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Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine

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Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine
Formation1997 (1943)
TypeLearned society
HeadquartersFairmount House, 230 Tadcaster Road, York, YO24 1ES, England
Location
  • United Kingdom
Coordinates53°56′54″N 1°06′03″W / 53.9483429°N 1.1008885°W / 53.9483429; -1.1008885Coordinates: 53°56′54″N 1°06′03″W / 53.9483429°N 1.1008885°W / 53.9483429; -1.1008885
Membership
4,700
Official language
English
President
Dr Robert Farley
Key people
Philip Morgan
Staff
22
Websitewww.ipem.ac.uk

The Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) is the United Kingdom's professional body and learned society for physicists, engineers and technologists within the field of medicine, founded in 1995, changing its name from the Institution of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and Biology (IPEMB) in 1997.[1] The Institute is governed by an elected Board of Trustees reporting to which are the Science, Research and Innovation Council and the Professional and Standards Council. The councils have operational responsibility for scientific and professional aspects of the Institute's work, respectively. Beneath the councils is a substructure of committees, groups and panels of members, which undertake the work of the Institute.

The Institute is licensed by the Engineering Council to register Chartered Engineers, Incorporated Engineers and Engineering Technologists and by the Science Council to register Chartered Scientists,[2] Registered Scientists and Registered Science Technicians.[2]

The aim of the Institute and its members, set out in its charitable objects and articles of association, is to promote for the public benefit the advancement of physics and engineering applied to medicine and biology, and to advance public education in the field.[3]

Discover more about Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine related topics

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a country in Europe, off the north-western coast of the continental mainland. It comprises England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands within the British Isles. Northern Ireland shares a land border with the Republic of Ireland; otherwise, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, the North Sea, the English Channel, the Celtic Sea and the Irish Sea. The total area of the United Kingdom is 242,495 square kilometres (93,628 sq mi), with an estimated 2020 population of more than 67 million people.

Learned society

Learned society

A learned society is an organization that exists to promote an academic discipline, profession, or a group of related disciplines such as the arts and science. Membership may be open to all, may require possession of some qualification, or may be an honour conferred by election.

Physicist

Physicist

A physicist is a scientist who specializes in the field of physics, which encompasses the interactions of matter and energy at all length and time scales in the physical universe. Physicists generally are interested in the root or ultimate causes of phenomena, and usually frame their understanding in mathematical terms. Physicists work across a wide range of research fields, spanning all length scales: from sub-atomic and particle physics, through biological physics, to cosmological length scales encompassing the universe as a whole. The field generally includes two types of physicists: experimental physicists who specialize in the observation of natural phenomena and the development and analysis of experiments, and theoretical physicists who specialize in mathematical modeling of physical systems to rationalize, explain and predict natural phenomena. Physicists can apply their knowledge towards solving practical problems or to developing new technologies.

Engineer

Engineer

Engineers, as practitioners of engineering, are professionals who invent, design, analyze, build and test machines, complex systems, structures, gadgets and materials to fulfill functional objectives and requirements while considering the limitations imposed by practicality, regulation, safety and cost. The word engineer is derived from the Latin words ingeniare and ingenium ("cleverness"). The foundational qualifications of an engineer typically include a four-year bachelor's degree in an engineering discipline, or in some jurisdictions, a master's degree in an engineering discipline plus four to six years of peer-reviewed professional practice and passage of engineering board examinations. A professional engineer is typically a person registered under an Engineering Council.

Medicine

Medicine

Medicine is the science and practice of caring for a patient, managing the diagnosis, prognosis, prevention, treatment, palliation of their injury or disease, and promoting their health. Medicine encompasses a variety of health care practices evolved to maintain and restore health by the prevention and treatment of illness. Contemporary medicine applies biomedical sciences, biomedical research, genetics, and medical technology to diagnose, treat, and prevent injury and disease, typically through pharmaceuticals or surgery, but also through therapies as diverse as psychotherapy, external splints and traction, medical devices, biologics, and ionizing radiation, amongst others.

Chartered Engineer (UK)

Chartered Engineer (UK)

In the United Kingdom, a Chartered Engineer (CEng) is an engineer registered with the UK's regulatory body for the engineering profession, the Engineering Council. Chartered Engineers are degree-qualified or can demonstrate equivalent work-based learning and have gained the appropriate professional competencies through education and working experience. Demonstration of competence is defined in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence, assessed through professional review of academic qualifications and professional development. Formal, non-formal and informal learning can be assessed. The title Chartered Engineer is protected in the UK under law by means of the Engineering Council’s Royal Charter and Bye-laws. As of 2019 there are approximately 180,000 engineers registered as a Chartered Engineer. Chartered Engineers are registered through Professional Engineering Institutions (PEIs) licensed by the Engineering Council which are relevant to their industry or specialism.

Science Council

Science Council

The Science Council is a UK organisation that was established by Royal Charter in 2003. The principal activity of The Science Council is the promotion of the advancement and dissemination of knowledge of and education in science pure and applied, for the public benefit. The Science Council is the Competent Authority with respect to the European Union directive 2005/36/EC. It is a membership organisation for learned and professional bodies across science and its applications and works with them to represent this sector to government and others. Together, the member organisations represent over 350,000 scientists. The Science Council provides a forum for discussion and exchange of views and works to foster collaboration between member organisations and the wider science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medical communities to enable inter-disciplinary contributions to science policy and the application of science.

Chartered Scientist

Chartered Scientist

Chartered Scientist (CSci) is a professional qualification in the United Kingdom that is awarded by the Science Council through its Licensed member organisations. Holders of this qualification can use the post-nominal letters CSci.

History

The organization can trace its origin to three societies:[1][4][5]

  • the Hospital Physicists Association (HPA) founded in 1943,
  • the Hospital Physics Technicians Association (HPTA) founded in 1952, and
  • the Biological Engineering Society (BES) founded in 1960.

The HPA created its scientific arm in 1984, the Institute of Physical Sciences in Medicine (IPSM). The trade union and scientific activities split in 1989: the scientific arm merged with the BES to form IPEMB while the trade union (HPA) joined the Manufacturing, Science and Finance Trades Union (MSF).[1][5] The Association of Medical Technologists (AMT), formerly HPTA, merged with IPEM in 2001.[1]

IPEM timeline

Membership

There are several categories of membership:

  • Fellowship (FIPEM): This is the most senior category of membership. It is only awarded to Full Members (MIPEM) who have made an outstanding contribution to Medical Physics or Engineering.
  • Full Membership (MIPEM): This category is for people seeking recognition as professional Scientists, Engineers or Technologist in the field of Medical Physics or Engineering. It includes the old Incorporated Membership.
  • Associate Membership: For people working in the relevant area including STP trainees. Postgraduate students and apprentices in an appropriate field are eligible for free Associate Membership
  • Professional Affiliate Membership: For professionals who are working with applications of physics and engineering applied to medicine but who are working as professionals other than clinical scientists or clinical/biomedical engineers e.g. doctors, radiographers, nurses, vets and dentists.
  • Affiliate Membership: For anyone with an interest in Medical Physics and Engineering. Full-time undergraduate students are eligible for free Affiliate Membership
  • Honorary Fellowship is awarded for outstanding contributions in the field of physics or engineering applied to medicine or related biological science.
  • Company Membership
  • Dual Membership with the Institute of Physics allows a 25% discount on membership subscriptions payable to each organisation for those who are or become individual members of both organisations.

Equality, diversity and inclusion

The Institute is a signatory[6] of the Engineering Diversity Concordat of the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Science Council Diversity Declaration and has its own Equality Policy.[7]

Annual Conference and Woolmer Lecture

The Institute holds an annual conference on Medical Physics and Engineering. During this conference the flagship lecture of the Institute, the Woolmer Lecture, is presented. The lecture is dedicated to Professor Ronald Woolmer who was the first Director of the Research Department of Anaesthetics at the Royal College of Surgeons.[8] Woolmer convened a meeting at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, to discuss the evolving field of engineering applied to medicine.[9] It was agreed that the group should hold regular meetings and as a result the Biological Engineering Society (BES) was formed with Ronald Woolmer as the first President. Woolmer died two years after the formation of the BES and it was agreed that a memorial lecture would be sponsored in recognition of his achievements.
The following table includes a list of the lectures since 2002:

Year Lecturer Subject
2002 Professor Anthony Unsworth Hip Joint Replacement
2003 Dr Arun Holden Computational Modelling in Medicine and Biology
2004 Professor Kevin Warwick Implant Technology
2005 Dr Henrik Gollee Assistive technologies for function restoration
2006 Professor Denis Noble Cardiac Modelling
2007 Professor Sir Michael Brady Digital Imaging
2008 Professor Clive Hahn Bioengineering Aspects of the Lung: Models and Measurements
2009 Professor Martin Birchall Regenerative Medicine: New challenges, new hopes
2010 Professor Mark Tooley Imitating the Patient
2011 Professor Willi Kalender Developments in Computed Tomography: Is sub-mSv a realistic option?
2012 Professor Lionel Tarassenko Physiology-Driven Signal Analysis and Data
2013 Professor Molly Stevens Designing Biomaterials for Ultrasensitive Biosensing and Regenerative Medicine
2014 Professor David Keating Medical Physics: A Gateway to Innovation
2015 Professor Tony Barker Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation – the First Thirty Years
2016 Professor Andrew Taylor Can engineering and imaging help us design cardiovascular devices?
2017 Professor Josef Käs Why do rigid tumours contain soft cancer cells?
2018 Professor Alison Noble Human Image Recognition, Artificial Intelligence and Shifting Perceptions of Medical Ultrasound

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Woolmer Lecture

Woolmer Lecture

The Woolmer lecture is the flagship lecture of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. It takes place annually during the Institute's Medical Physics and Engineering Conference.

Royal College of Surgeons

Royal College of Surgeons

The Royal College of Surgeons is an ancient college established in England to regulate the activity of surgeons. Derivative organisations survive in many present and former members of the Commonwealth. These organisations are now also responsible for training surgeons and setting their examinations.

Kevin Warwick

Kevin Warwick

Kevin Warwick is an English engineer and Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) at Coventry University. He is known for his studies on direct interfaces between computer systems and the human nervous system, and has also done research concerning robotics.

Denis Noble

Denis Noble

Denis Noble is a British biologist who held the Burdon Sanderson Chair of Cardiovascular Physiology at the University of Oxford from 1984 to 2004 and was appointed Professor Emeritus and co-Director of Computational Physiology. He is one of the pioneers of systems biology and developed the first viable mathematical model of the working heart in 1960.

Lionel Tarassenko

Lionel Tarassenko

Lionel Tarassenko, is a British engineer and academic, who is a leading expert in the application of signal processing and machine learning to healthcare. He was previously Head of Department of Engineering Science at the University of Oxford, succeeded by Ronald A. Roy. Towards the end of his time as Dean, the Department rose to number 1 in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings.

Molly Stevens

Molly Stevens

Molly Morag Stevens is Professor of Biomedical Materials and regenerative medicine and Research Director for Biomedical Materials Sciences in the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at Imperial College London.

Biosensor

Biosensor

A biosensor is an analytical device, used for the detection of a chemical substance, that combines a biological component with a physicochemical detector. The sensitive biological element, e.g. tissue, microorganisms, organelles, cell receptors, enzymes, antibodies, nucleic acids, etc., is a biologically derived material or biomimetic component that interacts with, binds with, or recognizes the analyte under study. The biologically sensitive elements can also be created by biological engineering. The transducer or the detector element, which transforms one signal into another one, works in a physicochemical way: optical, piezoelectric, electrochemical, electrochemiluminescence etc., resulting from the interaction of the analyte with the biological element, to easily measure and quantify. The biosensor reader device connects with the associated electronics or signal processors that are primarily responsible for the display of the results in a user-friendly way. This sometimes accounts for the most expensive part of the sensor device, however it is possible to generate a user friendly display that includes transducer and sensitive element. The readers are usually custom-designed and manufactured to suit the different working principles of biosensors.

Josef A. Käs

Josef A. Käs

Josef A. Käs is a German biophysicist. He is a professor at Leipzig University.

Alison Noble

Alison Noble

Julia Alison Noble is Technikos professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Oxford, a fellow of St Hilda's College, Oxford and Associate Head of the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division at the university. As of 2017 she is chief technology officer (CTO) of Intelligent Ultrasound Limited an Oxford University spin-off in medical imaging which she cofounded. She was director of the Oxford Institute of Biomedical Engineering (IBME) from 2012 to 2016.

Publications

IPEM owns three international peer-reviewed journals:[10]

PMB and Physiological Measurement are published in association with IOP Publishing while Medical Engineering and Physics is published by Elsevier.
The Institute also publishes:[11]

  • SCOPE – The Institute's quarterly magazine which is free to members and non-members.
  • a report series
  • educational and teaching material
  • a comprehensive e-book programme jointly with IOP Publishing

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Peer review

Peer review

Peer review is the evaluation of work by one or more people with similar competencies as the producers of the work. It functions as a form of self-regulation by qualified members of a profession within the relevant field. Peer review methods are used to maintain quality standards, improve performance, and provide credibility. In academia, scholarly peer review is often used to determine an academic paper's suitability for publication. Peer review can be categorized by the type of activity and by the field or profession in which the activity occurs, e.g., medical peer review. It can also be used as a teaching tool to help students improve writing assignments.

Physics in Medicine and Biology

Physics in Medicine and Biology

Physics in Medicine & Biology is a biweekly peer-reviewed medical journal covering research on the application of physics to medicine, physiology, and biology. It was established in 1956 and is published by IOP Publishing on behalf of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. It is also an official journal of the following medical societies: Canadian Organization of Medical Physics, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Medizinische Physik, Japanese Association of Radiological Physics, European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics, and the International Organization for Medical Physics. The editor-in-chief is Katia Parodi.

IOP Publishing

IOP Publishing

IOP Publishing is the publishing company of the Institute of Physics. It provides publications through which scientific research is distributed worldwide, including journals, community websites, magazines, conference proceedings and books. The Institute of Physics is a scientific charity devoted to increasing the practice, understanding and application of physics. Any financial surplus earned by IOP Publishing goes to support physics through the activities of the Institute.

Elsevier

Elsevier

Elsevier is a Netherlands-based academic publishing company specializing in scientific, technical, and medical content. Its products include journals such as The Lancet, Cell, the ScienceDirect collection of electronic journals, Trends, the Current Opinion series, the online citation database Scopus, the SciVal tool for measuring research performance, the ClinicalKey search engine for clinicians, and the ClinicalPath evidence-based cancer care service. Elsevier's products and services also include digital tools for data management, instruction, research analytics and assessment.

President of IPEM

The IPEM president serves for two years and takes office at the Annual Conference. The following table includes a list of all past presidents of IPEMB/IPEM.[12][13][14][15]

Dates President
1995–97 Prof Peter N.T. Wells CBE
1997–99 Prof P. F. Sharp OBE
1999–2001 Prof R.H. Smallwood
2001–03 Dr S.W. Smye OBE
2003–05 Prof P.C. Williams
2005–07 Dr P.C. Jackson
2007–09 Dr K.T. Ison OBE
2009-11 Dr C.J. Gibson
2011–13 Prof P.H. Jarritt
2013–15 Prof S.F. Keevil
2015–17 Prof D. Brettle
2017–19 Prof M. Tooley
2019-21 Prof. Stephen O'Connor
2021-23 Dr Robert Farley

Source: "Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institute_of_Physics_and_Engineering_in_Medicine.

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References
  1. ^ a b c d Jennings, Allan (December 2006). "Introduction". Scope. 15 (Heritage Supplement): 2–5.
  2. ^ a b "Search the Professional Registers". The Science Council.
  3. ^ IPEM (2013). "2012 A Review of the Year" (PDF). Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  4. ^ K. Reynard (2003). Aslib Directory of Information Sources in the United Kingdom. Aslib. p. 646. ISBN 978-0-85142-472-9. Retrieved 7 January 2013.
  5. ^ a b Zoi Kolitsi; et al. (2001). "Introduction". In Zoi Kolitsi (ed.). Towards a European Framework for Education and Training in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering. IOS Press. p. 12. ISBN 978-1-58603-151-0.
  6. ^ "Engineering Diversity Concordat Signatories". www.raeng.org.u. 2013. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  7. ^ "IPEM EQUALITY POLICY STATEMENT" (PDF). www.ipem.ac.uk. 2015. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  8. ^ G.S.W.O (February 1963). "In Memoriam: Professor R. F. Woolmer, V.R.D.". Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. 332 (1): 129–131.
  9. ^ "Prof. R. F. Woolmer, 1908–1962". Medical Electronics and Biological Engineering. 2 (1): 161–162. April–June 1963.
  10. ^ "IPEM > Publications > Journals". Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 9 September 2013.
  11. ^ "IPEM > Publications". Archived from the original on 9 September 2013. Retrieved 9 September 2013.
  12. ^ "Appendix 3: Honorary Officers of the IPEM Diversity within the Institute". Scope. 15 (Heritage Supplement): 56. December 2006.
  13. ^ Ison, Keith (December 2007). "President's Letter: Diversity within the Institute". Scope. 16 (4). ISSN 0964-9565.
  14. ^ Gibson, Chris (December 2009). "President's Letter: Welcome to all readers". Scope. 20 (4): 3. ISSN 0964-9565. Archived from the original on 23 January 2013. Retrieved 23 January 2013.
  15. ^ Jarritt, Peter (December 2011). "President's Letter: In the Spotlight". Scope. 20 (4): 3. ISSN 0964-9565. Archived from the original on 23 January 2013. Retrieved 23 January 2013.
External links
  • www.ipem.ac.uk – The Official site of the IPEM
  • E-SCOPE – The online archive of the IPEM magazine (www.ipem.ac.uk/ScientificJournalsPublications/SCOPE/E-SCOPE.aspx)

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