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Jackson County, Kentucky

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Jackson County
Jackson County courthouse in McKee
Jackson County courthouse in McKee
Motto(s): 
Where the Mountains and the Bluegrass Blend
Map of Kentucky highlighting Jackson County
Location within the U.S. state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°25′N 84°01′W / 37.42°N 84.01°W / 37.42; -84.01
Country United States
State Kentucky
Founded1858
Named forAndrew Jackson
SeatMcKee
Largest communityAnnville
Government
 • Judge ExecutiveShane Gabbard (R)
Area
 • Total347 sq mi (900 km2)
 • Land345 sq mi (890 km2)
 • Water1.3 sq mi (3 km2)  0.4%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total12,955
 • Estimate 
(2021)
12,984 Increase
 • Density37/sq mi (14/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP Codes
40447, 40402, 40434, 40481, 40486

Jackson County is located in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. As of the 2021 census estimation, the population was 12,984.[1] Its county seat is McKee.[2] The county was formed in 1858 from land given by Madison, Estill, Owsley, Clay, Laurel, and Rockcastle counties.[3] It was named for Andrew Jackson, seventh President of the United States.[4] Jackson County became a moist county via a "local-option" referendum in the Fall of 2019 that made the sale of alcoholic beverages in the county seat, McKee, legal.[5][6]

One fourth of Jackson County is within the Daniel Boone National Forest (56,000 acres), making it representative of eastern Kentucky's unique Appalachian topography, wildlife, and heritage. The county is home to many attractions and recreation spots such as Flat Lick Falls, public national forest campgrounds Turkey Foot and S-Tree, and the centermost trailhead (located in the county seat, McKee) of the historic Sheltowee Trace.[7]

Jackson County is the birthplace of the Grand Ole Opry star David "Stringbean" Akeman, and the site of the annually reenacted Battle of Big Hill, the Civil War skirmish that led to the Battle of Richmond in Madison County.

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Commonwealth (U.S. state)

Commonwealth (U.S. state)

Commonwealth is a term used by four of the 50 states of the United States in their full official state names. "Commonwealth" is a traditional English term for a political community founded for the common good. The four states – Kentucky, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Virginia – are all in the Eastern United States, and prior to the formation of the United States in 1776, were British colonial possessions. As such, they share a strong influence of English common law in some of their laws and institutions. However, the "commonwealth" appellation has no legal or political significance, and it does not make "commonwealth" states any different from other U.S. states.

Kentucky

Kentucky

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States and one of the states of the Upper South. Kentucky borders Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio to the north; West Virginia and Virginia to the east; Tennessee to the south; and Missouri to the west. The Commonwealth's northern border is defined by the Ohio River. Its capital is Frankfort, and its two largest cities are Louisville and Lexington. The state's population was approximately 4.5 million in 2020.

County seat

County seat

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is in use in Canada, China, Hungary, Romania, Taiwan, and the United States. The equivalent term shire town is used in the US state of Vermont and in some other English-speaking jurisdictions. County towns have a similar function in the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom, as well as historically in Jamaica.

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson was an American lawyer, planter, general, and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States from 1829 to 1837. Before being elected to the presidency, he gained fame as a general in the United States Army and served in both houses of the U.S. Congress. Although often praised as an advocate for ordinary Americans and for his work in preserving the union of states, Jackson has also been criticized for his racial policies, particularly his treatment of Native Americans, which has been described as forced removal and ethnic cleansing.

Local option

Local option

A local option is the ability of local political jurisdictions, typically counties or municipalities, to allow decisions on certain controversial issues within their borders, usually referring to a popular vote. It usually relates to the issue of alcoholic beverage, marijuana sales, and now mask wearing.

Daniel Boone National Forest

Daniel Boone National Forest

The Daniel Boone National Forest is a national forest in Kentucky. Established in 1937, it includes 708,000 acres (287,000 ha) of federally owned land within a 2,100,000 acres (850,000 ha) proclamation boundary. The name of the forest was changed in 1966 in honor of the explorer Daniel Boone.

Eastern Kentucky Coalfield

Eastern Kentucky Coalfield

The Eastern Kentucky Coalfield is part of the Central Appalachian bituminous coalfield, including all or parts of 30 Kentucky counties and adjoining areas in Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia and Tennessee. It covers an area from the Allegheny Mountains in the east across the Cumberland Plateau to the Pottsville Escarpment in the west. The region is known for its coal mining; most family farms in the region have disappeared since the introduction of surface mining in the 1940s and 1950s.

Appalachian Mountains

Appalachian Mountains

The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians,, are a system of mountains in eastern to northeastern North America. The Appalachians first formed roughly 480 million years ago during the Ordovician Period. They once reached elevations similar to those of the Alps and the Rocky Mountains before experiencing natural erosion. The Appalachian chain is a barrier to east–west travel, as it forms a series of alternating ridgelines and valleys oriented in opposition to most highways and railroads running east–west.

Grand Ole Opry

Grand Ole Opry

The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly American country music stage concert in Nashville, Tennessee, founded on November 28, 1925, by George D. Hay as a one-hour radio "barn dance" on WSM. Currently owned and operated by Opry Entertainment, it is the longest-running radio broadcast in US history. Dedicated to honoring country music and its history, the Opry showcases a mix of famous singers and contemporary chart-toppers performing country, bluegrass, Americana, folk, and gospel music as well as comedic performances and skits. It attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors from around the world and millions of radio and internet listeners.

David "Stringbean" Akeman

David "Stringbean" Akeman

David Akeman better known as Stringbean, was an American singer-songwriter, musician, comedian, actor and semiprofessional baseball player best known for his role as a main cast member on the hit television show Hee Haw and as a member of the Grand Ole Opry. Akeman was well-known for his "old-fashioned" banjo-picking style, careful mix of comedy and music, and his memorable stage wardrobe. Akeman and his wife were shot and murdered by burglars in their rural Tennessee home near Ridgetop in 1973.

American Civil War

American Civil War

The American Civil War was a civil war in the United States. It was fought between the Union and the Confederacy, the latter formed by states that had seceded. The central cause of the war was the dispute over whether slavery would be permitted to expand into the western territories, leading to more slave states, or be prevented from doing so, which was widely believed would place slavery on a course of ultimate extinction.

Battle of Richmond

Battle of Richmond

The Battle of Richmond, Kentucky, fought August 29–30, 1862, was one of the most complete Confederate victories in the war by Major General Edmund Kirby Smith against Union major general William "Bull" Nelson's forces, which were defending the town. It was the first major battle in the Kentucky Campaign. The battle took place on and around what is now the grounds of the Blue Grass Army Depot, outside Richmond, Kentucky.

Outdoor recreation

National recreation areas

The S-Tree campground sits on a ridge above Horse Lick Creek near McKee in Jackson County. A small picnic area features a historic picnic shelter that was constructed in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps. The campground receives heavy weekend use from off-highway vehicle users who ride the adjacent Sheltowee Trace National Recreation Trail and the Renfro Loop Trail. These trails may be accessed from the campground.[8]

The Turkey Foot campground is nestled along the banks of War Fork Creek in Jackson County. The creek is stocked with trout throughout the year. All of the campsites are wooded. A playfield with a horseshoe pit is located at the end of camping sites alongside the creek. Trails include the Turkey Foot Loop Trail and the Sheltowee Trace National Recreation Trail.[9]

Flat Lick Falls is tucked into the hills of southern Jackson County and consists of recreational facilities which include primitive camping, picnic shelters, and restrooms. The park features 86.09 acres of wooded land, cliffs and Flat Lick Creek running through the middle of the park with a 28-foot water fall emptying into a large pool at the bottom of the falls. The creek flows into the Laurel Fork Creek. The falls can be viewed up close via the meandering paths along the cliff line including a paved path leading to a wheelchair accessible viewing platform.[10]

Flat Lick Falls
Flat Lick Falls

Sheltowee Trace National Recreation Trail is over 300 miles of National Recreation Trail, established in 1979, in the Appalachian region of the Eastern U.S., and reaches from northern Rowan County, Kentucky to the Leather Wood Trail Head in the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area just across the Tennessee border. The Trail runs mostly through the Daniel Boone National Forest, and is named for the Shawnee word for “Big Turtle”, which was the name given to Daniel Boone in 1779 when he was adopted as the son of the great warrior chief Blackfish. Jackson County encompasses approximately 35 miles of the Sheltowee Trace, which is open to hiking, horseback riding, and mountain bikes. Some sections also allow all-terrain vehicles.[11]

Public parks

  • Bond Memorial Park
  • Jack Gabbard Park
  • McKee City Park
  • Gray Hawk Community Park
  • Sand Gap Community Park
  • Worthington Park
  • Jackson Energy Farm/Recreational Fields

Lakes and reservoirs

  • Beulah Lake
  • Owsley Fork Reservoir
  • McKee Reservoir

National protected areas

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McKee, Kentucky

McKee, Kentucky

McKee is a home rule-class city located in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It is the seat of Jackson County, KY. As of the 2020 census, the population of the city was 803. The city was founded on April 1, 1882 and was named for Judge George R. McKee. In 2019, the city held a vote regarding the sale of alcohol, the vote passed, making the city wet.

Civilian Conservation Corps

Civilian Conservation Corps

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a voluntary government work relief program that ran from 1933 to 1942 in the United States for unemployed, unmarried men ages 18–25 and eventually expanded to ages 17–28. The CCC was a major part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal that supplied manual labor jobs related to the conservation and development of natural resources in rural lands owned by federal, state, and local governments. The CCC was designed to supply jobs for young men and to relieve families who had difficulty finding jobs during the Great Depression in the United States

Sheltowee Trace Trail

Sheltowee Trace Trail

The Sheltowee Trace Trail is a 343-mile (552.00 km) National Recreation Trail that was created in 1979 and stretches from the Burnt Mill Bridge Trail Head in the Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area in Tennessee to northern Rowan County, Kentucky. The trail is named after Daniel Boone, who was given the name Sheltowee when he was adopted as the son of the great warrior Chief Blackfish of the Shawnee tribe.

Daniel Boone National Forest

Daniel Boone National Forest

The Daniel Boone National Forest is a national forest in Kentucky. Established in 1937, it includes 708,000 acres (287,000 ha) of federally owned land within a 2,100,000 acres (850,000 ha) proclamation boundary. The name of the forest was changed in 1966 in honor of the explorer Daniel Boone.

Geography

Jackson County is located on the edge of the Cumberland Plateau and Eastern Kentucky Coalfields region of Kentucky, adjacent to the Kentucky Bluegrass region. Because of this, the county's motto is "where the mountains and the bluegrass blend." The elevation of the county ranges from 600 ft. to 1600 ft. above sea level.[12] The Middle Fork of the Rockcastle River originates in southern Jackson County. Karst landscapes can also be found in the northern part of the county, creating notable caves such as Wind Cave near Turkey Foot campground.

Major routes

US Route 421 serves as the county's north–south corridor, connecting it to Madison County, the cities of Richmond and Berea , and I-75 to the north. While it connects the county to Clay County, the city of Manchester, and the Hal Rogers Parkway to the south. This route also connects the communities of Sandgap, McKee and Tyner within the county.

KY Route 30 is a newly constructed highway that serves as the main east–west corridor, passing through the southern part of the county, through the communities of Annville and Tyner. It is referred to as the Interstate 75 - Mountain Parkway connector. It connects the county to both of these major freeways as well as to the cities of London (Laurel County), Booneville (Owsley County), and Beattyville (Lee County).

KY Route 290 connects US Route 421 in McKee to KY Route 3630 in Annville.

Adjacent counties

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Cumberland Plateau

Cumberland Plateau

The Cumberland Plateau is the southern part of the Appalachian Plateau in the Appalachian Mountains of the United States. It includes much of eastern Kentucky and Tennessee, and portions of northern Alabama and northwest Georgia. The terms "Allegheny Plateau" and the "Cumberland Plateau" both refer to the dissected plateau lands lying west of the main Appalachian Mountains. The terms stem from historical usage rather than geological difference, so there is no strict dividing line between the two. Two major rivers share the names of the plateaus, with the Allegheny River rising in the Allegheny Plateau and the Cumberland River rising in the Cumberland Plateau in Harlan County, Kentucky.

Eastern Kentucky Coalfield

Eastern Kentucky Coalfield

The Eastern Kentucky Coalfield is part of the Central Appalachian bituminous coalfield, including all or parts of 30 Kentucky counties and adjoining areas in Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia and Tennessee. It covers an area from the Allegheny Mountains in the east across the Cumberland Plateau to the Pottsville Escarpment in the west. The region is known for its coal mining; most family farms in the region have disappeared since the introduction of surface mining in the 1940s and 1950s.

Bluegrass region

Bluegrass region

The Bluegrass region is a geographic region in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It makes up the central and northern part of the state, roughly bounded by the cities of Frankfort, Paris, Richmond and Stanford. The Bluegrass region is characterized by underlying fossiliferous limestone, dolomite, and shale of the Ordovician geological age. Hills are generally rolling, and the soil is highly fertile for growing pasture. Since the antebellum years, the region has been a center for breeding quality livestock, especially thoroughbred race horses. Since the late 20th century, the area has become increasingly developed with residential and commercial properties, particularly around Lexington, the business center. Although bluegrass music is popular throughout the region, the genre is indirectly named for the state rather than the region.

Karst

Karst

Karst is a topography formed from the dissolution of soluble rocks such as limestone, dolomite, and gypsum. It is characterized by underground drainage systems with sinkholes and caves. It has also been documented for more weathering-resistant rocks, such as quartzite, given the right conditions. Subterranean drainage may limit surface water, with few to no rivers or lakes. However, in regions where the dissolved bedrock is covered or confined by one or more superimposed non-soluble rock strata, distinctive karst features may occur only at subsurface levels and can be totally missing above ground.

Kentucky Route 30

Kentucky Route 30

Kentucky Route 30 is an east–west state highway in Kentucky managed by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

Kentucky Route 290

Kentucky Route 290

Kentucky Route 290 is a 8.850-mile (14.243 km) north–south road in Jackson County, Kentucky. Its south end is in Annville on KY 3630 and the north end is in Downtown McKee on US 421.

Kentucky Route 3630

Kentucky Route 3630

Kentucky Route 3630 is an east–west state highway in Jackson and Laurel Counties. The route was formerly KY 30 until it was rerouted.

Berea, Kentucky

Berea, Kentucky

Berea is a home rule-class city in Madison County, Kentucky, in the United States. The town is best known for its art festivals, historic restaurants and buildings, and as the home to Berea College, a private liberal arts college. The population was 15,539 at the 2020 census. It is one of the fastest-growing towns in Kentucky, having increased by 27.4% since 2000. Berea is a principal city of the Richmond−Berea Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Madison and Rockcastle counties. It was formally incorporated by the state assembly in 1890.

Interstate 75 in Kentucky

Interstate 75 in Kentucky

Interstate 75 (I-75) runs from near Williamsburg to Covington by way of Lexington in the US state of Kentucky. I-75 enters the Cumberland Plateau region from Tennessee, then descends into the Bluegrass region through the Pottsville Escarpment before crossing the Ohio River into Ohio. I-75 follows along the U.S. Route 25 (US 25) corridor for the entire length of Kentucky.

Clay County, Kentucky

Clay County, Kentucky

Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2020 census, the county population was 20,345. Its county seat is Manchester. The county was formed in 1807 and named in honor of Green Clay (1757–1826). Clay was a member of the Virginia and Kentucky State legislatures, first cousin once removed of Henry Clay, U.S. Senator from Kentucky and Secretary of State in the 19th century.

Hal Rogers Parkway

Hal Rogers Parkway

The Hal Rogers Parkway, formerly named the Daniel Boone Parkway, connects Somerset and Hazard in southeastern Kentucky. This toll road opened in November 1971, and the tolls were removed June 1, 2003. The original extent of the highway was to be 65.70 miles (105.73 km) with that mileage to have been included with an unconstructed limited-access London bypass and what is east of this area. The original portion of the road is designated unsigned Kentucky Route 9006. An extension of the Hal Rogers Parkway name west along Kentucky Route 80 (KY 80) to U.S. Route 27 (US 27) in Somerset was made in 2015 bringing the total mileage to 91.135 miles (146.668 km).

Annville, Kentucky

Annville, Kentucky

Annville is an unincorporated community, a census-designated place (CDP), and the largest community in Jackson County, KY. As of the 2020 census, the population was 1,102. The community was established in 1878 and named for local resident Nancy Ann Johnson. The community offers a few services such as a post office, grocery store, gas station, medical clinic, nursing home, restaurants, and other locally owned businesses.

Events

Jackson County Fair & Homecoming

This event is held annually on the Friday and Saturday before Labor Day. Activities include a show, craft exhibits, musical entertainment, clogging, vendors, food trucks, and a parade.[13]

Sheltowee Trace Artisans Fair

Local and guest artisans from across the state and beyond come to teach, demonstrate, and sell their crafts at this event, which is held during the first weekend in May.[13]

Battle of Big Hill Reenactment

The reenactment takes place the third weekend of August at the Jackson Energy Farm on HWY 290, about 6 miles south of McKee. A family-friendly outdoor event, reenactments generally take place over two days, and consist of games, historical speakers, a ladies and gentlemen's tea, food, and music before the actual battle. After dark, couples can follow the cues of the square dancing caller at the Civil War Ball, featuring local musicians playing songs from the era.[14]

Stringbean Music Festival

Most people remember David "Stringbean" Akemon from the old television show "Hee-Haw" but folks in Jackson County knew him as brother, uncle, and friend. Although a famous performer, "Stringbean" returned often to his home in Jackson County. In June 1996, Porter Wagoner, Grandpa & Ramona Jones, Mac Wiseman and a host of other entertainers and friends gathered to unveil a larger than life statue of Stringbean, and established a memorial in his honor. Since then, the festive has grown tremendously. Today, two festivals are held - one in June and one in October - and both feature nationally known bluegrass music performers, as well as mountain arts and crafts.[15]

Economy

The Jackson County Industrial Development Authority (JCIDA) assists with economic development efforts in the county. The authority manages 3 industrial parks in the county which include the Jackson County Regional Industrial Park in Annville, the McKee Industrial Park in McKee, and the Northern Jackson County Industrial Park in Sandgap.[16]

Major employers in Jackson County include:[16]

  • Jackson County Public Schools
  • People's Rural Telephone Cooperative (PRTC)
  • Jackson Energy Cooperative
  • Bear Precision Coatings
  • DTS Industries
  • JC Tech Industries
  • The Allen Company (Clover Bottom Limestone Quarry)
  • Phillips Diversified Manufacturing
  • Senture
  • Teleworks USA

Utilities

Jackson County is served by Jackson Energy, which is based in the City of McKee, and serves Jackson County and surrounding counties such as Lee County, Owsley County, Clay County, Laurel County, Rockcastle County, and Madison County. Jackson County, Owsley County, and Clay County are served by Peoples Rural Telephone Cooperative, also based in the City of McKee. Water is provided by the Jackson County Water Association and garbage pickup is provided by Woods Sanitation. Residents within the City of McKee are served by McKee Water and Sewer.

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Kentucky Utilities

Kentucky Utilities

Kentucky Utilities (KU) is based in Lexington, Kentucky, and provides electricity to 77 counties in Kentucky. KU also serves five counties in Virginia under the name Old Dominion Power. It is owned by LG&E and KU Energy, LLC, which, in turn, is owned by PPL Corporation.

McKee, Kentucky

McKee, Kentucky

McKee is a home rule-class city located in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It is the seat of Jackson County, KY. As of the 2020 census, the population of the city was 803. The city was founded on April 1, 1882 and was named for Judge George R. McKee. In 2019, the city held a vote regarding the sale of alcohol, the vote passed, making the city wet.

Lee County, Kentucky

Lee County, Kentucky

Lee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,719. Its county seat is Beattyville. The county was formed in 1870 from parts of Breathitt, Estill, Owsley and Wolfe counties. The county was named for Lee County, Virginia, which was named after Robert E. Lee's father and is from where many of its early residents emigrated. The area of Kentucky where Lee County is located was a pro-union region of Kentucky but the legislature that created the county was controlled by former Confederates.

Owsley County, Kentucky

Owsley County, Kentucky

Owsley County is a county located in the Eastern Coalfield region of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2020 census, the population was 4,051, making it the second-least populous county in Kentucky. The county seat is Booneville. The county was organized on January 23, 1843, from Clay, Estill, and Breathitt counties and named for William Owsley (1782–1862), the judge of the Kentucky Court of Appeals and Governor of Kentucky (1844–48). According to the 2010 census reports, Owsley County has the second-highest level of child poverty of any county in the United States. In terms of income per household, the county is the poorest in the nation. Between 1980 and 2014, the rate of death from cancer in the county increased by 45.6 percent, the largest such increase of any county in the United States.

Clay County, Kentucky

Clay County, Kentucky

Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2020 census, the county population was 20,345. Its county seat is Manchester. The county was formed in 1807 and named in honor of Green Clay (1757–1826). Clay was a member of the Virginia and Kentucky State legislatures, first cousin once removed of Henry Clay, U.S. Senator from Kentucky and Secretary of State in the 19th century.

Laurel County, Kentucky

Laurel County, Kentucky

Laurel County is a county located in the southeastern portion of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2020 census, the population was 62,613. Its county seat is London. After a special election in January 2016 alcohol sales are permitted only in the city limits of London. The ordinance went into effect on March 27, 2016, 60 days after results of the election. Laurel County is included in the London, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Rockcastle County, Kentucky

Rockcastle County, Kentucky

Rockcastle County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Kentucky. Its county seat is Mt. Vernon. The county was founded in 1810 and named for the Rockcastle River, which runs through it. The river, in turn, is named for its majestic rock cliffs. Rockcastle County is part of the Richmond–Berea, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Lexington-Fayette-Richmond-Frankfort, KY Combined Statistical Area.

Madison County, Kentucky

Madison County, Kentucky

Madison County is a county located in the central part of the U.S. state of Kentucky. At the 2020 census, its population was 92,701. Its county seat is Richmond. The county is named for Virginia statesman James Madison, who later became the fourth President of the United States.

Healthcare

Jackson County does not have a hospital. Nearby facilities include Saint Joseph Hospital (Berea), Baptist Health Hospital (Richmond), Advent Health (Manchester), Saint Joseph Hospital (London) and, Rockcastle Regional Hospital. (Mt. Vernon)

Emergency medical services for Jackson County are provided by the Jackson County Ambulance Service. Jackson County does have a few primary care facilities which include the White House Clinic, McKee Medical Clinic, Advent Health Clinic, and Annville Medical Clinic.

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Berea, Kentucky

Berea, Kentucky

Berea is a home rule-class city in Madison County, Kentucky, in the United States. The town is best known for its art festivals, historic restaurants and buildings, and as the home to Berea College, a private liberal arts college. The population was 15,539 at the 2020 census. It is one of the fastest-growing towns in Kentucky, having increased by 27.4% since 2000. Berea is a principal city of the Richmond−Berea Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Madison and Rockcastle counties. It was formally incorporated by the state assembly in 1890.

Richmond, Kentucky

Richmond, Kentucky

Richmond is a home rule-class city in and the county seat of Madison County, Kentucky, United States. It is named after Richmond, Virginia, and is home to Eastern Kentucky University. In 2019, the population was 36,157. Richmond is the fourth-largest city in the Bluegrass region and the state's sixth-largest city. It is the ninth largest population center in the state with a Micropolitan population of 106,864. The city serves as the center for work and shopping for south-central Kentucky. In addition, Richmond is the principal city of the Richmond-Berea, Kentucky Micropolitan Area, which includes all of Madison and Rockcastle counties.

Manchester, Kentucky

Manchester, Kentucky

Manchester is a home rule-class city in Clay County, Kentucky, in the United States. It is the seat of its county and the home of a minimum- and medium-security federal prison. The city's population was 1,255 at the 2010 census.

Laurel County, Kentucky

Laurel County, Kentucky

Laurel County is a county located in the southeastern portion of the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2020 census, the population was 62,613. Its county seat is London. After a special election in January 2016 alcohol sales are permitted only in the city limits of London. The ordinance went into effect on March 27, 2016, 60 days after results of the election. Laurel County is included in the London, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Rockcastle County, Kentucky

Rockcastle County, Kentucky

Rockcastle County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Kentucky. Its county seat is Mt. Vernon. The county was founded in 1810 and named for the Rockcastle River, which runs through it. The river, in turn, is named for its majestic rock cliffs. Rockcastle County is part of the Richmond–Berea, KY Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Lexington-Fayette-Richmond-Frankfort, KY Combined Statistical Area.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18603,087
18704,54747.3%
18806,67846.9%
18908,26123.7%
190010,56127.8%
191010,7341.6%
192011,6878.9%
193010,467−10.4%
194016,33956.1%
195013,101−19.8%
196010,677−18.5%
197010,005−6.3%
198011,99619.9%
199011,955−0.3%
200013,49512.9%
201013,4940.0%
202012,955−4.0%
2021 (est.)12,984[17]0.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[18]
1790-1960[19] 1900-1990[20]
1990-2000[21] 2010-2013[1]

As of the 2020 census[22] there were 12,955 people and 5,417 households in the county. The population density was 37.5 per square mile (14.5/km2). There were 5,978 housing units. The racial makeup of the county was 97.5% White, 0.4% Black or African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0% Pacific Islander, 0.8% from two or more races, and 0.9% Hispanic or Latino of any race.[22]

23.3% of the population are under the age of 18 and 18% of the population are 65 years of age or older. There are 529 veterans residing within the county.[22]

The median income for a household in the county was $31,515. The per capita income for the county was $17,573. About 24% of the population are below the poverty line.[22]

The median value for housing units is $83,100 and the average rent is $526 a month.[22]

72.1% of the population has a high school education or higher. 10.2% of the population has a bachelor's degree or higher. 78.8% of households have a computer and 70.7% have a broadband internet subscription.[22]

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1860 United States census

1860 United States census

The United States census of 1860 was the eighth census conducted in the United States starting June 1, 1860, and lasting five months. It determined the population of the United States to be 31,443,322 in 33 states and 10 organized territories. This was an increase of 35.4 percent over the 23,069,876 persons enumerated during the 1850 census. The total population included 3,953,762 slaves.

1870 United States census

1870 United States census

The United States census of 1870 was the ninth United States census. It was conducted by the Census Bureau from June 1, 1870, to August 23, 1871. The 1870 census was the first census to provide detailed information on the African-American population, only five years after the culmination of the Civil War when slaves were granted freedom. The total population was 38,925,598 with a resident population of 38,558,371 individuals, a 22.6% increase from 1860. The 1870 census' population estimate was controversial, as many believed it underestimated the true population numbers, especially in New York and Pennsylvania.

1880 United States census

1880 United States census

The United States census of 1880 conducted by the Census Bureau during June 1880 was the tenth United States census. It was the first time that women were permitted to be enumerators. The Superintendent of the Census was Francis Amasa Walker. This was the first census in which a city—New York City—recorded a population of over one million.

1890 United States census

1890 United States census

The United States census of 1890 was taken beginning June 2, 1890, but most of the 1890 census materials were destroyed in 1921 when a building caught fire and in the subsequent disposal of the remaining damaged records. It determined the resident population of the United States to be 62,979,766—an increase of 25.5 percent over the 50,189,209 persons enumerated during the 1880 census. The data reported that the distribution of the population had resulted in the disappearance of the American frontier. This was the first census in which a majority of states recorded populations of over one million, as well as the first in which multiple cities—New York as of 1880, Chicago, and Philadelphia—recorded populations of over one million. The census also saw Chicago rise in rank to the nation's second most populous city, a position it would hold until Los Angeles would supplant it in 1990. This was the first U.S. census to use machines to tabulate the collected data.

1900 United States census

1900 United States census

The United States census of 1900, conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1900, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21.01% from the 62,979,766 persons enumerated during the 1890 census.

1910 United States census

1910 United States census

The United States census of 1910, conducted by the Census Bureau on April 15, 1910, determined the resident population of the United States to be 92,228,496, an increase of 21 percent over the 76,212,168 persons enumerated during the 1900 census. The 1910 census switched from a portrait page orientation to a landscape orientation.

1920 United States census

1920 United States census

The United States census of 1920, conducted by the Census Bureau during one month from January 5, 1920, determined the resident population of the United States to be 106,021,537, an increase of 15.0 percent over the 92,228,496 persons enumerated during the 1910 census.

1930 United States census

1930 United States census

The United States census of 1930, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from April 1, 1930, determined the resident population of the United States to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 census.

1940 United States census

1940 United States census

The United States census of 1940, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7.3 percent over the 1930 population of 122,775,046 people. The census date of record was April 1, 1940. A number of new questions were asked including where people were five years before, highest educational grade achieved, and information about wages. This census introduced sampling techniques; one in 20 people were asked additional questions on the census form. Other innovations included a field test of the census in 1939. This was the first census in which every state (48) had a population greater than 100,000.

1950 United States census

1950 United States census

The United States census of 1950, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 150,697,361, an increase of 14.5 percent over the 131,669,275 persons enumerated during the 1940 census. This was the first census in which:More than one state recorded a population of over 10 million Every state and territory recorded a population of over 100,000 All 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 100,000

1960 United States census

1960 United States census

The United States census of 1960, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 179,323,175, an increase of 18.5 percent over the 151,325,798 persons enumerated during the 1950 census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over 200,000. This census's data determined the electoral votes for the 1964 and 1968 presidential elections. This is also the most recent census in which New York was the most populous state.

1970 United States census

1970 United States census

The United States census of 1970, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 203,392,031, an increase of 13.4 percent over the 179,323,175 persons enumerated during the 1960 census. This was the first census since 1800 in which New York was not the most populous state – California overtook it in population in January 1963. This was also the first census in which all states recorded a population of over 300,000, and the first in which a city in the geographic South recorded a population of over 1 million (Houston).

Communities

Cities

Census-designated places

Unincorporated places

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McKee, Kentucky

McKee, Kentucky

McKee is a home rule-class city located in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It is the seat of Jackson County, KY. As of the 2020 census, the population of the city was 803. The city was founded on April 1, 1882 and was named for Judge George R. McKee. In 2019, the city held a vote regarding the sale of alcohol, the vote passed, making the city wet.

Annville, Kentucky

Annville, Kentucky

Annville is an unincorporated community, a census-designated place (CDP), and the largest community in Jackson County, KY. As of the 2020 census, the population was 1,102. The community was established in 1878 and named for local resident Nancy Ann Johnson. The community offers a few services such as a post office, grocery store, gas station, medical clinic, nursing home, restaurants, and other locally owned businesses.

Gray Hawk, Kentucky

Gray Hawk, Kentucky

Gray Hawk is a small, unincorporated community in eastern Jackson County, KY. The community is located along US Route 421. Services in the community include a post office, gas station, and restaurant. Gray Hawk has a community park and two waterfalls: McCammon Branch Falls and Flat Lick Falls.

Tyner, Kentucky

Tyner, Kentucky

Tyner is a small, unincorporated community in southeastern Jackson County, KY. The town is located at the junction of U.S. Route 421, KY Route 30 and KY Route 3630. Tyner Elementary School (K-5) is located in the community and is operated by the Jackson County Public School system. The community offers a few services such as a post office, grocery store, and gas station.

Politics

National politics

In presidential elections, Jackson County has voted Republican since the Civil War and has never voted Democratic.[23] Lyndon Johnson in 1964 and Bill Clinton in 1996 are the only Democratic candidates to ever win as much as 20% of the county's vote. The only time Jackson County has not voted for the Republican Party was in its first election of 1860 when the county went to Constitutional Unionist John Bell, and in 1912 when the Republican Party was split and third party candidate Theodore Roosevelt carried the county with 52 percent of the vote over William Howard Taft with 34 percent.

Jackson County has a strong history of giving Republican candidates some of their highest winning percentages in the nation. This was the case in the 1928, 1948,[24] 1960,[25] 1976,[26] 1988,[27] and 1992 presidential elections.[28] In 1992 Jackson County, along with Sioux County, Iowa, were the only two counties in the U.S to vote for Republican George H. W. Bush by over 70 percent in his re-election campaign.[28] Additionally, Republican Alf Landon, who lost 46 of 48 states, received over 89 percent of Jackson County's vote in 1936.[29]

United States presidential election results for Jackson County, Kentucky[30]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,453 89.20% 605 9.90% 55 0.90%
2016 4,889 88.87% 482 8.76% 130 2.36%
2012 4,365 86.25% 612 12.09% 84 1.66%
2008 4,407 84.36% 743 14.22% 74 1.42%
2004 4,369 84.38% 769 14.85% 40 0.77%
2000 4,079 84.02% 701 14.44% 75 1.54%
1996 3,045 69.98% 960 22.06% 346 7.95%
1992 3,398 74.96% 776 17.12% 359 7.92%
1988 3,926 85.16% 678 14.71% 6 0.13%
1984 3,856 87.38% 542 12.28% 15 0.34%
1980 3,379 81.95% 702 17.03% 42 1.02%
1976 2,766 79.80% 680 19.62% 20 0.58%
1972 5,303 92.18% 436 7.58% 14 0.24%
1968 3,098 84.09% 304 8.25% 282 7.65%
1964 2,654 73.78% 920 25.58% 23 0.64%
1960 3,923 90.35% 419 9.65% 0 0.00%
1956 3,950 88.35% 501 11.21% 20 0.45%
1952 3,104 86.75% 471 13.16% 3 0.08%
1948 2,781 85.99% 429 13.27% 24 0.74%
1944 3,578 91.56% 328 8.39% 2 0.05%
1940 3,722 88.62% 465 11.07% 13 0.31%
1936 3,440 89.05% 420 10.87% 3 0.08%
1932 2,879 84.28% 529 15.49% 8 0.23%
1928 3,552 96.52% 123 3.34% 5 0.14%
1924 2,629 87.96% 284 9.50% 76 2.54%
1920 3,174 92.16% 260 7.55% 10 0.29%
1916 1,968 87.90% 252 11.26% 19 0.85%
1912 577 34.14% 216 12.78% 897 53.08%

Local and state politics

Jackson County is part of Kentucky's 5th Congressional District, which is represented by Republican Hal Rogers. In the Kentucky House of Representatives, the county is in the 89th District and is represented by Republican Timmy Truett. In the Kentucky Senate, the county is in the 21st District and is represented by Republican Brandon Storm.

Prohibition

The entirety of Jackson County prohibited the sale of alcoholic beverages from the years 1937 until 2019 when the City of McKee held a vote during the 2019 General Election regarding the ability for the city to grant licenses to businesses for selling alcoholic beverages. The vote's results were 100 in favor of selling alcohol to 81, who were not.[6]

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Republican Party (United States)

Republican Party (United States)

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States. The GOP was founded in 1854 by anti-slavery activists who opposed the Kansas–Nebraska Act, which allowed for the potential expansion of chattel slavery into the western territories. Since Ronald Reagan's presidency in the 1980s, conservatism has been the dominant ideology of the GOP. It has been the main political rival of the Democratic Party since the mid-1850s.

American Civil War

American Civil War

The American Civil War was a civil war in the United States. It was fought between the Union and the Confederacy, the latter formed by states that had seceded. The central cause of the war was the dispute over whether slavery would be permitted to expand into the western territories, leading to more slave states, or be prevented from doing so, which was widely believed would place slavery on a course of ultimate extinction.

Democratic Party (United States)

Democratic Party (United States)

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States. Founded in 1828, it was predominantly built by Martin Van Buren, who assembled a wide cadre of politicians in every state behind war hero Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party. Its main political rival has been the Republican Party since the 1850s. The party is a big tent, and though it is often described as liberal, it is less ideologically uniform than the Republican Party due to the broader list of unique voting blocs that compose it.

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton

William Jefferson Clinton is an American politician who served as the 42nd president of the United States from 1993 to 2001. He previously served as governor of Arkansas from 1979 to 1981 and again from 1983 to 1992, and as attorney general of Arkansas from 1977 to 1979. A member of the Democratic Party, Clinton became known as a New Democrat, as many of his policies reflected a centrist "Third Way" political philosophy. He is the husband of Hillary Clinton, who was a senator from New York from 2001 to 2009, secretary of state from 2009 to 2013 and the Democratic nominee for president in the 2016 presidential election.

Constitutional Union Party (United States)

Constitutional Union Party (United States)

The Constitutional Union Party was a United States third party active during the 1860 elections. It consisted of conservative former Whigs, largely from the Southern United States, who wanted to avoid secession over the slavery issue and refused to join either the Republican Party or the Democratic Party. The Constitutional Union Party campaigned on a simple platform "to recognize no political principle other than the Constitution of the country, the Union of the states, and the Enforcement of the Laws".

John Bell (Tennessee politician)

John Bell (Tennessee politician)

John Bell was an American politician, attorney, and planter who was a candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1860.

Third party (United States)

Third party (United States)

Third party is a term used in the United States for American political parties other than the two dominant parties, currently the Republican and Democratic Parties. Sometimes the phrase "minor party" is used instead of third party.

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt Jr., often referred to as Teddy or by his initials, T. R., was an American politician, statesman, soldier, conservationist, naturalist, historian, and writer who served as the 26th president of the United States from 1901 to 1909. He previously served as the 25th vice president under President William McKinley from March to September 1901 and as the 33rd governor of New York from 1899 to 1900. Assuming the presidency after McKinley's assassination, Roosevelt emerged as a leader of the Republican Party and became a driving force for anti-trust and Progressive policies.

Sioux County, Iowa

Sioux County, Iowa

Sioux County is a county located in the U.S. state of Iowa. As of the 2020 census, the population was 35,872. Its county seat is Orange City. Its largest city is Sioux Center.

George H. W. Bush

George H. W. Bush

George Herbert Walker Bush was an American politician, diplomat, and businessman who served as the 41st president of the United States from 1989 to 1993. A member of the Republican Party, he previously served as the 43rd vice president from 1981 to 1989 under President Ronald Reagan, in the U.S. House of Representatives, as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and as Director of Central Intelligence.

1992 United States presidential election

1992 United States presidential election

The 1992 United States presidential election was the 52nd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 3, 1992. Democratic Governor Bill Clinton of Arkansas defeated incumbent Republican President George H. W. Bush, independent businessman Ross Perot of Texas, and a number of minor candidates. The election marked the end of a period of Republican dominance in American politics that began in 1968, and also marked the end of 12 years of Republican rule of the White House, as well as the end of the Greatest Generation's 32-year American rule and the beginning of the Baby boomers 28-year dominance until 2020. It was the last time the incumbent president failed to win a second term until 2020, when Donald Trump lost the election to Joe Biden; it was the first such occurrence since 1980.

Alf Landon

Alf Landon

Alfred Mossman Landon was an American oilman and politician who served as the 26th governor of Kansas from 1933 to 1937. A member of the Republican Party, he was the party's nominee in the 1936 presidential election, and was defeated in a landslide by incumbent President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Education

Public education

The county is served by Jackson County Public Schools which operates the following schools:[31]

  • McKee Elementary School
  • Sand Gap Elementary School
  • Tyner Elementary School
  • Jackson County Middle School
  • Jackson County High School
  • Jackson County Area Technology Center

Private education

  • Annville Christian Academy (K-12)[32]

Higher education

There are no higher education institutes within the county, but some nearby universities and colleges include:

Public library

Jackson County has a lending library, the Jackson County Public Library, located in downtown McKee.

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Jackson County High School

Jackson County High School

Jackson County High School (JCHS) is a public high school which was established in 1967 and is located in the City of McKee, KY. It serves around 600 students in Jackson County, KY and McKee, KY in grades 9th through 12th. The school is located at the Jackson County Educational Complex which also consists of the Jackson County Area Technology Center, Jackson County Community Auditorium, a football stadium, baseball/softball fields, and the Jackson County Continuing Education Center.

Berea College

Berea College

Berea College is a private liberal arts work college in Berea, Kentucky. Founded in 1855, Berea College was the first college in the Southern United States to be coeducational and racially integrated. Berea College charges no tuition; every admitted student is provided the equivalent of a four-year scholarship. There are still other fees, such as room and board, textbooks, and personal expenses. Most students receive grants or scholarships and do not have to take out many loans, if any at all.

Berea, Kentucky

Berea, Kentucky

Berea is a home rule-class city in Madison County, Kentucky, in the United States. The town is best known for its art festivals, historic restaurants and buildings, and as the home to Berea College, a private liberal arts college. The population was 15,539 at the 2020 census. It is one of the fastest-growing towns in Kentucky, having increased by 27.4% since 2000. Berea is a principal city of the Richmond−Berea Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Madison and Rockcastle counties. It was formally incorporated by the state assembly in 1890.

Eastern Kentucky University

Eastern Kentucky University

Eastern Kentucky University is a public university in Richmond, Kentucky. As a regional comprehensive institution, EKU also maintains branch campuses in Corbin, Hazard, Lancaster, and Manchester and offers over 40 online undergraduate and graduate options.

Richmond, Kentucky

Richmond, Kentucky

Richmond is a home rule-class city in and the county seat of Madison County, Kentucky, United States. It is named after Richmond, Virginia, and is home to Eastern Kentucky University. In 2019, the population was 36,157. Richmond is the fourth-largest city in the Bluegrass region and the state's sixth-largest city. It is the ninth largest population center in the state with a Micropolitan population of 106,864. The city serves as the center for work and shopping for south-central Kentucky. In addition, Richmond is the principal city of the Richmond-Berea, Kentucky Micropolitan Area, which includes all of Madison and Rockcastle counties.

Manchester, Kentucky

Manchester, Kentucky

Manchester is a home rule-class city in Clay County, Kentucky, in the United States. It is the seat of its county and the home of a minimum- and medium-security federal prison. The city's population was 1,255 at the 2010 census.

Somerset Community College

Somerset Community College

Somerset Community College (SCC) is a public community college in Somerset, Kentucky. It is part of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS). The college offers academic, general education, and technical curricula leading to certificates, diplomas, and associate's degrees. Somerset Community College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS).

London, Kentucky

London, Kentucky

London is a home rule-class city in Laurel County, Kentucky, in the United States. It is the seat of its county. The population was 7,993 at the time of the 2010 census. It is the second-largest city named "London" in the United States and the fourth-largest in the world. It is part of the London, Kentucky micropolitan area. Of the seventeen micropolitan areas in Kentucky, London is the largest; the London micropolitan area's 2010 Census population was 126,369. London is also home to the annual World Chicken Festival that celebrates the life of Colonel Sanders and features the world's largest skillet.

Public library

Public library

A public library is a library that is accessible by the general public and is usually funded from public sources, such as taxes. It is operated by librarians and library paraprofessionals, who are also civil servants.

McKee, Kentucky

McKee, Kentucky

McKee is a home rule-class city located in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It is the seat of Jackson County, KY. As of the 2020 census, the population of the city was 803. The city was founded on April 1, 1882 and was named for Judge George R. McKee. In 2019, the city held a vote regarding the sale of alcohol, the vote passed, making the city wet.

Notable people

Source: "Jackson County, Kentucky", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson_County,_Kentucky.

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See also
References
  1. ^ a b "QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 31, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Rennick, Robert M. (1987). Kentucky Place Names. University Press of Kentucky. p. 151. ISBN 0813126312. Retrieved July 26, 2013.
  4. ^ The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. pp. 35.
  5. ^ "Historical Wet/Dry Vote for City of McKee - Results!". Jackson County Sun. Nolan Media Group. November 8, 2019. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  6. ^ a b "Liquor Licenses Granted: Alcohol Sales Now Authorized in McKee". Jackson County Sun. May 22, 2020. Retrieved October 20, 2020.
  7. ^ Jackson County Tourism. "About". Jackson County Tourism.
  8. ^ "S-Tree Campground". USDA Forest Service: Daniel Boone National Forest.
  9. ^ "Turkey Foot Campground". USDA Forest Service- Daniel Boone National Forest.
  10. ^ "Flat Lick Falls". Jackson County Kentucky Tourism.
  11. ^ Jackson County Tourism. "Hiking". Jackson County Tourism.
  12. ^ "Groundwater Resources of Jackson County, KY". UK Kentucky Geological Survey. Retrieved July 29, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. ^ a b Jackson County Tourism. "Fairs and Festivals". Jackson County Tourism.
  14. ^ Jackson County Tourism. "Civil War History". Jackson County Tourism.
  15. ^ Jackson County Tourism. "Stringbean Memorial Park". Jackson County Tourism.
  16. ^ a b "Kentucky's Advanced Manufacturing Hub". Jackson County Industrial Development Authority. Retrieved July 29, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  17. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  18. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 16, 2014.
  19. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 16, 2014.
  20. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 16, 2014.
  21. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 16, 2014.
  22. ^ a b c d e f "U.S. Census Bureau". U.S. Census Bureau. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 31, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  23. ^ Marshall, Anne E. Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State, pp. 114-115. ISBN 1469609835
  24. ^ "David Leip's Presidential Election Atlas – 1948 statistics". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 13, 2011.
  25. ^ "David Leip's Presidential Election Atlas – 1960 statistics". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 13, 2011.
  26. ^ "David Leip's Presidential Election Atlas – 1976 statistics". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 13, 2011.
  27. ^ "David Leip's Presidential Election Atlas – 1988 statistics". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 13, 2011.
  28. ^ a b "David Leip's Presidential Election Atlas – 1992 statistics". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 13, 2011.
  29. ^ "David Leip's Presidential Election Atlas – 1936 statistics". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 13, 2011.
  30. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved July 3, 2018.
  31. ^ "Schools". Jackson County Public Schools. Retrieved August 1, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  32. ^ "Annville Christian Academy". Grace Covenant Ministries. Retrieved August 1, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  33. ^ "Murder in the Kornfield: The Life and Death of Stringbean". WFMU's Beware of the Blog.
External links

Coordinates: 37°25′N 84°01′W / 37.42°N 84.01°W / 37.42; -84.01

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