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Impossible Man

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Impossible Man
FantasticFour-176.jpg
The Impossible Man appears on the cover of Fantastic Four #176 (Nov. 1976). Art by George Perez
Publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearanceFantastic Four #11 (February 1963)
Created byStan Lee (writer)
Jack Kirby (artist)
In-story information
SpeciesPoppupian
Team affiliationsFantastic Four
Lethal Legion
Notable aliasesImpy
Herald of Destruction
The Improbable Guy
Abilities

The Impossible Man is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. He first appeared in Fantastic Four #11 (February 1963), and was created by writer Stan Lee and writer/artist Jack Kirby.[1] The Impossible Man has been featured in other Marvel-endorsed products such as action figures, arcade and video games, animated television series, and merchandise such as trading cards.

The Impossible Man is a Poppupian from the planet Poppup and has shape-changing abilities. The character is primarily used for comedy as he is portrayed as a lonely, attention seeking alien that often annoys those around him, especially the Fantastic Four. Over the years, the Impossible Man created a wife called The Impossible Woman and also had a son named Adolf Impossible.

The Impossible Man has made various appearances in Marvel cartoon series, such as the 1978 and 1994 Fantastic Four series as well as Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes.

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Fiction

Fiction

Fiction is any creative work, chiefly any narrative work, portraying individuals, events, or places that are imaginary, or in ways that are imaginary. Fictional portrayals are thus inconsistent with history, fact, or plausibility. In a traditional narrow sense, "fiction" refers to written narratives in prose – often referring specifically to novels, novellas, and short stories. More broadly, however, fiction encompasses imaginary narratives expressed in any medium, including not just writings but also live theatrical performances, films, television programs, radio dramas, comics, role-playing games, and video games.

Character (arts)

Character (arts)

In fiction, a character is a human or other entity in a narrative. The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made. Derived from the Ancient Greek word χαρακτήρ, the English word dates from the Restoration, although it became widely used after its appearance in Tom Jones by Henry Fielding in 1749. From this, the sense of "a part played by an actor" developed. Character, particularly when enacted by an actor in the theatre or cinema, involves "the illusion of being a human person". In literature, characters guide readers through their stories, helping them to understand plots and ponder themes. Since the end of the 18th century, the phrase "in character" has been used to describe an effective impersonation by an actor. Since the 19th century, the art of creating characters, as practiced by actors or writers, has been called characterisation.

American comic book

American comic book

An American comic book is a thin periodical originating in the United States, on average 32 pages, containing comics. While the form originated in 1933, American comic books first gained popularity after the 1938 publication of Action Comics, which included the debut of the superhero Superman. This was followed by a superhero boom that lasted until the end of World War II. After the war, while superheroes were marginalized, the comic book industry rapidly expanded and genres such as horror, crime, science fiction and romance became popular. The 1950s saw a gradual decline, due to a shift away from print media in the wake of television and the impact of the Comics Code Authority. The late 1950s and the 1960s saw a superhero revival and superheroes remained the dominant character archetype throughout the late 20th century into the 21st century.

Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics is an American comic book publisher and the flagship property of Marvel Entertainment, a division of The Walt Disney Company since September 1, 2009. Evolving from Timely Comics in 1939, Magazine Management/Atlas Comics in 1951 and its predecessor, Marvel Mystery Comics, the Marvel Comics title/name/brand was first used in June 1961.

Fantastic Four (comic book)

Fantastic Four (comic book)

Fantastic Four is the name of several comic book titles featuring the team Fantastic Four and published by Marvel Comics, beginning with the original Fantastic Four comic book series which debuted in 1961.

Stan Lee

Stan Lee

Stan Lee was an American comic book writer, editor, publisher, and producer. He rose through the ranks of a family-run business called Timely Comics which would later become Marvel Comics. He was the primary creative leader for two decades, leading its expansion from a small division of a publishing house to a multimedia corporation that dominated the comics and film industries.

Jack Kirby

Jack Kirby

Jack Kirby was an American comic book artist, writer and editor, widely regarded as one of the medium's major innovators and one of its most prolific and influential creators. He grew up in New York City and learned to draw cartoon figures by tracing characters from comic strips and editorial cartoons. He entered the nascent comics industry in the 1930s, drawing various comics features under different pen names, including Jack Curtiss, before ultimately settling on Jack Kirby. In 1940, he and writer-editor Joe Simon created the highly successful superhero character Captain America for Timely Comics, predecessor of Marvel Comics. During the 1940s, Kirby regularly teamed with Simon, creating numerous characters for that company and for National Comics Publications, later to become DC Comics.

Action figure

Action figure

An action figure is a poseable character model figure made most commonly of plastic, and often based upon characters from a film, comic book, military, video game or television program; fictional or historical. These figures are usually marketed toward boys and adult collectors. The term was coined by Hasbro in 1964 to market G.I. Joe to boys.

Animation

Animation

Animation is a method by which still figures are manipulated to appear as moving images. In traditional animation, images are drawn or painted by hand on transparent celluloid sheets to be photographed and exhibited on film. Today, most animations are made with computer-generated imagery (CGI). Computer animation can be very detailed 3D animation, while 2D computer animation can be used for stylistic reasons, low bandwidth, or faster real-time renderings. Other common animation methods apply a stop motion technique to two- and three-dimensional objects like paper cutouts, puppets, or clay figures.

Trading card

Trading card

A trading card is a small card, usually made out of paperboard or thick paper, which usually contains an image of a certain person, place or thing and a short description of the picture, along with other text. There is a wide variation of different types of cards.

Fantastic Four (1994 TV series)

Fantastic Four (1994 TV series)

Fantastic Four, also known as Fantastic Four: The Animated Series, is the third animated television series based on Marvel's comic book series of the same name. Airing began on September 24, 1994, until ending on February 24, 1996. The series ran for two seasons, with 13 episodes per season, making 26 episodes in total.

Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes

Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes

Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes is an animated television series based on the Marvel Comics' Fantastic Four comic book series. This is the team's fourth foray into animation. The series is co-produced by American company Marvel Entertainment and French company MoonScoop Group, with the participation of M6 and Cartoon Network Europe, and distributed by Taffy Entertainment.

Publication history

The Impossible Man first appeared in Fantastic Four #11 (Feb 1963), and was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. According to Lee in a 1970 interview, this "was the worst-selling Fantastic Four we've ever had". In Lee's opinion, the green alien on the cover was "too unusual and too frivolous."[2]

After a long absence, Impossible Man returned in Fantastic Four #175 (Oct 1976) and visited the Marvel Comics office. At the end of the story, he was adopted by the Fantastic Four. This time, the character became popular.[3] He remained a regular part of the comic until #195 (June 1978), when Sue told him that she was tired of him, and he turned into a bee and flew away.

Originally, there were no limits to Impossible Man's transforming abilities - he convincingly imitated Sue Richards in Fantastic Four #175 (Oct 1976) and President Jimmy Carter in Marvel Two-in-One #27 (May 1977) - but in The New Mutants Annual #3 (Sept 1987), he could only turn into something that was green and purple, and that limitation has stuck ever since.[4]

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Fantastic Four (comic book)

Fantastic Four (comic book)

Fantastic Four is the name of several comic book titles featuring the team Fantastic Four and published by Marvel Comics, beginning with the original Fantastic Four comic book series which debuted in 1961.

Stan Lee

Stan Lee

Stan Lee was an American comic book writer, editor, publisher, and producer. He rose through the ranks of a family-run business called Timely Comics which would later become Marvel Comics. He was the primary creative leader for two decades, leading its expansion from a small division of a publishing house to a multimedia corporation that dominated the comics and film industries.

Jack Kirby

Jack Kirby

Jack Kirby was an American comic book artist, writer and editor, widely regarded as one of the medium's major innovators and one of its most prolific and influential creators. He grew up in New York City and learned to draw cartoon figures by tracing characters from comic strips and editorial cartoons. He entered the nascent comics industry in the 1930s, drawing various comics features under different pen names, including Jack Curtiss, before ultimately settling on Jack Kirby. In 1940, he and writer-editor Joe Simon created the highly successful superhero character Captain America for Timely Comics, predecessor of Marvel Comics. During the 1940s, Kirby regularly teamed with Simon, creating numerous characters for that company and for National Comics Publications, later to become DC Comics.

Jimmy Carter

Jimmy Carter

James Earl Carter Jr. is an American retired politician who served as the 39th president of the United States from 1977 to 1981. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as the 76th governor of Georgia from 1971 to 1975 and as a Georgia state senator from 1963 to 1967. Since leaving office, Carter has remained engaged in political and social projects, receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002 for his humanitarian work.

Marvel Two-in-One

Marvel Two-in-One

Marvel Two-in-One is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics featuring Fantastic Four member the Thing in a different team-up each issue.

New Mutants

New Mutants

The New Mutants are a group of fictional mutant superheroes appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, generally in association with the X-Men. Originally depicted as the teenaged junior class at the Xavier Institute, subsequent stories have depicted the characters as adult superheroes or as teachers and mentors to younger mutants.

Fictional character biography

1960s

When the Impossible Man first appeared, he was different from previous guest stars in that he was not a villain. The team first meet him at the Flamingo restaurant when they are summoned there to investigate a disturbance. Written by Lee to be a prankster and hedonist, the Impossible Man claimed to belong to the alien race of Poppupians from planet Poppup in the "Tenth Galaxy", who all share a collective consciousness and the ability to shapeshift, as their planet is so dangerous they have the ability to evolve very quickly.[5] Seeking amusement, the character visits Earth for a vacation by turning himself into a spaceship, talking of a Poppup Tourist Bureau. After finding the superhero team the Fantastic Four and realizing nobody else on Earth has his power (therefore concluding he is the most powerful being on Earth), he constantly harasses them until they decide to ignore him and tell other people to do the same, forcing the Impossible Man to leave as he finds Earth so boring, and saying Earth will never get their tourist business. He gets his name after the Thing claims he is "impossible".[6]

1970s

The character does not appear again until 1976. Acting as a deus ex machina in a storyline involving the cosmic entity and world-devourer Galactus, the Impossible Man convinces him to consume his homeworld Poppup instead of Earth, causing Galactus to seemingly perish from 'cosmic indigestion'. Since the Poppupians were a shared consciousness they were happy to sacrifice their planet to stop Galactus, knowing that their culture would live on in the embodiment of its most adventurous member.[7] The Impossible Man then makes a humorous appearance at the offices of Marvel Comics, where he causes havoc until Stan Lee promises to give him his own title.[8]

He offers peripheral assistance to the Fantastic Four when they are trapped in the Negative Zone by the Frightful Four, a team of their enemies.[9] The Impossible Man impersonates Jimmy Carter, on the day when he is to be inaugurated as President of the United States and briefly takes his place to foil an attempt to enslave him during an adventure with the Thing and the cyborg Deathlok.[10] He later saves the Invisible Woman from a fall[11] and becomes fascinated with Earth movies.[12] When returning to the Baxter Building, headquarters of the Fantastic Four, the Impossible Man is surprised and defeated by the villain Klaw, who, in an alliance with the Molecule Man, attempts to kill the Fantastic Four.[13] During the course of the storyline, the character recovers and, courtesy of his abilities, mimics and defeats Klaw in turn[14] and assists the Fantastic Four in stopping the Molecule Man.[15] The character continued his trend of general disruption during a visit to Hollywood with the Invisible Girl.[16]

1980s

After helping the Thing defeat several villains at a party, the Impossible Man observes the Thing with his partner Alicia Masters and becomes lonely. The character then decides to reproduce - here an asexual process - by splitting in two. This creates fellow Poppupian the Impossible Woman.[17] The pair later attempt to recreate their race and create the Impossible Kids, with the entire "family" visiting the Thing.[18] When the Impossible Woman is missing, the character hires private investigator Jessica Drew to locate her,[19] and has an encounter with the mutant X-Men after stealing artifacts from Earth to settle a supposed family dispute with the other members of his race.[20]

More comedic adventures followed, with the Impossible Man engaging in a shapeshifting competition with Warlock,[21] causing havoc on an alternate universe version of Earth,[22] and trying to obtain the movie rights to the autobiography of professional sidekick Rick Jones.[23]

1990s

The Impossible Man finds and teases the cosmic being the Silver Surfer on two occasions, pleading for him to develop a sense of humor before battling the titan Thanos.[24] The character returns to Earth and causes more mischief,[25] encounters the hero Daredevil while looking for a lost child,[26] starts a bar fight,[27] watches the Eternal Makkari win a galactic marathon,[28] and invited various otherwise un-contacted heroes and supervillains to the wedding of Rick Jones.[29]

After a brief encounter with the young superhero team the New Warriors,[30] the character enlists the aid of mutant team X-Force to instill some pride in his children,[31] and enters into a wager with the alternate universe imp Mister Mxyzptlk.[32]

2000s

The Impossible Man and the Poppupians make a cameo appearance in Noh-Varr's origin story.[33]

The Impossible Man returns to Earth disguised as the Silver Surfer, and after teasing the hero Spider-Man warns of an alien invasion. The Impossible Man's race are also revealed to have survived, with their consciousness stored inside the character. With the aid of the Fantastic Four, the aliens and the newly reborn Poppupians are transported off world, merging into one race on Spider-Man's suggestion.[34]

2010s

Later during the Chaos War, the Impossible Man confronts Mikaboshi, trying to humor and reason with him while shapeshifting in various forms to divert him, but the Chaos King tires of him and brutally dispatches him. Impossible Man's last words were "I thought we were just playing around..."[35]

Impossible Man returns to Earth where he witnesses a battle between Hulk, Red Hulk, and Xemnu. Impossible Man uses his magic to combine Hulk and Red Hulk into the Compound Hulk. Impossible Man watches as the Compound Hulk fights Xemnu's minion Kluh (a smart version of the Gray Hulk).[36]

Impossible Man is later shown to have a son named Adolf Impossible who has many of his father's fantastic powers and has a much more introverted personality. This caused Impossible Man to label Adolf as "entirely too possible" and plead with the Future Foundation to accept him and allow him to grow as a person.[37]

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Galactus

Galactus

Galactus is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Formerly a mortal man, Galactus is a cosmic entity who consumes planets to sustain his life force, and serves a functional role in the upkeep of the primary Marvel continuity. Galactus was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and first appeared in Fantastic Four #48.

Negative Zone

Negative Zone

The Negative Zone is a fictional setting, an antimatter universe appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The location is depicted in various publications from Marvel, most frequently in Fantastic Four and Captain Marvel. Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, it first appeared in Fantastic Four #51.

Frightful Four

Frightful Four

The Frightful Four are a group of fictional characters appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. They serve as the antithesis to the Fantastic Four.

Jimmy Carter

Jimmy Carter

James Earl Carter Jr. is an American retired politician who served as the 39th president of the United States from 1977 to 1981. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as the 76th governor of Georgia from 1971 to 1975 and as a Georgia state senator from 1963 to 1967. Since leaving office, Carter has remained engaged in political and social projects, receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002 for his humanitarian work.

Deathlok

Deathlok

Deathlok is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. He first appeared in Astonishing Tales #25, created by Rich Buckler. At least three subsequent Marvel characters have used the "Deathlok" identity since then. A recurring theme among these characters is that a dead human has been reanimated with cybernetic technology. "Deathlok technology" has also been used thematically by Marvel writers in other stories.

Invisible Woman

Invisible Woman

The Invisible Woman is a superheroine appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character is a founding member of the Fantastic Four and was the first female superhero created by Marvel during the Silver Age of Comic Books.

Film

Film

A film – also called a movie, motion picture, moving picture, picture, photoplay or (slang) flick – is a work of visual art that simulates experiences and otherwise communicates ideas, stories, perceptions, feelings, beauty, or atmosphere through the use of moving images. These images are generally accompanied by sound and, more rarely, other sensory stimulations. The word "cinema", short for cinematography, is often used to refer to filmmaking and the film industry, and to the art form that is the result of it.

Baxter Building

Baxter Building

The Baxter Building is a fictional 35-story office building appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, the construction first appeared in Fantastic Four #3. The building is depicted in Manhattan, and its five upper floors house the Fantastic Four's headquarters.

Molecule Man

Molecule Man

The Molecule Man is a character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. He first appeared in Fantastic Four #20 in November 1963 and was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. He is often portrayed as a supervillain, but sometimes takes the role of a reformed outlaw or reluctant hero.

Hollywood, Los Angeles

Hollywood, Los Angeles

Hollywood is a neighborhood in the central region of Los Angeles, California. Its name has come to be a shorthand reference for the U.S. film industry and the people associated with it. Many notable film studios, such as Columbia Pictures, Walt Disney Studios, Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros., and Universal Pictures, are located near or in Hollywood.

Alicia Masters

Alicia Masters

Alicia Reiss Masters is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. She is usually depicted as a supporting character to the superheroes the Fantastic Four and Silver Surfer. Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, she first appeared in The Fantastic Four #8.

Autobiography

Autobiography

An autobiography, sometimes informally called an autobio, is a self-written biography of one's own life.

Powers and abilities

The Impossible Man's unique physiology enables him to take on virtually any form via molecular manipulation, an effect commonly accompanied by a "Pop!" sound. He can mimic the properties of objects or humanoid beings at will. Almost every feature the Impossible Man copies another superhuman's appearance and their powers, such as Thor,[38] Klaw,[39] or even Wolverine.[40] He has the ability to travel through hyperspace across different universes, psionically levitate himself, and reproduce asexually. The Impossible Man and his mate are able to survive in the vacuum of space for months without sustenance by inducing a low-metabolic rate onto themselves.[41]

The Impossible Man possesses total knowledge of Earth's popular culture.

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Sound effect

Sound effect

A sound effect is an artificially created or enhanced sound, or sound process used to emphasize artistic or other content of films, television shows, live performance, animation, video games, music, or other media. Traditionally, in the twentieth century, they were created with foley. In motion picture and television production, a sound effect is a sound recorded and presented to make a specific storytelling or creative point without the use of dialogue or music. The term often refers to a process applied to a recording, without necessarily referring to the recording itself. In professional motion picture and television production, dialogue, music, and sound effects recordings are treated as separate elements. Dialogue and music recordings are never referred to as sound effects, even though the processes applied to such as reverberation or flanging effects, often are called "sound effects".

Superhuman

Superhuman

The term superhuman refers to humans or human-like beings with enhanced qualities and abilities that exceed those naturally found in humans. These qualities may be acquired through natural ability, self-actualization or technological aids. The related concept of a super race refers to an entire category of beings with the same or varying superhuman characteristics, created from present-day human beings by deploying various means such as eugenics, euthenics, genetic engineering, nanotechnology, and/or brain–computer interfacing to accelerate the process of human evolution.

Thor (Marvel Comics)

Thor (Marvel Comics)

Thor Odinson is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character is based on the Norse mythological god of the same name, the Asgardian god of thunder whose enchanted hammer Mjolnir enables him to fly and manipulate weather, among his other superhuman attributes. A founding member of the superhero team the Avengers, Thor has a host of supporting characters and enemies.

Wolverine (character)

Wolverine (character)

Wolverine is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, mostly in association with the X-Men. He is a mutant who possesses animal-keen senses, enhanced physical capabilities, a powerful regenerative ability known as a healing factor, and three retractable claws in each hand. Wolverine has been depicted variously as a member of the X-Men, X-Force, Alpha Flight, the Fantastic Four, and the Avengers.

Asexual reproduction

Asexual reproduction

Asexual reproduction is a type of reproduction that does not involve the fusion of gametes or change in the number of chromosomes. The offspring that arise by asexual reproduction from either unicellular or multicellular organisms inherit the full set of genes of their single parent and thus the newly created individual is genetically and physically similar to the parent or an exact clone of the parent. Asexual reproduction is the primary form of reproduction for single-celled organisms such as archaea and bacteria. Many eukaryotic organisms including plants, animals, and fungi can also reproduce asexually. In vertebrates, the most common form of asexual reproduction is parthenogenesis, which is typically used as an alternative to sexual reproduction in times when reproductive opportunities are limited. Komodo dragons and some monitor lizards can also reproduce asexually.

Other versions

Wha...Huh?

Impossible Man appears in the spoof comic "Wha...Huh?" in the segment titled "What If Identity Crisis Happened in the Marvel Universe". He appears as a villain that few of the heroes remember.[42]

The Cross-Time Caper

The Impossible Man appears in Excalibur, during the Cross-Time Caper. He has populated an analogue of the Earth with multiple twisted versions of the superheroes of the Marvel Universe (such as Daredevil, the 'Man without Common Sense'). This version of the Earth is destroyed by Galactus, who deems it "Too silly to be allowed to exist", and deems the Impossible Man as "In your own way... as great a threat as the Phoenix". Once Galactus leaves, Impossible Man repopulates the planet effortlessly, allowing the mayhem to begin again. His powers in this reality generate a 'Pip' rather than a 'Pop'.[43]

In other media

Television

  • The Impossible Man appears in a self-titled episode of the 1978 Fantastic Four series, voiced by Frank Welker.
  • The Impossible Man appears in the 1994 Fantastic Four series episode "Hopelessly Impossible", voiced by Jess Harnell.
  • The Impossible Man appears in Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes, voiced by Terry Klassen.
  • The Impossible Man appears in The Super Hero Squad Show, voiced again by Jess Harnell.[44] After making a minor appearance in the episode "Tremble at the Might of... M.O.D.O.K.!", the Impossible Man appears in the episode "Missing: Impossible!" to live with the Super Hero Squad after being kicked out by his wife. Unable to handle his mischief, the heroes decide to help him restore his relationship by having him fight the Dark Surfer. In the subsequent duel, the Impossible Man inadvertently creates a black hole until the Super Hero Squad and Mister Fantastic help him close it. In the aftermath, Impossible Man and his wife reconcile.
  • The Impossible Man appears in the Avengers Assemble episode "Avengers: Impossible", voiced by Tom Kenny.[44] While evading the Chitauri, he arrives on Earth, where he witnesses Falcon and the Avengers fighting the Wrecking Crew. Impossible Man frees the latter and traps the former so Falcon can single-handedly defeat the Wrecking Crew instead as part of a show about the hero. The Avengers fight back and temporarily trap Impossible Man, but he escapes and summons Attuma, Ulik, the Midgard Serpent, and Wendigo so Falcon can defeat them as well, but the hero forces him to send the villains away. When the Chitauri arrive on Earth, Falcon "deputizes" Impossible Man as an Avenger so the latter can help his team fend them off.
  • Impossible Man appears in the Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. episode "Mission Impossible Man",[45] voiced again by Tom Kenny.[44] He arrives at the agents of S.M.A.S.H.'s base posing as Fin Fang Foom and fights them until the Hulk sees through his ploy. Impossible Man voices his desire to join the agents of S.M.A.S.H. and combines the Hulk and Red Hulk into a Two-Headed Compound Hulk. When Sauron attacks a nearby amusement park, Impossible Man joins the agents of S.M.A.S.H. in fending him off, only to lose his powers to the villain, who uses them to summon the real Fin Fang Foom. When the monster knocks Sauron away, Impossible Man regains his powers and borrows a device from Hank Pym's laboratory to enlarge the Two-Headed Compound Hulk so they can defeat Fin Fang Foom before separating the two Hulks, who send Impossible Man away.

Video games

In the online MMO Super Hero Squad Online, the player can find the Impossible Man hiding all around town. If the player finds him five times with the same character, the player can fight him.

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Frank Welker

Frank Welker

Franklin Wendell Welker is an American voice actor. He began his career in the 1960s, and holds over 860 film, television, and video game credits as of 2022, making him one of the most prolific voice actors of all time. With a total worldwide box-office gross of $17.4 billion, he is also the third-highest-grossing actor of all time.

Fantastic Four (1994 TV series)

Fantastic Four (1994 TV series)

Fantastic Four, also known as Fantastic Four: The Animated Series, is the third animated television series based on Marvel's comic book series of the same name. Airing began on September 24, 1994, until ending on February 24, 1996. The series ran for two seasons, with 13 episodes per season, making 26 episodes in total.

Jess Harnell

Jess Harnell

Jess Harnell is an American voice actor and singer. His notable roles include Captain Hero in the animated TV series Drawn Together, Wakko Warner in Animaniacs, Ironhide in the first three Transformers films produced by Michael Bay, and Crash Bandicoot in the video game franchise of the same name. Harnell has also been the announcer for America's Funniest Home Videos since 1998.

Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes

Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes

Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes is an animated television series based on the Marvel Comics' Fantastic Four comic book series. This is the team's fourth foray into animation. The series is co-produced by American company Marvel Entertainment and French company MoonScoop Group, with the participation of M6 and Cartoon Network Europe, and distributed by Taffy Entertainment.

Terry Klassen

Terry Klassen

Terry Klassen is a Canadian voice actor, ADR director and writer. Before animation, Klassen worked in radio in Winnipeg (CITI-FM), Toronto (Q107), Calgary (CFAC), Portage la Prairie (CFRY) and part-time at CFOX and CFMI. In animation, he is best known for his work on My Little Pony being voice director of all episodes including the movie and the Equestria Girls series. Klassen has also voiced many characters including Baby Sylvester in Baby Looney Tunes, Tusky Husky in Krypto the Superdog and Tony and Seth Parsons in The Cramp Twins.

Avengers Assemble (TV series)

Avengers Assemble (TV series)

Avengers Assemble is an American animated television series based on the fictional Marvel Comics superhero team known as the Avengers. Designed to capitalize on the success of the 2012 film The Avengers, the series premiered on Disney XD on May 26, 2013, as the successor to The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes.

Chitauri

Chitauri

The Chitauri are a fictional race of extraterrestrial shapeshifters appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, specifically in Ultimate Marvel. They were created by Mark Millar and Bryan Hitch for the Ultimate universe franchise in place of the existing Marvel Comics alien species, the Skrulls, which play a similar role in the franchise's mainstream continuity. Marvel later chose to distinguish between the Skrulls and Chitauri of the Ultimate universe. The race first appeared in Ultimates #8, and later had counterparts on Earth-616.

Falcon (comics)

Falcon (comics)

Falcon is a superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character was introduced by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist Gene Colan in Captain America #117, and was the first Black American superhero in mainstream comic books.

Avengers (comics)

Avengers (comics)

The Avengers are a team of superheroes appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby, the team made its debut in The Avengers #1. Labeled "Earth's Mightiest Heroes," the original Avengers consisted of Iron Man, Ant-Man, Hulk, Thor and the Wasp. Captain America was discovered trapped in ice in issue #4, and joined the group after they revived him.

Attuma

Attuma

Attuma is a supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. He is an Atlantean nomadic warlord who is usually depicted as an enemy of Namor the Sub-Mariner, and is the father of the superhero Andromeda. He believes he is the prophesied conqueror of the Atlantean Empire.

Midgard Serpent (Marvel Comics)

Midgard Serpent (Marvel Comics)

Jormungand, also known as the Midgard Serpent and the World Serpent, is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character, based on the serpent Jörmungandr from Norse mythology, first appears in Marvel Tales #105, in the period between the Golden Age of Comic Books and the Silver Age of Comic Books.

Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H.

Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H.

Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. is an American animated television series based on the superhero character by Marvel Comics. The series premiered on August 11, 2013, on Disney XD as part of the Marvel Universe block, and ended on June 28, 2015.

Source: "Impossible Man", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 1st), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impossible_Man.

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References
  1. ^ Markstein, Don. "The Impossible Man". Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Retrieved 2 April 2020.
  2. ^ Fingeroth, Danny; Thomas, Roy (2011). The Stan Lee Universe. TwoMorrows Publishing. pp. 97–102. ISBN 978-1605490304.
  3. ^ Brevoort, Tom; DeFalco, Tom; Manning, Matthew K.; Sanderson, Peter; Wiacek, Win (2017). Marvel Year By Year: A Visual History. DK Publishing. p. 90. ISBN 978-1465455505.
  4. ^ Cronin, Brian (June 14, 2019). "When The Impossible Man Got Stuck With the Colors Purple and Green!". CBR.com. Retrieved 18 January 2020.
  5. ^ DeFalco, Tom; Sanderson, Peter; Brevoort, Tom; Teitelbaum, Michael; Wallace, Daniel; Darling, Andrew; Forbeck, Matt; Cowsill, Alan; Bray, Adam (2019). The Marvel Encyclopedia. DK Publishing. p. 184. ISBN 978-1-4654-7890-0.
  6. ^ Fantastic Four Vol 1 #11 (February 1963)
  7. ^ Fantastic Four #175 (Oct. 1976)
  8. ^ Fantastic Four #176 (Nov. 1976)
  9. ^ Fantastic Four #177-178 (Dec. 1976-Jan. 1977)
  10. ^ Marvel Two-In-One #27 (May 1977)
  11. ^ Fantastic Four #183 (June. 1977)
  12. ^ Fantastic Four #184-185 (July - Aug. 1977)
  13. ^ Fantastic Four #186 (Sep. 1977)
  14. ^ Fantastic Four #187 (Oct. 1977)
  15. ^ Fantastic Four #188 (Nov. 1977)
  16. ^ Fantastic Four #193-195 (Apr.-July 1978)
  17. ^ Marvel Two-In-One #60 (Feb. 1980)
  18. ^ Marvel Two-in-One #86
  19. ^ Spider-Woman #45 (Aug. 1982)
  20. ^ The Uncanny X-Men Annual #7 (Dec. 1983)
  21. ^ The New Mutants Annual #3 (Jan. 1987)
  22. ^ Excalibur #14 (Nov. 1989)
  23. ^ Avengers Spotlight #25 (Nov. 1989)
  24. ^ Silver Surfer vol. 3 #33 (Jan. 1990) & #36 (Apr. 1990)
  25. ^ Impossible Man Summer Vacation Spectacular #1 & 2 (Aug. 1990 & 1991)
  26. ^ Marvel Comics Presents #91 (Dec. 1991)
  27. ^ Marvel Comics Presents #97 (June 1992)
  28. ^ Quasar #58 (May 1994)
  29. ^ The Incredible Hulk vol. 2 #417 (June 1994)
  30. ^ Marvel Comics Presents #162 (Sep. 1994)
  31. ^ X-Force & Cable Annual (Dec. 1995)
  32. ^ Silver Surfer/Superman (Nov. 1996)
  33. ^ Marvel Boy #5 (Dec. 2000)
  34. ^ Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four #1-4 (May - Aug. 2007)
  35. ^ Chaos War: Chaos King #1
  36. ^ Hulk vol. 2 #30
  37. ^ FF vol. 2 #11
  38. ^ Fantastic Four Annual Vol 1 #3 (October 1965)
  39. ^ Fantastic Four #187 (Oct. 1976)
  40. ^ Silver Surfer vol. 3, #31 (Apr. 1990)
  41. ^ The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe Vol 1 #5 (May 1983)
  42. ^ Wha...Huh? #1 (January 2005)
  43. ^ Excaliber Vol 1 #14 (November 1989)
  44. ^ a b c "Impossible Man Voice – Fantastic Four franchise | Behind The Voice Actors". Behind The Voice Actors. Retrieved December 20, 2019. Check mark indicates role has been confirmed using screenshots of closing credits and other reliable sources.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: postscript (link)
  45. ^ "February 2014 premieres on Disney Channel / Disney XD". www.toonzone.net. Archived from the original on 2014-02-02.
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