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Hunts Point Avenue station

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 Hunts Point Avenue
 "6" train"6" express train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
IRT Pelham Hunts Point Avenue Southbound Platform.jpg
View from southbound platform
Station statistics
AddressHunts Point Avenue & Southern Boulevard
Bronx, NY 10459
BoroughThe Bronx
LocaleLongwood
Coordinates40°49′14″N 73°53′30″W / 40.820565°N 73.89164°W / 40.820565; -73.89164Coordinates: 40°49′14″N 73°53′30″W / 40.820565°N 73.89164°W / 40.820565; -73.89164
DivisionA (IRT)[1]
LineIRT Pelham Line
Services   6 all times (all times) weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction (weekdays until 8:45 p.m., peak direction)​
TransitBus transport NYCT Bus: Bx5, Bx6, Bx6 SBS, Bx19
StructureUnderground
Platforms2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks3
Other information
OpenedJanuary 7, 1919; 104 years ago (1919-01-07)[2]
AccessibleThis station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ADA-accessible
Opposite-
direction
transfer
Yes
Traffic
20193,174,354[3]Decrease 1.3%
Rank156 out of 424[3]
Location
Hunts Point Avenue station is located in New York City Subway
Hunts Point Avenue station
Hunts Point Avenue station is located in New York City
Hunts Point Avenue station
Hunts Point Avenue station is located in New York
Hunts Point Avenue station
Track layout

Street map

Station service legend
Symbol Description
Stops all times Stops all times
Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Stops rush hours in the peak direction only

The Hunts Point Avenue station is an express station on the IRT Pelham Line of the New York City Subway, served by the 6 train at all times and the train on weekdays in the peak direction. It is located at Hunts Point Avenue and Southern Boulevard in the Longwood neighborhood in the Bronx.

This station opened in 1919 as part of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT)'s Pelham Line. The line was constructed as part of an agreement between New York City and two private transit operators to expand transit service across the city known as the Dual Contracts. The station exclusively served local trains until 1946, when rush-hour express service began. The Hunts Point Avenue station was renovated to become compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 in 2014.

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Metro station

Metro station

A metro station or subway station is a train station for a rapid transit system, which as a whole is usually called a "metro" or "subway". A station provides a means for passengers to purchase tickets, board trains, and evacuate the system in the case of an emergency. In the United Kingdom, they are known as underground stations, most commonly used in reference to the London Underground.

IRT Pelham Line

IRT Pelham Line

The IRT Pelham Line is a rapid transit line on the New York City Subway, operated as part of the A Division and served by the 6 and <6> trains. It was built as part of the Dual Contracts expansion and opened between 1918 and 1920. It is both elevated and underground with Whitlock Avenue being the southernmost elevated station. It has three tracks from the beginning to just south of the Pelham Bay Park terminal. The Pelham Line also has a connection to Westchester Yard, where 6 trains are stored, just north of Westchester Square–East Tremont Avenue. As of 2013, it has a daily ridership of 205,590.

New York City Subway

New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system in the New York City boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. It is owned by the government of New York City and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). Opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City Subway is one of the world's oldest public transit systems, one of the most-used, and the one with the most stations, with 472 stations in operation.

6 (New York City Subway service)

6 (New York City Subway service)

The 6 Lexington Avenue Local and <6> Pelham Bay Park Express are two rapid transit services in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Their route emblems, or "bullets", are colored forest green since they use the IRT Lexington Avenue Line in Manhattan. Local service is denoted by a (6) in a circular bullet, and express service is denoted by a <6> in a diamond-shaped bullet. On the R62A rolling stock, this is often indicated by LEDs around the service logo to indicate local or express service to riders. The LEDs illuminate in a green circle pattern for 6 local trains and in a red diamond pattern for <6> trains.

Southern Boulevard (Bronx)

Southern Boulevard (Bronx)

Southern Boulevard is a street in the Bronx, New York City, United States. It stretches from Bruckner Boulevard in Mott Haven to Bronx Park East in Allerton where it becomes Allerton Avenue. From 1981 until 2011, the portion north of Fordham Road, adjacent to the New York Botanical Garden, was also named Dr. Theodore L. Kazimiroff Boulevard. In 2011, the name of Kazimiroff, a Bronx historian and a founder of The Bronx County Historical Society, was changed to an honorary designation for this portion of Southern Boulevard after the New York City Department of Transportation, having been lobbied by Fordham University, decided that the designation was little known and confusing to those unfamiliar with the area.

Longwood, Bronx

Longwood, Bronx

Longwood is a mixed-use neighborhood geographically located in the southwest Bronx, New York City. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are East 167th Street to the north, the Bronx River and the Bruckner Expressway to east, East 149th Street to the south, and Prospect Avenue to the west. Southern Boulevard is the primary thoroughfare through Longwood.

The Bronx

The Bronx

The Bronx is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Bronx County, in the state of New York. It is south of Westchester County; north and east of the New York City borough of Manhattan, across the Harlem River; and north of the New York City borough of Queens, across the East River. The Bronx has a land area of 42 square miles (109 km2) and a population of 1,472,654 in the 2020 census. If each borough were ranked as a city, the Bronx would rank as the ninth-most-populous in the U.S. Of the five boroughs, it has the fourth-largest area, fourth-highest population, and third-highest population density. It is the only borough of New York City not primarily on an island. With a population that is 54.8% Hispanic as of 2020, it is the only majority-Hispanic county in the Northeastern United States and the fourth-most-populous nationwide.

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the private operator of New York City's original underground subway line that opened in 1904, as well as earlier elevated railways and additional rapid transit lines in New York City. The IRT was purchased by the city in June 1940, along with the younger BMT and IND systems, to form the modern New York City Subway. The former IRT lines are now the A Division or IRT Division of the Subway.

Dual Contracts

Dual Contracts

The Dual Contracts, also known as the Dual Subway System, were contracts for the construction and/or rehabilitation and operation of rapid transit lines in the City of New York. The contracts were signed on March 19, 1913, by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company and the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company. As part of the Dual Contracts, the IRT and BRT would build or upgrade several subway lines in New York City, then operate them for 49 years.

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 or ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on disability. It affords similar protections against discrimination to Americans with disabilities as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which made discrimination based on race, religion, sex, national origin, and other characteristics illegal, and later sexual orientation and gender identity. In addition, unlike the Civil Rights Act, the ADA also requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities, and imposes accessibility requirements on public accommodations.

History

Background

In 1913, New York City, the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, and the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) reached an agreement, known as the Dual Contracts, to dramatically expand subway service across the City. The portion of the agreement between New York City and the IRT was known as Contract 3. As part of this contract, the IRT agreed to construct a branch of the original subway, which opened in 1904,[4] north along Lexington Avenue with branches along Jerome Avenue and a three-track branch running northeast via 138th Street, Southern Boulevard and Westchester Avenue to Pelham Bay Park.[5]

The construction of the Lexington Avenue Line, in conjunction with the construction of the Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line would change the operations of the IRT system. Instead of having trains go via Broadway, turning onto 42nd Street, before finally turning onto Park Avenue, there would be two trunk lines connected by the 42nd Street Shuttle. The system would be changed from looking like a "Z" system on a map to an "H" system. One trunk would run via the new Lexington Avenue Line down Park Avenue, and the other trunk would run via the new Seventh Avenue Line up Broadway.[6]

Opening

On August 1, 1918, the first portion of the Pelham Line opened as a branch of the Lexington Avenue Line, with the extension of Lexington Avenue local service to Third Avenue–138th Street.[7] The Hunts Point Avenue station opened on January 7, 1919, as the new terminal of the Pelham Line, with the extension of the line from Third Avenue–138th Street.[8][9] The extension was originally supposed to be finished by the end of 1918, but due to the difficulty in acquiring materials, the opening was delayed. In January 1919, the New York State Public Service Commission was looking into acquiring property for a subway yard at Pelham Bay Park.[2] On May 30, 1920, the Pelham Line was extended to East 177th Street,[9][10][11] with the extension being served by a shuttle service operating with elevated cars. Passengers transferred to the shuttle at Hunts Point Avenue.[8]

Express service at this station, and on the Pelham Line between East 177th Street and Third Avenue–138th Street, was inaugurated on October 14, 1946. Express trains ran during weekday rush hours and on Saturday morning in the peak direction. This express service saved eight minutes between Third Avenue and East 177th Street. During this time, 6 trains that ran local in the Bronx when express trains operated terminated at East 177th Street to make room for express trains to Pelham Bay Park.[12] Express service did not start until this date because of the increase in ridership from the huge Parkchester housing complex at East 177th Street.[13]

Renovations

View of the station in 2002
View of the station in 2002

In the early 1960s, the platforms at this station along the Pelham Line were extended to 514 feet (157 m) accommodate 10-car trains. The stations along the line between Hunts Point Avenue and Third Avenue–138th Street, and Third Avenue–149th Street on the IRT White Plains Road Line had their platforms extended under the same contract. Construction of the platform extensions was still underway as of June 1963.[14][15]

On April 12, 1978, following president Jimmy Carter's visit to the nearly-destroyed Charlotte Street neighborhood nearby, his administration announced that it would allocate $55.6 million to help rehabilitate the blighted South Bronx between then and September 30.[16] Some of this funding was planned to go to the modernization of the Third Avenue–149th Street and Hunts Point Avenue stations. A component of the planned renovations was increased security.[17]

In 1981, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) listed the station among the 69 most deteriorated stations in the subway system.[18] On November 18, 2014, a $17.8 million project to make the station compliant with the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 was completed, and the reconstructed entrances and fare control area opened to the public. There are three elevators: one from the mezzanine to each platform within fare control, and one from the mezzanine to Monsignor Del Valle Square.[19][20]

Under the 2015–2019 MTA Capital Program, the station, along with thirty other New York City Subway stations, would have been entirely closed for up to six months to undergo a complete overhaul. Updates would have included cellular service, Wi-Fi, charging stations, improved signage, and improved station lighting.[21][22] However, these renovations are being deferred until the 2020–2024 Capital Program due to a lack of funding.[23]

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Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company

The Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (BRT) was a public transit holding company formed in 1896 to acquire and consolidate railway lines in Brooklyn and Queens, New York City, United States. It was a prominent corporation and industry leader using the single-letter symbol B on the New York Stock Exchange.

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the private operator of New York City's original underground subway line that opened in 1904, as well as earlier elevated railways and additional rapid transit lines in New York City. The IRT was purchased by the city in June 1940, along with the younger BMT and IND systems, to form the modern New York City Subway. The former IRT lines are now the A Division or IRT Division of the Subway.

Dual Contracts

Dual Contracts

The Dual Contracts, also known as the Dual Subway System, were contracts for the construction and/or rehabilitation and operation of rapid transit lines in the City of New York. The contracts were signed on March 19, 1913, by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company and the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company. As part of the Dual Contracts, the IRT and BRT would build or upgrade several subway lines in New York City, then operate them for 49 years.

Early history of the IRT subway

Early history of the IRT subway

The first regularly operated subway in New York City was opened on October 27, 1904, and was operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT). The early IRT system consisted of a single trunk line below 96th Street in Manhattan, running under Broadway, 42nd Street, Park Avenue, and Lafayette Street. The line had three northern branches in Upper Manhattan and the Bronx, and a southern branch to Brooklyn. The system had four tracks between Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall and 96th Street, allowing for local and express service. The original line and early extensions consisted of:The IRT Eastern Parkway Line from Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center to Borough Hall The IRT Lexington Avenue Line from Borough Hall to Grand Central–42nd Street The IRT 42nd Street Shuttle from Grand Central–42nd Street to Times Square The IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line from Times Square to Van Cortlandt Park–242nd Street The IRT Lenox Avenue Line from 96th Street to 145th Street The IRT White Plains Road Line from 142nd Street Junction to 180th Street–Bronx Park

IRT Lexington Avenue Line

IRT Lexington Avenue Line

The IRT Lexington Avenue Line is one of the lines of the A Division of the New York City Subway, stretching from Lower Manhattan north to 125th Street in East Harlem. The line is served by the 4, ​5, ​6, and <6> trains.

IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

The IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line is a New York City Subway line. It is one of several lines that serves the A Division, stretching from South Ferry in Lower Manhattan north to Van Cortlandt Park–242nd Street in Riverdale, Bronx. The Brooklyn Branch, known as the Wall and William Streets Branch during construction, from the main line at Chambers Street southeast through the Clark Street Tunnel to Borough Hall in Downtown Brooklyn, is also part of the Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line. The IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line is the only line to have elevated stations in Manhattan, with two short stretches of elevated track at 125th Street and between Dyckman and 225th Streets.

42nd Street Shuttle

42nd Street Shuttle

The 42nd Street Shuttle is a New York City Subway shuttle train service that operates in Manhattan. The shuttle is sometimes referred to as the Grand Central/Times Square Shuttle, since these are the only two stations it serves. The shuttle runs at all times except late nights, with trains running on two tracks underneath 42nd Street between Times Square and Grand Central; for many decades, three tracks had been in service until a major renovation was begun in 2019 reducing it to two tracks. With two stations, it is the shortest regular service in the system by number of stops, running about 2,402 feet (732 m) in 90 seconds as of 2005. The shuttle is used by over 100,000 passengers every day, and by up to 10,200 passengers per hour during rush hours.

IRT White Plains Road Line

IRT White Plains Road Line

The White Plains Road Line is a rapid transit line of the A Division of the New York City Subway serving the central Bronx. It is mostly elevated and served both subway and elevated trains until 1952. The original part of the line, the part opened as part of the first subway was called the West Farms Division, and the extension north to 241st Street as part of the Dual Contracts was called the White Plains Road Line. Eventually, however, the two parts came to be known as the White Plains Road Line.

Jimmy Carter

Jimmy Carter

James Earl Carter Jr. is an American retired politician who served as the 39th president of the United States from 1977 to 1981. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as the 76th governor of Georgia from 1971 to 1975 and as a Georgia state senator from 1963 to 1967.

Crotona Park East, Bronx

Crotona Park East, Bronx

Crotona Park East, also known as Crotona or East Morrisania, is a residential neighborhood geographically located in the southwest Bronx in New York City. Crotona Park East is considered part of the South Bronx. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are the Cross-Bronx Expressway to the north, the Bronx River to the east, East 167th Street to the south, and Crotona/Prospect Avenues to the west. Southern Boulevard is the primary thoroughfare through the area. The neighborhood is adjacent to, but distinct from, the nearby park named Crotona Park.

Metropolitan Transportation Authority

Metropolitan Transportation Authority

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation responsible for public transportation in the New York City metropolitan area of the U.S. state of New York. The MTA is the largest public transit authority in the United States, serving 12 counties in Downstate New York, along with two counties in southwestern Connecticut under contract to the Connecticut Department of Transportation, carrying over 11 million passengers on an average weekday systemwide, and over 850,000 vehicles on its seven toll bridges and two tunnels per weekday.

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 or ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on disability. It affords similar protections against discrimination to Americans with disabilities as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which made discrimination based on race, religion, sex, national origin, and other characteristics illegal, and later sexual orientation and gender identity. In addition, unlike the Civil Rights Act, the ADA also requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities, and imposes accessibility requirements on public accommodations.

Station layout

G Street level Exit/entrance
M Mezzanine Fare control, station agent
Disabled access Elevator in Monsignor Del Valle Square, at northeast corner of Bruckner Boulevard and Hunts Point Avenue
P
Platform level
Southbound local "6" train toward Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall (Longwood Avenue)
Island platform Disabled access
Peak-direction express "6" express train AM rush toward Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall (Third Avenue–138th Street)
"6" express train PM rush toward Pelham Bay Park (Parkchester)
Island platform Disabled access
Northbound local "6" train toward Pelham Bay Park (Parkchester PM rush) (Whitlock Avenue)
Exit-only station house on Southern Boulevard
Exit-only station house on Southern Boulevard

This underground station has three tracks and two island platforms. The 6 stops on the outer local tracks while the stops on the center express track. This is the last underground station on the line outbound before the elevated stretch to Pelham Bay Park.[24]

The track walls have geometric Squire Vickers-designed mosaic friezes in muted shades of blue, grey and beige, with occasional sections of pale pink. The large identifying plaques show "H P".[25] Matching "uptown" and "downtown" directional mosaics are found in the mezzanine, along with a smaller, simplified version of the frieze found on the lower level.[26] Dark green I-beam columns run along both platforms at regular intervals, a single line in the middle at their ends and one line on each side at their center.[27]

Exits

Stairwell entrance into the station from street level, as seen in winter
Stairwell entrance into the station from street level, as seen in winter

This station's main fare control area is a mezzanine above the center of the platforms and tracks. Two staircases from each platform go up to a waiting area/crossover,[28] where a turnstile bank provides access to and from the station.[29] Outside fare control, there is a token booth and two street stairs going up to Monsignor Del Valle Square, a city-owned park on the triangle formed by East 163rd Street, Hunts Point Avenue, and Bruckner Boulevard. In a design that is not common in the subway system, the street-level facility, street stair enclosures, and lights are all made of bricks.[30][31] Although the platform level is lit by fluorescent bulbs, the mezzanine remains lit by incandescent lights, which were replaced along every platform in the subway by the late 1980s.[32]

The northbound platform has an exit-only at its extreme northern end. A twisting staircase goes up to a street-level steel and glass structure, where exit-only turnstiles provide access out of the station. It is located at the southeast corner of Southern Boulevard and Hunts Point Avenue.[32]

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Accessibility

Accessibility

Accessibility is the design of products, devices, services, vehicles, or environments so as to be usable by people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design and practice of accessible development ensures both "direct access" and "indirect access" meaning compatibility with a person's assistive technology.

6 (New York City Subway service)

6 (New York City Subway service)

The 6 Lexington Avenue Local and <6> Pelham Bay Park Express are two rapid transit services in the A Division of the New York City Subway. Their route emblems, or "bullets", are colored forest green since they use the IRT Lexington Avenue Line in Manhattan. Local service is denoted by a (6) in a circular bullet, and express service is denoted by a <6> in a diamond-shaped bullet. On the R62A rolling stock, this is often indicated by LEDs around the service logo to indicate local or express service to riders. The LEDs illuminate in a green circle pattern for 6 local trains and in a red diamond pattern for <6> trains.

Longwood Avenue station

Longwood Avenue station

The Longwood Avenue station is a local station on the IRT Pelham Line of the New York City Subway. It is served by the 6 train at all times and is located at Longwood Avenue and Southern Boulevard in the Longwood neighborhood of the Bronx. The station opened in 1919 as part of an extension of the Pelham Line of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company, and had its platforms extended in the 1960s. Further renovations were completed in 2019 and 2020.

Island platform

Island platform

An island platform is a station layout arrangement where a single platform is positioned between two tracks within a railway station, tram stop or transitway interchange. Island platforms are popular on twin-track routes due to pragmatic and cost reasons. They are also useful within larger stations where local and express services for the same direction of travel can be provided from opposite sides of the same platform thereby simplifying transfers between the two tracks. An alternative arrangement is to position side platforms on either side of the tracks. The historical use of island platforms depends greatly upon the location. In the United Kingdom the use of island platforms is relatively common when the railway line is in a cutting or raised on an embankment, as this makes it easier to provide access to the platform without walking across the tracks.

Third Avenue–138th Street station

Third Avenue–138th Street station

The Third Avenue–138th Street station is an express station on the IRT Pelham Line of the New York City Subway located at the intersection of Third Avenue and East 138th Street in the Bronx. It is served by the 6 train at all times and the <6> train during weekdays in the peak direction.

Pelham Bay Park station

Pelham Bay Park station

The Pelham Bay Park station is the northern terminal station of the IRT Pelham Line of the New York City Subway. Located across from Pelham Bay Park, at the intersection of the Bruckner Expressway and Westchester Avenue in the Pelham Bay neighborhood of the Bronx, it is served by the 6 train at all times, except weekdays in the peak direction, when the <6> serves it.

Parkchester station

Parkchester station

The Parkchester station is an express station on the IRT Pelham Line of the New York City Subway. It is located above Hugh J. Grant Circle in the Parkchester neighborhood of the Bronx, where East 177th Street, Metropolitan Avenue, and Westchester Avenue intersect. The station is served by the 6 train at all times and the <6> train during weekdays in the peak direction.

Whitlock Avenue station

Whitlock Avenue station

The Whitlock Avenue station is a local station on the IRT Pelham Line of the New York City Subway. It is served by the 6 train at all times and is located at Whitlock Avenue and Westchester Avenue in the Bronx.

Squire J. Vickers

Squire J. Vickers

Squire Joseph Vickers (1872–1947) was an "underground Renaissance man", according to The New York Times. He was a chief architect of the New York City Subway system.

Mezzanine

Mezzanine

A mezzanine is an intermediate floor in a building which is partly open to the double-height ceilinged floor below, or which does not extend over the whole floorspace of the building, a loft with non-sloped walls. However, the term is often used loosely for the floor above the ground floor, especially where a very high-ceilinged original ground floor has been split horizontally into two floors.

Ridership

In 2018, the station had 3,216,569 boardings, making it the 153rd most used station in the 424-station system. This amounted to an average of 10,460 passengers per weekday.[3]

Source: "Hunts Point Avenue station", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 8th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunts_Point_Avenue_station.

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References
  1. ^ "Glossary". Second Avenue Subway Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) (PDF). Vol. 1. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. March 4, 2003. pp. 1–2. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 26, 2021. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  2. ^ a b "New Lines In Bronx Coming This Year: Rays of Rapid Transit to be Let Into Dark Sections in the West and North" (PDF). The New York Times. January 5, 1919. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  4. ^ "Exercises In City Hall.; Mayor Declares Subway Open -- Ovations for Parsons and McDonald". The New York Times. October 28, 1904. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 16, 2018.
  5. ^ The Dual System of Rapid Transit. New York State Public Service Commission. September 1912 – via nycsubway.org.
  6. ^ Sealey, D. A. (May 4, 1916). "Rapid Transit Work in 1915, New York City". Engineering News-record. McGraw-Hill Publishing Company. 75 (18): 812–814.
  7. ^ "Opening New Subway H Shortens Distance to A. & S." The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. August 1, 1918. p. 8. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  8. ^ a b Cunningham, Joseph; DeHart, Leonard O. (1993). A History of the New York City Subway System. J. Schmidt, R. Giglio, and K. Lang. p. 48.
  9. ^ a b Brooklyn Daily Eagle Almanac. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 1922. p. 372.
  10. ^ Annual Report of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company for the Year Ending June 30, 1920. Interborough Rapid Transit Company. 1920. pp. 5, 13.
  11. ^ "Bronx Subway Extension Opened" (PDF). The New York Times. May 28, 1920. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  12. ^ Report for the three and one-half years ending June 30, 1949. New York City Board of Transportation. 1949. p. 32. hdl:2027/mdp.39015023094926.
  13. ^ Linder, Bernard (September 1988). "Pelham Bay Line". New York Division Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 31 (9): 2–7.
  14. ^ Annual Report 1962–1963. New York City Transit Authority. 1963.
  15. ^ Minutes and Proceedings. New York City Transit Authority. 1969. p. 425.
  16. ^ Fowler, Glenn (April 13, 1978). "$55.6 Million By Fall To Help South Bronx Is Pledged By U.S." The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  17. ^ "Projects Are Listed In South Bronx Plan". The New York Times. April 13, 1978. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
  18. ^ Gargan, Edward A. (June 11, 1981). "Agency Lists Its 69 Most Deteriorated Subway Stations". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 13, 2016.
  19. ^ "Hunts Point Avenue station installation of ADA elevators, Bronx". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. November 7, 2011. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  20. ^ "Hunts Point Av 6 Station Becomes the 84th Fully ADA Accessible Subway Station". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. November 18, 2014. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  21. ^ Whitford, Emma (January 8, 2016). "MTA Will Completely Close 30 Subway Stations For Months-Long "Revamp"". Gothamist. Archived from the original on August 1, 2016. Retrieved July 18, 2016.
  22. ^ "MTAStations" (PDF). governor.ny.gov. Government of the State of New York. Retrieved July 18, 2016.
  23. ^ Berger, Paul (April 3, 2018). "New York Subway Cuts Back Plans to Renovate Stations". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  24. ^ Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books.
  25. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (December 19, 2003). "A 'HP' on the wall trim at Hunts Point Avenue (6)". subwaynut.com. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  26. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (December 19, 2003). "A mosaic sign for downtown trains at Hunts Point Avenue (6)". subwaynut.com. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  27. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (October 5, 2015). "Looking across Hunts Point Avenue". subwaynut.com. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  28. ^ Rosenfeld, Robbie (July 16, 2015). "Staircases and elevator from platform to mezzanine". nycsubway.org. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  29. ^ Dooley, John (September 22, 2011). "Turnstiles and Mezzanine". nycsubway.org. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  30. ^ Kindell, Jay (April 4, 2009). "Station Entrance". nycsubway.org. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  31. ^ Rosenfeld, Robbie (April 30, 2007). "Station entrance with sign". nycsubway.org. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  32. ^ a b "Hunts Point Avenue Neighborhood Map" (PDF). new.mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. April 2018. Retrieved February 28, 2019.
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