chicago Bears season

2009 Chicago Bears season

The 2009 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 90th season overall in the National Football League. The Bears had looked to improve upon their 9–7 record from 2008 and return to the playoffs for the first time since the 2006 season, but failed to do so for the third consecutive season. The team finished 7–9, and third in the NFC North. This season was Lovie Smith's sixth season as the team's head coach. The Bears played all their home games at Soldier Field.

2010 NFL season

2010 NFL season

The 2010 NFL season was the 91st regular season of the National Football League and the 45th of the Super Bowl era.

2010 Chicago Bears season

2010 Chicago Bears season

The 2010 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 91st season overall in the National Football League. Coming off a disappointing 7–9 record in the 2009 season and failing to qualify for the NFL playoffs for a third consecutive season, the Bears sought to develop their roster and improve on their record in 2010, particularly their standing in the NFC North. All Bears home games were scheduled to be played at Soldier Field. With their final regular season record at 11–5, the Bears improved drastically on their 2009 record. Their regular season finished with their first playoff appearance since the Super Bowl season of 2006, winning the NFC North division and earning a bye as the NFC's second seed. The Bears won their first game in the Divisional round of the playoffs, defeating the Seattle Seahawks, to advance to the NFC Championship game. However, their season came to an end with a 21–14 loss to their longtime rivals and eventual Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers.

2011 NFL season

2011 NFL season

The 2011 NFL season was the 92nd regular season of the National Football League and the 46th of the Super Bowl era. It began on Thursday, September 8, 2011, with the Super Bowl XLV champion Green Bay defeating the Super Bowl XLIV champion New Orleans at Lambeau Field and ended with Super Bowl XLVI, the league's championship game, on February 5, 2012, at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis where the New York Giants defeated the New England Patriots.

2011 Chicago Bears season

2011 Chicago Bears season

The 2011 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 92nd overall season in the National Football League (NFL), and the 8th under head coach Lovie Smith. The Bears, defending NFC North Division champions, attempted a return to the playoffs after falling in the NFC Championship Game to their arch-rival Green Bay Packers. The club was scheduled to partake in the Pro Football Hall of Fame Game but due to the lockout, the game was cancelled. The Bears traveled to Wembley Stadium in London to take on the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the NFL International Series and played the Green Bay Packers on Christmas Day evening in the only scheduled game on that day. Despite starting the season with a 7-3 record, the Bears went 1-5 the rest of the way, finishing the season with an 8–8 record and not qualifying for the playoffs. The season would begin somewhat of a lengthy playoff drought for the organization, as they would not return to the playoffs again until 2018.

In the media

An animated representation of Cutler briefly appeared in the South Park episode "Guitar Queer-O." The show is set in Colorado and the characters are avid Broncos fans. Two characters, Stan and Kyle, meet Cutler and say, "Nice to meet you. I mean, you kinda suck, but my dad says you might be good some day." Cutler himself later responded to the episode, saying, "It was cool. I thought it was funny. They can make fun of me if they want to."[229]

Cutler, along with former Broncos tight end Tony Scheffler and former Broncos backup quarterback Preston Parsons, took part in an episode of Oprah's Big Give filmed in Denver in 2007.[230] The episode aired on ABC on March 9, 2008.

In 2011, after the Bears lost five straight games while Cutler was out with a thumb injury, Chicago recording artist Magic 1 recorded "Cutty Come Back", a parody of the song "Baby Come Back".[231]

An internet meme, called "Smokin' Jay Cutler", portrays pictures of Cutler in an apathetic state with a cigarette photoshopped into his mouth. Cutler commented he is aware of the meme and "gets a kick out of that".[232] Aaron Rodgers of the Green Bay Packers performed a smoking gesture to reference the meme during a 38–14 win over the Bears in 2014.[233]

In 2013, Cutler played himself in an episode of the comedy show The League alongside his ex-wife, Kristin Cavallari, who appeared in one other episode of the show.[234]

Cutler supported Mitt Romney in the 2012 presidential election,[235] and Donald Trump in 2016 and 2020.[236][237] Cutler posted and then deleted an Instagram post in November 2020 that supported the conspiracy that Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential election was illegitimate.[238]

Cutler regularly appeared on the show Very Cavallari between 2018 and 2020.[239]

In 2021, Cutler launched a meat subscription service called CUTS and his podcast "Uncut" a few months later.[240][241]

Discover more about In the media related topics

Guitar Queer-O

Guitar Queer-O

"Guitar Queer-O" is the thirteenth episode of the eleventh season and the 166th overall episode of American animated television series South Park, which first aired on Comedy Central on November 7, 2007. The episode was rated TV-MA L in the United States. The episode parodies the Guitar Hero video games, and aired ten days after the release of Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock.

Kyle Broflovski

Kyle Broflovski

Kyle Broflovski is a fictional character in the adult animated television series South Park. He is voiced by and loosely based on co-creator Matt Stone. Kyle is one of the series' four central characters, along with his friends Stan Marsh, Kenny McCormick, and Eric Cartman. He debuted on television when South Park first aired on August 13, 1997, after having first appeared in The Spirit of Christmas shorts created by Stone and long-time collaborator Trey Parker in 1992 and 1995.

Preston Parsons

Preston Parsons

Preston Thomas Parsons is a former American football quarterback. He was signed by the Arizona Cardinals as an undrafted free agent in 2002. He played college football at Northern Arizona.

Oprah's Big Give

Oprah's Big Give

Oprah's Big Give is a reality television series that aired Sunday nights at 9:00 PM Eastern/8:00PM Central on ABC, and is hosted by Nate Berkus. The Big Give is produced by Harpo Productions, and created and produced by Oprah Winfrey, and also produced by Bertram van Munster and Elise Doganieri. On April 20, 2008, during the final show, Stephen Paletta was declared the winner and won the $1 million. Outside the United States, the series is distributed through FremantleMedia.

American Broadcasting Company

American Broadcasting Company

The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American commercial broadcast television network. It is the flagship property of the ABC Entertainment Group division of The Walt Disney Company. The network is headquartered in Burbank, California, on Riverside Drive, directly across the street from Walt Disney Studios and adjacent to the Roy E. Disney Animation Building. The network's secondary offices, and headquarters of its news division, are in New York City, at its broadcast center at 77 West 66th Street on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

Baby Come Back (Player song)

Baby Come Back (Player song)

"Baby Come Back" is a song by the British-American rock band Player. It was released in late 1977 as the lead single from their 1977 self-titled debut album, and was the breakthrough single for the band, gaining them mainstream success, hitting #1 on the US Billboard Hot 100 and #10 on the R&B charts in 1978. Their biggest hit single, the song was written and performed by Peter Beckett and J.C. Crowley, the founders of Player.

Internet meme

Internet meme

An Internet meme, commonly known simply as a meme, is a cultural item that is spread via the Internet, often through social media platforms. What is considered a meme may vary across different communities on the Internet and is subject to change over time. Traditionally, they mostly took the form of images, concepts, or catchphrases, but the term has since become broader and multi-faceted, including more elaborate structures such as GIFs, videos, and viral sensations. The retronym derives from the earlier concept of a meme as any cultural idea, behavior or style that propagates through imitation.

Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Charles Rodgers is an American football quarterback for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). Rodgers began his college football career at Butte College in 2002 before transferring to the University of California, Berkeley to play for the California Golden Bears, where he set several career passing records, including lowest single-season and career interception rates. He was selected in the first round of the 2005 NFL Draft by the Packers.

Green Bay Packers

Green Bay Packers

The Green Bay Packers are a professional American football team based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The Packers compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the National Football Conference (NFC) North division. It is the third-oldest franchise in the NFL, dating back to 1919, and is the only non-profit, community-owned major league professional sports team based in the United States. Home games have been played at Lambeau Field since 1957. They have the most wins of any NFL franchise.

Kristin Cavallari

Kristin Cavallari

Kristin Elizabeth Cavallari is an American television personality, fashion designer, and author. She first rose to fame in 2004 as a cast member on the popular MTV reality television series Laguna Beach: The Real Orange County (2004–2006), then on the spin-off MTV reality television series The Hills (2009–2010), and was later given her own E! reality series to star in, Very Cavallari (2018–2020). She also starred as an actress on television shows and in films, including National Lampoon's Van Wilder: Freshman Year. In 2017, Cavallari founded the company Uncommon James, which sells jewelry, homeware, skincare, and beauty products.

Mitt Romney

Mitt Romney

Willard Mitt Romney is an American politician, businessman, and lawyer serving as the junior United States senator from Utah since January 2019, succeeding Orrin Hatch. He served as the 70th governor of Massachusetts from 2003 to 2007 and was the Republican Party's nominee for president of the United States in the 2012 election, losing to Barack Obama.

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

Donald John Trump is an American politician, media personality, and businessman who served as the 45th president of the United States from 2017 to 2021.

Personal life

Cutler (#6, top row, far right) with teammates and Marines at Buckley Air Force Base in 2006.
Cutler (#6, top row, far right) with teammates and Marines at Buckley Air Force Base in 2006.

Family and children

Cutler began dating Kristin Cavallari in September 2010[242] and became engaged to her in April 2011. They called off the engagement in July 2011,[243] but subsequently confirmed their reconciliation that November.[244] Cutler and Cavallari married on June 7, 2013, in Nashville, Tennessee.[245] They have two sons and one daughter.[246][247][248] Despite the birth of his first son coming the day before the Bears played their preseason opener against the Denver Broncos, Cutler dressed for the game, though he did not play.[249]

In April 2020, the couple announced that they are getting a divorce, with Cavallari saying the split came as a result of the two simply "growing apart."[250] As of May 2021, the couple had not finalized their divorce due to financial issues.[251] In June 2022, it was reported that their settlement had been finalized and the couple were officially divorced.[252]

Volunteer work

Cutler does volunteer work for young people with developmental disabilities through Vanderbilt's "Best Buddies" program.[253]

During the 2007 offseason, Cutler started the Jay Cutler Foundation, which partnered with Mile High United Way's Youth Success Initiative to help at-risk youth overcome obstacles and graduate from high school.[4]

On May 1, 2008, Cutler announced that he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and needs daily insulin shots.[254] He is responding well with the insulin treatments.[255]

Cutler works with Dedicated to Diabetes, which is a Denver-based organization that aims to improve public knowledge about diabetes.[256]

For the 2009 season, Cutler teamed up with Eli Lilly and Company in a campaign called "Touchdowns For Diabetes". For every touchdown pass Cutler threw during the 2009 season, Lilly sent a child to diabetes camp by donating $1,000 to the ADA's "Camp Scholarship" fund—roughly the cost of providing tuition for one child to attend a week of diabetes camp. For every pass Cutler completed in 2009, Lilly donated $100 to the ADA Camp Scholarship fund to allow even more kids the chance to attend camp the following summer.[257]

In 2012, Cutler visited Perspectives Charter School in Chicago, and talked about diabetes awareness.[258]

Business ventures

In 2022, Cutler launched Gratis Brewing, which is based in Nashville.[259]

Discover more about Personal life related topics

Kristin Cavallari

Kristin Cavallari

Kristin Elizabeth Cavallari is an American television personality, fashion designer, and author. She first rose to fame in 2004 as a cast member on the popular MTV reality television series Laguna Beach: The Real Orange County (2004–2006), then on the spin-off MTV reality television series The Hills (2009–2010), and was later given her own E! reality series to star in, Very Cavallari (2018–2020). She also starred as an actress on television shows and in films, including National Lampoon's Van Wilder: Freshman Year. In 2017, Cavallari founded the company Uncommon James, which sells jewelry, homeware, skincare, and beauty products.

Nashville, Tennessee

Nashville, Tennessee

Nashville is the capital city of the U.S. state of Tennessee and the seat of Davidson County. With a population of 689,447 at the 2020 U.S. census, Nashville is the most populous city in the state, 21st most-populous city in the U.S., and the fourth most populous city in the southeastern U.S. Located on the Cumberland River, the city is the center of the Nashville metropolitan area, which is one of the fastest growing in the nation.

Denver Broncos

Denver Broncos

The Denver Broncos are a professional American football franchise based in Denver. The Broncos compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division. The team is headquartered in Dove Valley, Colorado.

Type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (T1D), formerly known as juvenile diabetes, is an autoimmune disease that originates when cells that make insulin are destroyed by the immune system. Insulin is a hormone required for the cells to use blood sugar for energy and it helps regulate glucose levels in the bloodstream. Before treatment this results in high blood sugar levels in the body. The common symptoms of this elevated blood sugar are frequent urination, increased thirst, increased hunger, weight loss, and other serious complications. Additional symptoms may include blurry vision, tiredness, and slow wound healing. Symptoms typically develop over a short period of time, often a matter of weeks.

Insulin

Insulin

Insulin is a peptide hormone produced by beta cells of the pancreatic islets encoded in humans by the INS gene. It is considered to be the main anabolic hormone of the body. It regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and protein by promoting the absorption of glucose from the blood into liver, fat and skeletal muscle cells. In these tissues the absorbed glucose is converted into either glycogen via glycogenesis or fats (triglycerides) via lipogenesis, or, in the case of the liver, into both. Glucose production and secretion by the liver is strongly inhibited by high concentrations of insulin in the blood. Circulating insulin also affects the synthesis of proteins in a wide variety of tissues. It is therefore an anabolic hormone, promoting the conversion of small molecules in the blood into large molecules inside the cells. Low insulin levels in the blood have the opposite effect by promoting widespread catabolism, especially of reserve body fat.

Eli Lilly and Company

Eli Lilly and Company

Eli Lilly and Company is an American pharmaceutical company headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, with offices in 18 countries. Its products are sold in approximately 125 countries. The company was founded in 1876 by, and named after, Colonel Eli Lilly, a pharmaceutical chemist and veteran of the American Civil War.

Source: "Jay Cutler", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Cutler.

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