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It's Grim Up North

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"It's Grim Up North"
The JAMs - It's Grim Up North.jpg
Single by The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu
Released28 October 1991
RecordedTrancentral[1]
GenreIndustrial techno
Length4:04 (radio edit)
10:03 (extended)
LabelKLF Communications (UK)
Songwriter(s)Jimmy Cauty, Bill Drummond
Producer(s)The KLF
Drummond & Cauty singles chronology
"America: What Time Is Love?"
(1991)
"It's Grim Up North"
(1991)
"Justified & Ancient (Stand by The JAMs)"
(1991)

"It's Grim Up North" is a song by The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu (The JAMs). The song was originally released as a limited edition "Club Mix" in December 1990 with Pete Wylie on vocals. A re-recorded version with Bill Drummond on vocals was released commercially in October 1991. These recordings were the first releases by Drummond and his creative partner Jimmy Cauty under the JAMs moniker since the 1988 compilation album Shag Times, and the last under that name; in the meantime they had operated as the Timelords and the KLF. The 1991 single release reached No. 10 on the UK Singles Chart and entered the top 10 in Denmark and Finland.

The lyrics to "It's Grim Up North" list towns and cities in the North of England, set to a pounding industrial techno beat and percussion reminiscent of steam whistles. The 1991 version segues into an orchestral instrumental of the hymn "Jerusalem". A recurring theme of "It's Grim Up North" was drab greyness, representing the dreary, overcast skies of the "grim" North. The original single featuring Pete Wylie was pressed on grey vinyl, and the same colour was retained for the sleeve of the 1991 release. The video for "It's Grim Up North" was filmed in black and white, and shows The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu performing in the pouring rain.

"It's Grim Up North" was planned to be a prominent track on the JAM's album The Black Room, but the album was never completed.

Discover more about It's Grim Up North related topics

Pete Wylie

Pete Wylie

Peter James Wylie is an English singer/songwriter and guitarist, best known as the leader of the band variously known as Wah!, Wah! Heat, Shambeko! Say Wah!, JF Wah!, The Mighty Wah! and Wah! The Mongrel.

Bill Drummond

Bill Drummond

William Ernest Drummond is a Scottish artist, musician, writer and record producer. He was the co-founder of late 1980s avant-garde pop group The KLF and its 1990s media-manipulating successor, the K Foundation, with which he famously burned £1 million in 1994. More recent art activities, carried out under Drummond's chosen banner of the Penkiln Burn, include making and distributing cakes, soup, flowers, beds and shoe-shines. More recent music projects include No Music Day, and the international tour of a choir called The17. Drummond is the author of several books about art and music.

Jimmy Cauty

Jimmy Cauty

James Francis Cauty, also known as Rockman Rock, is an English artist and musician, best known as one-half of the duo The KLF, co-founder of The Orb and as the man who burnt £1 million.

Shag Times

Shag Times

Shag Times is a UK compilation and remix double album released in 1989 by The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu. The album also introduced Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty's new incarnation – and one which would become considerably more famous – The KLF.

The KLF

The KLF

The KLF are a British electronic band formed in London in 1987. Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty began by releasing hip hop-inspired and sample-heavy records as the JAMs. As the Timelords, they recorded the British number-one single "Doctorin' the Tardis", and documented the process of making a hit record in a book The Manual . As the KLF, Drummond and Cauty pioneered stadium house and, with their 1990 LP Chill Out, the ambient house genre. The KLF released a series of international hits on their own KLF Communications record label and became the biggest selling singles act in the world in 1991.

UK Singles Chart

UK Singles Chart

The UK Singles Chart is compiled by the Official Charts Company (OCC), on behalf of the British record industry, listing the top-selling singles in the United Kingdom, based upon physical sales, paid-for downloads and streaming. The Official Chart, broadcast on BBC Radio 1 and MTV, is the UK music industry's recognised official measure of singles and albums popularity because it is the most comprehensive research panel of its kind, today surveying over 15,000 retailers and digital services daily, capturing 99.9% of all singles consumed in Britain across the week, and over 98% of albums. To be eligible for the chart, a single is currently defined by the Official Charts Company (OCC) as either a 'single bundle' having no more than four tracks and not lasting longer than 25 minutes or one digital audio track not longer than 15 minutes with a minimum sale price of 40 pence. The rules have changed many times as technology has developed, the most notable being the inclusion of digital downloads in 2005 and streaming in July 2014.

Northern England

Northern England

Northern England, also known as the North of England, the North Country, or simply the North, is the northern area of England. It broadly corresponds to the former kingdom of Northumbria, similar to the Midlands with Mercia.

Industrial techno

Industrial techno

Industrial techno is a subgenre of techno and industrial dance music that originated in the 1990s. Characteristically, it incorporates influences from the bleak, noisy sound and aesthetics of early industrial music acts, particularly Cabaret Voltaire and Throbbing Gristle. American industrial music label Wax Trax! also had a profound influence over the genre's development. The genre has seen a resurgence in the 2010s, spearheaded by acts such as Adam X, Orphx, and Ancient Methods, and others later like Blawan and Karenn. As a result, it has gained a significant fanbase from the post-dubstep audience. It is not to be mistaken with Techno Industrial, which is in essence similar to the power noise/rhythmic noise subgenre. The different terminology is used depending if one is coming from a techno perspective or industrial perspective, with Industrial Techno having more techno-inspired rhythmic section with many reverb and wall-of-noise or sci-fi effects, while Techno Industrial is closer to rhythmic noise in composition, with a distorted rhythmic section. Other artists associated with industrial techno include Cut Hands, Helena Hauff, Forward Strategy Group, Surgeon, Michael Forshaw, Jeff Mills, Regis, Dominick Fernow and Mike Banks. Perc Trax record label has been credited with the revival of the genre in the UK, with artists such as Perc, Truss, Hppa and Ansome.

Steam whistle

Steam whistle

A steam whistle is a device used to produce sound with the aid of live steam, which acts as a vibrating system.

And did those feet in ancient time

And did those feet in ancient time

"And did those feet in ancient time" is a poem by William Blake from the preface to his epic Milton: A Poem in Two Books, one of a collection of writings known as the Prophetic Books. The date of 1804 on the title page is probably when the plates were begun, but the poem was printed c. 1808. Today it is best known as the hymn "Jerusalem", with music written by Sir Hubert Parry in 1916. The famous orchestration was written by Sir Edward Elgar. It is not to be confused with another poem, much longer and larger in scope and also by Blake, called Jerusalem The Emanation of the Giant Albion.

The Black Room (KLF album)

The Black Room (KLF album)

The Black Room is a never-completed album by The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu, intended to be the follow-up to their KLF album The White Room.

Background

Music-industry figure[2][3] Bill Drummond and artist/musician[3] Jimmy Cauty began recording together in 1987 as The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu (also known as The JAMs), naming themselves after the fictional conspiratorial group "The Justified Ancients of Mummu" from The Illuminatus! Trilogy.[4] In 1988 they had their first UK number one hit single - Doctorin' the Tardis - as The Timelords,[5][6] after which they transitioned into The KLF.[7] "It's Grim Up North" was released commercially by the Justified Ancients of Mu Mu in 1991, in the middle of a run of upbeat house records by the KLF[8] which would see Cauty and Drummond become the biggest-selling singles act in the world that year.[9]

Discover more about Background related topics

Bill Drummond

Bill Drummond

William Ernest Drummond is a Scottish artist, musician, writer and record producer. He was the co-founder of late 1980s avant-garde pop group The KLF and its 1990s media-manipulating successor, the K Foundation, with which he famously burned £1 million in 1994. More recent art activities, carried out under Drummond's chosen banner of the Penkiln Burn, include making and distributing cakes, soup, flowers, beds and shoe-shines. More recent music projects include No Music Day, and the international tour of a choir called The17. Drummond is the author of several books about art and music.

Jimmy Cauty

Jimmy Cauty

James Francis Cauty, also known as Rockman Rock, is an English artist and musician, best known as one-half of the duo The KLF, co-founder of The Orb and as the man who burnt £1 million.

The Illuminatus! Trilogy

The Illuminatus! Trilogy

The Illuminatus! Trilogy is a series of three novels by American writers Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson, first published in 1975. The trilogy is a satirical, postmodern, science fiction–influenced adventure story; a drug-, sex-, and magic-laden trek through a number of conspiracy theories, both historical and imaginary, related to the authors' version of the Illuminati. The narrative often switches between third- and first-person perspectives in a nonlinear narrative. It is thematically dense, covering topics like counterculture, numerology, and Discordianism.

Doctorin' the Tardis

Doctorin' the Tardis

"Doctorin' the Tardis" is a 1988 electronic novelty pop single by the Timelords. The song is predominantly a mash-up of the Doctor Who theme music and Gary Glitter's "Rock and Roll " with sections from "Blockbuster!" by Sweet. The single was not well received by critics but was a commercial success, hitting number one on the UK and New Zealand singles charts, and reaching the top 10 in Australia, Finland, Ireland and Norway.

House music

House music

House is a music genre characterized by a repetitive four-on-the-floor beat and a typical tempo of 120 beats per minute. It was created by DJs and music producers from Chicago's underground club culture in the late 1970s, as DJs began altering disco songs to give them a more mechanical beat.

Theme

A screenshot from the "It's Grim Up North" video, filmed in black and white. The JAMs perform in the rain, in the dark and "grim" North. Bill Drummond is pictured centre, Jimmy Cauty is on the far right and an unknown drummer is behind Cauty near the speakers.
A screenshot from the "It's Grim Up North" video, filmed in black and white. The JAMs perform in the rain, in the dark and "grim" North. Bill Drummond is pictured centre, Jimmy Cauty is on the far right and an unknown drummer is behind Cauty near the speakers.

"It's Grim Up North", with its markedly darker tone than the KLF records,[8] was planned to be a prominent track on the ultimately unreleased album The Black Room,[10] an album which Cauty said would be "so heavy it will just pin you to the floor"[11] and which Drummond said would be the "yang to the yin" of The White Room,[12] released in March 1991.[13]

A recurring theme of "It's Grim Up North" was drab greyness, representing the dreary, overcast skies of the "grim" North. The original issue featuring Pete Wylie was on grey vinyl,[14] and the same colour was retained for the sleeve of the 1991 release (pictured above). The video for "It's Grim Up North" was filmed in black and white, and shows The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu performing in the pouring rain.[15] King Boy D (Drummond) voices the words into the microphone of a backpack field radio worn by a child shop mannequin at his side wearing military uniform and a helmet labelled "KLF".[15] Rockman Rock (Cauty) is shown playing bass guitar as well as an unnamed drummer in the background wearing a hoodie.[15] Cars and trucks rush by, leaving a trail of spray because evidently The JAMs are performing on one lane of a road; they are lit by the headlights of several nearby stationary vehicles.[15] As the performance draws to a close, and the strains of Jerusalem can be heard, the slogan "The North will rise again" appears on screen.[15]

The sleevenotes further elaborated on The JAMs' inspiration: "Through the downpour and diesel roar, Rockman and Kingboy D can feel a regular dull thud. Whether this is the eternal echo of a Victorian steam driven revolution or the turbo kick of a distant Northern rave is irrelevant. Thus inspired, The JAMS climb into the back of their truck and work."[16]

Discover more about Theme related topics

The Black Room (KLF album)

The Black Room (KLF album)

The Black Room is a never-completed album by The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu, intended to be the follow-up to their KLF album The White Room.

The White Room (KLF album)

The White Room (KLF album)

The White Room is the fourth and final studio album by British electronic music group The KLF, released on 3 March 1991. The album features versions of the band's hit singles, including "What Time Is Love?", "3 a.m. Eternal", and "Last Train to Trancentral".

Pete Wylie

Pete Wylie

Peter James Wylie is an English singer/songwriter and guitarist, best known as the leader of the band variously known as Wah!, Wah! Heat, Shambeko! Say Wah!, JF Wah!, The Mighty Wah! and Wah! The Mongrel.

And did those feet in ancient time

And did those feet in ancient time

"And did those feet in ancient time" is a poem by William Blake from the preface to his epic Milton: A Poem in Two Books, one of a collection of writings known as the Prophetic Books. The date of 1804 on the title page is probably when the plates were begun, but the poem was printed c. 1808. Today it is best known as the hymn "Jerusalem", with music written by Sir Hubert Parry in 1916. The famous orchestration was written by Sir Edward Elgar. It is not to be confused with another poem, much longer and larger in scope and also by Blake, called Jerusalem The Emanation of the Giant Albion.

Rave

Rave

A rave is a dance party at a warehouse, club, or other public or private venue, typically featuring performances by DJs playing electronic dance music. The style is most associated with the early 1990s dance music scene when DJs played at illegal events in musical styles dominated by electronic dance music from a wide range of sub-genres, including techno, hardcore, house, and alternative dance. Occasionally live musicians have been known to perform at raves, in addition to other types of performance artists such as go-go dancers and fire dancers. The music is amplified with a large, powerful sound reinforcement system, typically with large subwoofers to produce a deep bass sound. The music is often accompanied by laser light shows, projected coloured images, visual effects and fog machines.

Composition

"It's Grim Up North (Part 1)" is a 10-minute composition with two distinct segueing sections. The seven-minute first section is a heavy, pounding industrial techno track, over which Drummond lists the names of some towns and cities in the North of England. Between verses, Drummond's distorted voice urgently alerts us that "It's grim up north". The instrumentation is in a minor key and is frequently discordant, featuring synthesised sounds reminiscent of passing heavy goods vehicles and train whistles. Although the underlying rhythm keeps a 4/4 time signature, several instruments keep 3/16 and 3/4 time throughout the track, including a deep second drum line—the "regular dull thud"—which juxtaposes when the 4/4 instruments and percussion drop out. The second section is a fully orchestrated arrangement of Jerusalem, with the sounds of brass, strings, organs, drums and choir. The instrumentation and vocals of the first section gradually diminish to nothing over a period of nearly two minutes. Following the climax of the hymn, howling wind and crow calls are heard and then fade out.[17]

"It's Grim Up North (Part 2)" is a six-minute reprise of the techno themes from Part 1, without the vocals and orchestra.[17] The CD single track "Jerusalem on the Moors" comprises the orchestral arrangement of Jerusalem, beginning alongside a fadeout of the industrial techno instrumentation.[17]

Discover more about Composition related topics

Industrial techno

Industrial techno

Industrial techno is a subgenre of techno and industrial dance music that originated in the 1990s. Characteristically, it incorporates influences from the bleak, noisy sound and aesthetics of early industrial music acts, particularly Cabaret Voltaire and Throbbing Gristle. American industrial music label Wax Trax! also had a profound influence over the genre's development. The genre has seen a resurgence in the 2010s, spearheaded by acts such as Adam X, Orphx, and Ancient Methods, and others later like Blawan and Karenn. As a result, it has gained a significant fanbase from the post-dubstep audience. It is not to be mistaken with Techno Industrial, which is in essence similar to the power noise/rhythmic noise subgenre. The different terminology is used depending if one is coming from a techno perspective or industrial perspective, with Industrial Techno having more techno-inspired rhythmic section with many reverb and wall-of-noise or sci-fi effects, while Techno Industrial is closer to rhythmic noise in composition, with a distorted rhythmic section. Other artists associated with industrial techno include Cut Hands, Helena Hauff, Forward Strategy Group, Surgeon, Michael Forshaw, Jeff Mills, Regis, Dominick Fernow and Mike Banks. Perc Trax record label has been credited with the revival of the genre in the UK, with artists such as Perc, Truss, Hppa and Ansome.

Time signature

Time signature

The time signature is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats (pulses) are contained in each measure (bar), and which note value is equivalent to a beat.

Northern England

Northern England

Northern England, also known as the North of England, the North Country, or simply the North, is the northern area of England. It broadly corresponds to the former kingdom of Northumbria, similar to the Midlands with Mercia.

Arrangement

Arrangement

In music, an arrangement is a musical adaptation of an existing composition. Differences from the original composition may include reharmonization, melodic paraphrasing, orchestration, or formal development. Arranging differs from orchestration in that the latter process is limited to the assignment of notes to instruments for performance by an orchestra, concert band, or other musical ensemble. Arranging "involves adding compositional techniques, such as new thematic material for introductions, transitions, or modulations, and endings. Arranging is the art of giving an existing melody musical variety". In jazz, a memorized (unwritten) arrangement of a new or pre-existing composition is known as a head arrangement.

Crow

Crow

A crow is a bird of the genus Corvus, or more broadly a synonym for all of Corvus. Crows are generally black in colour. The word "crow" is used as part of the common name of many species. The related term "raven" is not pinned scientifically to any certain trait, but is rather a general grouping for larger Corvus spp.

Reprise

Reprise

In music, a reprise is the repetition or reiteration of the opening material later in a composition as occurs in the recapitulation of sonata form, though—originally in the 18th century—was simply any repeated section, such as is indicated by beginning and ending repeat signs.

Release

"It's Grim Up North" was first previewed in December 1990, as a limited edition "Club Mix" with Pete Wylie on vocals.[7][18] A re-recorded version with Bill Drummond on vocals received a regular release on KLF Communications in October 1991,[7] peaking at No. 10 on the UK Singles Chart.[19] These recordings were the first releases under The KLF's "JAMs" pseudonym since the 1988 compilation album Shag Times, and were to be the last under that name.[7]

The JAMs used a photograph of graffiti reading "It's Grim Up North" to advertise their single in the 2 November 1991 edition of the NME;[20] the graffiti – painted on a bridge over the northbound carriageway of the M1 motorway – had been the subject of an early day motion in the British House of Commons on 21 October 1991.[21][22] The JAMs "categorically denied" to the same publication that they were responsible for the vandalism.[22][18]

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Pete Wylie

Pete Wylie

Peter James Wylie is an English singer/songwriter and guitarist, best known as the leader of the band variously known as Wah!, Wah! Heat, Shambeko! Say Wah!, JF Wah!, The Mighty Wah! and Wah! The Mongrel.

UK Singles Chart

UK Singles Chart

The UK Singles Chart is compiled by the Official Charts Company (OCC), on behalf of the British record industry, listing the top-selling singles in the United Kingdom, based upon physical sales, paid-for downloads and streaming. The Official Chart, broadcast on BBC Radio 1 and MTV, is the UK music industry's recognised official measure of singles and albums popularity because it is the most comprehensive research panel of its kind, today surveying over 15,000 retailers and digital services daily, capturing 99.9% of all singles consumed in Britain across the week, and over 98% of albums. To be eligible for the chart, a single is currently defined by the Official Charts Company (OCC) as either a 'single bundle' having no more than four tracks and not lasting longer than 25 minutes or one digital audio track not longer than 15 minutes with a minimum sale price of 40 pence. The rules have changed many times as technology has developed, the most notable being the inclusion of digital downloads in 2005 and streaming in July 2014.

The KLF

The KLF

The KLF are a British electronic band formed in London in 1987. Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty began by releasing hip hop-inspired and sample-heavy records as the JAMs. As the Timelords, they recorded the British number-one single "Doctorin' the Tardis", and documented the process of making a hit record in a book The Manual . As the KLF, Drummond and Cauty pioneered stadium house and, with their 1990 LP Chill Out, the ambient house genre. The KLF released a series of international hits on their own KLF Communications record label and became the biggest selling singles act in the world in 1991.

Shag Times

Shag Times

Shag Times is a UK compilation and remix double album released in 1989 by The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu. The album also introduced Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty's new incarnation – and one which would become considerably more famous – The KLF.

NME

NME

New Musical Express (NME) is a British music, film, gaming, and culture website and brand. Founded as a newspaper in 1952, with the publication being referred to as a 'rock inkie', the NME would become a magazine that ended up as a free publication, before becoming an online brand which includes its website and radio stations.

M1 motorway

M1 motorway

The M1 motorway connects London to Leeds, where it joins the A1(M) near Aberford, to connect to Newcastle. It was the first inter-urban motorway to be completed in the UK; the first motorway in the country was the Preston By-pass, which later became part of the M6.

Early day motion

Early day motion

In the Westminster parliamentary system, an early day motion (EDM) is a motion, expressed as a single sentence, tabled by members of Parliament that formally calls for debate "on an early day". In practice, they are rarely debated in the House and their main purpose is to draw attention to particular subjects of interest. Government ministers, Whips, Parliamentary Private Secretaries, the Speaker of the House of Commons and Deputy Speakers do not normally sign EDMs. EDMs remain open for signature for the duration of the parliamentary session.

Critical reception

Record Mirror hailed the original club version as "the hardest rave track of the year" and as "one mind-blowing mental onslaught".[11]

In awarding the 1991 release "single of the week", NME said: "The Scotsman [Drummond] picks over the place names with gruesome relish, the backing track pummels and tweaks, blasts and buffets him round the furthest God-forsaken reaches of this demi-paradise, this land of kings, this sceptred isle, this England... A thing of feverish, fiendish irreverence and conceptual genius...".[18]

In a 2007 article on songs about northern England, The Guardian said that "It's Grim Up North" "wrongfoots the listener. A deadpan catalogue of northern towns, recited over rainy-motorway techno, suddenly blossoms into a rendition of Blake's Jerusalem, as if arriving at some socialist rave utopia.".[23]

In 2005, Freaky Trigger placed it at number 81 in their list of "The Top 100 Songs of All Time," with a writer for the webzine saying the record is "not a fucking joke. It’s the best British single of the 1990s."[24] In 1999, the website's founder Tom Ewing also included the song at number 75 in his list of the "Top 100 Singles of the 1990s", saying "“It’s Grim Up North” is a document of one of pop's most individual bands at their imaginative peak. It boils down to a man in his late 30s, and a mate, doing exactly what they want to do, without fear or compromise or cant, and getting it into the Top 40 to boot. And that makes this not only an excellent single, but a genuinely inspirational one".[25]

Locations

  • In order of counties these villages/towns/cities/suburbs which are mentioned in the song are in:

All locations are in the north of England, predominantly in Cheshire, Yorkshire, Lancashire, Merseyside and Greater Manchester. With certain mentions of parts of Cumbria, Derbyshire, North Lincolnshire and North-East Lincolnshire also mentioned. These include Barrow-in-Furness, Glossop, Buxton, Grimsby, Cleethorpes and Scunthorpe. Although Derbyshire is actually in the East Midlands Region it is likely that, due to their proximity to the areas in question, KLF mentioned them. [26] The full list of locations are found in the lyrics, announced by Drummond.[17]

First verse

"Bolton, Barnsley, Nelson, Colne, Burnley, Bradford, Buxton, Crewe, Warrington, Widnes, Wigan, Leeds, Northwich, Nantwich, Knutsford, Hull, Sale, Salford, Southport, Leigh, Kirkby, Kearsley, Keighley, Maghull, Harrogate, Huddersfield, Oldham, Lancs (Lancaster), Grimsby, Glossop, Hebden Bridge."

Second verse

"Brighouse, Bootle, Featherstone, Speke, Runcorn, Rotherham, Rochdale, Barrow, Morecambe, Macclesfield, Lytham St Annes, Clitheroe, Cleethorpes, the M62."
(Note: this verse appears in the full length version only; it is not present on the radio edit.)

Third verse

"Pendlebury, Prestwich, Preston, York, Skipton, Scunthorpe, Scarborough-on-Sea, Chester, Chorley, Cheadle Hulme (could also be interpreted as the equally valid Cheadle, Hulme), Ormskirk, Accrington, Stanley (could also be interpreted as the football club, Accrington Stanley F.C.), and Leigh, Ossett, Otley, Ilkley Moor, Sheffield, Manchester, Castleford, Skem (Skelmersdale), Doncaster, Dewsbury, Halifax, Bingley, Bramhall, are all in the North."

Discover more about Locations related topics

Cheshire

Cheshire

Cheshire is a ceremonial and historic county in northwest England, bordered by Wales to the west, Merseyside and Greater Manchester to the north, Derbyshire to the east, and Staffordshire and Shropshire to the south. Cheshire's county town is the cathedral city of Chester, while its largest town by population is Warrington. Other towns in the county include Alsager, Congleton, Crewe, Ellesmere Port, Frodsham, Knutsford, Macclesfield, Middlewich, Nantwich, Neston, Northwich, Poynton, Runcorn, Sandbach, Widnes, Wilmslow, and Winsford.

Chester

Chester

Chester is a cathedral city and the county town of Cheshire, England. It is located on the River Dee, close to the English-Welsh border. With a population of 79,645 in 2011, it is the most populous settlement of Cheshire West and Chester and serves as its administrative headquarters. It is also the historic county town of Cheshire and the second-largest settlement in Cheshire after Warrington.

Crewe

Crewe

Crewe is a railway town and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East in Cheshire, England. The Crewe built-up area had a total population of 75,556 in 2011, which also covers parts of the adjacent civil parishes of Willaston, Shavington cum Gresty and Wistaston.

Cumbria

Cumbria

Cumbria is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in North West England, bordering Scotland. The county and Cumbria County Council, its local government, came into existence in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972. Cumbria's county town is Carlisle, in the north of the county. Other major settlements include Barrow-in-Furness, Kendal, Whitehaven and Workington.

Barrow-in-Furness

Barrow-in-Furness

Barrow-in-Furness is a port town in Cumbria, England. Historically in Lancashire, it was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1867 and merged with Dalton-in-Furness Urban District in 1974 to form the Borough of Barrow-in-Furness. In 2023 the borough will merge with Eden and South Lakeland districts to form a new unitary authority; Westmorland and Furness. At the tip of the Furness peninsula, close to the Lake District, it is bordered by Morecambe Bay, the Duddon Estuary and the Irish Sea. In 2011, Barrow's population was 56,745, making it the second largest urban area in Cumbria after Carlisle. Natives of Barrow, as well as the local dialect, are known as Barrovian.

Derbyshire

Derbyshire

Derbyshire is a ceremonial county in the East Midlands, England. It includes much of the Peak District National Park, the southern end of the Pennine range of hills and part of the National Forest. It borders Greater Manchester to the north-west, West Yorkshire to the north, South Yorkshire to the north-east, Nottinghamshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south-east, Staffordshire to the west and south-west and Cheshire to the west.

Buxton

Buxton

Buxton is a spa town in the Borough of High Peak, Derbyshire, England. It is England's highest market town, sited at some 1,000 feet (300 m) above sea level. It lies close to Cheshire to the west and Staffordshire to the south, on the edge of the Peak District National Park. In 1974, the municipal borough merged with other nearby boroughs, including Glossop, to form the local government district and borough of High Peak.

Glossop

Glossop

Glossop is a market town in the Borough of High Peak, Derbyshire, England. It is located 15 miles (24 km) east of Manchester, 24 miles (39 km) north-west of Sheffield and 32 miles (51 km) north of the county town, Matlock. Glossop lies near Derbyshire's borders with Cheshire, Greater Manchester, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire. It is between 150 and 300 metres above sea level and is bounded by the Peak District National Park to the south, east and north.

East Riding of Yorkshire

East Riding of Yorkshire

The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is a ceremonial county and unitary authority area in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. It borders North Yorkshire to the north and west, South Yorkshire to the south-west, and Lincolnshire to the south.

Humberside

Humberside

Humberside was a non-metropolitan and ceremonial county in Northern England from 1 April 1974 until 1 April 1996. It was composed of land from either side of the Humber Estuary, created from portions of the East Riding of Yorkshire, West Riding of Yorkshire, and the northern part of Lindsey, Lincolnshire. The county council's headquarters was County Hall at Beverley, inherited from East Riding County Council. Its largest settlement and only city was Kingston upon Hull. Other notable towns included Goole, Beverley, Scunthorpe, Grimsby, Cleethorpes and Bridlington. The county stretched from Wold Newton in its northern tip to a different Wold Newton at its most southern point.

Greater Manchester

Greater Manchester

Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county and combined authority area in North West England, with a population of 2.8 million; comprising ten metropolitan boroughs: Manchester, Salford, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan. The county was created on 1 April 1974, as a result of the Local Government Act 1972, and designated a functional city region on 1 April 2011. Greater Manchester is formed of parts of the historic counties of Cheshire, Lancashire and the West Riding of Yorkshire.

Bolton

Bolton

Bolton is a large town in Greater Manchester in North West England, formerly a part of Lancashire. A former mill town, Bolton has been a production centre for textiles since Flemish weavers settled in the area in the 14th century, introducing a wool and cotton-weaving tradition. The urbanisation and development of the town largely coincided with the introduction of textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution. Bolton was a 19th-century boomtown and, at its zenith in 1929, its 216 cotton mills and 26 bleaching and dyeing works made it one of the largest and most productive centres of cotton spinning in the world. The British cotton industry declined sharply after the First World War and, by the 1980s, cotton manufacture had virtually ceased in Bolton.

Formats and track listings

"It's Grim Up North" was originally released as a limited-edition one-side promotional 12" on 17 December 1990. Reworked with Drummond's vocals, the track was given a European single release on 28 October 1991.[7] The CD single track "Jerusalem on the Moors" comprises the orchestral arrangement of Jerusalem, beginning alongside a fadeout of the industrial techno instrumentation.[17] The single's formats and track listings are tabulated below:[7]

Format (and countries) Track number
1 2 3 4
One-sided 12" promo single (UK) (limited edition of 350) O
7" single (UK, Germany, Denmark, Belgium), cassette single (UK) p1 p2
12" single (UK, Germany, Denmark, Belgium) P1 P2
CD single (UK, Germany, Denmark) p1 P1 P2 J

Key

  • O – "It's Grim up North" (original club mix) (8:38)
  • p1 – "It's Grim up North (Part 1)" (radio edit) (4:04)
  • P1 – "It's Grim up North (Part 1)" (10:03)
  • p2 – "It's Grim up North (Part 2)" (radio edit) (3:37)
  • P2 – "It's Grim up North (Part 2)" (6:13)
  • J – "Jerusalem on the Moors" (3:04)

Personnel (1991 commercial release)

All songs written by Jimmy Cauty and Bill Drummond.

Source: JAMS 028CD sleeve notes[1]

Discover more about Personnel (1991 commercial release) related topics

Charts

Chart (1991–1992) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[27] 136
Denmark (IFPI)[28] 9
Europe (Eurochart Hot 100)[29] 34
Finland (Suomen virallinen lista)[30] 5
Switzerland (Schweizer Hitparade)[31] 26
UK Singles (OCC)[32] 10

Discover more about Charts related topics

ARIA Charts

ARIA Charts

The ARIA Charts are the main Australian music sales charts, issued weekly by the Australian Recording Industry Association. The charts are a record of the highest selling songs and albums in various genres in Australia. ARIA became the official Australian music chart in June 1988, succeeding the Kent Music Report, which had been Australia's national music sales charts since 1974.

IFPI Danmark

IFPI Danmark

IFPI Danmark is the Danish branch of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) and is the official charts provider and recording sales certification body for Denmark.

European Hot 100 Singles

European Hot 100 Singles

The European Hot 100 Singles was compiled by Billboard and Music & Media magazine from March 1984 until December 2010. The chart was based on national singles sales charts in 17 European countries: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

The Official Finnish Charts

The Official Finnish Charts

The Official Finnish Charts are national record charts in Finland compiled and published by Musiikkituottajat – IFPI Finland. The name Suomen virallinen lista/Finlands officiella lista, which is singular in both Finnish and Swedish, is used generically to refer to both the albums and the singles chart, and the context reveals which chart is meant.

Swiss Hitparade

Swiss Hitparade

The Swiss Hitparade is Switzerland's main music sales charts. The charts are a record of the highest-selling singles and albums in various genres in Switzerland.

UK Singles Chart

UK Singles Chart

The UK Singles Chart is compiled by the Official Charts Company (OCC), on behalf of the British record industry, listing the top-selling singles in the United Kingdom, based upon physical sales, paid-for downloads and streaming. The Official Chart, broadcast on BBC Radio 1 and MTV, is the UK music industry's recognised official measure of singles and albums popularity because it is the most comprehensive research panel of its kind, today surveying over 15,000 retailers and digital services daily, capturing 99.9% of all singles consumed in Britain across the week, and over 98% of albums. To be eligible for the chart, a single is currently defined by the Official Charts Company (OCC) as either a 'single bundle' having no more than four tracks and not lasting longer than 25 minutes or one digital audio track not longer than 15 minutes with a minimum sale price of 40 pence. The rules have changed many times as technology has developed, the most notable being the inclusion of digital downloads in 2005 and streaming in July 2014.

Source: "It's Grim Up North", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It's_Grim_Up_North.

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References
  1. ^ a b The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu (1991). It's Grim Up North (Sleeve notes). KLF Communications. JAMS 028CD.
  2. ^ "Big in Japan – Where are they now?". Q. January 1992. Archived (via the Library of Mu) on 16 September 2016.Wikipedia:WikiProject The KLF/LibraryOfMu/271
  3. ^ a b Harrison, Andrew (27 April 2017). "Return of the KLF: 'They were agents of chaos. Now the world they anticipated is here'". The Guardian.
  4. ^ Cranna, Ian (1987). "1987 (What the Fuck Is Going On?) review". Q. Archived (via the Library of Mu) on 4 October 2016.Wikipedia:WikiProject The KLF/LibraryOfMu/479
  5. ^ Paphides, Peter (22 February 2004). "Making the law". The Observer Music Monthly. Archived from the original on 23 February 2004.
  6. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Longmire, Ernie; et al. (2020) [1998]. "Discography: The KLF (including The JAMS, The Timelords, 2K etc.)". Archived from the original on 29 February 2020.
  8. ^ a b Medsker, David (6 August 2008). "White Label Wednesday: The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu, It's Grim Up North (Part 1)". PopDose. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  9. ^ Bush, John. KLF at AllMusic. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  10. ^ Drummond, Bill (September 1991). "Bomlagadafshipoing" (Interview). Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation Radio 2. Transcript archived (via the Library of Mu) on 16 September 2016.Wikipedia:WikiProject The KLF/LibraryOfMu/521
  11. ^ a b Blackmore, Richie (29 December 1990). "Pump Up The Jams". Record Mirror. Archived (via the Library of Mu) on 16 September 2016.Wikipedia:WikiProject The KLF/LibraryOfMu/176
  12. ^ Longmire, Ernie ("Lazlo Nibble") (1 April 1991). "KLF is Gonna Rock Ya!". X Magazine (Interview with Bill Drummond). Archived (via the Library of Mu) on 16 September 2016.Wikipedia:WikiProject The KLF/LibraryOfMu/229
  13. ^ Bush, John. The White Room – The KLF at AllMusic. Retrieved 7 March 2020.
  14. ^ "The KLF: Enigmatic Dance Duo". Record Collector. 1 April 1991. Archived (via the Library of Mu) on 16 September 2016.Wikipedia:WikiProject The KLF/LibraryOfMu/226
  15. ^ a b c d e The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu (1991). It's Grim Up North (Music Video). KLF Communications.
  16. ^ "The Black Room – The JAMs (KLF BIOG-011)". KLF Communications. November 1990. Archived (via the Library of Mu) on 16 September 2016.Wikipedia:WikiProject The KLF/LibraryOfMu/511
  17. ^ a b c d e The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu (1991). It's Grim Up North (CD). KLF Communications. JAMS 028CD.
  18. ^ a b c "It's Grim Up North". NME (Single of the Week). 2 November 1991. Archived (via the Library of Mu) on 16 September 2016.Wikipedia:WikiProject The KLF/LibraryOfMu/257
  19. ^ "JUSTIFIED ANCIENTS OF MU MU | full Official Chart History". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  20. ^ ""It's Grim Up North" Graffiti Advert". NME (advertisement). 2 November 1991.
  21. ^ "MOTORWAY GRAFFITI – Early Day Motions" (Early Day Motion by Joe Ashton MP). House of Commons. 21 October 1991. Retrieved 29 February 2020. That this House calls on the Secretary of State for Transport to remove the huge white painted graffiti on the bridge over the M1 on the northbound carriageway just north of the M25 junction which reads – Its Grim Up North, or alternatively arrange to add the words, Gruesome in the Midlands, and Nowt but Homeless Folk in Cardboard Boxes in London, to restore a fair regional balance during the next election.
  22. ^ a b "The JAMs: centre of political interest". NME. 9 November 1991. Archived (via the Library of Mu) on 16 September 2016.Wikipedia:WikiProject The KLF/LibraryOfMu/258
  23. ^ Lynskey, Dorian (7 September 2007). "Readers recommend ... Songs about northern England". The Guardian. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  24. ^ "top 100 songs of all time – FreakyTrigger". Freaky Trigger. 1 September 2005. Retrieved 14 February 2017.
  25. ^ Ewing, Tom (12 September 1999). "75. THE JUSTIFIED ANCIENTS OF MU MU – "It's Grim Up North"". Freaky Trigger. Retrieved 7 January 2017.
  26. ^ "A Map Of Every Place Mentioned In "It's Grim Up North"". BuzzFeed. 4 June 2013. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  27. ^ "Bubbling Down Under Week Commencing November 25, 1991". Bubbling Down Under. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  28. ^ "Top 10 Sales in Europe" (PDF). Music & Media. Vol. 9, no. 2. 11 January 1992. p. 18. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  29. ^ "Eurochart Hot 100 Singles" (PDF). Music & Media. Vol. 8, no. 48. 30 November 1991. p. 25. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  30. ^ Nyman, Jake (2005). Suomi soi 4: Suuri suomalainen listakirja (in Finnish) (1st ed.). Helsinki: Tammi. ISBN 951-31-2503-3.
  31. ^ "The Jams - The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu – It's Grim Up North". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved 8 April 2020.
  32. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 8 April 2020.

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