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Indra Sinha

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Indra Sinha in his garden in France, March 2007
Indra Sinha in his garden in France, March 2007

Indra Sinha (born 1950 in Colaba,[1] Mumbai, Maharashtra, India) is a British writer of Indian and English descent.[2] Animal's People, his most recent novel, was shortlisted for the 2007 Man Booker Prize[3][4] and winner of the 2008 Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Europe and South Asia.

In July 2015, Sinha was awarded an honorary Doctorate in Literature by the University of Brighton for "his major contribution to literature and demonstrating the power of words in changing people’s lives".[5]

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Colaba

Colaba

Colaba is a part of the city of Mumbai, India. It is one of the four peninsulas of Mumbai while the other three are Worli, Bandra and Malabar Hill. During Portuguese rule in the 16th century, the island was known as Kolbhat. After the British took over the island in the late 17th century, it was known as Kolio.

Mumbai

Mumbai

Mumbai is the capital city of the Indian state of Maharashtra and the de facto financial centre of India. According to the United Nations, as of 2018, Mumbai is the second-most populous city in India after Delhi and the eighth-most populous city in the world with a population of roughly 20 million. As per the Indian government population census of 2011, Mumbai was the most populous city in India with an estimated city proper population of 12.5 million (1.25 crore) living under the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation. Mumbai is the centre of the Mumbai Metropolitan Region, the sixth most populous metropolitan area in the world with a population of over 23 million. Mumbai lies on the Konkan coast on the west coast of India and has a deep natural harbour. In 2008, Mumbai was named an alpha world city.

Animal's People

Animal's People

Animal's People is a novel by Indra Sinha. It was shortlisted for the 2007 Man Booker Prize and is the Winner of the 2008 Commonwealth Writers' Prize: Best Book From Europe & South Asia. Sinha's narrator is a 19-year-old orphan of Khaufpur, born a few days before the 1984 Bhopal disaster, whose spine has become so twisted that he must walk on all fours. Ever since he can remember, he has gone on all fours. Known to everyone simply as Animal, he rejects sympathy, spouts profanity and obsesses about sex. He lives with a crazy old French nun called Ma Franci, and his dog Jara. Also, he falls in love with a local musician's daughter, Nisha.

Doctor of Letters

Doctor of Letters

Doctor of Letters is a terminal degree in the humanities that, depending on the country, is a higher doctorate after the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree or equivalent to a higher doctorate, such as the Doctor of Science. It is awarded in many countries by universities and learned bodies in recognition of superior accomplishment in the humanities, original contributions to the creative or cultural arts, or scholarship and other merits. It may be conferred as an earned degree upon the completion of a regular doctoral course of study, usually including the development and defense of an original dissertation, or may be conferred as an earned higher doctorate after the submission and academic evaluation of a portfolio of sustained scholarship, publications, research, or other scientific work of the highest caliber.

University of Brighton

University of Brighton

The University of Brighton is a public university based on four campuses in Brighton and Eastbourne on the south coast of England. Its roots can be traced back to 1858 when the Brighton School of Art was opened in the Royal Pavilion. It achieved university status in 1992.

Biography

Sinha is the son of an officer in the Indian Navy and an English writer.[6] He was educated at Mayo College, Ajmer, Rajasthan in India; Oakham School, Rutland, England and Pembroke College, Cambridge in England, where he studied English literature. His wife and he live in the Lot valley in south-west France.[7] They have three grown-up children.

Formerly a copywriter for Ogilvy & Mather, London,[8] and, from 1984, Collett Dickenson Pearce & Partners,[9] Sinha has the distinction of having been voted one of the top ten British copywriters of all time.[1] He became known for hard-hitting, campaigning advertising for charities such as Amnesty International and the Bhopal Medical Appeal,[1] but became increasingly disenchanted with commercial advertising.[1] In 1995, Sinha resigned from the agency to concentrate on writing.[7]

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Indian Navy

Indian Navy

The Indian Navy (IN) is the maritime branch of the Indian Armed Forces. The President of India is the Supreme Commander of the Indian Navy. The Chief of Naval Staff, a four-star admiral, commands the navy. As a blue-water navy, it operates significantly in the Persian Gulf Region, the Horn of Africa, the Strait of Malacca, and routinely conducts anti-piracy operations and partners with other navies in the region. It also conducts routine two to three month-long deployments in the South and East China seas as well as the western Mediterranean sea simultaneously.

Mayo College

Mayo College

Mayo College is a boys-only independent boarding school in Ajmer, Rajasthan, India. It was founded in 1875 by Richard Bourke, 6th Earl of Mayo, who was the Viceroy of India from 1869 to 1872. This makes it one of the oldest public boarding schools in India. The principal is Lt. Gen. (Retd) Surendra Kulkarni, who has occupied the post since January 2015 as the 17th principal.The school houses 800 pupils aged between 9 and 18.

Ajmer

Ajmer

Ajmer pronounced [ədʒmeːr] (listen) is one of the major and oldest cities in the Indian state of Rajasthan and the centre of the eponymous Ajmer District. It is located at the centre of Rajasthan. It is also known as heart of Rajasthan. The city was established as "Ajayameru" by a Chahamana ruler, either Ajayaraja I or Ajayaraja II, and served as their capital until the 12th century CE.

Oakham School

Oakham School

Oakham School is a public school in Oakham, Rutland, England.

Pembroke College, Cambridge

Pembroke College, Cambridge

Pembroke College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. The college is the third-oldest college of the university and has over 700 students and fellows. It is one of the university's larger colleges, with buildings from almost every century since its founding, as well as extensive gardens. Its members are termed "Valencians". The college's current master is Chris Smith, Baron Smith of Finsbury.

English literature

English literature

English literature is literature written in the English language from United Kingdom, its crown dependencies, the Republic of Ireland, the United States, and the countries of the former British Empire. The English language has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon invaders in the fifth century, are called Old English. Beowulf is the most famous work in Old English, and has achieved national epic status in England, despite being set in Scandinavia. However, following the Norman conquest of England in 1066, the written form of the Anglo-Saxon language became less common. Under the influence of the new aristocracy, French became the standard language of courts, parliament, and polite society. The English spoken after the Normans came is known as Middle English. This form of English lasted until the 1470s, when the Chancery Standard, a London-based form of English, became widespread. Geoffrey Chaucer, author of The Canterbury Tales, was a significant figure in the development of the legitimacy of vernacular Middle English at a time when the dominant literary languages in England were still French and Latin. The invention of the printing press by Johannes Gutenberg in 1439 also helped to standardise the language, as did the King James Bible (1611), and the Great Vowel Shift.

Lot (department)

Lot (department)

Lot is a department in the Occitanie region of France. Named after the Lot River, it lies in the southwestern part of the country and had a population of 174,094 in 2019. Its prefecture is Cahors; its subprefectures are Figeac and Gourdon.

Copywriting

Copywriting

Copywriting is the act or occupation of writing text for the purpose of advertising or other forms of marketing. The product, called copy or sales copy, is written content that aims to increase brand awareness and ultimately persuade a person or group to take a particular action.

Collett Dickenson Pearce

Collett Dickenson Pearce

Collett Dickenson Pearce & Partners (CDP) was a British advertising agency which operated from 1960 till 2000. It was founded by John Pearce and Ronnie Dickenson who bought an existing agency owned by John Collett. The agency played a pivotal role in London's cultural shift of the 1960s and was a nursery for a number British creative entrepreneurs who would later enjoy famed careers.

Amnesty International

Amnesty International

Amnesty International is an international non-governmental organization focused on human rights, with its headquarters in the United Kingdom. The organization says it has more than ten million members and supporters around the world. The stated mission of the organization is to campaign for "a world in which every person enjoys all of the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights instruments." The organization has played a notable role on human rights issues due to its frequent citation in media and by world leaders.

Books

Animal's People, set in the fictional Indian city of Khaufpur, was a reworking of the Bhopal disaster[10][11] based on Sinha's long association working with the Bhopal survivors. His earlier works include translations of ancient Sanskrit texts into English,[12] a non-fiction memoir of the pre-internet generation (The Cybergypsies),[13] and a novel, The Death of Mr. Love, based on the case of K. M. Nanavati vs. State of Maharashtra.[14]

"I was invited by a publisher to write the text for Tantra.[1] Having done some research, what fascinated me was the evidence that many 'tantric' ideas actually came to India from the Mediterranean. It is rather a dry read and debunks reports of orgies and sexual mischief – sorry to disappoint".

— Indra Sinha, Interview.        

Bibliography

  • 1980. The Love Teachings of Kama Sutra:[15] With extracts from Koka Shastra, Ananga Ranga and other famous Indian works on love. Translations from Sanskrit and commentary. London: Hamlyn. Hardcover first edition: ISBN 0-600-34158-5. First North American edition 1997, New York: Marlowe & Co. Paperback: ISBN 1-56924-779-X.
  • 1993. Tantra: The Search for Ecstasy[16] (also known with the subtitle "The Cult of Ecstasy").[1] London: Hamlyn. ISBN 0-600-57699-X.
  • 1993. The Great Book of Tantra: Translations and Images from the Classic Indian Text. Rochester: Inner Traditions - Bear & Company. ISBN 0-89281-487-X. London: Hamlyn paperback edition: ISBN 0-600-59998-1.
  • 1999. The Cybergypsies: a True Tale of Lust, War, and Betrayal on the Electronic Frontier.[13] New York: Viking Press, hardcover first edition. ISBN 0-670-88630-0. New York: Simon & Schuster paperback edition: ISBN 0-684-81929-5.
  • 2002. The Death of Mr Love.[17] New York: Scribner (Simon & Schuster). ISBN 0-7432-0698-3. (See also: K. M. Nanavati vs. State of Maharashtra.)
  • 2007. Animal's People.[10] New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-7432-5920-3. (See also: Bhopal disaster.)

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Animal's People

Animal's People

Animal's People is a novel by Indra Sinha. It was shortlisted for the 2007 Man Booker Prize and is the Winner of the 2008 Commonwealth Writers' Prize: Best Book From Europe & South Asia. Sinha's narrator is a 19-year-old orphan of Khaufpur, born a few days before the 1984 Bhopal disaster, whose spine has become so twisted that he must walk on all fours. Ever since he can remember, he has gone on all fours. Known to everyone simply as Animal, he rejects sympathy, spouts profanity and obsesses about sex. He lives with a crazy old French nun called Ma Franci, and his dog Jara. Also, he falls in love with a local musician's daughter, Nisha.

Bhopal disaster

Bhopal disaster

The Bhopal disaster or Bhopal gas tragedy was a chemical accident on the night of 2–3 December 1984 at the Union Carbide India Limited (UCIL) pesticide plant in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India. Considered the world's worst industrial disaster, over 500,000 people in the small towns around the plant were exposed to the highly toxic gas methyl isocyanate (MIC). Estimates vary on the death toll, with the official number of immediate deaths being 2,259. In 2008, the Government of Madhya Pradesh paid compensation to the family members of 3,787 victims killed in the gas release, and to 574,366 injured victims. A government affidavit in 2006 stated that the leak caused 558,125 injuries, including 38,478 temporary partial injuries and approximately 3,900 severely and permanently disabling injuries. Others estimate that 8,000 died within two weeks, and another 8,000 or more have since died from gas-related diseases.

Translation

Translation

Translation is the communication of the meaning of a source-language text by means of an equivalent target-language text. The English language draws a terminological distinction between translating and interpreting ; under this distinction, translation can begin only after the appearance of writing within a language community.

Sanskrit

Sanskrit

Sanskrit is a classical language belonging to the Indo-Aryan branch of the Indo-European languages. It arose in South Asia after its predecessor languages had diffused there from the northwest in the late Bronze Age. Sanskrit is the sacred language of Hinduism, the language of classical Hindu philosophy, and of historical texts of Buddhism and Jainism. It was a link language in ancient and medieval South Asia, and upon transmission of Hindu and Buddhist culture to Southeast Asia, East Asia and Central Asia in the early medieval era, it became a language of religion and high culture, and of the political elites in some of these regions. As a result, Sanskrit had a lasting impact on the languages of South Asia, Southeast Asia and East Asia, especially in their formal and learned vocabularies.

Memoir

Memoir

A memoir is any nonfiction narrative writing based in the author's personal memories. The assertions made in the work are thus understood to be factual. While memoir has historically been defined as a subcategory of biography or autobiography since the late 20th century, the genre is differentiated in form, presenting a narrowed focus, usually a particular time phase in someone's life or career. A biography or autobiography tells the story "of a life", while a memoir often tells the story of a particular, career, event, or time, such as touchstone moments and turning points from the author's life. The author of a memoir may be referred to as a memoirist or a memorialist.

Generation Z

Generation Z

Generation Z, colloquially known as zoomers, is the demographic cohort succeeding Millennials and preceding Generation Alpha. Researchers and popular media use the mid-to-late 1990s as starting birth years and the early 2010s as ending birth years. Most members of Generation Z are children of Generation X.

Mediterranean Basin

Mediterranean Basin

In biogeography, the Mediterranean Basin is the region of lands around the Mediterranean Sea that have mostly a Mediterranean climate, with mild to cool, rainy winters and warm to hot, dry summers, which supports characteristic Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and scrub vegetation.

Ananga Ranga

Ananga Ranga

The Ananga Ranga or Kamaledhiplava is an Indian sex manual written by Kalyana malla in the 15th or 16th century. The poet wrote the work in honor of Lad Khan, son of Ahmed Khan Lodi. He was related to the Lodi dynasty, which from 1451 to 1526 ruled from Delhi. Later commentators have said it is aimed specifically at preventing the separation of a husband and wife. This work is often compared to the Kama Sutra, on which it draws.

Viking Press

Viking Press

Viking Press is an American publishing company owned by Penguin Random House. It was founded in New York City on March 1, 1925, by Harold K. Guinzburg and George S. Oppenheim and then acquired by the Penguin Group in 1975.

Bhopal

Sinha has been a passionate campaigner for justice for the victims of the Bhopal disaster since 1993,[7] when he created the first advertisement for the Bhopal Medical Appeal (using the now-famous photograph by Raghu Rai of a dead child being buried)[1] that raised money to build a clinic to provide free treatment for the survivors.[7] He is an outspoken critic of Dow Chemical Company, the multinational owner of Union Carbide, whose neglected, dilapidated and undermanned chemical plant in the city of Bhopal leaked 27 tonnes of poisonous gas on the night of 3 December 1984, killing up to 8,000 people and injuring upwards of half a million. Around 22,000 people have died as a result of injuries sustained on "that night", and more than 100,000 remain chronically ill; the abandoned, derelict factory continues to leach toxic chemicals into the groundwater, poisoning wells.[18]

Apart from his novel, Animal's People (a fictionalised account of the aftermath of the disaster), Sinha has given many interviews and written several articles on the subject,[19] including one in The Guardian marking the 25th anniversary of the disaster, in which he roundly condemns local politicians (particularly Babulal Gaur of the BJP) for their failure to comply with a 2004 Supreme Court ruling ordering them to supply clean water to the poison victims.[20] Nor does he absolve the Indian Government of blame.

"Dow has been trying to twist the arm of Manmohan Singh's Congress government into letting it off the Bhopal hook in return for a billion-dollar investment in India." "When people ask, 'Why is the disaster continuing? Why has the factory not been cleaned? Why have Union Carbide and Dow not faced justice?', the answer is this: Union Carbide's victims are still dying in Bhopal because India itself is dying under the corrupt and self-serving rule of rotten leaders."

— Indra Sinha, 'Bhopal: 25 years of poison', The Guardian, 3 December 2009[20]

As a former advertising copywriter, Sinha is particularly scathing about Dow Chemical Company's attempts to improve its image through its sponsorship of events such as the Blue Planet Run and Live Earth Run For Water. He has called Dow's "Human Element" advertising campaign "glossy falsehoods", and quotes artist Paul Phare (who created a set of e-cards in response to Dow) "Telling a lie beautifully does not make it true".[21][22]

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Raghu Rai

Raghu Rai

Raghu Rai , is an Indian photographer and photojournalist. He was a protégé of Henri Cartier-Bresson, who appointed Rai, then a young photojournalist, to Magnum Photos in 1977.

Dow Chemical Company

Dow Chemical Company

The Dow Chemical Company, officially Dow Inc., is an American multinational chemical corporation headquartered in Midland, Michigan, United States. The company is among the three largest chemical producers in the world.

Union Carbide

Union Carbide

Union Carbide Corporation is an American chemical corporation wholly owned subsidiary by Dow Chemical Company. Union Carbide produces chemicals and polymers that undergo one or more further conversions by customers before reaching consumers. Some are high-volume commodities and others are specialty products meeting the needs of smaller markets. Markets served include paints and coatings, packaging, wire and cable, household products, personal care, pharmaceuticals, automotive, textiles, agriculture, and oil and gas. The company is a former component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

Bhopal

Bhopal

Bhopal is the capital city of the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh and the administrative headquarters of both Bhopal district and Bhopal division. It is known as the City of Lakes due to its various natural and artificial lakes. It is also one of the greenest cities in India. It is the 16th largest city in India and 131st in the world. After the formation of Madhya Pradesh, Bhopal was part of the Sehore district. It was bifurcated in 1972 and a new district, Bhopal, was formed. Flourishing around 1707, the city was the capital of the former Bhopal State, a princely state of the British ruled by the Nawabs of Bhopal. Numerous heritage structures from this period include the Taj-ul-Masajid and Taj Mahal palace. In 1984, the city was struck by the Bhopal disaster, one of the worst industrial disasters in history.

Babulal Gaur

Babulal Gaur

Babulal Gaur Yadav was an Indian politician from Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) who served as the 16th Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh. He was elected ten times to the Madhya Pradesh Legislative Assembly, twice from Bhopal South and eight times from Govindpura. He retired from electoral politics in 2018 due to old age.

Bharatiya Janata Party

Bharatiya Janata Party

The Bharatiya Janata Party is a political party in India, and one of the two major Indian political parties alongside the Indian National Congress. Since 2014, it has been the ruling political party in India under Narendra Modi, the incumbent Indian prime minister. The BJP is aligned with right-wing politics, and its policies have historically reflected a traditional Hindu nationalist ideology; it has close ideological and organisational links to the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS). As of February 2022, it is the country's largest political party in terms of representation in the Parliament of India as well as state legislatures.

Supreme Court of India

Supreme Court of India

The Supreme Court of India is the supreme authority of India and the highest court of the Republic of India under the constitution. It is the most senior constitutional court, has the final decision in all legal matters except for personal laws and interstate river disputes, and also has the power of judicial review. The Chief Justice of India is the Head and Chief Judge of the Supreme Court, which consists of a maximum of 34 judges, and has extensive powers in the form of original, appellate and advisory jurisdictions.

Government of India

Government of India

The Government of India, known as the Union Government or Central Government but often simply as the Centre, is the national government of the Republic of India, a federal democracy located in South Asia, consisting of 28 union states and eight union territories. Under the Constitution, there are three primary branches of government: the legislative, the executive and the judiciary, whose powers are vested in a bicameral Parliament, President, aided by the Council of Ministers, and the Supreme Court respectively. Through judicial evolution, the Parliament has lost its sovereignty as its amendments to the Constitution are subject to judicial intervention. Judicial appointments in India are unique in that the executive or legislature have negligible say.

Manmohan Singh

Manmohan Singh

Manmohan Singh is an Indian politician, economist and statesman who served as the 13th prime minister of India from 2004 to 2014. He is also the third longest-serving prime minister after Jawaharlal Nehru and Indira Gandhi. A member of the Indian National Congress, Singh was the first Sikh prime minister of India. He was also the first prime minister since Jawaharlal Nehru to be re-elected after completing a full five-year term.

Indian National Congress

Indian National Congress

The Indian National Congress (INC), colloquially the Congress Party but often simply the Congress, is a political party in India with widespread roots. Founded in 1885, it was the first modern nationalist movement to emerge in the British Empire in Asia and Africa. From the late 19th century, and especially after 1920, under the leadership of Mahatma Gandhi, the Congress became the principal leader of the Indian independence movement. The Congress led India to independence from the United Kingdom, and significantly influenced other anti-colonial nationalist movements in the British Empire.

Live Earth

Live Earth

Live Earth was an event developed to increase environmental awareness through entertainment.

Source: "Indra Sinha", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indra_Sinha.

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References
  1. ^ a b c d e f g Lindsay Pereira (22 August 2007). "I feel strong contempt for Indian politicians". Rediff.com. Pick an advertising agency; any agency. Walk to where the copywriters congregate, and gently whisper the name 'Indra Sinha'. Then stand back and watch as feelings of inadequacy suddenly rush into the room. There is a perfectly logical explanation for the reaction. For decades now, Sinha has been making copywriters around the world feel inadequate and inspired in turns. Being voted one of the top ten British copywriters of all time tends to give one that kind of power ... Sinha's writing career has been intriguing. He began with a translation (Kama Sutra) and followed it with an explanation of the Tantric tradition (Tantra: The Cult of Ecstasy), before winning acclaim with his rather frightening memoir on hours spent online in the early years of the Internet, The Cybergypsies. His first novel, The Death of Mr Love, was based on a real-life murder, in Mumbai, where he was born.
  2. ^ "Indra Sinha profile". The Guardian. UK. Retrieved 28 May 2008.
  3. ^ "McEwan battles Booker newcomers". BBC News. 7 August 2007.
  4. ^ "At-a-glance: a guide to the Booker longlist 2007". BBC News. 8 August 2007.
  5. ^ "The man whose words changed lives". University of Brighton. 29 July 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2019.
  6. ^ Biography on Indra Sinha's website Archived 29 September 2007 at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ a b c d Moss, Stephen (26 September 2007). "Triumph from Tragedy". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 5 July 2019.
  8. ^ Ogilvy Indra Sinha's website blog Archived 23 October 2011 at the Wayback Machine, accessed 21 October 2011.
  9. ^ Indra Sinha's website blog Archived 23 October 2011 at the Wayback Machine, accessed 21 October 2011.
  10. ^ a b Nilanjana S Roy (14 August 2007). "Bhopal revisited: Animal's Story". Business Standard. (This book review also discusses Sinha's book in the context of previous books about the Bhopal disaster: It Was Five Minutes Past Midnight (2001) by Dominique Lapierre and Javier Moro; A Breath of Fresh Air (2002) by Amulya Malladi.)
  11. ^ Mark Thwaite (2007). "Interview with Indra Sinha". The Book Depository, Ltd. Gloucester.
  12. ^ "SINHA, Indra". State Library of Western Australia. Archived from the original on 18 August 2007.
  13. ^ a b "Our decade: The 90s and cyberspace". BBC News E-cyclopedia. 13 March 1999.
  14. ^ KM Nanavati v State of Maharashtra
  15. ^ Common misconceptions about Kama Sutra. Archived 29 September 2007 at the Wayback Machine "The Kama Sutra is neither a sex-manual nor, as also commonly believed, a sacred or religious work. It is certainly not a tantric text. In opening with a discussion of the three aims of ancient Hindu life – dharma, artha and kamaVatsyayana's purpose is to set kama, or enjoyment of the senses, in context. Thus dharma or virtuous living is the highest aim, artha, the amassing of wealth is next, and kama is the least of the three". —Indra Sinha.
  16. ^ "Books on Indra Sinha's website". Archived from the original on 17 May 2007. Retrieved 1 June 2016..
  17. ^ Shamaila Khan (15 November 2002). "Indra Sinha Interview". BBC Radio Manchester (includes audio link).
  18. ^ Indra Sinha, "Abandoned to their fate", The Guardian, 9 April 2008, accessed 5 December 2009.
  19. ^ Indra Sinha, "Why I'm going on hunger strike for Bhopal", The Guardian, 12 June 2008, accessed 5 December 2009.
  20. ^ a b Indra Sinha, "Bhopal: 25 years of poison", The Guardian, 3 December 2009, accessed 5 December 2009.
  21. ^ Bhopal.net "Behind the mask of Dow" e.cards accessed 5 December 2009. Archived 22 August 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  22. ^ A glimpse behind the mask of Dow Indra Sinha's website blog (cached), accessed 5 December 2009.
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