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Hillel Rivlin

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Hillel Rivlin of Shklov (Hebrew: הלל ריבלין; 16 September 1757–- 2 June 1838 and the Hebrew date 2 Tishrei 5518–9 Sivan 5598) was a close disciple of the Vilna Gaon.[1] Along with some other pupils of the Vilna Gaon, he is credited with having revitalized the Ashkenazi community in what is now Israel (then the Ottoman province of Damascus Eyalet), by immigrating to Jerusalem in 1809.[2]

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Hebrew language

Hebrew language

Hebrew is a Northwest Semitic language of the Afroasiatic language family. Historically, it is one of the spoken languages of the Israelites and their longest-surviving descendants, the Jews and Samaritans. It was largely preserved throughout history as the main liturgical language of Judaism and Samaritanism. Hebrew is the only Canaanite language still spoken today, and serves as the only truly successful example of a dead language that has been revived. It is also one of only two Northwest Semitic languages still in use, with the other being Aramaic.

Vilna Gaon

Vilna Gaon

Elijah ben Solomon Zalman, known as the Vilna Gaon or Elijah of Vilna, or by his Hebrew acronym HaGra, was a Lithuanian Jewish Talmudist, halakhist, kabbalist, and the foremost leader of misnagdic (non-hasidic) Jewry of the past few centuries. He is commonly referred to in Hebrew as ha-Gaon he-Chasid mi-Vilna, "the pious genius from Vilnius".

Ashkenazi Jews

Ashkenazi Jews

Ashkenazi Jews, also known as Ashkenazic Jews or Ashkenazim, are a Jewish diaspora population who coalesced in the Holy Roman Empire around the end of the first millennium CE. Their traditional diaspora language is Yiddish, which developed during the Middle Ages after they had moved from Germany and France into Northern Europe and Eastern Europe. For centuries, Ashkenazim in Europe used Hebrew only as a sacred language until the revival of Hebrew as a common language in 20th-century Israel.

Old Yishuv

Old Yishuv

The Old Yishuv were the Jewish communities of the southern Syrian provinces in the Ottoman period, up to the onset of Zionist aliyah and the consolidation of the New Yishuv by the end of World War I.

Damascus Eyalet

Damascus Eyalet

Damascus Eyalet was an eyalet of the Ottoman Empire. Its reported area in the 19th century was 51,900 square kilometres (20,020 sq mi). It became an eyalet after the Ottomans conquered it from the Mamluks in 1516. Janbirdi al-Ghazali, a Mamluk traitor, was made the first beylerbey of Damascus. The Damascus Eyalet was one of the first Ottoman provinces to become a vilayet after an administrative reform in 1865, and by 1867 it had been reformed into the Syria Vilayet.

Aliyah

Aliyah

Aliyah is the immigration of Jews from the diaspora to, historically, the geographical Land of Israel, which is in the modern era chiefly represented by the State of Israel. Traditionally described as "the act of going up", moving to the Land of Israel or "making aliyah" is one of the most basic tenets of Zionism. The opposite action—emigration by Jews from the Land of Israel—is referred to in the Hebrew language as yerida. The Law of Return that was passed by the Israeli parliament in 1950 gives all diaspora Jews, as well as their children and grandchildren, the right to relocate to Israel and acquire Israeli citizenship on the basis of connecting to their Jewish identity.

Jerusalem

Jerusalem

Jerusalem is a city in Western Asia. Situated on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea, it is one of the oldest cities in the world and is considered to be a holy city for the three major Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Both Israelis and Palestinians claim Jerusalem as their capital, as Israel maintains its primary governmental institutions there and the State of Palestine ultimately foresees it as its seat of power. Because of this dispute, neither claim is widely recognized internationally.

Early life

Hillel Rivlin's father was Rabbi Binyamin Rivlin of Shklov,[3] the cousin and student of the Vilna Gaon.

Personal life

Rivlin married Zipora, the daughter of Moshe Yozal in Hever. Their son, Rabbi Moshe Rivlin, was the rabbi of the Ashkenazi community in Jerusalem from 1840 to 1846. Rivlin's son-in-law was the philanthropist and businessman Shmarihu Luria of Mohilev, the father-in-law of Rabbi David Friedman of Karlin and Yehiel Michal Pines. Rivlin's descendants, starting with his great-grandson Rabbi Yosef Rivlin, were among the first settlers to live outside the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem.[3] He is considered one of the patriarchs of the Rivlin family.

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Career

In 1782, when the Gaon of Vilna realized he would not be able to immigrate to the Land of Israel, he appointed Hillel Rivlin to head the "Chazon Zion" movement which helped organize Jews from Belarus to immigrate to Israel. In 1809, Rivlin, as the head of a group of the students of the Gra, immigrated to the Land of Israel.

Author

He was also the author of the esoteric text known as Kol HaTor, that describes the 999 footsteps of the Messiah's arrival.[1] Until approximately the 1980s the book was preserved only in manuscript form, when it began to be published in stages.[3]

Source: "Hillel Rivlin", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillel_Rivlin.

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References
  1. ^ a b "Hillel Rivlin (1757-1838.), of Shklov, Kol ha-Tor | The National Library of Israel". www.nli.org.il. Retrieved 2022-10-02.
  2. ^ "Hillel Rivlin | Texts & Source Sheets from Torah, Talmud and Sefaria's library of Jewish sources". www.sefaria.org. Retrieved 2022-10-02.
  3. ^ a b c Krumbein, Elyakim (2016-01-19). "Heavenly Wisdom and Earthly Wisdom". torah.etzion.org.il. Retrieved 2022-10-02.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)


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