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Italy–Spain football rivalry

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Italy–Spain football rivalry
Leonardo Bonucci and Fernando Torres Euro 2012 final.jpg
Teams Italy
 Spain
First meetingSpain 2–0 Italy
1920 Summer Olympics
(2 September 1920)
Latest meetingItaly 1–2 Spain
UEFA Nations League
(6 October 2021)
Statistics
Meetings total39
Most winsSpain (12)
All-time seriesItaly: 11
Draw: 16
Spain: 12
Largest victoryItaly 7–1 Spain
1928 Summer Olympics
(4 June 1928)
Largest goal scoringItaly 7–1 Spain
1928 Summer Olympics
(4 June 1928)
Italy–Spain football rivalry is located in Europe
Italy
Italy
Spain
Spain

The Italy–Spain football rivalry (Italian: Rivalità calcistica Italia-Spagna; Spanish: Rivalidad futbolística Italia-España) sometimes referred to as the Mediterranean derby,[1] is a football rivalry between the national football teams of Italy and Spain,[2] the two countries have won five FIFA World Cups and five UEFA European Championship between them. Italy has won four FIFA World Cups and two UEFA European Championships while Spain have won one FIFA World Cups and three UEFA European Championships. They have played against each other three times in the World Cup and six times in the European Championship, including each of the previous four Euros from 2008 to 2020 editions. Most notably, the two met at the UEFA Euro 2012 Final, which Spain won 4–0. They also met at the 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup and the 2020–21 UEFA Nations League semi-finals.

Spain has won 12, and Italy 11, of the 39 matches between them (including four at the Summer Olympic Games in the 1920s).[3] Although the two nations are not immediate geographical neighbours, their rivalry at international level is enhanced by the strong performances of the representative clubs in UEFA competitions, in which they are among the leading associations and have each enjoyed spells of dominance. Including the defunct UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, twelve continental finals have been contested between an Italian and a Spanish representative (Spain dominate this with eight victories).[4][5] The frequent meetings between the clubs have led to the elite players becoming very familiar with one another when they meet at national level. The two nations' under-21 teams, which are also among the strongest in the world, are also acknowledged as rivals.[1]

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Italian language

Italian language

Italian is a Romance language of the Indo-European language family that evolved from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire. Together with Sardinian, Italian is the least divergent language from Latin. Spoken by about 85 million people (2022), Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino, and Vatican City. It has official minority status in Croatia and in some areas of Slovenian Istria.

Spanish language

Spanish language

Spanish is a Romance language of the Indo-European language family that evolved from colloquial Latin spoken on the Iberian Peninsula. Today, it is a global language with more than 500 million native speakers, mainly in the Americas and Spain. Spanish is the official language of 20 countries. It is the world's second-most spoken native language after Mandarin Chinese; the world's fourth-most spoken language overall after English, Mandarin Chinese, and Hindustani (Hindi-Urdu); and the world's most widely spoken Romance language. The largest population of native speakers is in Mexico.

Association football

Association football

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played between two teams of 11 players who primarily use their feet to propel a ball around a rectangular field called a pitch. The objective of the game is to score more goals than the opposite team by moving the ball beyond the goal line into a rectangular-framed goal defended by the opposing side. Traditionally, the game has been played over two 45 minute halves, for a total match time of 90 minutes. With an estimated 250 million players active in over 200 countries and territories, it is considered the world's most popular sport.

Italy national football team

Italy national football team

The Italy national football team has represented Italy in international football since its first match in 1910. The national team is controlled by the Italian Football Federation (FIGC), the governing body for football in Italy, which is a co-founder and member of UEFA. Italy's home matches are played at various stadiums throughout Italy, and its primary training ground and technical headquarters, Centro Tecnico Federale di Coverciano, is located in Florence. Italy are the reigning European champions, having won UEFA Euro 2020.

Spain national football team

Spain national football team

The Spain national football team has represented Spain in international men's football competitions since 1920. It is governed by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The tournament has been held every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are Argentina, who won their third title at the 2022 tournament.

UEFA Euro 2008

UEFA Euro 2008

The 2008 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2008 or simply Euro 2008, was the 13th UEFA European Championship, a quadrennial football tournament contested by the member nations of UEFA. It took place in Austria and Switzerland from 7 to 29 June 2008.

UEFA Euro 2020

UEFA Euro 2020

The 2020 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2020 or simply Euro 2020, was the 16th UEFA European Championship, the quadrennial international men's football championship of Europe organised by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). To celebrate the 60th anniversary of the European Championship competition, UEFA president Michel Platini declared that the tournament would be hosted in several nations as a "romantic" one-off event, with 11 cities in 11 UEFA countries each providing venues for the tournament. Defending champions Portugal, who won UEFA Euro 2016 in France, were eliminated in the round of 16 by Belgium. Italy won their second European Championship title by beating England on penalties in the final following a 1–1 draw after extra time. The win came exactly on the 39th anniversary of Italy's 1982 FIFA World Cup Final win over West Germany.

2013 FIFA Confederations Cup

2013 FIFA Confederations Cup

The 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup was the ninth FIFA Confederations Cup, which was held in Brazil from 15 to 30 June 2013 as a prelude to the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The most recent winners of the six continental championships appeared in the tournament, along with hosts Brazil and UEFA Euro 2012 runners-up Italy, who qualified because the Euro 2012 winners, Spain, had also won the most recent FIFA World Cup in 2010 thus securing a spot in the tournament.

2020–21 UEFA Nations League

2020–21 UEFA Nations League

The 2020–21 UEFA Nations League was the second season of the UEFA Nations League, an international association football competition involving the men's national teams of the 55 member associations of UEFA. The competition was held from September to November 2020, October 2021 and March 2022.

Football at the Summer Olympics

Football at the Summer Olympics

Football at the Summer Olympics, referred to as the Olympic Football Tournament, has been included in every Summer Olympic Games as a men's competition sport, except 1896 and 1932. Women's football was added to the official program at the Atlanta 1996 Games.

UEFA Cup Winners' Cup

UEFA Cup Winners' Cup

The UEFA Cup Winners' Cup was a European football club competition contested annually by the winners of domestic cup competitions. The cup was, chronologically, the second seasonal inter-European club competition organised by UEFA. The tournament ran for 39 seasons, with the final edition held in 1998–99, after which it was discontinued.

List of matches

Number Date Location Competition Results
1 2 September 1920 Belgium Antwerp 1920 Summer Olympics Spain 2–0 Italy
2 9 March 1924 Italy Milan Friendly Italy 0–0 Spain
3 25 May 1924 France Colombes 1924 Summer Olympics Italy 1–0 Spain
4 14 June 1925 Spain Valencia Friendly Spain 1–0 Italy
5 29 May 1927 Italy Bologna Italy 2–0 Spain
6 22 April 1928 Spain Gijón Spain 1–1 Italy
7 1 June 1928 Netherlands Amsterdam 1928 Summer Olympics Italy 1–1 Spain [a]
8 4 June 1928 Italy 7–1 Spain [b]
9 22 June 1930 Italy Bologna Friendly Italy 2–3 Spain
10 19 April 1931 Spain Bilbao Spain 0–0 Italy
11 31 May 1934 Italy Florence 1934 World Cup Italy 1–1 Spain [c]
12 1 June 1934 Italy 1–0 Spain [d]
13 19 April 1942 Italy Milan Friendly Italy 4–0 Spain
14 27 March 1949 Spain Madrid Spain 1–3 Italy
15 28 February 1959 Italy Rome Italy 1–1 Spain
16 13 March 1960 Spain Barcelona Spain 3–1 Italy
17 21 February 1970 Spain Madrid Spain 2–2 Italy
18 20 February 1971 Italy Cagliari Italy 1–2 Spain
19 25 January 1978 Spain Madrid Spain 2–1 Italy
20 21 December 1978 Italy Rome Italy 1–0 Spain
21 12 June 1980 Italy Milan Euro 1980 Italy 0–0 Spain
22 14 June 1988 West Germany Frankfurt Euro 1988 Italy 1–0 Spain
23 9 July 1994 United States Foxborough 1994 World Cup Italy 2–1 Spain
24 18 November 1998 Italy Salerno Friendly Italy 2–2 Spain
25 29 March 2000 Spain Barcelona Spain 2–0 Italy
26 28 April 2004 Italy Genoa Italy 1–1 Spain
27 26 March 2008 Spain Elche Spain 1–0 Italy
28 22 June 2008 Austria Vienna Euro 2008 Spain 0–0 Italy [e]
29 10 August 2011 Italy Bari Friendly Italy 2–1 Spain
30 10 June 2012 Poland Gdańsk Euro 2012 Spain 1–1 Italy
31 1 July 2012 Ukraine Kyiv Spain 4–0 Italy
32 27 June 2013 Brazil Fortaleza 2013 Confederations Cup Spain 0–0 Italy [f]
33 5 March 2014 Spain Madrid Friendly Spain 1–0 Italy
34 24 March 2016 Italy Udine Italy 1–1 Spain
35 27 June 2016 France Saint-Denis Euro 2016 Italy 2–0 Spain
36 6 October 2016 Italy Turin 2018 World Cup qualification Italy 1–1 Spain
37 2 September 2017 Spain Madrid Spain 3–0 Italy
38 6 July 2021 England London Euro 2020 Italy 1–1 Spain [g]
39 6 October 2021 Italy Milan 2021 Nations League finals Italy 1–2 Spain
  1. ^ The quarter-final match ended in a draw after extra time.
  2. ^ The quarter-final was replayed after ending in a draw; Italy won the replay and advanced.
  3. ^ The quarter-final match ended in a draw after extra time.
  4. ^ The quarter-final was replayed the next day after ending in a draw; Italy won the replay and advanced.
  5. ^ Spain won 4–2 on penalties after extra time.
  6. ^ Spain won 7–6 on penalties after extra time.
  7. ^ Italy won 4–2 on penalties after extra time.

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Belgium

Belgium

Belgium, officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a country in Northwestern Europe. The country is bordered by the Netherlands to the north, Germany to the east, Luxembourg to the southeast, France to the southwest, and the North Sea to the northwest. It covers an area of 30,528 km2 (11,787 sq mi) and has a population of more than 11.5 million, making it the 22nd most densely populated country in the world and the 6th most densely populated country in Europe, with a density of 376/km2 (970/sq mi). Belgium is part of an area known as the Low Countries, historically a somewhat larger region than the Benelux group of states, as it also included parts of northern France. The capital and largest city is Brussels; other major cities are Antwerp, Ghent, Charleroi, Liège, Bruges, Namur, and Leuven.

Antwerp

Antwerp

Antwerp is the largest city in Belgium by area at 204.51 square kilometres (78.96 sq mi) and the capital of Antwerp Province in the Flemish Region. With a population of 530,504, it is the most populous municipality in Belgium, and with a metropolitan population of around 1,200,000 people, it is the second-largest metropolitan region in Belgium, second only to Brussels.

Football at the 1920 Summer Olympics

Football at the 1920 Summer Olympics

Football was one of the 154 events at the 1920 Summer Olympics, held in Antwerp, Belgium. It was the fifth time association football was on the Olympic schedule. The tournament expanded to 15 countries, including a non-European nation (Egypt) for the first time.

Italy

Italy

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, or the Republic of Italy, is a country in Southern and Western Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, it consists of a peninsula delimited by the Alps and surrounded by several islands; its territory largely coincides with the homonymous geographical region. Italy shares land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates of Vatican City and San Marino. It has a territorial exclave in Switzerland, Campione. Italy covers an area of 301,230 km2 (116,310 sq mi), with a population of about 60 million. It is the third-most populous member state of the European Union, the sixth-most populous country in Europe, and the tenth-largest country in the continent by land area. Italy's capital and largest city is Rome.

France

France

France, officially the French Republic, is a country primarily located in Western Europe. It also includes overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, giving it one of the largest discontiguous exclusive economic zones in the world. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Its eighteen integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 km2 (248,573 sq mi) and contain close to 68 million people.

Colombes

Colombes

Colombes is a commune in the northwestern suburbs of Paris, France. It is located 10.6 km (6.6 mi) from the centre of Paris. In 2019, Colombes was the 53rd largest city in France.

Football at the 1924 Summer Olympics

Football at the 1924 Summer Olympics

Football at the 1924 Summer Olympics was the sixth edition of the football tournament at the 1924 Summer Olympics held in Paris.

Bologna

Bologna

Bologna is the capital and largest city of the Emilia-Romagna region in Northern Italy. It is the seventh most populous city in Italy with about 400,000 inhabitants and 150 different nationalities. Its metropolitan area is home to more than 1,000,000 people. It is known as the Fat City for its rich cuisine, and the Red City for its Spanish-style red tiled rooftops and, more recently, its leftist politics. It is also called the Learned City because it is home to the oldest university in the world.

Gijón

Gijón

Gijón or Xixón is a city and municipality in north-western Spain. It is the largest city and municipality by population in the autonomous community of Asturias. It is located on the coast of the Cantabrian Sea in the Bay of Biscay, in the central-northern part of Asturias; it is approximately 24 km (15 mi) north-east of Oviedo, the capital of Asturias, and 26 km (16 mi) from Avilés. With a population of 271,780, Gijón is the 15th largest city in Spain.

Amsterdam

Amsterdam

Amsterdam is the capital and most populous city of the Netherlands, with The Hague being the seat of government. It has a population of 921,402 within the city proper, 1,457,018 in the urban area and 2,480,394 in the metropolitan area. Located in the Dutch province of North Holland, Amsterdam is colloquially referred to as the "Venice of the North", for its large number of canals, now designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Football at the 1928 Summer Olympics

Football at the 1928 Summer Olympics

Football was one of the tournaments at the 1928 Summer Olympics. It was won by Uruguay against Argentina, and was the last Olympic football tournament before the inception of the FIFA World Cup, which was held for the first time in 1930.

Bilbao

Bilbao

Bilbao is a city in northern Spain, the largest city in the province of Biscay and in the Basque Country as a whole. It is also the largest city proper in northern Spain. Bilbao is the tenth largest city in Spain, with a population of 345,141 as of 2015. The Bilbao metropolitan area has 1,037,847 inhabitants, making it one of the most populous metropolitan areas in northern Spain; with a population of 875,552 the comarca of Greater Bilbao is the fifth-largest urban area in Spain. Bilbao is also the main urban area in what is defined as the Greater Basque region.

Comparison of Italy's and Spain's positions in major international tournaments

Key

  Denotes which team finished better in that particular competition.
DNQ: Did not qualify.
DNP: Did not participate.
TBD: To be determined.

Tournament  Italy  Spain Notes
1930 FIFA World Cup DNP DNP
1934 FIFA World Cup 1st 5th Italy and Spain faced off in the quarter-final match which ended 1–1 and was replayed the following day where Italy won 1–0. Tournament played in Italy.
1938 FIFA World Cup 1st DNP
1950 FIFA World Cup 7th 4th
1954 FIFA World Cup 10th DNP
1958 FIFA World Cup DNQ
1960 European Nations' Cup DNP
1962 FIFA World Cup 9th 13th
1964 European Nations' Cup DNQ 1st Tournament played in Spain.
1966 FIFA World Cup 9th 10th
UEFA Euro 1968 1st DNQ Tournament played in Italy.
1970 FIFA World Cup 2nd
UEFA Euro 1972 DNQ
1974 FIFA World Cup 10th
UEFA Euro 1976 DNQ
1978 FIFA World Cup 4th 10th
UEFA Euro 1980 7th Tournament played in Italy.
1982 FIFA World Cup 1st 12th Tournament played in Spain.
UEFA Euro 1984 DNQ 2nd
1986 FIFA World Cup 12th 7th
UEFA Euro 1988 4th 6th Italy beat Spain 1–0 in their group stage match up; Spain did not advance from the group, while Italy did.
1990 FIFA World Cup 3rd 10th Tournament played in Italy.
UEFA Euro 1992 DNQ
1994 FIFA World Cup 2nd 8th Italy beat Spain 2–1 in the quarter-finals, eliminating them from the tournament.
UEFA Euro 1996 10th 6th
1998 FIFA World Cup 5th 17th
UEFA Euro 2000 2nd 5th
2002 FIFA World Cup 15th 5th
UEFA Euro 2004 9th 10th
2006 FIFA World Cup 1st 9th
UEFA Euro 2008 8th 1st In the quarter-finals, Italy and Spain were matched up in a goalless draw after 120 minutes in which Spain won 4–2 on penalties, eliminating Italy from the tournament.
2010 FIFA World Cup 26th
UEFA Euro 2012 2nd Italy and Spain were matched up in the group stage, which ended 1–1 and later faced off in the final, in which Spain defeated Italy 4–0.
2014 FIFA World Cup 22nd 23rd
UEFA Euro 2016 5th 10th In the round of 16, Italy defeated Spain 2–0, eliminating them from the tournament.
2018 FIFA World Cup DNQ 10th
UEFA Euro 2020 1st 3rd In the semi-finals, Italy eliminated Spain 4–2 on penalties. Some games of the tournament were played in Italy and Spain.
2022 FIFA World Cup DNQ 13th
UEFA Euro 2024 TBD TBD

Discover more about Comparison of Italy's and Spain's positions in major international tournaments related topics

1930 FIFA World Cup

1930 FIFA World Cup

The 1930 FIFA World Cup was the inaugural FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national football teams. It took place in Uruguay from 13 to 30 July 1930. FIFA, football's international governing body, selected Uruguay as host nation, as the country would be celebrating the centenary of its first constitution and the Uruguay national football team had successfully retained their football title at the 1928 Summer Olympics. All matches were played in the Uruguayan capital, Montevideo, the majority at the Estadio Centenario, which was built for the tournament.

1934 FIFA World Cup

1934 FIFA World Cup

The 1934 FIFA World Cup was the second edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for senior men's national teams. It took place in Italy from 27 May to 10 June 1934.

1938 FIFA World Cup

1938 FIFA World Cup

The 1938 FIFA World Cup was the third edition of the World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for senior men's national teams and was held in France from 4 June until 19 June 1938. Italy defended its title in the final, beating Hungary 4–2. Italy's 1934 and 1938 teams hold the distinction of being the only men's national team to win the World Cup multiple times under the same coach, Vittorio Pozzo. It would be the last World Cup until 1950 due to the disruption from World War II.

1950 FIFA World Cup

1950 FIFA World Cup

The 1950 FIFA World Cup was the fourth edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for senior men's national teams and held in Brazil from 24 June to 16 July 1950. The planned 1942 and 1946 World Cups were cancelled due to World War II. This tournament ended the hiatus. Uruguay, who had won the inaugural competition in 1930, defeated the host nation, Brazil, in the deciding match of the four-team group of the final round. This was the only tournament not decided by a one-match final. It was also the inaugural tournament where the trophy was referred to as the Jules Rimet Cup, to mark the 25th anniversary of Jules Rimet's presidency of FIFA.

1954 FIFA World Cup

1954 FIFA World Cup

The 1954 FIFA World Cup was the fifth edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football tournament for senior men's national teams of the nations affiliated to FIFA. It was held in Switzerland from 16 June to 4 July. Switzerland was selected as the host country in July 1946. At the tournament several all-time records for goal-scoring were set, including the highest average number of goals scored per game. The tournament was won by West Germany, who defeated tournament favourites Hungary 3–2 in the final, their first World Cup title.

1958 FIFA World Cup

1958 FIFA World Cup

The 1958 FIFA World Cup was the sixth FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams, and was played in Sweden from 8 to 29 June 1958. It was the first FIFA World Cup to be played in a Nordic country.

1960 European Nations' Cup

1960 European Nations' Cup

The 1960 European Nations' Cup was the first edition of the UEFA European Championship, held every four years and organised by UEFA. The first tournament was held in France. It was won by the Soviet Union, who beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in Paris after extra time.

1962 FIFA World Cup

1962 FIFA World Cup

The 1962 FIFA World Cup was the seventh edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for senior men's national teams. It was held from 30 May to 17 June 1962 in Chile. The qualification rounds took place between August 1960 and December 1961, with 56 teams entering from six confederations, and fourteen qualifying for the finals tournament alongside Chile, the hosts, and Brazil, the defending champions.

1964 European Nations' Cup

1964 European Nations' Cup

The 1964 European Nations' Cup was the second edition of the UEFA European Championship. The final tournament was held in Spain. It was won by the hosts 2–1 over the defending champions, the Soviet Union.

1966 FIFA World Cup

1966 FIFA World Cup

The 1966 FIFA World Cup was the eighth FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams. It was played in England from 11 July to 30 July 1966. The England national football team defeated West Germany 4–2 in the final to win the tournament. The final had finished at 2–2 after 90 minutes and went to extra time, when Geoff Hurst scored two goals to complete his hat-trick, the first to be scored in a men's World Cup final. England were the fifth nation to win the event, and the third host nation to win after Uruguay in 1930 and Italy in 1934. Brazil were the defending champions, but they failed to progress from the group stage.

1970 FIFA World Cup

1970 FIFA World Cup

The 1970 FIFA World Cup was the ninth edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for men's senior national teams. Held from 31 May to 21 June in Mexico, it was the first World Cup tournament held outside Europe and South America, and it was also the first held in North America. Teams representing 75 nations from all six populated continents entered the competition, and its qualification rounds began in May 1968. Fourteen teams qualified from this process to join host nation Mexico and defending champions England in the 16-team final tournament. El Salvador, Israel and Morocco made their debut appearances at the final stage.

1974 FIFA World Cup

1974 FIFA World Cup

The 1974 FIFA World Cup was the tenth FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams, and was played in West Germany between 13 June and 7 July. The tournament marked the first time that the current trophy, the FIFA World Cup Trophy, created by the Italian sculptor Silvio Gazzaniga, was awarded. The previous trophy, the Jules Rimet Trophy, had been won for the third time by Brazil in 1970 and awarded permanently to the Brazilians. This was the first out of three World Cups to feature two rounds of group stages.

Major encounters

1934 FIFA World Cup

On 31 May, Italy faced Spain in the quarter-final of the 1934 FIFA World Cup, where the two sides drew 1–1 after extra time with Spanish goal by Luis Regueiro in the 30th minute and Italian goal by Giovanni Ferrari in the 44th minute. They then faced off again in the replay match the following day to settle the team that advances; Italy won the replay 1–0 win the goal coming from Giuseppe Meazza in the 11th minute.[6] Italy went on to win their first World Cup title.

Italy 1–1 (a.e.t.) Spain
Ferrari 44' Report Regueiro 30'
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Louis Baert (Belgium)
Replay
Italy 1–0 Spain
Meazza 11' Report

UEFA Euro 1988

On 14 June, Italy and Spain were matched up for the second match in the group stage, where Italy won 1–0 with the goal coming from Gianluca Vialli in the 73rd minute.[6] Italy went on to win their last group match, while Spain lost theirs; Italy made it out of the group, while Spain did not.

Italy 1–0 Spain
Vialli 73' Report
Attendance: 47,506

1994 FIFA World Cup

On 9 July, Italy won the quarter-final match up against Spain in the 1994 World Cup 2–1 quarter-final at Foxboro Stadium, with Italian Dino Baggio scoring first in the 25th minute, the Spaniards equalised with a goal from José Luis Caminero in the 58th minute, before Roberto Baggio sealed the Italian victory in the 88th minute.[6] A controversy in the match was Mauro Tassotti's elbow on Spanish player Luis Enrique,[7] but during the match the incident went unpunished – Tassotti was later banned for eight games.[8]

Italy 2–1 Spain
D. Baggio 25'
R. Baggio 88'
Report Caminero 58'
Attendance: 53,400

UEFA Euro 2008

On 22 June, Italy and Spain were matched up for a quarter-final in Euro 2008; the game ended a goalless draw after 120 minutes and resulted in a penalty shoot-out which Spain won 4–2.[6] Spain went on to win the European Championship for the second time.

Spain 0–0 (a.e.t.) Italy
Report
Penalties
4–2

UEFA Euro 2012

On 1 July, Spain and Italy were matched up for the final of Euro 2012. The sides had already met in the group stage, drawing 1–1. Spain took the lead in the 14th minute, though, when Andrés Iniesta played a through-ball to Cesc Fàbregas, who drove past Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini to the by-line before pulling back a cross for David Silva to head into the net from six yards.[10] Chiellini was clearly struggling with a thigh injury he had picked up in the earlier rounds, and he was replaced by Federico Balzaretti after 20 minutes.[10] Italy responded with a couple of shots from Antonio Cassano that were saved by Spain goalkeeper Iker Casillas,[10] but Spain doubled their lead before half-time when Xavi picked out left-back Jordi Alba, who capped a long forward run with a precise finish past Gianluigi Buffon in the Italy goal.[10]

Antonio Di Natale came on for Cassano at half-time and twice went close to scoring, the second effort forcing a save from the onrushing Casillas.[10] Italy's final substitution saw Thiago Motta replace Riccardo Montolivo, but he soon suffered a hamstring injury; with all of their substitutes used, Italy had to play the last 30 minutes of the match with ten men.[10] Fernando Torres replaced Fàbregas with 15 minutes left to play, and scored in the 84th minute – assisted by Xavi – to become the first man to score in two European Championship finals.[11] Torres then turned provider four minutes later, cutting the ball back with the outside of his boot for fellow substitute and Chelsea forward Juan Mata to sweep into an empty net for a final score of 4–0,[10] the widest margin of victory in any European Championship final. Spain became the first team to retain the European Championship title and also the first European team to win three major international competitions in a row.

Spain 1–1 Italy
Report
Attendance: 38,869[12]
Spain 4–0 Italy
Report
Attendance: 63,170[13]

2013 FIFA Confederations Cup

On 27 June, the semi-final of the 2013 Confederations Cup in Brazil was contested between Italy and Spain, where after a goalless 120 minutes, Spain won 7–6 in the resulting penalty shoot-out; Italy's Leonardo Bonucci was the only player to miss.[14]

UEFA Euro 2016

On 27 June, Italy and Spain matched up for the round of 16 in the Euro 2016, in a rematch of the previous tournament's final. Italy won 2–0 with goals from Giorgio Chiellini in the 33rd minute and Graziano Pellè in stoppage time of the second half. Spanish goalkeeper David de Gea made several impressive saves to keep Spain in the match, notably on Pellè's first-half header attempt, however, it ultimately ended in defeat, eliminating the defending European champions Spain.[15][16]

Italy 2–0 Spain
Report

2018 FIFA World Cup qualifying

Italy was not seeded into the first pot, being placed into the second pot due to being in 17th place in the FIFA World Rankings at the time of the group draws; Italy and Spain, from pot one, were drawn together on 25 July 2015.[18] Italy and Spain drew 1–1 in Turin on 6 October 2016, followed by a 3–0 Spain win in Madrid on 2 September 2017, as Spain topped Group G, leaving Italy in second place five points behind.[19][20] Italy were then required to go through the play-off against Sweden. After a 1–0 aggregate loss to Sweden, on 13 November 2017, Italy failed to qualify for the 2018 FIFA World Cup for the first time since 1958.[21]

Italy 1–1 Spain
Report
Attendance: 38,470
Referee: Felix Brych (Germany)

Spain 3–0 Italy
Report

UEFA Euro 2020

On 6 July 2021, Italy and Spain faced each other in the semi-finals of the Euro 2020 (held in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic) at Wembley Stadium in London, marking the fourth consecutive European Championship that the sides meet. Italy and Spain, could not break the deadlock after 120 minutes, and Italy won 4–2 in the resulting penalty shoot-out en route to their first European title in 53 years.

2021 UEFA Nations League finals

On 6 October 2021, Italy and Spain faced each other in the semi-finals of the 2020–21 UEFA Nations League at San Siro in Milan. Spain ended Italy's world-record 37-game unbeaten run with a 2–1 win to reach their first UEFA Nations League final. Italy, defeated at home in a competitive game for the first time since 1999, thus failed in their attempt to emulate Portugal's achievement of holding the Nations League and European Championship titles simultaneously.[23]

Italy 1–2 Spain
Pellegrini 83' Report Ferr. Torres 17', 45+2'
Attendance: 33,524[24]

Discover more about Major encounters related topics

1934 FIFA World Cup

1934 FIFA World Cup

The 1934 FIFA World Cup was the second edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for senior men's national teams. It took place in Italy from 27 May to 10 June 1934.

Overtime (sports)

Overtime (sports)

Overtime or extra time is an additional period of play specified under the rules of a sport to bring a game to a decision and avoid declaring the match a tie or draw where the scores are the same. In some sports, this extra period is played only if the game is required to have a clear winner, as in single-elimination tournaments where only one team or players can advance to the next round or win the tournament.

Luis Regueiro

Luis Regueiro

Luis Regueiro Pagola, sometimes nicknamed Corso, was a footballer, and an Olympian from the Basque Country in the north of Spain.

Giovanni Ferrari

Giovanni Ferrari

Giovanni Ferrari was an Italian footballer who played as an attacking midfielder/inside forward on the left. He is regarded as one of the best players of his generation, one of Italy's best ever players, and as one of the greatest players of all time, having won the Serie A 8 times, as well as two consecutive FIFA World Cup titles with the Italy national football team. Along with Giuseppe Meazza and Eraldo Monzeglio, he is one of only three Italian players to have won two World Cups.

Giuseppe Meazza

Giuseppe Meazza

Giuseppe "Peppino" Meazza, also known as il Balilla, was an Italian football manager and player. Throughout his career, he played mainly for Inter Milan in the 1930s, scoring 242 goals in 365 games for the club, and winning three Serie A titles, as well as the Coppa Italia; he later also played for local rivals Milan, as well as Turin rivals Juventus, in addition to his spells with Varese and Atalanta. At international level, he led Italy to win two consecutive World Cups: in 1934 on home soil, and in 1938 as captain, being named to the All-star Team. Meazza is widely considered one of the greatest footballers of all time, as well as being regarded by many in the sport as Italy's greatest ever player. Giuseppe Prisco and Gianni Brera considered him to be the greatest footballer of all time.

Central European Summer Time

Central European Summer Time

Central European Summer Time (CEST), sometimes referred to as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+02:00, which makes it the same as Eastern European Time, Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time, Egypt Standard Time and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.

Italy national football team

Italy national football team

The Italy national football team has represented Italy in international football since its first match in 1910. The national team is controlled by the Italian Football Federation (FIGC), the governing body for football in Italy, which is a co-founder and member of UEFA. Italy's home matches are played at various stadiums throughout Italy, and its primary training ground and technical headquarters, Centro Tecnico Federale di Coverciano, is located in Florence. Italy are the reigning European champions, having won UEFA Euro 2020.

Spain national football team

Spain national football team

The Spain national football team has represented Spain in international men's football competitions since 1920. It is governed by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain.

Florence

Florence

Florence is a city in Central Italy and the capital city of the Tuscany region. It is the most populated city in Tuscany, with 383,083 inhabitants in 2016, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.

Louis Baert

Louis Baert

Louis Andre Baert was an international football referee from Belgium, particularly active during the 1930s.

Statistics

Overall

As of 6 October 2021
Matches Wins Draws Goals
Italy Spain Italy Spain
FIFA World Cup 3 2 0 1 4 2
FIFA World Cup qualifiers 2 0 1 1 1 4
UEFA European Championship 7 2 1 4[a][b] 5 6
UEFA Nations League 1 0 1 0 1 2
FIFA Confederations Cup 1 0 0 1[c] 0 0
Summer Olympics 4 2 1 1 9 4
All competitions 18 6 4 8 20 18
Friendly 21 5 8 8 25 25
All matches 39 11 12 16 45 43
  1. ^ Spain defeated Italy in the Euro 2008 quarter-finals 4–2 on penalties after a 0–0 draw in 120 minutes.
  2. ^ Italy defeated Spain in the Euro 2020 semi-finals 4–2 on penalties after a 1–1 draw in 120 minutes.
  3. ^ Spain defeated Italy in the 2013 Confederations Cup semi-finals 7–6 on penalties after a 0–0 draw in 120 minutes.

Discover more about Statistics related topics

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The tournament has been held every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are Argentina, who won their third title at the 2022 tournament.

FIFA World Cup qualification

FIFA World Cup qualification

The FIFA World Cup qualification is a competitive match that a national association football team takes in order to qualify for one of the available berths at the final tournament of the men's FIFA World Cup.

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship

The UEFA European Football Championship, less formally the European Championship and informally the Euro, is the primary association football tournament organised by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). The competition is contested by UEFA members' senior men's national teams, determining the continental champion of Europe. It is the second-most watched football tournament in the world after the FIFA World Cup. The Euro 2012 final was watched by a global audience of around 300 million. The competition has been held every four years since 1960, except for 2020, when it was postponed until 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe, but kept the name Euro 2020. Scheduled to be in the even-numbered year between FIFA World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the European Nations' Cup, changing to the current name in 1968. Since 1996, the individual events have been branded as "UEFA Euro [year]".

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League

The UEFA Nations League is a biennial international football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the member associations of UEFA, the sport's European governing body.

FIFA Confederations Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup

The FIFA Confederations Cup was an international association football tournament for men's national teams, held every four years by FIFA. It was contested by the holders of each of the six continental championships, along with the current FIFA World Cup holder and the host nation, to bring the number of teams up to eight.

Football at the Summer Olympics

Football at the Summer Olympics

Football at the Summer Olympics, referred to as the Olympic Football Tournament, has been included in every Summer Olympic Games as a men's competition sport, except 1896 and 1932. Women's football was added to the official program at the Atlanta 1996 Games.

Exhibition game

Exhibition game

An exhibition game is a sporting event whose prize money and impact on the player's or the team's rankings is either zero or otherwise greatly reduced. In team sports, matches of this type are often used to help coaches and managers select and condition players for the competitive matches of a league season or tournament. If the players usually play in different teams in other leagues, exhibition games offer an opportunity for the players to learn to work with each other. The games can be held between separate teams or between parts of the same team.

UEFA Euro 2008

UEFA Euro 2008

The 2008 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2008 or simply Euro 2008, was the 13th UEFA European Championship, a quadrennial football tournament contested by the member nations of UEFA. It took place in Austria and Switzerland from 7 to 29 June 2008.

Penalty shoot-out (association football)

Penalty shoot-out (association football)

A penalty shoot-out is a tie-breaking method in association football to determine which team is awarded victory in a match that cannot end in a draw, when the score is tied after the normal time as well as extra time have expired. In a penalty shoot-out, each team takes turns shooting at goal from the penalty mark, with the goal defended only by the opposing team's goalkeeper. Each team has five shots which must be taken by different kickers; the team that makes more successful kicks is declared the victor. Shoot-outs finish as soon as one team has an insurmountable lead. If scores are level after five pairs of shots, the shootout progresses into additional "sudden-death" rounds. Balls successfully kicked into the goal during a shoot-out do not count as goals for the individual kickers or the team, and are tallied separately from the goals scored during normal play. Although the procedure for each individual kick in the shoot-out resembles that of a penalty kick, there are some differences. Most notably, neither the kicker nor any player other than the goalkeeper may play the ball again once it has been kicked.

UEFA Euro 2020

UEFA Euro 2020

The 2020 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2020 or simply Euro 2020, was the 16th UEFA European Championship, the quadrennial international men's football championship of Europe organised by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). To celebrate the 60th anniversary of the European Championship competition, UEFA president Michel Platini declared that the tournament would be hosted in several nations as a "romantic" one-off event, with 11 cities in 11 UEFA countries each providing venues for the tournament. Defending champions Portugal, who won UEFA Euro 2016 in France, were eliminated in the round of 16 by Belgium. Italy won their second European Championship title by beating England on penalties in the final following a 1–1 draw after extra time. The win came exactly on the 39th anniversary of Italy's 1982 FIFA World Cup Final win over West Germany.

2013 FIFA Confederations Cup

2013 FIFA Confederations Cup

The 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup was the ninth FIFA Confederations Cup, which was held in Brazil from 15 to 30 June 2013 as a prelude to the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The most recent winners of the six continental championships appeared in the tournament, along with hosts Brazil and UEFA Euro 2012 runners-up Italy, who qualified because the Euro 2012 winners, Spain, had also won the most recent FIFA World Cup in 2010 thus securing a spot in the tournament.

Source: "Italy–Spain football rivalry", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italy–Spain_football_rivalry.

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References
  1. ^ a b "El derbi mediterráneo: historia de una rivalidad entre las dos mejores selecciones Sub-21" [The Mediterranean derby: history of a rivalry between the two best Under-21 teams]. Sefutbol.com (in Spanish). Royal Spanish Football Federation. 26 June 2017. Retrieved 11 October 2018.
  2. ^ "Spain renews its rivalry with Italy". TSN.ca. 25 June 2016. Archived from the original on 4 July 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  3. ^ "Spain national football team: record v Italy". 11v11.com. AFS Enterprises. Retrieved 6 July 2021.
  4. ^ "Spain v Italy: UEFA Champions League finals". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 28 May 2015. Retrieved 29 June 2018.
  5. ^ "Cambiasso: Juventus only Italian club that lose to the Spanish". Forza Italian Football. 23 June 2017. Retrieved 29 June 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d Richard Martin (25 June 2016). "Italy v Spain: five unforgettable meetings". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  7. ^ "Luis Enrique full of respect". BBC Sport. 20 June 2002. Retrieved 16 July 2014.
  8. ^ Date set for Hendry decision; BBC Sport, 3 April 2001
  9. ^ "Full-time report Spain-Italy" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 22 June 2008. Retrieved 11 June 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g McNulty, Phil (1 July 2012). "Spain 4–0 Italy". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  11. ^ Rostance, Tom; Dawkes, Phil (2 July 2012). "Euro 2012 final: as it happened". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 4 July 2012.
  12. ^ "Full-time report Spain-Italy" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 10 June 2012. Retrieved 10 June 2012.
  13. ^ "Full-time report Spain–Italy" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 1 July 2012. Retrieved 1 July 2012.
  14. ^ "Match Report Spain-Italy". FIFA.com. Archived from the original on June 30, 2013.
  15. ^ Jim Foulerton (27 June 2016). "Dominant Italy brush aside champions Spain". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  16. ^ "David De Gea's save in Spain vs. Italy was a 'miracle' - Graziano Pelle". ESPNFC.com. 28 June 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  17. ^ "Full Time Summary – Italy v Spain" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 27 June 2016. Retrieved 27 June 2016.
  18. ^ "European teams learn World Cup qualifying fate". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 25 July 2015.
  19. ^ "World Cup 2018: Italy and the nightmare of their play-off against Sweden". bbc.com. 10 November 2017.
  20. ^ "Ogden: Isco superb as Spain beat Italy". espn.co.uk.
  21. ^ "Ignominious Italy out of World Cup". Football Italia. 13 November 2017.
  22. ^ "Full Time Summary – Italy v Spain" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 July 2021. Retrieved 6 July 2021.
  23. ^ Begley, Emlyn (6 October 2021). "La Roja end Azzurri's long unbeaten run to reach Nations League final". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation.
  24. ^ "Full Time Report – Semi-finals – Italy v Spain" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 October 2021. Retrieved 6 October 2021.
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