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Hokkien mee

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Hokkien mee
Newton HokkienMee.JPG
Singaporean-style Hokkien Mee
TypeNoodle
Place of originFujian province, China
Associated national cuisineIndonesia,[1][2][3] Malaysia, Singapore
Main ingredientsEgg noodles, rice noodles, egg, pork, prawn, squid
VariationsHokkien hae mee, Hokkien char mee

Hokkien mee, literally "Fujian noodles", is a series of related Southeast Asian dishes that have their origins in the cuisine of China's Fujian (Hokkien) province.[4]

Types

Hokkien mee can refer to four distinct dishes, with each being ubiquitous in specific localities in Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia. The dishes are all indigenous to the region and not known in Fujian itself, although they are all thought to have descended from lor mee (卤面), a staple of Fujianese cooking.

Type Hokkien mee
(fried noodles)
Penang hae mee (prawn noodles) Singapore hae mee
(prawn noodles)
Hokkien char mee
(fried noodles)
Origin Singapore Penang Singapore Kuala Lumpur
(Petaling Street/Pasar Seni)
Cooking method Stir fried Broth-based Stir fried
Ingredients Egg noodles and rice noodles Fat yellow noodles
No dark soy sauce used Dark soy sauce is used
Egg, prawn, squid, fish cake and pork, often with lard, limes and sambal on the side. Prawn is the main ingredient, with slices of chicken or pork, egg, kangkung and sambal added as well. Prawn is the main ingredient with slices of chicken or pork, squid and fish cake. Slices of chicken or pork, squid and cabbage

Hokkien mee

A plate of Singapore-style hokkien mee
A plate of Singapore-style hokkien mee

In Singapore, Hokkien mee (福建面) refers to a dish of egg noodles and rice noodles stir-fried with egg, slices of pork, prawns and squid. The key to the dish is copious quantities of an aromatic broth made from prawns and pork bones, slowly simmered for many hours. Sambal chilli and calamansi limes are served on the side for the diner to blend in, giving it an extra zing and tanginess. Traditionally, small cubes of fried lard are added, and some stalls also serve the dish on an opeh leaf (soft areca palm bark), which enhances the fragrance of the dish.

The Singaporean version of Hokkien mee was created after World War II by Chinese sailors from Fujian (Hokkien) province in southern China. After working in the factories, they would congregate along Rochor Road and fry excess noodles from the noodle factories over a charcoal stove. The dish is considered a classic of Singaporean cuisine[5] and several hawker stalls selling it have been recognized by the Michelin Guide.[6]

The dish is also known as "fried Hokkien noodles" (炒福建面), "Hokkien fried prawn noodles" (福建炒虾面), and particularly in Malaysia, "sotong mee" (squid noodles) to differentiate it from other types of Hokkien mee.

In Indonesia, Mie Hokkien is associated particularly with the city of Medan on Sumatra. While the ingredients resemble the Singaporean version, instead of being stir-fried together, the ingredients are typically cooked separately and simply tossed together before serving.[7]

Penang hae mee (noodle soup)

A bowl of Penang Hokkien mee
A bowl of Penang Hokkien mee

The Penang variant can be easily distinguished from the other variants by its characteristic spicy prawn broth. It primarily consists of rice vermicelli and thicker yellow egg noodles, while the broth is made with prawn heads and shells, and pork ribs.[8] Sliced prawns are also added into the dish, along with pork slices, hard boiled eggs, kangkung (Ipomoea aquatica), bean sprouts, fried shallots, lard and sambal. In Penang, pig skin, an ingredient rarely served in Kuala Lumpur, is a common topping as well.

Egg noodles are served in richly flavoured dark soup stock with prawns, pork slices, fish cake slices and bean sprouts, topped with fried shallots and scallion. The stock is made using dried shrimp, plucked heads of prawns, white pepper, garlic and other spices. Traditionally, lard is added to the soup, but this is now less common due to health concerns. A "dry" (without soup) version is also available; this version usually involves flavouring the noodles and toppings with vinegar, soy sauce, oil and chili, if desired. The dish is also usually served with freshly cut red chili slices in light soy sauce and lime juice.

Singaporean hae mee

A bowl of Singaporean hae mee noodle soup
A bowl of Singaporean hae mee noodle soup

Another version also called "prawn noodles" in Singapore is similar to the Penang variation of Hokkien mee. Egg noodles and rice noodles are served in richly flavoured dark soup stock with prawns, pork slices, fish cake slices, and bean sprouts topped with fried shallots and spring onion. The stock is made using dried shrimps, prawn heads, white pepper, garlic and other spices.

Hokkien char mee

A plate of Kuala Lumpur-style hokkien mee
A plate of Kuala Lumpur-style hokkien mee

Hokkien char mee (Hokkien fried noodles; 福建炒麵) is served in Kuala Lumpur and the surrounding region. It is a dish of thick yellow noodles braised in thick dark soy sauce with pork, squid, fish cake and cabbage as the main ingredients and cubes of pork fat fried until crispy (sometimes pork liver is included). The best examples are usually cooked over a raging charcoal fire. This dish originated from a hawker stall chef, Ong Kim Lian, at Petaling Street in 1927. Unlike the other variants of Hokkien mee, this dish does not incorporate prawns.

Discover more about Types related topics

Lor mee

Lor mee

Lor mee is a Chinese Hokkien noodle dish from Zhangzhou served in a thick starchy gravy. Variants of the dish are also eaten by Hokkiens in Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. In the Philippines, the local variant is called Lomi or Pancit Lomi. The thick gravy is made of corn starch, spices, meat, seafoods and eggs. The ingredients added into the noodles are usually ngo hiang, fish cake, fish, round and flat meat dumplings, half a boiled egg, and other items depending on the stall and the price paid. Vinegar and garlic can be added as an optional item. Lor Mee can be served together with red chili. Traditional versions also include bits of fried fish as topping though few stalls serve this version anymore.

Petaling Street

Petaling Street

Petaling Street is a Chinatown located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The whole vicinity is also known as Chinatown KL. Haggling is a common sight here and the place is usually crowded with locals as well as tourists.

Dark soy sauce

Dark soy sauce

In Chinese cuisine, dark soy sauce is a dark-coloured soy sauce used mainly for adding colour and flavour to dishes. It is richer, slightly thicker, and less salty than other types of soy sauce. As the Chinese name lăo chōu suggests, it is also aged longer. It is often sweetened by adding molasses or other sweetening agents. Dark soy sauce is often used in stews, stir-fries, and sauces. It is used in dishes requiring colours, such as red cooked dishes.

Ipomoea aquatica

Ipomoea aquatica

Ipomoea aquatica, most widely known as water spinach, is a semi-aquatic, tropical plant grown as a vegetable for its tender shoots. I. aquatica is generally believed to have been first domesticated in Southeast Asia. It is widely cultivated in Southeast Asia, East Asia, and South Asia. It grows abundantly near waterways and requires little to no care.

Rice noodles

Rice noodles

Rice noodles, or simply rice noodle, are noodles made with rice flour and water as the principal ingredients. Sometimes ingredients such as tapioca or corn starch are added in order to improve the transparency or increase the gelatinous and chewy texture of the noodles. Rice noodles are most common in the cuisines of East and Southeast Asia. They are available fresh, frozen, or dried, in various shapes, thicknesses and textures. Fresh noodles are also highly perishable; their shelf life may be just several days.

Egg

Egg

An egg is an organic vessel grown by an animal to carry a possibly fertilized egg cell and to incubate from it an embryo within the egg until the embryo has become an animal fetus that can survive on its own, at which point the animal hatches.

Pork

Pork

Pork is the culinary name for the meat of the domestic pig. It is the most commonly consumed meat worldwide, with evidence of pig husbandry dating back to 5000 BCE.

Prawn

Prawn

Prawn is a common name for small aquatic crustaceans with an exoskeleton and ten legs, some of which can be eaten.

Calamansi

Calamansi

Calamansi, also known as calamondin, Philippine lime, or Philippine lemon, is an economically important citrus hybrid predominantly cultivated in the Philippines. It is native to the Philippines, Borneo, Sumatra, and Sulawesi in Indonesia in Southeast Asia, as well as southern China and Taiwan in East Asia. Calamansi is ubiquitous in traditional Filipino cuisine. It is naturally very sour, and is used in various condiments, beverages, dishes, marinades, and preserves. Calamansi is also used as an ingredient in Malaysian and Indonesian cuisines.

Areca catechu

Areca catechu

Areca catechu is a species of palm which grows in much of the tropical Pacific, Asia, and parts of east Africa. The palm is believed to have originated in the Philippines, but is widespread in cultivation and is considered naturalized in southern China, Taiwan, India, Bangladesh, the Maldives, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, New Guinea, many of the islands in the Pacific Ocean, and also in the West Indies.

Michelin Guide

Michelin Guide

The Michelin Guides are a series of guide books that have been published by the French tyre company Michelin since 1900. The Guide awards up to three Michelin stars for excellence to a select few establishments. The acquisition or loss of a star or stars can have dramatic effects on the success of a restaurant. Michelin also publishes the Green Guides, a series of general guides to cities, regions, and countries.

Medan

Medan

Medan is the capital and largest city of the Indonesian province of North Sumatra, as well as a regional hub and financial centre of Sumatra. According to the National Development Planning Agency, Medan is one of the four main central cities of Indonesia, alongside Jakarta, Surabaya, and Makassar. As of the 2020 Census, Medan has a population of 2,435,252 within its city limits, and over 3.4 million in its built-up urban area, making it the fourth largest urban area in Indonesia. The Medan metropolitan area—which includes neighbouring Binjai, Deli Serdang Regency, and a part of Karo Regency—is the largest metropolitan area outside of Java, with 4,744,323 residents counted in the 2020 Census. Medan is a multicultural metropolis and a busy trading city bordered by the Strait of Malacca, making it one of the major economic cities in Indonesia. A gateway to the western part of Indonesia, Medan is supported by the Port of Belawan and Kualanamu International Airport, both of which are connected to the city centre via toll roads and railways.

Source: "Hokkien mee", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokkien_mee.

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See also
References
  1. ^ "Yuk Cari Tahu Jenis-Jenis Mie yang Populer di Indonesia!", ilmupedia
  2. ^ "Bosan Mie Bakso Biasa? Yuk Coba Kelezatan Lomie", tribunnews
  3. ^ "Gurih Mantap! Lomie Lombok Khas Bandung Buat 'Brunch' Akhir Pekan", Detik
  4. ^ Tan, Bonny (2011). "Hokkien prawn noodle soup". Singapore Infopedia. Retrieved 8 May 2019.
  5. ^ "Uniquely Singaporean dishes that originated on our island". Timeout. 17 May 2018. Retrieved 16 July 2020.
  6. ^ "Tiong Bahru Yi Sheng Fried Hokkien Prawn Mee – Singapore - a MICHELIN Guide Restaurant".
  7. ^ "Mie Hokkian Medan/Hokkian Noodle". 3 October 2017.
  8. ^ "Behold, the Penang Hokkien Mee". 13 April 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2017.
Further reading

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