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Huang Ta-chou

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Huang Ta-chou
黃大洲
2005Taipei101RunUp-ThomasHuang (cropped).jpg
Commissioner of the Chinese Professional Baseball League
In office
22 July 1998 – 7 March 2002
Preceded byChen Chung-kuang [zh]
Yang Tien-fa [zh] (acting)
Succeeded byHarvey Tung [zh]
Chairman of the Chinese Taipei Olympic Committee
In office
January 1998 – January 2006
Preceded byChang Feng-hsu
Succeeded byThomas Tsai
Minister of the Research, Development and Evaluation Commission
In office
June 1996 – September 1997
Preceded byWang Jen-huong
Succeeded byYung Chaur-shin
Mayor of Taipei
In office
2 June 1990 – 25 December 1994
Preceded byWu Po-hsiung
Succeeded byChen Shui-bian
Personal details
Born (1936-02-07) 7 February 1936 (age 86)
Shanhua, Tainan, Taiwan, Empire of Japan
NationalityTaiwanese
Political partyKuomintang
Alma materNational Taiwan University
Cornell University
OccupationProfessor

Huang Ta-chou (Chinese: 黃大洲; pinyin: Huáng Dàzhōu; born 7 February 1936), also known as Thomas Huang, is a Taiwanese politician who served as mayor of Taipei between 1990 and 1994.[1] He chaired the Chinese Taipei Olympic committee from 1998 to 2006.[2]

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Traditional Chinese characters

Traditional Chinese characters

Traditional Chinese characters are one type of standard Chinese character sets of the contemporary written Chinese. The traditional characters had taken shapes since the clerical change and mostly remained in the same structure they took at the introduction of the regular script in the 2nd century. Over the following centuries, traditional characters were regarded as the standard form of printed Chinese characters or literary Chinese throughout the Sinosphere until the middle of the 20th century, before different script reforms initiated by countries using Chinese characters as a writing system.

Pinyin

Pinyin

Hanyu Pinyin, often shortened to just pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Mandarin Chinese in China, and to some extent, in Singapore and Malaysia. It is often used to teach Mandarin, normally written in Chinese form, to learners already familiar with the Latin alphabet. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones, but pinyin without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written in the Latin script, and is also used in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The word Hànyǔ literally means "Han language", while Pīnyīn (拼音) means "spelled sounds".

Taipei

Taipei

Taipei, officially Taipei City, is the capital and a special municipality of the Republic of China (Taiwan). Located in Northern Taiwan, Taipei City is an enclave of the municipality of New Taipei City that sits about 25 km (16 mi) southwest of the northern port city of Keelung. Most of the city rests on the Taipei Basin, an ancient lakebed. The basin is bounded by the relatively narrow valleys of the Keelung and Xindian rivers, which join to form the Tamsui River along the city's western border.

Chinese Taipei

Chinese Taipei

"Chinese Taipei" is the term used in various international organizations and tournaments for groups or delegations representing the Republic of China (ROC), a sovereign state commonly known as Taiwan.

National Olympic Committee

National Olympic Committee

A National Olympic Committee (NOC) is a national constituent of the worldwide Olympic movement. Subject to the controls of the International Olympic Committee, NOCs are responsible for organizing their people's participation in the Olympic Games. They may nominate cities within their respective areas as candidates for future Olympic Games. NOCs also promote the development of athletes and training of coaches and officials at a national level within their geographies.

Early life

Huang was born in Shanhua, Tainan in Taiwan, Empire of Japan in 1936. He graduated from National Taiwan University, where Lee Teng-hui was once his instructor.[3] He received his PhD in agriculture from Cornell University in the United States in 1971.[4][5] After his return to Taiwan, Huang taught at National Taiwan University.

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Shanhua District

Shanhua District

Shanhua District is a suburban district of Tainan, Taiwan. Until 25 December 2010, it was an urban township in the dissolved Tainan County, which is now merged with the original Tainan City to form a single special municipality.

Taiwan

Taiwan

Taiwan, officially the Republic of China (ROC), is a country in East Asia, at the junction of the East and South China Seas in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, with the People's Republic of China (PRC) to the northwest, Japan to the northeast, and the Philippines to the south. The territories controlled by the ROC consist of 168 islands, with a combined area of 36,193 square kilometres (13,974 sq mi). The main island of Taiwan, also known as Formosa, has an area of 35,808 square kilometres (13,826 sq mi), with mountain ranges dominating the eastern two-thirds and plains in the western third, where its highly urbanised population is concentrated. The capital, Taipei, forms along with New Taipei City and Keelung the largest metropolitan area of Taiwan. Other major cities include Taoyuan, Taichung, Tainan, and Kaohsiung. With around 23.9 million inhabitants, Taiwan is among the most densely populated countries in the world.

Empire of Japan

Empire of Japan

The Empire of Japan, also known as the Japanese Empire or Imperial Japan, was a historical nation-state and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration in 1868 until the enactment of the post-World War II 1947 constitution and subsequent formation of modern Japan. It encompassed the Japanese archipelago and several colonies, protectorates, mandates, and other territories.

National Taiwan University

National Taiwan University

National Taiwan University is a public research university in Taipei, Taiwan.

Lee Teng-hui

Lee Teng-hui

Lee Teng-hui was a Taiwanese statesman and economist who served as President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) under the 1947 Constitution and chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT) from 1988 to 2000. He was the first president to be born in Taiwan, the last to be indirectly elected and the first to be directly elected. During his presidency, Lee oversaw the end of martial law and the full democratization of the ROC, advocated the Taiwanese localization movement, and led an ambitious foreign policy to gain allies around the world. Nicknamed "Mr. Democracy", Lee was credited as the president who completed Taiwan's transition to the democratic era.

Agriculture

Agriculture

Agriculture or farming is the practice of cultivating plants and livestock. Agriculture was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The history of agriculture began thousands of years ago. After gathering wild grains beginning at least 105,000 years ago, nascent farmers began to plant them around 11,500 years ago. Sheep, goats, pigs and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Plants were independently cultivated in at least 11 regions of the world. Industrial agriculture based on large-scale monoculture in the twentieth century came to dominate agricultural output, though about 2 billion people still depended on subsistence agriculture.

Cornell University

Cornell University

Cornell University is a private Ivy League and statutory land-grant research university based in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White, Cornell was founded with the intention to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge—from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. Cornell is ranked among the most prestigious universities in the world. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell's founding principle, a popular 1868 quotation from founder Ezra Cornell: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study."

Political career

Later on, Huang also participated in politics. He was admired by Lee Teng-hui, who was helpful throughout Huang's political career. At 1979, Lee was the Mayor of Taipei and appointed him as the mayoral adviser and the Secretary-General of the Research, Development, and Evaluation Commission, Executive Yuan. Two years later, Lee became the chief executive of Taiwan Province, he followed Lee to Taiwan Provincial Government and was appointed the Deputy Secretary-General. He went back to National Taiwan University in 1984 as a professor, before he was appointed the Secretary-General of Taipei City Government in 1987. He became the acting Mayor of Taipei in May 1990, replacing Wu Poh-hsiung. In October, he was appointed Mayor of Taipei by President Lee Teng-hui. During the final year of Huang's term, under the pressure of democratization, the office of mayor became directly elected and Huang is the last Mayor of Taipei to have served via presidential appointment.

In the 1994 Taipei mayoral election, Huang received a late nomination from the Kuomintang.[6][7] Though he secured the party's endorsement and support from Lee,[8] Huang did not win the election. The loss could be partly ascribed to the split between the Kuomintang and Chinese New Party within the Pan-Blue Coalition. Although the entire Pan-Blue Coalition gained more votes, Huang only received 25.89% of the voter turnout, allowing Democratic Progressive Party candidate Chen Shui-bian to be elected in a traditional pro-Chinese unification city and Mainlander stronghold.[9][10]

1994 Taipei City Mayoral Election Result
Party # Candidate Votes Percentage
Independent candidate icon (TW).svg Independent 1 Ji Rong-zhi (紀榮治) 3,941 0.28%
New Party 2 Jaw Shaw-kong 424,905 30.17%
Democratic Progressive Party 3 Chen Shui-bian 615,090 43.67% Vote1.svg
Emblem of the Kuomintang.svg Kuomintang 4 Huang Ta-chou 364,618 25.89%
Total 1,408,554 100.00%
Voter turnout

After he lost the mayoral election, Huang was appointed the Minister of the Research, Development, and Evaluation Commission in June 1996, and a Minister without Portfolio in 1997.

He was appointed National Policy Advisor by President Ma Ying-jeou in 2009.

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Executive Yuan

Executive Yuan

The Executive Yuan is the executive branch of the government of the Republic of China (Taiwan). Its leader is the Premier, who is appointed by the President of the Republic of China, and requires confirmation by the Legislative Yuan.

Taiwan Province

Taiwan Province

Taiwan Province is a nominal administrative division of the Republic of China (ROC). Its definition has remained part of the Constitution of the Republic of China, but the province is no longer considered to have any administrative function practically.

Taipei City Government

Taipei City Government

The Taipei City Government (TCG) is the municipal government of Taipei.

Kuomintang

Kuomintang

The Kuomintang (KMT), also referred to as the Guomindang (GMD) or the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a major political party in the Republic of China, initially on the Chinese mainland and in Taiwan after 1949. It was the sole party in China during the Republican Era from 1928 to 1949, when most of the Chinese mainland was under its control. The party retreated from the mainland to Taiwan on 7 December 1949, following its defeat in the Chinese Civil War. Chiang Kai-shek declared martial law and retained its authoritarian rule over Taiwan under the Dang Guo system until democratic reforms were enacted in the 1980s and full democratization in the 1990s. In Taiwanese politics, the KMT is the dominant party in the Pan-Blue Coalition and primarily competes with the rival Democratic Progressive Party (DPP). It is currently the largest opposition party in the Legislative Yuan. The current chairman is Eric Chu.

Pan-Blue Coalition

Pan-Blue Coalition

The pan-Blue coalition, pan-Blue force or pan-Blue groups is a political coalition in the Republic of China (Taiwan) consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), People First Party (PFP), New Party (CNP), Non-Partisan Solidarity Union (NPSU), and Young China Party (YCP). The name comes from the party color of the Kuomintang. This coalition maintains that the Republic of China instead of the People's Republic of China is the legitimate government of China, favors a Chinese and Taiwanese dual identity over an exclusive Taiwanese identity, and favors greater friendly exchange with Mainland China, as opposed to the Pan-Green Coalition.

Democratic Progressive Party

Democratic Progressive Party

The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) is a Taiwanese nationalist and centre-left political party in the Republic of China (Taiwan). Controlling both the Republic of China presidency and the unicameral Legislative Yuan, it is the majority ruling party and the dominant party in the Pan-Green Coalition as of 2022.

Chen Shui-bian

Chen Shui-bian

Chen Shui-bian is a retired Taiwanese politician and lawyer who served as the president of the Republic of China (Taiwan) from 2000 to 2008. Chen was the first president from the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) which ended the Kuomintang's (KMT) 55 years of continuous rule in Taiwan. He is colloquially referred to as A-Bian (阿扁).

Chinese unification

Chinese unification

Chinese unification, also known as the Cross-Strait unification or Chinese reunification, is the potential unification of territories currently controlled, or claimed, by the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China ("Taiwan") under one political entity, possibly the formation of a political union between the two republics. Together with full Taiwan independence, unification is one of the main proposals to address questions on the political status of Taiwan, which is a central focus of Cross-Strait relations.

Mainland Chinese

Mainland Chinese

Mainland Chinese or Mainlanders are Chinese people who live in or have recently emigrated from mainland China, defined as the territory governed by the People's Republic of China (PRC) except for Hong Kong, Macau, and the partly-PRC-controlled South China Sea Islands, and also excluding certain territories that are claimed by the PRC but not controlled, namely Taiwan aka the "Republic of China" (ROC), which is a state with limited recognition, and other associated territories that are ruled by Taiwan. The term also refers to historical groups of people of Chinese origin who immigrated to Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan during the 20th century, especially in the context of specific historical events.

New Party (Taiwan)

New Party (Taiwan)

The New Party (NP), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP), is a Chinese nationalist political party in the Republic of China (Taiwan).

Jaw Shaw-kong

Jaw Shaw-kong

Jaw Shaw-kong is a Taiwanese media personality and politician. Jaw served a single term on the Taipei City Council before being elected to the Legislative Yuan from 1987 to 1991 and 1993 to 1994. Between Legislative Yuan stints, Jaw led the Environmental Protection Administration.

Ma Ying-jeou

Ma Ying-jeou

Ma Ying-jeou is a Hong Kong-born Taiwanese politician who served as President of the Republic of China from 2008 to 2016. His previous political roles include Justice Minister (1993–96) and Mayor of Taipei (1998–2006). He was also the Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT) between 2005–2007 and 2009–2014.

Sports

Apart from politics, Huang also contributed a lot in sports. He was elected the President of Chinese Taipei Olympic Committee in 1997, followed by becoming the commissioner of Chinese Professional Baseball League upon invitation in 1998.

Academics

After his session in the Olympic Committee in 2005, he returned to his academic research in agricultural science. He invented a new method of nurturing strawberry. He is currently a professor of Toko University in Taiwan.

Source: "Huang Ta-chou", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huang_Ta-chou.

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References
  1. ^ Copper, John Franklin (1998). Taiwan's mid-1990s elections: taking the final steps to democracy. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-275-96207-4.
  2. ^ "Asian Medal Winners In For Bonanza". New Straits Times. 6 September 2000. Retrieved 26 February 2011.
  3. ^ Low, Stephanie (22 September 2001). "KMT breaks it off with Lee Teng-hui". Taipei Times. Retrieved 27 June 2016.
  4. ^ "Huang takes helm at Grand Hotel". China Post. 24 April 2010. Retrieved 27 June 2016.
  5. ^ "A New Team In Place". Taiwan Today. 1 July 1990. Retrieved 27 June 2016.
  6. ^ "KMT leaders ask election delay". Taiwan Today/Taiwan Info. 24 June 1994. Archived from the original on 16 August 2016. Retrieved 27 June 2016.
  7. ^ Yu, Susan (19 August 1994). "KMT names incumbent officials". Taiwan Info. Archived from the original on 16 August 2016. Retrieved 27 June 2016.
  8. ^ Yu, Susan (25 September 1994). "Parties push themes, target the undecided". Taiwan Today. Archived from the original on 15 September 2016. Retrieved 27 June 2016.
  9. ^ Sheng, Virginia (21 February 1997). "Parties exchange barbs in Taoyuan County race". Taiwan Today. Archived from the original on 15 September 2016. Retrieved 27 June 2016.
  10. ^ Copper, John F. (1995). "Taiwan's 1994 Gubernatorial and Mayoral Elections". Asian Affairs. 22 (2): 97–118. doi:10.1080/00927678.1995.9933701. JSTOR 30172242.
Government offices
Preceded by Mayor of Taipei
1990–1994
Succeeded by

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