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Hugo Young

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Hugo John Smelter Young (13 October 1938 – 22 September 2003) was a British journalist and columnist and senior political commentator at The Guardian.

Early life and education

Born in Sheffield into an old recusant Roman Catholic family, he was head boy at Ampleforth College in North Yorkshire during his youth; later, he read law at Balliol College, Oxford, and worked for the Yorkshire Post in Leeds from 1961. In 1963, he spent a year as a Harkness Fellow in the US and he spent the next year working as a congressional fellow.

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Sheffield

Sheffield

Sheffield is a city in South Yorkshire, England, whose name derives from the River Sheaf which runs through it. The city serves as the administrative centre of the City of Sheffield. It is historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire and some of its southern suburbs were transferred from Derbyshire to the city council. It is the largest settlement in South Yorkshire.

Ampleforth College

Ampleforth College

Ampleforth College is a co-educational independent day and boarding school in the English public school tradition located in the village of Ampleforth, North Yorkshire, England. It opened in 1802 as a boys' school, it is situated in the grounds of the Benedictine monastery, Ampleforth Abbey. The school is in a valley with sports pitches, wooded areas and lakes. Its affiliated preparatory school, St Martin's Ampleforth, which lay across the valley at Gilling Castle, closed in 2020.

Balliol College, Oxford

Balliol College, Oxford

Balliol College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. One of Oxford's oldest colleges, it was founded around 1263 by John I de Balliol, a landowner from Barnard Castle in County Durham, who provided the foundation and endowment for the college. When de Balliol died in 1268, his widow, Dervorguilla, a woman whose wealth far exceeded that of her husband, continued his work in setting up the college, providing a further endowment and writing the statutes. She is considered a co-founder of the college.

Leeds

Leeds

Leeds is a city and the administrative centre of the City of Leeds district in West Yorkshire, England. It is built around the River Aire and is in the eastern foothills of the Pennines. It is also the third-largest settlement in England, after London and Birmingham.

Harkness Fellowship

Harkness Fellowship

The Harkness Fellowship is a program run by the Commonwealth Fund of New York City. This fellowship was established to reciprocate the Rhodes Scholarships and enable Fellows from several countries to spend time studying in the United States.

Journalistic career

In 1965, Young returned to the United Kingdom. He was recruited by Denis Hamilton of The Sunday Times. In his second year there, he became chief leader writer, a position he kept until 1977. From 1973–84, he was also the paper's political editor. He established a Sunday column, "Inside Politics", that made him famous. Beginning in 1981, he also held the position of joint deputy editor. However, Young's relationship with The Sunday Times cooled notably when Rupert Murdoch took over the paper in 1981. The conflict culminated in a series of battles with editor Andrew Neil, particularly over the US invasion of Grenada in 1983. This ultimately led to Young's leaving The Sunday Times and joining The Guardian in 1984.[1]

Young continued to write a twice-weekly political column at The Guardian until his death. Young was a strong proponent of European integration, and sharply expressed his disappointment with the British government's eurosceptic politics in his columns, including Prime Minister Tony Blair's decision to side with George W. Bush instead of his EU partners in the 2003 invasion of Iraq.[2]

Despite these differences, Young remained on good terms with senior ministers, including Tony Blair and Margaret Thatcher. He wrote a critical biography of the latter, One of Us (1989), in addition to a very critical article[3] he wrote two weeks before his death but which was not published until after Thatcher's death, nearly ten years after his own. He wrote other books, including This Blessed Plot: Britain And Europe From Churchill To Blair, which was published in 1998. From 1989 onwards, Young was the chairman of the Scott Trust, which owns The Guardian and other news media, and helped the paper through important developments such as the purchase of The Observer. His papers are held at the Guardian News & Media Archive in London.

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Denis Hamilton

Denis Hamilton

Lieutenant Colonel Sir Charles Denis Hamilton, DSO, TD was an English newspaper editor.

Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch

Keith Rupert Murdoch is an Australian-born American business magnate. Through his company News Corp, he is the owner of hundreds of local, national, and international publishing outlets around the world, including in the UK, in Australia, in the US, book publisher HarperCollins, and the television broadcasting channels Sky News Australia and Fox News. He was also the owner of Sky, 21st Century Fox, and the now-defunct News of the World. With a net worth of US$21.7 billion as of 2 March 2022, Murdoch is the 31st richest person in the United States and the 71st richest in the world.

Andrew Neil

Andrew Neil

Andrew Ferguson Neil is a Scottish journalist and broadcaster who is chairman of The Spectator and presenter of The Andrew Neil Show on Channel 4. He was editor of The Sunday Times from 1983 to 1994. He formerly presented BBC political programmes and was chairman of GB News.

Grenada

Grenada

Grenada is an island country in the West Indies in the Caribbean Sea at the southern end of the Grenadines island chain. Grenada consists of the island of Grenada itself, two smaller islands, Carriacou and Petite Martinique, and several small islands which lie to the north of the main island and are a part of the Grenadines. It is located northwest of Trinidad and Tobago, northeast of Venezuela and southwest of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. Its size is 348.5 square kilometres (134.6 sq mi), and it had an estimated population of 112,523 in July 2020. Its capital is St. George's. Grenada is also known as the "Island of Spice" due to its production of nutmeg and mace crops.

European integration

European integration

European integration is the process of industrial, economic, political, legal, social, and cultural integration of states wholly or partially in Europe or nearby. European integration has primarily come about through the European Union and its policies.

Tony Blair

Tony Blair

Sir Anthony Charles Lynton Blair is a British former politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1997 to 2007 and Leader of the Labour Party from 1994 to 2007. He previously served as Leader of the Opposition from 1994 to 1997, and had served in various shadow cabinet posts from 1987 to 1994. Blair was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Sedgefield from 1983 to 2007. He is the second longest serving prime minister in modern history after Margaret Thatcher, and is the longest serving Labour politician to have held the office.

George W. Bush

George W. Bush

George Walker Bush is an American politician who served as the 43rd president of the United States from 2001 to 2009. A member of the Republican Party, Bush family, and son of the 41st president George H. W. Bush, he previously served as the 46th governor of Texas from 1995 to 2000.

2003 invasion of Iraq

2003 invasion of Iraq

The 2003 invasion of Iraq was a United States-led invasion of the Republic of Iraq and the first stage of the Iraq War. The invasion phase began on 19 March 2003 (air) and 20 March 2003 (ground) and lasted just over one month, including 26 days of major combat operations, in which a combined force of troops from the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, and Poland invaded Iraq. Twenty-two days after the first day of the invasion, the capital city of Baghdad was captured by Coalition forces on 9 April 2003 after the six-day-long Battle of Baghdad. This early stage of the war formally ended on 1 May 2003 when U.S. President George W. Bush declared the "end of major combat operations" in his Mission Accomplished speech, after which the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) was established as the first of several successive transitional governments leading up to the first Iraqi parliamentary election in January 2005. U.S. military forces later remained in Iraq until the withdrawal in 2011.

Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Thatcher

Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher , was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990 and Leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 to 1990. She was the first female British prime minister and the longest-serving British prime minister of the 20th century. As prime minister, she implemented economic policies that became known as Thatcherism. A Soviet journalist dubbed her the "Iron Lady", a nickname that became associated with her uncompromising politics and leadership style.

The Observer

The Observer

The Observer is a British newspaper published on Sundays. It is a sister paper to The Guardian and The Guardian Weekly, whose parent company Guardian Media Group Limited acquired it in 1993. First published in 1791, it is the world's oldest Sunday newspaper.

The Hugo Young Lecture

There is now an annual Hugo Young lecture, organised by The Guardian in Young's memory. It has been delivered by David Cameron, Nick Clegg, Ed Miliband, Marjorie Scardino and Alex Salmond.[4]

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David Cameron

David Cameron

David William Donald Cameron is a British former politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 2010 to 2016 and Leader of the Conservative Party from 2005 to 2016. He previously served as Leader of the Opposition from 2005 to 2010, and was Member of Parliament (MP) for Witney from 2001 to 2016. He identifies as a one-nation conservative, and has been associated with both economically liberal and socially liberal policies.

Nick Clegg

Nick Clegg

Sir Nicholas William Peter Clegg is a British media executive and former Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom who has been president for global affairs at Meta Platforms since 2022, having previously been vice‑president of global affairs and communications at Facebook from 2018 to 2022. Before joining Facebook, Clegg served as Deputy Prime Minister of the UK from 2010 to 2015 and as Leader of the Liberal Democrats from 2007 to 2015. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Sheffield Hallam from 2005 to 2017. An "Orange Book" liberal, he has been associated with both socially liberal and economically liberal policies.

Ed Miliband

Ed Miliband

Edward Samuel Miliband is a British politician serving as Shadow Secretary of State for Climate Change and Net Zero since 2021. He has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for Doncaster North since 2005. Miliband was Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition between 2010 and 2015, resigning after Labour's defeat at the 2015 general election. Alongside his brother, Foreign Secretary David Miliband, he served in the Cabinet from 2007 to 2010 under Prime Minister Gordon Brown.

Marjorie Scardino

Marjorie Scardino

Dame Marjorie Scardino,, FRSA is an American-born British business executive. She is the former CEO of Pearson PLC. Scardino became a trustee of Oxfam during her tenure at Pearson.

Alex Salmond

Alex Salmond

Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond is a Scottish politician and economist who served as First Minister of Scotland from 2007 to 2014. A prominent figure on the Scottish nationalist movement, he has served as leader of the Alba Party since 2021. Salmond was leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP), on two occasions, from 1990 to 2000 and from 2004 to 2014. He served as the party's depute leader from 1987 to 1990.

Personal life

Grave of Hugo Young in Highgate Cemetery
Grave of Hugo Young in Highgate Cemetery

Young married twice. His first wife, Helen Mason died in 1989 of lung cancer. They had three daughters, including the film director Emily Young, and one son.

He remarried in 1990, this time to American artist Lucy Waring. Young died at the age of 64 of colon cancer and was buried on the west side of Highgate Cemetery.[5]

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Source: "Hugo Young", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Young.

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Bibliography
  • The Hugo Young Papers: Thirty years of British politics – off the record (18 November 2008) ISBN 978-1-84614-054-9 (published posthumously)
  • Supping with the Devils: Political Journalism (2003) ISBN 1-84354-116-5
  • Political Lives (2001) ISBN 0-19-860430-0
  • This Blessed Plot: Britain and Europe from Churchill to Blair (1998) ISBN 0-333-57992-5
  • Thatcherism: Did society survive? (The Maisie Ward Sheed memorial lecture) (1992) ISBN 0-903113-97-X
  • One of Us: Life of Margaret Thatcher (1989) ISBN 0-333-34439-1
  • The Iron Lady: A Biography of Margaret Thatcher (1989) ISBN 0-374-22651-2 (US edition of "One of Us" – there is a US biography of Richard Nixon entitled "One of Us")
  • But, Chancellor: Inquiry into the Treasury (1984) ISBN 0-563-20237-8
  • No, Minister (1982) ISBN 0-563-20056-1
  • The Thatcher Phenomenon (1986) ISBN 0-563-20472-9
  • Crossman Affair (1976) ISBN 0-241-89449-2
References
  1. ^ Hugo Young obituary, The Guardian; accessed 20 April 2014.
  2. ^ Column archive, The Guardian; accessed 20 April 2014.
  3. ^ Young, Hugo (8 April 2013). "Margaret Thatcher left a dark legacy that has still not disappeared". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 8 April 2013.
  4. ^ "Alex Salmond delivers Hugo Young lecture". Democracy Live. BBC. 27 January 2012. Retrieved 27 January 2012.
  5. ^ Hugo Young obituary, The Times; accessed 20 April 2014.
External links
Obituaries
Media offices
Preceded by Deputy Editor of the Sunday Times
1981–1984
with Ron Hall (1981–1982)
Brian MacArthur (1982–1984)
Succeeded by
Ivan Fallon

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