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Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010

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Eurovision Song Contest 2010
Country Iceland
National selection
Selection processSöngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2010
Selection date(s)Semi-finals:
9 January 2010
16 January 2010
23 January 2010
Final:
6 February 2010
Selected entrantHera Björk
Selected song"Je ne sais quoi"
Selected songwriter(s)
Finals performance
Semi-final resultQualified (3rd, 123 points)
Final result19th, 41 points
Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest
◄2009 2010 2011►

Iceland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010 with the song "Je ne sais quoi", written by Örlygur Smári and Hera Björk and performed by Björk. The Icelandic entry for the 2010 contest in Oslo, Norway was selected through the national final Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2010, organised by the Icelandic broadcaster Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV). The selection process consisted of three semi-finals and a final, held on 9 January, 16 January, 23 January and 6 February 2010, respectively. Five songs competed in each semi-final with the top two as selected by a public televote advancing to the final. In the final, "Je ne sais quoi" performed by Björk emerged as the winner exclusively through public televoting. Promotional activities for the entry included the release of a music video and album and performances of the song in Norway and at the UKeurovision Preview Party in London.

Iceland was drawn to compete in the first semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest which took place on 25 May 2010. Performing as the closing entry of the show in position 17, "Je ne sais quoi" was announced among the top 10 entries of the first semi-final and therefore qualified to compete in the final on 29 May. It was later revealed that the Iceland placed third out of the 17 participating countries in the semi-final with 123 points. In the final, Iceland performed in position 16 and placed 19th out of the 25 participating countries, scoring 41 points.

Discover more about Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010 related topics

Iceland

Iceland

Iceland is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic Ocean and in the Arctic Ocean. Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in Europe. Iceland's capital and largest city is Reykjavík, which is home to over 65% of the population. Iceland is the biggest part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that rises above sea level, and its central volcanic plateau is erupting almost constantly. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, and many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence keep summers chilly, and most of its islands have a polar climate.

Eurovision Song Contest 2010

Eurovision Song Contest 2010

The Eurovision Song Contest 2010 was the 55th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Oslo, Norway, following the country's victory at the 2009 contest with the song "Fairytale" by Alexander Rybak. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Norsk rikskringkasting (NRK), the contest was held at the Telenor Arena, and consisted of two semi-finals on 25 and 27 May, and a final on 29 May 2010, tying with the 1999 edition for the contest hosted the latest. The three live shows were presented by Norwegian television presenters Erik Solbakken and Nadia Hasnaoui and singer Haddy N'jie.

Je ne sais quoi (song)

Je ne sais quoi (song)

"Je ne sais quoi" is an Icelandic eurodance song composed by Örlygur Smári and Hera Björk and performed by Hera Björk, and was the Icelandic entry at the Eurovision Song Contest 2010, held in Oslo, Norway on 25, 27 and 29 May 2010. The performance took place in the first semi-final on 25 May and was performed again in the final, four days later. The song is performed in English with some phrases in French. "Je ne sais quoi" was the winner of the Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2010 contest, organised by Icelandic broadcaster Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV) to select the Icelandic entry for the contest. Despite being one of the early favorites and the fans' favorite to win the contest and finishing 3rd with 123 points in the semi-final, the song ended up finishing 19th with 41 points.

Örlygur Smári

Örlygur Smári

Örlygur Smári is an Icelandic producer/composer.

Hera Björk

Hera Björk

Hera Björk Þórhallsdóttir is an Icelandic singer. She is known for representing Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010 with the song "Je ne sais quoi" and her participation at Viña del Mar International Song Festival 2013, in Chile. She represented Iceland in the International Competition and she won in the Best Song category.

Oslo

Oslo

Oslo is the capital and most populous city of Norway. It constitutes both a county and a municipality. The municipality of Oslo had a population of 702,543 in 2022, while the city's greater urban area had a population of 1,019,513 in 2019, and the metropolitan area had an estimated population of 1,546,706 in 2021.

Söngvakeppnin

Söngvakeppnin

Söngvakeppnin is an annual music competition organised by Icelandic public broadcaster Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV). It determines the country's representative for the Eurovision Song Contest.

Music video

Music video

A music video is a video of variable duration, that integrates a music song or a music album with imagery that is produced for promotional or musical artistic purposes. Modern music videos are primarily made and used as a music marketing device intended to promote the sale of music recordings.

Background

Prior to the 2010 contest, Iceland had participated in the Eurovision Song Contest twenty-two times since its first entry in 1986.[1] Iceland's best placing in the contest to this point was second, which it achieved on two occasions: in 1999 with the song "All Out of Luck" performed by Selma and in 2009 with the song "Is It True?" performed by Yohanna. Since the introduction of a semi-final to the format of the Eurovision Song Contest in 2004, Iceland has, to this point, only failed to qualify to the final three times.[1]

The Icelandic national broadcaster, Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV), broadcasts the event within Iceland and organises the selection process for the nation's entry. RÚV confirmed their intentions to participate in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010 on 9 September 2009.[2] Since 2006, Iceland has used a national final to select their entry for the Eurovision Song Contest, a method that continued for their 2010 participation.[a]

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Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Iceland has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 34 times since its debut in 1986, missing only two contests since then, in 1998 and 2002, when prevented from competing due to finishing outside qualification places the preceding years. The country's best result is two second-place finishes, with Selma in 1999 and Yohanna in 2009.

Selma Björnsdóttir

Selma Björnsdóttir

Selma Björnsdóttir, also known as simply Selma or Selma Björns, is an Icelandic actress and singer born in Reykjavík, best known internationally for representing Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest in both 1999 and 2005.

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2009

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2009

Iceland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2009 with the song "Is It True?" written by Óskar Páll Sveinsson, Tinatin Japaridze and Christopher Neil. The song was performed by Yohanna, which is the artistic name of singer Jóhanna Guðrún Jónsdóttir. The Icelandic entry for the 2009 contest in Moscow, Russia was selected through the national final Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2009, organised by the Icelandic broadcaster Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV). The selection consisted of four semi-finals and a final, held on 10 January, 17 January, 24 January, 31 January and 14 February 2009, respectively. Four songs competed in each semi-final with the top two as selected by a public televote advancing to the final. In the final, "Is It True?" performed by Yohanna emerged as the winner exclusively through public televoting.

Is It True? (Yohanna song)

Is It True? (Yohanna song)

"Is It True?" is a song by Icelandic singer Yohanna, the Icelandic entry in the Eurovision Song Contest 2009 in Moscow, Russia. The song was composed by Óskar Páll Sveinsson and won second place in the contest. The song was also recorded in Spanish, German, Russian and French.

Eurovision Song Contest 2004

Eurovision Song Contest 2004

The Eurovision Song Contest 2004 was the 49th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Istanbul, Turkey, following the country's victory at the 2003 contest with the song "Everyway That I Can" by Sertab Erener. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Turkish Radio and Television Corporation (TRT), the contest was held at the Abdi İpekçi Arena, and, for the first time, consisted of a semi-final on 12 May, and a final on 15 May 2004. The two live shows were presented by Turkish actors Korhan Abay and Meltem Cumbul. It was the first time that Turkey had hosted the contest, 29 years after the country made its debut, and was also the first time since the 1998 contest in Birmingham that it was not hosted in the host country's capital city. This was the only edition of the contest that was hosted in a city other than the host nation's capital in the 21st century, until Germany picked Düsseldorf as the host city for the 2011 edition.

Before Eurovision

Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2010

The logo of Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2010
The logo of Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2010

Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2010 was the national final format developed by RÚV to select Iceland's entry for the Eurovision Song Contest 2010. It consisted of five shows (three semi-finals, a summary show and a final), hosted by Ragnhildur Steinunn Jónsdóttir and Eva María Jónsdóttir, all taking place at the RÚV studios in Reykjavík. Fifteen songs competed in total, with five in each respective semi-final on held 9, 16 and 23 January 2010.[4] The top two songs from each semi-final qualified to the final which took place on 6 February 2010. The results of the semi-finals and final were determined by public televoting.[5] The semi-finals and final were broadcast on RÚV and online at the broadcaster's official website ruv.is. The final was also streamed online at the Eurovision Song Contest official website eurovision.tv.[6]

Competing entries

On 9 September 2009, RÚV opened the submission period for interested songwriters to submit their entries until the deadline on 5 October 2009. Songwriters were required to be Icelandic or possess Icelandic citizenship and could submit up to three entries. Non-Icelandic songwriters could also participate in the competition if they joined with an Icelandic singer.[2] At the close of the submission deadline, 150 entries were received.[7] A selection committee was then formed to select the top fourteen entries, while an additional entry came from Óskar Páll Sveinsson, composer of the winning song from the year prior, who had been invited to the competition by RÚV.[8] The fifteen competing artists and songs were revealed by the broadcaster on 18 December 2009.[4][9]

Competing entries[4]
Artist Song Songwriter(s)
Anna Hlín "Komdu á morgun til mín" Grétar Sigurbergsson
Arnar Jónsson "Þúsund stjörnur" Jóhannes Kári Kristinsson
Edgar Smári Atlason "Now and Forever" Albert Guðmann Jónsson, Albert Guðmann Jónsson, Katrín Halldórsdóttir
Hera Björk "Je ne sais quoi" Örlygur Smári, Hera Björk
Hvanndalsbræður "Gleði og glens" Rögnvaldur Rögnvaldsson
Íris Hólm "The One" Birgir Jóhann Birgisson, Ingvi Þór Kormáksson
Jógvan Hansen "One More Day" Óskar Páll Sveinsson, Bubbi Morthens
Karen Pálsdóttir "In the Future" Bryndís Sunna Valdimarsdóttir, Daði Georgsson, Bryndís Sunna Valdimarsdóttir
Kolbrún Eva Viktorsdóttir "You Are the One" Haraldur G. Ásmundsson, Kolbrún Eva Viktorsdóttir
Matthías Matthíasson "Out of Sight" Matthías Stefánsson
Menn ársins "Gefst ekki upp" Haraldur Vignir Sveinbjörnsson, Sváfnir Sigurðarson
Sigrún Vala Baldursdóttir "I Believe in Angels" Halldór Guðjónsson, Ronald Kerst
Sigurjón Brink "Waterslide" Sigurjón Brink
"You Knocked Upon My Door" Jóhannes Kári Kristinsson
Steinarr Logi Nesheim "Every Word" Steinarr Logi Nesheim

Shows

Semi-finals

The three semi-finals took place on 9, 16 and 23 January 2010. In each semi-final five acts presented their entries, and the top two entries voted upon solely by public televoting proceeded to the final.[10][11][12] The shows also featured guest performances by Ingó and 2009 Icelandic Eurovision entrant Yohanna in the first semi-final. Yohanna and Ingó covered the 2000 Icelandic Eurovision entry "Tell Me!" and the song "It Ain't Me Babe".[13]

Semi-final 1 – 9 January 2010[4][10]
Draw Artist Song Result
1 Íris Hólm "The One" Advanced
2 Matthías Matthíasson "Out of Sight" Advanced
3 Sigurjón Brink "You Knocked Upon My Door" Eliminated
4 Kolbrún Eva Viktorsdóttir "You Are the One" Eliminated
5 Karen Pálsdóttir "In the Future" Eliminated
Semi-final 2 – 16 January 2010[4][11]
Draw Artist Song Result
1 Menn ársins "Gefst ekki upp" Eliminated
2 Hvanndalsbræður "Gleði og glens" Advanced
3 Sigrún Vala Baldursdóttir "I Believe in Angels" Eliminated
4 Jógvan Hansen "One More Day" Advanced
5 Edgar Smári Atlason "Now and Forever" Eliminated
Semi-final 3 – 23 January 2010[4][12]
Draw Artist Song Result
1 Arnar Jónsson "Þúsund stjörnur" Eliminated
2 Sigurjón Brink "Waterslide" Advanced
3 Hera Björk "Je ne sais quoi" Advanced
4 Steinarr Logi Nesheim "Every Word" Eliminated
5 Anna Hlín "Komdu á morgun til mín" Eliminated

Final

The final took place on 6 February 2010 where the six entries that qualified from the preceding three semi-finals competed. After a first round of televoting, "Je ne sais quoi" performed by Hera Björk and "One More Day" by Jógvan Hansen were selected to go against each other for a "superfinal". The winner of the two, selected solely by televoting, was "Je ne sais quoi"; the placings of the other four songs were not revealed.[14][15] Björk's prior Eurovision exposure included providing backing vocals for the Icelandic entries in 2008 and 2009, and placing second in Denmark's 2009 national final Dansk Melodi Grand Prix 2009 with the song "Someday".[16] "Je ne sais quoi" was cowritten by Björk and Örlygur Smári, the latter of whom had previously written Eurovision entries for Iceland in 1997, 2000 and 2008.[17] In addition to the performances of the competing artists, the show was opened by a medley featuring 1997 Icelandic Eurovision entrant Páll Óskar, 1999 and 2005 Icelandic Eurovision entrant Selma, and 2008 Icelandic Eurovision entrant Euroband covering past Eurovision entries, while the interval acts featured guest performances by Haffi Haff and Yohanna.[18]

Final – 6 February 2010[14]
Draw Artist Song Place
1 Íris Hólm "The One"
2 Matthías Matthíasson "Out of Sight"
3 Hvanndalsbræður "Gleði og glens"
4 Jógvan Hansen "One More Day" 2
5 Sigurjón Brink "Waterslide"
6 Hera Björk "Je ne sais quoi" 1

Promotion

To promote the entry, a music video for "Je ne sais quoi" was released on 30 April 2010,[19] and the song served as a title track of Björk's album Je ne sais quoi, which was released on 18 May, days before the contest.[20][21] Amongst the 12 tracks, the album contained four versions of the song, including Eurovision, ballad, French-language and sing-along.[21] Björk performed the song live at the UKeurovision Preview Party in London on 2 May,[22] and also attended a party in Norway on 20 May at the home of Iceland's ambassador to Norway, where she performed both the ballad and Eurovision versions of the song.[23] In an interview with ESC Radio, Björk noted that the ongoing eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano at the time brought additional awareness to Iceland, and indirectly to her entry.[20] She would later be seen holding a smoking volcano prop in the green room of the contest.[24]

Discover more about Before Eurovision related topics

Ragnhildur Steinunn Jónsdóttir

Ragnhildur Steinunn Jónsdóttir

Ragnhildur Steinunn Jónsdóttir is an Icelandic actress and television presenter who is the assistant director of RÚV, the Icelandic national broadcaster. She is a former Miss Iceland.

Reykjavík

Reykjavík

Reykjavík is the capital and largest city of Iceland. It is located in southwestern Iceland, on the southern shore of Faxaflói bay. Its latitude is 64°08' N, making it the world's northernmost capital of a sovereign state. With a population of around 131,136, it is the centre of Iceland's cultural, economic, and governmental activity, and is a popular tourist destination.

Hera Björk

Hera Björk

Hera Björk Þórhallsdóttir is an Icelandic singer. She is known for representing Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010 with the song "Je ne sais quoi" and her participation at Viña del Mar International Song Festival 2013, in Chile. She represented Iceland in the International Competition and she won in the Best Song category.

Je ne sais quoi (song)

Je ne sais quoi (song)

"Je ne sais quoi" is an Icelandic eurodance song composed by Örlygur Smári and Hera Björk and performed by Hera Björk, and was the Icelandic entry at the Eurovision Song Contest 2010, held in Oslo, Norway on 25, 27 and 29 May 2010. The performance took place in the first semi-final on 25 May and was performed again in the final, four days later. The song is performed in English with some phrases in French. "Je ne sais quoi" was the winner of the Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2010 contest, organised by Icelandic broadcaster Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV) to select the Icelandic entry for the contest. Despite being one of the early favorites and the fans' favorite to win the contest and finishing 3rd with 123 points in the semi-final, the song ended up finishing 19th with 41 points.

Jógvan Hansen

Jógvan Hansen

Jógvan Hansen is a Faroese singer, musician and actor who won the first ever Icelandic version of The X Factor in 2007 with 70% of the popular vote. His album Rooftop and the title single were #1 in Iceland. Prior to his solo career, he was in the music formations Aria and Kular Røtur

Bubbi Morthens

Bubbi Morthens

Bubbi Morthens is an Icelandic-Danish-Norwegian singer and songwriter. Aside from a lengthy solo career, he has been a member of such Icelandic bands as Utangarðsmenn and Egó.

Matthías Matthíasson

Matthías Matthíasson

Matthías Matthíasson is an Icelandic musician best known for being the vocalist of the Icelandic tribute band Sjonni's Friends and being the singing voice of Sportacus in the children's television series LazyTown.

Haraldur Vignir Sveinbjörnsson

Haraldur Vignir Sveinbjörnsson

Haraldur Vignir Sveinbjörnsson is an Icelandic composer and arranger.

Sjonni Brink

Sjonni Brink

Sigurjón Brink, better known as Sjonni Brink or just the mononym Sjonni, was an Icelandic musician and singer. He was one of the founders of the Icelandic theatre group Vesturport, which received the honourable Europe Theatre Prize in St. Petersburg.

Ingólfur Þórarinsson

Ingólfur Þórarinsson

Ingólfur Þórarinsson, commonly known as Ingó Veðurguð, is an Icelandic singer and songwriter and a former footballer. He plays with the band Ingó og Veðurguðirnir, best known for the 2008 hit song "Bahama" and the 2009 song "Gestalistinn".

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000

Iceland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000 with the song "Tell Me!" written by Örlygur Smári and Sigurður Örn Jónsson. The song was performed by August and Telma, which are the artistic names of singers Einar Ágúst Víðisson and Telma Ágústsdóttir. The Icelandic entry for the 2000 contest in Stockholm, Sweden was selected through the national final Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2000, organised by the Icelandic broadcaster Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV). Five songs competed in the selection which was held on 26 February 2000. "Hvert sem er" performed by Einar Ágúst Víðisson and Telma Ágústsdóttir emerged as the winner exclusively through public televoting. The song was later translated from Icelandic to English for the Eurovision Song Contest and was titled "Tell Me!".

It Ain't Me Babe

It Ain't Me Babe

"It Ain't Me Babe" is a song by Bob Dylan that originally appeared on his fourth album Another Side of Bob Dylan, which was released in 1964 by Columbia Records. According to music critic Oliver Trager, this song, along with others on the album, marked a departure for Dylan as he began to explore the possibilities of language and deeper levels of the human experience. Within a year of its release, the song was picked up as a single by folk rock act the Turtles and country artist Johnny Cash.

At Eurovision

Hera Björk at the Eurovision Opening Party in Oslo
Hera Björk at the Eurovision Opening Party in Oslo

The Eurovision Song Contest 2010 took place at Telenor Arena in Oslo, Norway, and consisted of two semi-finals held on 25 and 27 May, respectively, and the final on 29 May 2010.[25] According to the Eurovision rules, all participating countries, except the host nation and the "Big Four", consisting of France, Germany, Spain and the United Kingdom, were required to qualify from one of the two semi-finals to compete for the final, although the top 10 countries from the respective semi-final progress to the final.[26] The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) split up the competing countries into five different pots based on voting patterns from previous contests evaluated by Digame, in order to decrease the influence of neighbour and diaspora voting.[27][28] On 7 February 2010, an allocation draw was held which placed each country into one of the two semi-finals and determined which half of the show they would perform in. Iceland was placed into the first semi-final, to be held on 25 May 2010, and was scheduled to perform in the second half of the show.[29] The running order for the semi-finals was decided through another draw on 23 March 2010 with the nation set to perform last (17th), following the entry from Belarus.[30] The two semi-finals and the final were broadcast in Iceland on RÚV with commentary by Sigmar Guðmundsson.[31][32]

Performances

Hera Björk during a rehearsal before the first semi-final
Hera Björk during a rehearsal before the first semi-final

Hera Björk took part in technical rehearsals on 17 and 21 May,[33][34] followed by dress rehearsals on 24 and 25 May.[35] This included the jury show on 24 May where the professional juries of each country watched and voted on the competing entries. On the day of the first semi-final, Iceland was considered by bookmakers to be the third most likely country to advance into the final.[36] The Icelandic performance featured Björk in a wine red dress designed by Uniform, joined on stage by three female and two male backing vocalists dressed in red and black outfits. The female backing vocalists also performed choreography with Björk during the performance. The stage backdrop displayed a starry night sky with a purple hue which later transitioned into blue, red and yellow pulsating lights with quick flickering intervals.[34][37][38] In speaking about her stage performance, Björk remarked that "The red colour of the dress is just my colour. I had a vision about four years ago with me standing on a big stage in a flowing red dress with lots of flags, and I'm staying true to that vision with this dress."[37] The backing vocalists that joined Björk were: Erna Hrönn Ólafsdóttir, Heiða Ólafsdóttir, Kristján Gíslason, Kristjana Stefánsdóttir and Pétur Örn Guðmundsson. Kristján Gíslason previously represented Iceland in 2001 as part of Two Tricky.[39]

At the end of the first semi-final, held on 25 May, Iceland was announced as having finished in the top 10, subsequently qualifying for the final. It was later revealed that Iceland had placed third in the semi-final, receiving a total of 112 points.[40] Shortly after the first semi-final, a winners' press conference was held for the ten qualifying countries. As part of this press conference, the qualifying artists took part in a draw to determine the running order for the final. This draw was done in the order the countries were announced during the semi-final. Iceland was drawn to perform in position 16, following the entry from Albania and preceding the entry from Ukraine.[41] In the following days, Björk once again took part in dress rehearsals on 28 and 29 May, including the jury final where the professional juries cast their final votes before the live show. Björk then performed a repeat of her semi-final performance during the final on 29 May. At the end of the contest, Iceland placed nineteenth in the final, scoring 41 points.[42]

Voting

Voting during the three shows involved each country awarding points from 1-8, 10 and 12 as determined by a combination of 50% national jury and 50% televoting. Each nation's jury consisted of five music industry professionals who are citizens of the country they represent. This jury judged each entry based on: vocal capacity; the stage performance; the song's composition and originality; and the overall impression by the act. In addition, no member of a national jury was permitted to be related in any way to any of the competing acts in such a way that they cannot vote impartially and independently.[26]

Following the release of the full split voting by the EBU after the conclusion of the competition, it was revealed that Iceland had placed fifteenth with the public televote and nineteenth with the jury vote in the final. In the public vote, Iceland scored 40 points, while with the jury vote, Iceland scored 57 points. In the first semi-final, Iceland placed second with the public televote with 149 points and sixth with the jury vote, scoring 85 points.[43]

Below is a breakdown of points awarded to Iceland and awarded by Iceland in the first semi-final and final of the contest. The nation awarded its 12 points to Belgium in the semi-final and to Denmark in the final of the contest. It received 12 points from Belgium in the semi-final, while its highest point award in the final was 8 points, also from Belgium.[44][45] The Icelandic spokesperson, who announced the Icelandic votes during the final, was Yohanna who had previously represented Iceland in 2009.[46]

Points awarded to Iceland

Points awarded by Iceland

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Telenor Arena

Telenor Arena

Telenor Arena, sometimes referred to as Fornebu Arena, is a multi-purpose indoor arena located at Fornebu in Bærum, outside Oslo, Norway. It serves as a venue for a variety of events, including concerts, exhibitions, action shows, family shows, TV and sport. It has a capacity for 15,000 spectators for sports and 25,000 for concerts, including 40 luxury boxes and club seating for 1,200. The venue has a fixed roof and an asphalt floor. The venue was opened ahead of the 2009 Norwegian football season as a replacement for Nadderud Stadion. It cost 585 million Norwegian kroner (NOK) to build, of which NOK 300 million was for the sports venue. The arena will host the 2025 World Men's Handball Championship with the country, Croatia and Denmark including the final.

Oslo

Oslo

Oslo is the capital and most populous city of Norway. It constitutes both a county and a municipality. The municipality of Oslo had a population of 702,543 in 2022, while the city's greater urban area had a population of 1,019,513 in 2019, and the metropolitan area had an estimated population of 1,546,706 in 2021.

Rules of the Eurovision Song Contest

Rules of the Eurovision Song Contest

A detailed set of rules and obligations which all participating broadcasters and participants in the annual Eurovision Song Contest must uphold is produced annually ahead of each edition of the international song contest. These rules are drafted by the contest organisers, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), and approved by the contest's Reference Group, and typically outline which songs may be deemed eligible for entry, the format of the contest, the voting system employed to select a contest winner and how the results of this vote are presented to the televised audience, the overall values of the contest, and distribution and broadcasting rights through television, radio and streaming services.

France in the Eurovision Song Contest

France in the Eurovision Song Contest

France has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 64 times since its debut at the first contest in 1956. France is one of only seven countries to be present at the first contest, and has been absent from only two contests in its history, missing the 1974 and 1982 contests. Along with Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom, France is one of the "Big Five" countries that are automatically prequalified for the final, due to being the largest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). France has won the contest five times.

Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest

Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest

Germany has officially participated in every Eurovision Song Contest since its beginning in 1956, except in 1996 when its entry did not qualify past the audio-only pre‐selection round, and consequently was not seen in the broadcast final and does not count as one of Germany's 65 appearances. No other country has been represented as many times. Along with France, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom, Germany is one of the "Big Five" countries that are automatically prequalified for the final, due to being the largest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). The final is broadcast in Germany on ARD's flagship channel, Das Erste.

Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest

Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest

Spain has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 61 times since making its debut in 1961, where they finished ninth. Since 1999, Spain has been one of the "Big Five" countries, along with France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom, that are automatically prequalified for the final each year as they are the biggest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). Spain has competed in the contest continuously since the country's debut in 1961. The only country with a longer run of uninterrupted Eurovision appearances is the United Kingdom, ever-present since 1959.

European Broadcasting Union

European Broadcasting Union

The European Broadcasting Union is an alliance of public service media organisations whose countries are within the European Broadcasting Area or who are members of the Council of Europe. As of 2022, it is made up of 112 member organizations from 54 countries, and 31 associate members from a further 20 countries. It was established in 1950, and had its administrative headquarters in Geneva and technical office in Brussels.

Belarus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010

Belarus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010

Belarus participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010 with the song "Butterflies" written by Maxim Fadeev, Robert Wells and Malka Chaplin. The song was performed by the band 3+2 featuring Robert Wells, who were internally selected by the Belarusian broadcaster National State Television and Radio Company of the Republic of Belarus (BTRC) to represent the nation at the 2010 contest in Oslo, Norway after broadcaster All-National TV (ONT), which was to take over BTRC, failed to receive EBU membership. 3+2 and the song "Far Away" were initially announced as the Belarusian entry on 25 February 2010, however the band opted to withdraw their song and the replacement entry, "Butterflies", was announced on 19 March 2010.

Bookmaker

Bookmaker

A bookmaker, bookie, or turf accountant is an organization or a person that accepts and pays off bets on sporting and other events at agreed-upon odds.

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2001

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2001

Iceland participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2001 with the song "Angel" written by Einar Bárðarson and Magnús Þór Sigmundsson. The song was performed by the duo Two Tricky. The Icelandic entry for the 2001 contest in Copenhagen, Denmark was selected through the national final Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 2001, organised by the Icelandic broadcaster Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV). Eight songs competed in the selection which was held on 17 February 2001. "Birta" performed by Kristján Gíslason and Gunnar Ólason emerged as the winner exclusively through public televoting. The song was later translated from Icelandic to English for the Eurovision Song Contest and was titled "Angel", while the duo was renamed as Two Tricky.

Albania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010

Albania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010

Albania participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010 in Oslo, Norway, with the song "It's All About You" performed by Juliana Pasha. Its selected entry was chosen through the national selection competition Festivali i Këngës organised by Radio Televizioni Shqiptar (RTSH) in December 2009. To this point, the nation had participated in the Eurovision Song Contest six times since its first entry in 2004. Prior to the contest, the song was promoted by a music video and live performances both in Macedonia and the Netherlands.

Jury

Jury

A jury is a sworn body of people (jurors) convened to hear evidence and render an impartial verdict officially submitted to them by a court, or to set a penalty or judgment.

Source: "Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2010", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iceland_in_the_Eurovision_Song_Contest_2010.

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Notes
  1. ^ This acts as a summary of the history of the selection process, 2005–2010.[3]
References
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  3. ^ Citations regarding the history of the selection process:
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  11. ^ a b Grillhofer, Florian (16 January 2010). "Results: Two acts qualified in Iceland". ESCToday. Archived from the original on 8 April 2022. Retrieved 16 January 2010.
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  22. ^ Medinika, Aija (16 April 2010). "Romania joins the party in London". ESCToday. Archived from the original on 11 April 2022. Retrieved 11 April 2022.
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  27. ^ Bakker, Sietse (4 February 2010). "Today: Watch the Semi-Final Allocation Draw!". European Broadcasting Union (EBU). Archived from the original on 19 March 2012.
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  29. ^ Bakker, Sietse (4 February 2010). "Sunday: Watch the Semi-Final Allocation Draw!". European Broadcasting Union (EBU). Archived from the original on 11 June 2022. Retrieved 5 April 2022.
  30. ^ "Oslo 2010: Results of the Running Order Draw". European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 23 March 2010. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 6 April 2022.
  31. ^ "Sjónvarpið". Fréttablaðið (in Icelandic). 29 May 2010. Archived from the original on 18 January 2015. Retrieved 9 August 2012 – via Timarit.is.
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  36. ^ "Estimate of the winner of ESC 2010 (real results in brackets)". escstats.com. Archived from the original on 10 February 2022. Retrieved 10 February 2022.
  37. ^ a b "The secrets behind the clothes of the first Semi-Final". European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 24 May 2010. Archived from the original on 13 April 2021. Retrieved 14 April 2022.
  38. ^ "Hera aims for a disco knock out". eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 17 May 2010. Archived from the original on 10 February 2022. Retrieved 10 February 2022.
  39. ^ "Iceland". Six on Stage. Archived from the original on 9 February 2022. Retrieved 10 February 2022.
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  41. ^ "Tonight's winners draw their position in the Final". European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 26 May 2010. Archived from the original on 17 September 2021. Retrieved 19 November 2021.
  42. ^ "Grand Final of Oslo 2010". European Broadcasting Union (EBU). Archived from the original on 27 April 2021. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  43. ^ Bakker, Sietse (28 June 2010). "EBU reveals split voting outcome, surprising results". European Broadcasting Union (EBU). Archived from the original on 1 July 2010. Retrieved 28 April 2021.
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  46. ^ Granger, Anthony (4 May 2017). "Iceland: Bo Halldórsson To Announce Jury Votes". Eurovoix. Archived from the original on 8 April 2022. Retrieved 8 April 2022.
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