Get Our Extension

International College, Beirut

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
International College
انترناشونال كولدج
Location

Information
TypeIndependent(Private)
Established1891
Head of SchoolJoel Peinado
GradesNursery-->12th Grade
EnrollmentOver 3500
Average class size24 students
Color(s)Green and White
SongAlma Mater
AthleticsFootball, Basketball, Rugby, Tennis, Archery, Swimming, Volleyball, Track and Field, Badminton, Gymnastics
MascotCougar
NewspaperInside IC
YearbookTorch
Tuition±$9,500-$14,000
Websiteic.edu.lb

International College (Arabic: انترناشونال كولدج), Beirut, Lebanon, is an independent non-profit international school. Its students come from all over Lebanon, as well as the Middle-East and around the world. With two campuses, one in the Lebanese capital Beirut and the other in the urban hillsides (Ain Aar), the school educates over 3,500 students each year. The school was established in 1891 and is chartered in Massachusetts, US.

Discover more about International College, Beirut related topics

Beirut

Beirut

Beirut is the capital and largest city of Lebanon. As of 2014, Greater Beirut has a population of 2.5 million, which makes it the third-largest city in the Levant region. The city is situated on a peninsula at the midpoint of Lebanon's Mediterranean coast. Beirut has been inhabited for more than 5,000 years, and was one of Phoenicia's most prominent city states, making it one of the oldest cities in the world. The first historical mention of Beirut is found in the Amarna letters from the New Kingdom of Egypt, which date to the 14th century BC.

Lebanon

Lebanon

Lebanon, officially the Republic of Lebanon or the Lebanese Republic, is a country in Western Asia. It is located between Syria to the north and east and Israel to the south, while Cyprus lies to its west across the Mediterranean Sea; its location at the crossroads of the Mediterranean Basin and the Arabian hinterland has contributed to its rich history and shaped a cultural identity of religious diversity. It is part of the Levant region of the Middle East. Lebanon is home to roughly five million people and covers an area of 10,452 square kilometres (4,036 sq mi), making it the second smallest country in continental Asia. The official language of the state is Arabic, while French is also formally recognized; the Lebanese Arabic is used alongside Modern Standard Arabic throughout the country.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts

Massachusetts, officially the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the Northeastern United States. It borders on the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Maine to the east, Connecticut and Rhode Island to the south, New Hampshire and Vermont to the north, and New York to the west. Massachusetts is the 6th smallest state by land area but is the 15th most populous state and the 3rd most densely populated, after New Jersey and Rhode Island. The state's capital and most populous city, as well as its cultural and financial center, is Boston. Massachusetts is also home to the urban core of Greater Boston, the largest metropolitan area in New England and a region profoundly influential upon American history, academia, and the research economy. Originally dependent on agriculture, fishing, and trade. Massachusetts was transformed into a manufacturing center during the Industrial Revolution. During the 20th century, Massachusetts's economy shifted from manufacturing to services. Modern Massachusetts is a global leader in biotechnology, engineering, higher education, finance, and maritime trade.

History

The International College was founded in Smyrna (now İzmir), Turkey in 1891, by Alexander MacLachlan, a Canadian educator, as the American Boys’ School. The first class of five students graduated in 1895, and it was renamed the American Collegiate Institute for Boys.

In 1913, IC opened an elementary school, and added the French language Section Secondaire in 1926.

In 1936, Dr. Bayard Dodge of the American University of Beirut invited IC to come to Beirut and affiliate with AUB as its preparatory school. As a result, IC was known for many years as "The Prep." During its first year in Beirut, IC had 901 students from 37 countries representing 16 religious sects. IC had students from all over the Middle East, who came as boarders living in Thomson and Sage Halls.

IC separated from AUB in the 1960s, naming a separate board of trustees and admitted women to become a co-educational institution.

During the Lebanese Civil War under the leadership of Dr. Alton Reynolds, students and teachers of all religious sects continued to attend classes in Ras Beirut. It evolved to become a leading institution of education in the Middle East with the inspiration of some exemplary Directors such as Mr. Sadik Umar and Mr. Elie Kurban.

In 1988, a satellite campus was constructed in Ain A’ar, far from Beirut, to accommodate the children of alumni in that area. The Ain A’ar campus continues to serve students from pre-school through middle school.

In 1997, IC achieved dual accreditation by the Council of International Schools and the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

Discover more about History related topics

Smyrna

Smyrna

Smyrna was a Greek city located at a strategic point on the Aegean coast of Anatolia. Due to its advantageous port conditions, its ease of defence, and its good inland connections, Smyrna rose to prominence. The name of the city since about 1930 is İzmir.

İzmir

İzmir

İzmir, also spelled Izmir, is a metropolitan city in the western extremity of Anatolia, capital of the province of the same name. It is the third most populous city in Turkey, after Istanbul and Ankara and the second largest urban agglomeration on the Aegean Sea after Athens.

Turkey

Turkey

Turkey, officially the Republic of Türkiye, is a transcontinental country located mainly on the Anatolian Peninsula in Western Asia, with a small portion on the Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe. It borders the Black Sea to the north; Georgia to the northeast; Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Iran to the east; Iraq to the southeast; Syria and the Mediterranean Sea to the south; the Aegean Sea to the west; and Greece and Bulgaria to the northwest. Cyprus is off the south coast. Most people are Turks, and Kurds are the largest minority. Ankara is Turkey's capital, while Istanbul is its largest city and financial centre.

Canadians

Canadians

Canadians are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical or cultural. For most Canadians, many of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being Canadian.

French language

French language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the Latin spoken in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

American University of Beirut

American University of Beirut

The American University of Beirut (AUB) is a private, non-sectarian, and independent university chartered in New York with its campus in Beirut, Lebanon. AUB is governed by a private, autonomous board of trustees and offers programs leading to bachelor's, master's, MD, and PhD degrees.

Beirut

Beirut

Beirut is the capital and largest city of Lebanon. As of 2014, Greater Beirut has a population of 2.5 million, which makes it the third-largest city in the Levant region. The city is situated on a peninsula at the midpoint of Lebanon's Mediterranean coast. Beirut has been inhabited for more than 5,000 years, and was one of Phoenicia's most prominent city states, making it one of the oldest cities in the world. The first historical mention of Beirut is found in the Amarna letters from the New Kingdom of Egypt, which date to the 14th century BC.

Lebanese Civil War

Lebanese Civil War

The Lebanese Civil War was a multifaceted armed conflict that took place from 1975 to 1990. It resulted in an estimated 120,000 fatalities and an exodus of almost one million people from Lebanon.

Alumni

Alumni

Alumni are former students of a school, college, or university who have either attended or graduated in some fashion from the institution. The feminine plural alumnae is sometimes used for groups of women. The word is Latin and means "one who is being nourished". The term is not synonymous with "graduate"; one can be an alumnus without graduating. The term is sometimes used to refer to a former employee or member of an organization, contributor, or inmate.

Council of International Schools

Council of International Schools

The Council of International Schools (CIS) is a membership organization aimed at international education.

New England Association of Schools and Colleges

New England Association of Schools and Colleges

The New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. (NEASC) is a United States' regional accreditation association providing educational accreditation. NEASC serves over 1500 public, independent schools, and technical/career institutions in the six New England states, the United States, plus international schools in more than 85 nations worldwide. Its headquarters is in Burlington, Massachusetts.

Schools

All content is taught using the target languages of Arabic, English and French and works within the PYP curricular framework.

The Elementary School covers grades one through five (ages six to eleven). The medium of instruction is either English or French, although Arabic is mandatory for all students. An Arabic program is made available in IC to students who have lived abroad and qualify for exemption from the regular programs.

The Middle School is a four-year cycle covering grades 6 through 9. It offers three programs: the Lebanese Program prepares students for the official Lebanese Brevet examination; the College Preparatory Program is an English medium non-Brevet program; and the French Program is non-Brevet program taught in French that prepares the student for the official French Baccalaureate examination. All programs require the teaching of Arabic, English, French, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Physical Education, Arts, Information Technology (IT), Music and Theatre Courses. Grades 6,7, and 8 also receive Technology instruction. 1

The Secondary School is a three-year cycle made up of four separate programs: The Lebanese Baccalaureate Program which follows a curriculum set by the Lebanese Ministry of Education; The French Baccalaureate Program which follows a curriculum set by the French Ministry of Education; the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program; and The American College Preparatory Program (CPP), a non-baccalaureate diploma program.

IC's Ain Aar campus holds two schools. The Lower School for students from nursery to Grade 3 and the Upper School for students from Grade 4 to Grade 9 inclusive. Both Ain Aar schools follow the same curriculum as applied in the Ras Beirut campus.

Discover more about Schools related topics

English language

English language

English is a West Germanic language in the Indo-European language family, with its earliest forms spoken by the inhabitants of early medieval England. It is named after the Angles, one of the ancient Germanic peoples that migrated to the island of Great Britain. Existing on a dialect continuum with Scots, and then most closely related to the Low German and Frisian languages, English is genealogically Germanic. However, its vocabulary also shows major influences from French and Latin, plus some grammar and a small amount of core vocabulary influenced by Old Norse. Speakers of English are called Anglophones.

French language

French language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the Latin spoken in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

Mathematics

Mathematics

Mathematics is an area of knowledge that includes the topics of numbers, formulas and related structures, shapes and the spaces in which they are contained, and quantities and their changes. These topics are represented in modern mathematics with the major subdisciplines of number theory, algebra, geometry, and analysis, respectively. There is no general consensus among mathematicians about a common definition for their academic discipline.

Science

Science

Science is a systematic endeavor that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.

Secondary School programs

The Lebanese Baccalaureate Program, which follows a curriculum set by the Lebanese Ministry of Education, is available to all students in either an English or French track for core subjects including math and sciences. In the French track, English is taught as a third language and vice versa. In both tracks, Social Studies, History, Geography, Civics, Sociology and Economics, are taught in Arabic with the study of Arabic literature and language mandatory. In the second year, students chose a focus in humanities or sciences, and specialize in the third year.

The French Baccalaureate Program, which follows a curriculum set by the French Ministry of Education, is designed to meet the needs of foreign and Lebanese students who wish to pursue the French Baccalaureate. All core subjects are taught in French. Upon successful completion of the Lebanese or French Baccalaureate program, students are eligible to enter at the sophomore level in all Lebanese and many European and North American universities. Some students pursue both the Lebanese and French Baccalaureate simultaneously. See Secondary education in France.

The International Baccalaureate Program is a two-year curriculum with an assessment component. The IB diploma is recognized by universities around the world. Students admitted to the IB program must hold a second nationality in addition to Lebanese, or must obtain an exemption from the Lebanese official program allowing them to engage in a non-Lebanese program. A good knowledge of English is a prerequisite as it is the language of instruction and also a school average of around a 79.

The "College Preparatory Program" is a two-year curriculum designed on the American High school System. Students admitted into this program must hold a foreign passport. Courses taken are extensive and rigorous. Calculus, micro and macroeconomics, and worldwide literature are some of the things taught in courses such as Math, Biology, Economics, Global Issues, English, Arabic, French, Art, Music, Physical Education, and History.

Discover more about Secondary School programs related topics

Education in Lebanon

Education in Lebanon

Education in Lebanon is regulated by the Ministry of Education and Higher Education (MEHE). In Lebanon, the main three languages, English and/or French with Arabic are taught from early years in schools. English or French are the mandatory media of instruction for mathematics and science for all schools. Education is compulsory from age 3 to 14.

English language

English language

English is a West Germanic language in the Indo-European language family, with its earliest forms spoken by the inhabitants of early medieval England. It is named after the Angles, one of the ancient Germanic peoples that migrated to the island of Great Britain. Existing on a dialect continuum with Scots, and then most closely related to the Low German and Frisian languages, English is genealogically Germanic. However, its vocabulary also shows major influences from French and Latin, plus some grammar and a small amount of core vocabulary influenced by Old Norse. Speakers of English are called Anglophones.

French language

French language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the Latin spoken in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

History

History

History is the systematic study and documentation of human activity. The time period of events before the invention of writing systems is considered prehistory. "History" is an umbrella term comprising past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of these events. Historians seek knowledge of the past using historical sources such as written documents, oral accounts, art and material artifacts, and ecological markers. History is not complete and still has debatable mysteries.

Geography

Geography

Geography is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena of Earth. The first recorded use of the word γεωγραφία was as a title of a book by Greek scholar Eratosthenes. Geography is an all-encompassing discipline that seeks an understanding of Earth and its human and natural complexities—not merely where objects are, but also how they have changed and come to be. While geography is specific to Earth, many concepts can be applied more broadly to other celestial bodies in the field of planetary science. One such concept, the first law of geography, proposed by Waldo Tobler, is "everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." Geography has been called "the world discipline" and "the bridge between the human and the physical sciences."

Civics

Civics

Civics is the study of the rights and obligations of citizens in society. The term derives from the Latin word civicus, meaning "relating to a citizen". The term relates to behavior affecting other citizens, particularly in the context of urban development.

Economics

Economics

Economics is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.

Arabic literature

Arabic literature

Arabic literature is the writing, both as prose and poetry, produced by writers in the Arabic language. The Arabic word used for literature is Adab, which is derived from a meaning of etiquette, and which implies politeness, culture and enrichment.

Humanities

Humanities

Humanities are academic disciplines that study aspects of human society and culture. In the Renaissance, the term contrasted with divinity and referred to what is now called classics, the main area of secular study in universities at the time. Today, the humanities are more frequently defined as any fields of study outside of natural sciences, social sciences, formal sciences and applied sciences. They use methods that are primarily critical, or speculative, and have a significant historical element—as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural sciences; yet, unlike the sciences, there is no general history of humanities as a distinct discipline in its own right.

Education in France

Education in France

Education in France is organized in a highly centralized manner, with many subdivisions. It is divided into the three stages of primary education, secondary education, and higher education. The main age that a child starts school in France is age 2. Two year olds do not start primary school, they start preschool. Then, by the age of six, a child in France starts primary school and soon moves onto higher and higher grade levels until they graduate.

Secondary education in France

Secondary education in France

In France, secondary education is in two stages:Collèges cater for the first four years of secondary education from the ages of 11 to 15. Lycées provide a three-year course of further secondary education for children between the ages of 15 and 18. Pupils are prepared for the baccalauréat, which can lead to higher education studies or directly to professional life. There are three main types of baccalauréat: the baccalauréat général, baccalauréat technologique and baccalauréat professionnel.

International Baccalaureate

International Baccalaureate

The International Baccalaureate (IB), formerly known as the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), is a nonprofit foundation headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, and founded in 1968. It offers four educational programmes: the IB Diploma Programme and the IB Career-related Programme for students aged 15 to 19, the IB Middle Years Programme for students aged 11 to 16, and the IB Primary Years Programme for children aged 3 to 12. To teach these programmes, schools must be authorized by the International Baccalaureate.

Community Service Program

Participation in the Community Service Program is mandatory for all IC Secondary School students. Students select two community projects per year, ranging from helping to raise awareness of environmental issues, volunteer at orphanages, and centers for the aged, infirmed and disabled.

Notable alumni

Discover more about Notable alumni related topics

Constantin Zureiq

Constantin Zureiq

Constantin K. Zurayk was a prominent and influential Syrian Arab intellectual who was one of the first to pioneer and express the importance of Arab nationalism. He stressed the urgent need to transform stagnant Arab society by means of rational thought and radical modification of the methods of thinking and acting. He developed some ideas, such as the "Arab mission" and "national philosophy", which were to become key concepts for Arab nationalist thinkers, and in more recent years was a strong proponent of an intellectual reformation of Arab society, emphasizing the need for rationalism and an ethical revolution.

Arab nationalism

Arab nationalism

Arab nationalism is a nationalist ideology that asserts the Arabs are a nation and promotes the unity of Arab people, celebrating the glories of Arab civilization, the language and literature of the Arabs, and calling for rejuvenation and political union in the Arab world. Its central premise is that the people of the Arab world, from the Atlantic Ocean to the Indian Ocean, constitute one nation bound together by common ethnicity, language, culture, history, identity, geography and politics. One of the primary goals of Arab nationalism is the end of Western influence in the Arab world, seen as a "nemesis" of Arab strength, and the removal of those Arab governments considered to be dependent upon Western power. It rose to prominence with the weakening and defeat of the Ottoman Empire in the early 20th century and declined after the defeat of the Arab armies in the Six-Day War.

Ghassan Tueni

Ghassan Tueni

Ghassan Tueni was a veteran Lebanese journalist, politician and diplomat who headed An Nahar, one of the Arab World's leading newspapers. He was often referred to as the "Dean of Lebanese Journalism".

Lebanon

Lebanon

Lebanon, officially the Republic of Lebanon or the Lebanese Republic, is a country in Western Asia. It is located between Syria to the north and east and Israel to the south, while Cyprus lies to its west across the Mediterranean Sea; its location at the crossroads of the Mediterranean Basin and the Arabian hinterland has contributed to its rich history and shaped a cultural identity of religious diversity. It is part of the Levant region of the Middle East. Lebanon is home to roughly five million people and covers an area of 10,452 square kilometres (4,036 sq mi), making it the second smallest country in continental Asia. The official language of the state is Arabic, while French is also formally recognized; the Lebanese Arabic is used alongside Modern Standard Arabic throughout the country.

Parliament of Lebanon

Parliament of Lebanon

The Lebanese Parliament is the national parliament of the Republic of Lebanon. There are 128 members elected to a four-year term in multi-member constituencies, apportioned among Lebanon's diverse Christian and Muslim denominations but with half of the seats reserved for Christians and half reserved to Muslims per Constitutional Article 24. Lebanon has universal adult suffrage. Its major functions are to elect the President of the republic, to approve the government, and to approve laws and expenditure.

Gebran Tueni

Gebran Tueni

Gebran Ghassan Tueni was a Lebanese politician and the former editor and publisher of daily paper An Nahar, established by his grandfather, also named Gebran Tueni, in 1933. He was assassinated in 2005 as part of a series of assassinations of Syria's critiques in Lebanon.

Druze

Druze

The Druze are an Arabic-speaking esoteric ethnoreligious group from Western Asia who adhere to the Druze faith, an Abrahamic, monotheistic, syncretic, and ethnic religion based on the teachings of Hamza ibn Ali ibn Ahmad and ancient Greek philosophers like Plato, Aristotle, Pythagoras, and Zeno of Citium. Adherents of the Druze religion call themselves "the Monotheists" or "the Unitarians" (al-Muwaḥḥidūn).

Walid Jumblatt

Walid Jumblatt

Walid Kamal Jumblatt is a Lebanese Druze politician and former militia commander who has been leading the Progressive Socialist Party since 1977. While leading the Lebanese National Resistance Front and allying with the Amal Movement during the Lebanese Civil War, he worked closely with Suleiman Frangieh to oppose Amine Gemayel's rule as president in 1983. After the civil war, he initially supported Syria but later led an anti-Assad stance during the start of the Syrian Civil War. He is still active in politics, most recently leading his party, the Progressive Socialist Party (PSP) in the 2022 Lebanese general election.

Sobhi Mahmassani

Sobhi Mahmassani

Sobhi R. Mahmassani was a Lebanese legal scholar, practising lawyer, judge, and political figure helped to build the legal and civic foundations of the then-nascent country of Lebanon, and whose writings on Islamic jurisprudence remain authoritative works on this topic for legal scholars and researchers.

Lebanese people

Lebanese people

The Lebanese people are the people inhabiting or originating from Lebanon. The term may also include those who had inhabited Mount Lebanon and the Anti-Lebanon Mountains prior to the creation of the modern Lebanese state. The major religious groups among the Lebanese people within Lebanon are Shia Muslims (27%), Sunni Muslims (27%), Maronite Christians (21%), Greek Orthodox Christians (8%), Melkite Christians (5%), Druze (5.2%), Protestant Christians (1%). The largest contingent of Lebanese, however, comprise a diaspora in North America, South America, Europe, Australia and Africa, which is predominantly Maronite Christian.

Saeb Salam

Saeb Salam

Saeb Salam was a Lebanese politician, who served as Prime Minister six times between 1952 and 1973. Following his death, the Lebanese daily As-Safir described Salam as "most successful in dealing with the media and in presenting a particular image of himself to people on a daily basis through wearing his customary carnation ... and expounding unforgettable slogans", and that he was Lebanon's most popular prime minister after independence leader Riad Al Solh. A significant aspect of Salam was that, unlike other Lebanese leaders, he did not act as a chief over a particular area in the country. Salam fiercely advocated the unity of Lebanon.

Yassine Jaber

Yassine Jaber

Yassine Jaber is a liberal Shia member of parliament in Lebanon. He has represented the Nabatiyeh district in South Lebanon since the first post Lebanese Civil War election in 1992. He is an independent candidate but is affiliated with the Liberation and Development bloc led by Amal Movement head and Parliamentary Speaker Nabih Berri. In the May 2018 elections, Jaber won 7,920 preferential votes under a newly instituted, hybrid voting system that put him at the 71st place out of 515 total candidates across the country.

Honors

IC is the first green school building with LEED "Gold" certification in Lebanon and the Middle East.[1]

Source: "International College, Beirut", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_College,_Beirut.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ ECOlogical & ECOnomical Solutions for Business-As-Usual Challenges, for successfully building one of the best campuses in the middle east. [1]
  • With Youth on Phoenician Shores, Leslie W. Leavitt, Wellesley, Massachusetts, 1968
  • Seeing Arabs Through An American School, Robert F. Ober Jr., Philadelphia, 2003.
External links

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.