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How Do You Know

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How Do You Know
How Do You Know Poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byJames L. Brooks
Written byJames L. Brooks
Produced by
Starring
CinematographyJanusz Kamiński
Edited byRichard Marks
Music byHans Zimmer
Production
company
Distributed bySony Pictures Releasing[1]
Release dates
  • December 13, 2010 (2010-12-13) (Westwood)
  • December 17, 2010 (2010-12-17) (United States)
Running time
121 minutes[2]
CountryUnited States[1]
LanguageEnglish
Budget$120 million[3][4]
Box office$48.7 million[4]

How Do You Know is a 2010 American romantic comedy[1] film directed, written and produced by James L. Brooks, and starring Reese Witherspoon, Owen Wilson, Paul Rudd and Jack Nicholson in his final film role. It was the third film to feature Witherspoon and Rudd following Overnight Delivery and Monsters vs. Aliens. The plot follows softball player Lisa (Witherspoon), who is caught in a love triangle between two men—the charming baseball player Matty (Wilson) and George (Rudd), a businessman who is charged for stock fraud.

The film was shot in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C. and was released on December 17, 2010. It was a box office bomb, grossing $49 million against a $120 million budget, and received mixed reviews from critics.

Discover more about How Do You Know related topics

Romantic comedy

Romantic comedy

Romantic comedy is a subgenre of comedy and slice of life fiction, focusing on lighthearted, humorous plot lines centered on romantic ideas, such as how true love is able to surmount most obstacles. In a typical romantic comedy, the two lovers tend to be young, likeable, and seemingly meant for each other, yet they are kept apart by some complicating circumstance until, surmounting all obstacles, they are finally united. A fairy-tale-style happy ending is a typical feature.

James L. Brooks

James L. Brooks

James Lawrence Brooks is an American director, producer, screenwriter and co-founder of Gracie Films. His television and film work includes The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Taxi, The Simpsons, Broadcast News, As Good as It Gets, and Terms of Endearment.

Reese Witherspoon

Reese Witherspoon

Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon is an American actress. The recipient of various accolades, including an Academy Award, a British Academy Film Award, a Primetime Emmy Award, and two Golden Globe Awards, she has consistently ranked among the world's highest-paid actresses. Time magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2006 and 2015, and Forbes listed her among the World's 100 Most Powerful Women in 2019 and 2021. In 2021, Forbes named her the world's highest earning actress with an estimated net worth of $400 million.

Owen Wilson

Owen Wilson

Owen Cunningham Wilson is an American actor. He has had a long association with filmmaker Wes Anderson with whom he shared writing and acting credits for Bottle Rocket (1996), Rushmore (1998), and The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), the last of which earned him a nomination for the Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Screenplay. He has also appeared in Anderson's The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2004), The Darjeeling Limited (2007), Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009), The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014), and The French Dispatch (2021). Wilson also starred in the Woody Allen romantic comedy Midnight in Paris (2011) as unsatisfied screenwriter Gil Pender, a role which earned him a Golden Globe Award nomination. In 2014 he appeared in Paul Thomas Anderson's Inherent Vice, and Peter Bogdanovich's She's Funny That Way.

Paul Rudd

Paul Rudd

Paul Stephen Rudd is an American actor. He studied theater at the University of Kansas and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, before making his acting debut in 1991. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in July 2015. He was included on the Forbes Celebrity 100 list in 2019. In 2021, he was named People magazine's "Sexiest Man Alive".

Jack Nicholson

Jack Nicholson

John Joseph Nicholson is an American retired actor and filmmaker. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest actors of all time. In many of his films, he played rebels against the social structure. He received numerous accolades throughout his career which spanned over five decades, including three Academy Awards, three BAFTA Awards, six Golden Globe Awards, a Grammy Award, and a Screen Actors Guild Award. He also received the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award in 1994 and the Kennedy Center Honor in 2001.

Overnight Delivery

Overnight Delivery

Overnight Delivery is a 1998 American romantic comedy film directed by Jason Bloom. It stars Paul Rudd and Reese Witherspoon as a college student and a stripper who take a road trip across America to retrieve a package that had been impulsively sent to a girlfriend. It was filmed on location in Minnesota in 1996. It was released direct-to-video in 1998.

Monsters vs. Aliens

Monsters vs. Aliens

Monsters vs. Aliens is a 2009 American 3D computer-animated monster comedy film produced by DreamWorks Animation and distributed by Paramount Pictures. The film was directed by Conrad Vernon and Rob Letterman from a screenplay written by Letterman, Maya Forbes, Wallace Wolodarsky, and the writing team of Jonathan Aibel and Glenn Berger. Featuring the voices of Reese Witherspoon, Seth Rogen, Hugh Laurie, Will Arnett, Kiefer Sutherland, Rainn Wilson, Paul Rudd, and Stephen Colbert, the film involves a group of misfit monsters hired by the United States Armed Forces to stop the invasion of an extraterrestrial villain and save the world in exchange for freedom.

Securities fraud

Securities fraud

Securities fraud, also known as stock fraud and investment fraud, is a deceptive practice in the stock or commodities markets that induces investors to make purchase or sale decisions on the basis of false information. The setups are generally made to result in monetary gain for the deceivers, and generally result in unfair monetary losses for the investors. They are generally violating securities laws.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, often called Philly, is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the second-largest city in both the Northeast megalopolis and Mid-Atlantic regions after New York City. It is one of the most historically significant cities in the United States and served as the nation's capital until 1800. Philadelphia is the nation's sixth-largest city with a population of 1,603,797 as of the 2020 census. Since 1854, the city has been coextensive with Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the Delaware Valley, the nation's seventh-largest and one of the world's largest metropolitan regions with 6.245 million residents. Philadelphia is known for its extensive contributions to American history, especially the American Revolution, and for its contemporary influence in business and industry, culture, sports, and music.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly known as Washington or D.C., is the capital city and federal district of the United States. The city is located on the east bank of the Potomac River, which forms its southwestern border with Virginia, and borders Maryland to its north and east. The city was named for George Washington, a Founding Father, commanding general of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War, and the first president of the United States, and the district is named for Columbia, the female personification of the nation.

Box-office bomb

Box-office bomb

A box-office bomb, or box-office disaster, is a film that is unprofitable or considered highly unsuccessful during its theatrical run. Although any film for which the production, marketing, and distribution costs combined exceed the revenue after release has technically "bombed", the term is more frequently used for major studio releases that were highly anticipated, extensively marketed and expensive to produce that ultimately failed commercially.

Plot

Softball player Lisa Jorgenson begins dating Matty Reynolds, a pitcher for the Washington Nationals. She also receives an intriguing phone call from a young executive, George Madison, who was advised by a friend of Lisa's to give her a call. George calls out of politeness because he wants to explain that his relationship with his girlfriend has just become more serious.

Life takes an abrupt turn for the worse for George when he suddenly finds himself the target of a federal criminal investigation for corporate malfeasance at a company run by his father, Charles Madison. He is fired from his job and abandoned by the company, with the exception of his father and his pregnant secretary, Annie.

Still reeling from this blow, George goes to his girlfriend for sympathy and is stunned when she immediately breaks up with him. At the same time, Lisa is devastated when she is left off the Team USA roster.

On a whim, George calls again to invite Lisa to lunch and she accepts. It turns out to be a disaster; he is so overwhelmed with his troubles that she eventually asks that they just eat in silence, and they part ways not expecting to see one another again. Unsure what to do next, Lisa moves in with Matty, who has a penthouse in the same upscale building where George's father lives. Matty is rich, well-meaning and fun, but is also immature and insensitive, and continues to have casual affairs with other women.

George is indicted and could face prison time. Annie is so loyal that she tries to give him inside information in advance, but he urges her not to lose her own job. George and Lisa bump into each other in Matty's building and he offers to help her carry her groceries home. Matty returns home and is upset to find Lisa at “his place” with an uninvited guest.

Matty inadvertently offends her, so Lisa moves out and spends a pleasant, tipsy evening at George's modest new apartment. His father then drops one last bombshell on his son: It was he who committed the illegal act for which George is being charged. Due to a previous conviction, Charles would spend at least 25 years — basically, the rest of his life due to his advanced age — in prison, whereas George would only do three years at most.

On the night Annie's baby is born and her boyfriend proposes, Lisa begins to reconsider her previous reluctance to settle down. George is clearly smitten with her, but Matty pleads for another chance and she accepts. George makes a proposition to his father: he will take one more shot at persuading Lisa to be with him. If she does, Charles must go to jail, and if she doesn't, George will take the rap for his dad.

At a birthday party that Matty throws for Lisa, George confesses his feelings for her and asks her to meet him downstairs if she decides she reciprocates them. He then leaves the party and goes downstairs to give her time to think it over. Finally, Lisa says goodbye to Matty and joins George outside. Charles, looking on from above smiles at the sight, but his smile soon fades as he realises he has to go to jail.

Lisa is confused about her feelings and tells George, "I thought you were this silly guy. Now it's like... everything but you seems silly." George suggests she had never felt the kind of overwhelming love where the guy is the whole deal, which helps her realise that she's in love with him. Lisa then reaches out and holds his hand and we see them board a bus together.

Cast

Bill Murray was Brooks' original choice for the role of Charles Madison.[5]

Discover more about Cast related topics

Reese Witherspoon

Reese Witherspoon

Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon is an American actress. The recipient of various accolades, including an Academy Award, a British Academy Film Award, a Primetime Emmy Award, and two Golden Globe Awards, she has consistently ranked among the world's highest-paid actresses. Time magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2006 and 2015, and Forbes listed her among the World's 100 Most Powerful Women in 2019 and 2021. In 2021, Forbes named her the world's highest earning actress with an estimated net worth of $400 million.

Owen Wilson

Owen Wilson

Owen Cunningham Wilson is an American actor. He has had a long association with filmmaker Wes Anderson with whom he shared writing and acting credits for Bottle Rocket (1996), Rushmore (1998), and The Royal Tenenbaums (2001), the last of which earned him a nomination for the Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Screenplay. He has also appeared in Anderson's The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2004), The Darjeeling Limited (2007), Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009), The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014), and The French Dispatch (2021). Wilson also starred in the Woody Allen romantic comedy Midnight in Paris (2011) as unsatisfied screenwriter Gil Pender, a role which earned him a Golden Globe Award nomination. In 2014 he appeared in Paul Thomas Anderson's Inherent Vice, and Peter Bogdanovich's She's Funny That Way.

Paul Rudd

Paul Rudd

Paul Stephen Rudd is an American actor. He studied theater at the University of Kansas and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, before making his acting debut in 1991. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in July 2015. He was included on the Forbes Celebrity 100 list in 2019. In 2021, he was named People magazine's "Sexiest Man Alive".

Jack Nicholson

Jack Nicholson

John Joseph Nicholson is an American retired actor and filmmaker. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest actors of all time. In many of his films, he played rebels against the social structure. He received numerous accolades throughout his career which spanned over five decades, including three Academy Awards, three BAFTA Awards, six Golden Globe Awards, a Grammy Award, and a Screen Actors Guild Award. He also received the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award in 1994 and the Kennedy Center Honor in 2001.

Dean Norris

Dean Norris

Dean Joseph Norris is an American actor. He is best known for playing DEA agent Hank Schrader on the AMC series Breaking Bad (2008–2013) and its spin-off Better Call Saul (2020). He also portrayed town councilman James "Big Jim" Rennie on the CBS series Under the Dome (2013–2015) and played mob boss Clay "Uncle Daddy" Husser on the TNT series Claws (2017-2022). Throughout his career, Norris has acted in nearly 50 movies and more than 100 different TV shows.

Kathryn Hahn

Kathryn Hahn

Kathryn Marie Hahn is an American actress and comedian. She began her career on television, starring as grief counselor Lily Lebowski in the NBC crime drama series Crossing Jordan (2001–2007). Hahn gained prominence appearing as a supporting actress in a number of comedy films, including How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days (2003), Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (2004), Step Brothers (2008), The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard (2009), Our Idiot Brother (2011), We're the Millers, and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.

Andrew Wilson (actor)

Andrew Wilson (actor)

Andrew Cunningham Wilson is an American film actor and director. He is the older brother of actors Owen Wilson and Luke Wilson.

Domenick Lombardozzi

Domenick Lombardozzi

Domenick Lombardozzi is an American actor. He is best known for portraying Herc in The Wire, and is also known for his roles in A Bronx Tale (1993), Entourage, and The Irishman (2019).

Lenny Venito

Lenny Venito

Lenny Venito is an American actor, who has made appearances in movies such as Gigli, Men in Black 3, and War of the Worlds. He also starred as Marty Weaver in the ABC comedy The Neighbors and James "Murmur" Zancone on The Sopranos.

Mark Linn-Baker

Mark Linn-Baker

Mark Linn-Baker is an American actor and director who played Benjy Stone in the film My Favorite Year and Larry Appleton in the television sitcom Perfect Strangers.

Molly Price

Molly Price

Molly Evan Price is an American actress. She is best known for her role as Faith Yokas in the NBC drama series Third Watch (1999–2005). Price has also appeared in recurring and guest-starring roles in many other television dramas and co-starred in a number of films, including Sweet and Lowdown (1999), Chasing Sleep (2000), and Not Fade Away (2012).

Bill Murray

Bill Murray

William James Murray is an American actor, comedian, writer, producer, and director. Known for his deadpan delivery, Murray rose to fame on The National Lampoon Radio Hour (1973–1974) before becoming a national presence on Saturday Night Live from 1977 to 1980, where he received a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series. He starred in comedy films including Meatballs (1979), Caddyshack (1980), Stripes (1981), Ghostbusters (1984), Scrooged (1988), What About Bob? (1991), Groundhog Day (1993), Kingpin (1996), The Man Who Knew Too Little (1997), Osmosis Jones (2001) and Garfield (2004). His only directorial credit is Quick Change (1990), which he co-directed with Howard Franklin.

Production

Brooks began work on the film in 2005, wishing to create a film about a young female athlete. While interviewing numerous women for hundreds of hours in his research for the film, he also became interested in "the dilemmas of contemporary business executives, who are sometimes held accountable by the law for corporate behavior of which they may not even be aware." He created Paul Rudd's and Jack Nicholson's characters for this concept.[6] Filming finished in November 2009,[7] although Brooks later reshot the film's opening and ending.[3] The total production cost of the film was $120 million, with the net budget at about $100 million after tax rebates from Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia. The combined salaries for the director Brooks (about $10 million) and the four major stars Witherspoon ($15 million), Nicholson ($12 million), Wilson ($10 million) and Rudd ($3 million) totaled about $50 million. Brooks' "slow and meticulous" production and post-production process have been given as reasons for the size of the budget.[3]

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Paul Rudd

Paul Rudd

Paul Stephen Rudd is an American actor. He studied theater at the University of Kansas and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, before making his acting debut in 1991. He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in July 2015. He was included on the Forbes Celebrity 100 list in 2019. In 2021, he was named People magazine's "Sexiest Man Alive".

Jack Nicholson

Jack Nicholson

John Joseph Nicholson is an American retired actor and filmmaker. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest actors of all time. In many of his films, he played rebels against the social structure. He received numerous accolades throughout his career which spanned over five decades, including three Academy Awards, three BAFTA Awards, six Golden Globe Awards, a Grammy Award, and a Screen Actors Guild Award. He also received the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award in 1994 and the Kennedy Center Honor in 2001.

Tax refund

Tax refund

A tax refund or tax rebate is a payment to the taxpayer due to the taxpayer having paid more tax than they owed.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state spanning the Mid-Atlantic, Northeastern, Appalachian, and Great Lakes regions of the United States. Pennsylvania borders Delaware to its southeast, Maryland to its south, West Virginia to its southwest, Ohio to its west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to its northwest, New York state to its north, and the Delaware River and New Jersey to its east.

Salary

Salary

A salary is a form of periodic payment from an employer to an employee, which may be specified in an employment contract. It is contrasted with piece wages, where each job, hour or other unit is paid separately, rather than on a periodic basis. From the point of view of running a business, salary can also be viewed as the cost of acquiring and retaining human resources for running operations, and is then termed personnel expense or salary expense. In accounting, salaries are recorded in payroll accounts.

Release

How Do You Know opened at $7.6 million in the United States and Canada, making it eighth in the box office at its first weekend.[8] The film fell off the chart by its third weekend. On its opening day, December 17, 2010, it debuted at No. 5 behind Tron: Legacy, Yogi Bear, The Fighter and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. By December 22, it was No. 11 in the box office. How Do You Know grossed a total of $48.7 million worldwide.[4] In 2014, the Los Angeles Times listed the film as one of the biggest box office flops of all time.[9]

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Tron: Legacy

Tron: Legacy

Tron: Legacy is a 2010 American science fiction action film directed by Joseph Kosinski and written by Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis, from a story by Horowitz, Kitsis, Brian Klugman, and Lee Sternthal. It serves as a sequel to Tron (1982), whose director Steven Lisberger returned to produce. The cast includes Jeff Bridges and Bruce Boxleitner reprising their roles as Kevin Flynn and Alan Bradley, respectively, as well as Garrett Hedlund, Olivia Wilde, James Frain, Beau Garrett and Michael Sheen. The story follows Flynn's adult son Sam, who responds to a message from his long-lost father and is transported into a virtual reality called "the Grid", where Sam, his father, and the algorithm Quorra must stop the malevolent program Clu from invading the real world.

Yogi Bear (film)

Yogi Bear (film)

Yogi Bear is a 2010 American 3D live-action/computer-animated comedy film directed by Eric Brevig and written by Brad Copeland, Joshua Sternin and Jennifer Ventimilia. Based on the Hanna-Barbera animated television series The Yogi Bear Show, the film stars Anna Faris, Tom Cavanagh, T.J. Miller, Nate Corddry and Andrew Daly, alongside the voices of Dan Aykroyd and Justin Timberlake. The film centers on Ranger Smith as he teams up with his girlfriend Rachel Johnson, Yogi Bear, and Boo-Boo Bear to stop their home, Jellystone Park, from being logged. Production on the film took place in New Zealand in October 2008.

The Fighter

The Fighter

The Fighter is a 2010 American biographical sports drama film directed by David O. Russell, and stars Mark Wahlberg, Christian Bale, Amy Adams, and Melissa Leo. The film centers on the lives of professional boxer Micky Ward (Wahlberg) and his older half-brother and former boxer Dicky Eklund (Bale). The film was inspired by the 1995 documentary that features the Eklund-Ward family, titled High on Crack Street: Lost Lives in Lowell.

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is a 2010 high fantasy adventure film directed by Michael Apted from a screenplay by Christopher Markus, Stephen McFeely, and Michael Petroni, based on the 1952 novel The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, the third published and fifth chronological novel in the children's book series The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. The sequel to The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (2008), it is the third and final installment in The Chronicles of Narnia film series. It is the only film in the series not to be distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, which was replaced by 20th Century Fox. However, Disney would eventually own the rights to all the films in the series following the acquisition of 21st Century Fox by Disney in 2019.

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times, abbreviated as LA Times, is a daily newspaper that started publishing in Los Angeles in 1881. Based in the Los Angeles suburb of El Segundo since 2018, it is the sixth-largest newspaper by circulation in the United States. The publication has won more than 40 Pulitzer Prizes. It is owned by Patrick Soon-Shiong and published by the Times Mirror Company. The newspaper's coverage has evolved more recently away from U.S. and international headlines and toward emphasizing California and especially Southern California stories.

List of biggest box-office bombs

List of biggest box-office bombs

In the film and media industry, if a film released in theatres fails to break even by a large amount, it is considered a box-office bomb, thus losing money for the distributor, studio, and/or production company that invested in it. Due to the secrecy surrounding costs and profit margins in the film industry, figures of losses are usually rough estimates at best, and there are often conflicting estimates over how much a film has lost. To accommodate this uncertainty, the losses are presented as ranges where this is the case, and the list is ordered alphabetically in the absence of a definitive order. Because the films on the list have been released over a large span of time, currency inflation is a material factor, so losses are adjusted for inflation using the United States Consumer Price Index to enable comparison at equivalent purchasing power.

Reception

On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of 31% based on reviews from 150 critics, with an average rating of 4.9/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "How Do You Know boasts a quartet of likeable leads – and they deserve better than this glib, overlong misfire from writer/director James L. Brooks."[10] On Metacritic it has a score of 46 out of 100 based on reviews from 38 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[11] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "C−" on an A+ to F scale.[12]

Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter gave it a mixed review, and called it "A low-impact romantic comedy-drama from James L. Brooks in which the central characters are strangely disconnected from one another as well as from the audience."[13] Peter Debruge of Variety gave it a negative review, and wrote: "How do you know when the spark is gone? When your latest romantic comedy looks like TV, feels like greeting-card poetry and sounds like a self-help manual."[14] Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times wrote: "Nothing heats up. The movie doesn't lead us, it simply stays in step."[15]

Richard Corliss of Time magazine, noted that the film had already received particularly negative reviews, but responded "Yeah, well, I still like the film."[16]

Discover more about Reception related topics

Rotten Tomatoes

Rotten Tomatoes

Rotten Tomatoes is an American review-aggregation website for film and television. The company was launched in August 1998 by three undergraduate students at the University of California, Berkeley: Senh Duong, Patrick Y. Lee, and Stephen Wang. Although the name "Rotten Tomatoes" connects to the practice of audiences throwing rotten tomatoes in disapproval of a poor stage performance, the original inspiration comes from a scene featuring tomatoes in the Canadian film Léolo (1992).

Metacritic

Metacritic

Metacritic is a website that aggregates reviews of films, television shows, music albums, video games, and formerly books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged. Metacritic was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999, and is owned by Fandom, Inc. as of 2023.

CinemaScore

CinemaScore

CinemaScore is a market research firm based in Las Vegas. It surveys film audiences to rate their viewing experiences with letter grades, reports the results, and forecasts box office receipts based on the data.

Todd McCarthy

Todd McCarthy

Todd McCarthy is an American film critic and author. He wrote for Variety for 31 years as its chief film critic until 2010. In October of that year, he joined The Hollywood Reporter, where he subsequently served as chief film critic until 2020. McCarthy subsequently began writing regularly for Deadline Hollywood in 2020.

The Hollywood Reporter

The Hollywood Reporter

The Hollywood Reporter (THR) is an American digital and print magazine which focuses on the Hollywood film, television, and entertainment industries. It was founded in 1930 as a daily trade paper, and in 2010 switched to a weekly large-format print magazine with a revamped website. As of 2020, the day-to-day operations of the company are handled by Penske Media Corporation through a joint venture with Eldridge Industries.

Variety (magazine)

Variety (magazine)

Variety is an American media company owned by Penske Media Corporation. The company was founded by Sime Silverman in New York City in 1905 as a weekly newspaper reporting on theater and vaudeville. In 1933 it added Daily Variety, based in Los Angeles, to cover the motion-picture industry. Variety.com features entertainment news, reviews, box office results, cover stories, videos, photo galleries and features, plus a credits database, production charts and calendar, with archive content dating back to 1905.

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

Roger Joseph Ebert was an American film critic, film historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. Neil Steinberg of the Chicago Sun-Times said Ebert "was without question the nation's most prominent and influential film critic," and Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times called him "the best-known film critic in America."

Chicago Sun-Times

Chicago Sun-Times

The Chicago Sun-Times is a daily newspaper published in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Since 2022, it is the flagship paper of Chicago Public Media, and has the second largest circulation among Chicago newspapers, after the Chicago Tribune. The modern paper grew out of the 1948 merger of the Chicago Sun and the Chicago Daily Times. Journalists at the paper have received eight Pulitzer prizes, mostly in the 1970s; one recipient was film critic Roger Ebert (1975), who worked at the paper from 1967 until his death in 2013. Long owned by the Marshall Field family, since the 1980s ownership of the paper has changed hands numerous times, including twice in the late 2010s.

Richard Corliss

Richard Corliss

Richard Nelson Corliss was an American film critic and magazine editor for Time. He focused on movies, with occasional articles on other subjects.

Time (magazine)

Time (magazine)

Time is an American news magazine based in New York City. For nearly a century, it was published weekly, but starting in March 2020 it transitioned to every other week. It was first published in New York City on March 3, 1923, and for many years it was run by its influential co-founder, Henry Luce. A European edition is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa, and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney.

Source: "How Do You Know", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/How_Do_You_Know.

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References
  1. ^ a b c d "How Do You Know (2010)". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  2. ^ "How Do You Know (12A)". British Board of Film Classification. December 22, 2010. Retrieved November 29, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Masters, Kim (December 10, 2010). "EXCLUSIVE: 'How Do You Know' Price Tag: $120 Million, $50 Million Just for Talent". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 19, 2010.
  4. ^ a b c "How Do You Know (2010)". Box Office Mojo. Amazon.com. Retrieved December 31, 2010.
  5. ^ Evans, Bradford (February 17, 2011). "The Lost Roles of Bill Murray". Splitsider. Archived from the original on May 20, 2015. Retrieved May 25, 2015.
  6. ^ Cieply, Michael (March 22, 2010). "Star-Heavy Big-Budget Love Story Bucks Trend". The New York Times.
  7. ^ Rosenberg, Adam (November 3, 2009). "Reese Witherspoon Sheds Some Light On Her Untitled Project With James L. Brooks". MTV.com. Retrieved March 31, 2010.
  8. ^ "Weekend Box Office Results for December 17-19". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 2010-12-26.
  9. ^ Eller, Claudia (January 15, 2014). ""The costliest box office flops of all time"". Los Angeles Times.
  10. ^ "How Do You Know (2010)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango Media. Retrieved November 1, 2020.
  11. ^ "How Do You Know Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved November 27, 2016.
  12. ^ "Box office: 'How Do You Know' flops; 'Tron' doesn't; and like the bear himself, 'Yogi' is soft [Updated]". Los Angeles Times. December 19, 2010. After a terrible opening, it's likely to fade quickly from theaters, as the mostly adult-female ticket buyers gave it a CinemaScore of C-, agreeing with critics who largely disliked the movie.
  13. ^ Todd McCarthy (2010). "How Do You Know: Film Review". The Hollywood Reporter.
  14. ^ Debruge, Peter (December 15, 2010). "How Do You Know". Variety.
  15. ^ Ebert, Roger (December 15, 2010). "How Do You Know? movie review (2010)". Chicago Sun-Times.
  16. ^ Corliss, Richard (December 17, 2010). "'How Do You Know' Review: Witherspoon, Wilson and Rudd's Love Story". Time.
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