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Hainaut Province

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Hainaut
Hinnot (Walloon)
Hénau (Picard)
Heynowes
Flag of Hainaut
Coat of arms of Hainaut
Location of Hainaut
Coordinates: 50°30′N 3°55′E / 50.5°N 3.92°E / 50.5; 3.92Coordinates: 50°30′N 3°55′E / 50.5°N 3.92°E / 50.5; 3.92
Country Belgium
Region Wallonia
CapitalMons
Largest cityCharleroi
Government
 • GovernorTommy Leclercq
Area
 • Total3,813 km2 (1,472 sq mi)
Population
 (1 January 2019)[2]
 • Total1,344,241
 • Density350/km2 (910/sq mi)
HDI (2018)0.888[3]
very high · 11th of 11
Websiteportail.hainaut.be
Pays des Collines
Pays des Collines

Hainaut (/ˈn/, also US: /hˈ-, ɛˈ-/, UK: /ˈ(h)n/,[4][5][6] French: [ɛno]; Dutch: Henegouwen [ˈɦeːnəɣʌuə(n)] (listen); Walloon: Hinnot; Picard: Hénau), historically also known as Heynowes in English, is a province of Wallonia and Belgium.

To its south lies the French department of Nord, while within Belgium it borders (clockwise from the North) on the Flemish provinces of West Flanders, East Flanders, Flemish Brabant and the Walloon provinces of Walloon Brabant and Namur.

Its capital is Mons (Dutch Bergen) and the most populous city is Charleroi, the province's urban, economic and cultural hub, the financial capital of Hainaut and the fifth largest city in the country by population. Hainaut has an area of 3,831 km2 (1,479 sq mi) and as of January 2019 a population of 1,344,241.[7] Another remarkable city is Tournai (Dutch Doornik) on the Scheldt river, one of the oldest cities of Belgium and the first capital of the Frankish Empire.

Hainaut province exists of a wavy landscape, except for the very southern part, the so-called Boot of Hainaut, which is quite hilly and belongs to the Ardennes and its foothills Fagne and the Condroz.

The village of L'Escaillère in the utmost southeastern corner is with an altitude of 365 metres the highest point of the province.

In the Boot of Hainaut on the border of Namur province the artificial five Eau d'Heure lakes are situated, the largest lake area of Belgium.

A well-known region is the Borinage, the old coal mining region around the city of Mons. Also well-known is the Pays des Collines (English Land of the Hills), a low hilly area forming one natural region with the Flemish Ardennes in the East Flanders province.

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American English

American English

American English, sometimes called United States English or U.S. English, is the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States. English is the most widely spoken language in the United States and in most circumstances is the de facto common language used in government, education, and commerce. Since the 20th century, American English has become the most influential form of English worldwide.

British English

British English

British English (BrE) is, according to Oxford Dictionaries, "English as used in Great Britain, as distinct from that used elsewhere". More narrowly, it can refer specifically to the English language in England, or, more broadly, to the collective dialects of English throughout the British Isles taken as a single umbrella variety, for instance additionally incorporating Scottish English, Welsh English, and Northern Irish English. Tom McArthur in the Oxford Guide to World English acknowledges that British English shares "all the ambiguities and tensions [with] the word 'British' and as a result can be used and interpreted in two ways, more broadly or more narrowly, within a range of blurring and ambiguity".

Dutch language

Dutch language

Dutch is a West Germanic language spoken by about 25 million people as a first language and 5 million as a second language. It is the third most widely spoken Germanic language, after its close relatives German and English. Afrikaans is a separate but somewhat mutually intelligible daughter language spoken, to some degree, by at least 16 million people, mainly in South Africa and Namibia, evolving from the Cape Dutch dialects of Southern Africa. The dialects used in Belgium and in Suriname, meanwhile, are all guided by the Dutch Language Union.

Belgium

Belgium

Belgium, officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a country in Northwestern Europe. The country is bordered by the Netherlands to the north, Germany to the east, Luxembourg to the southeast, France to the southwest, and the North Sea to the northwest. It covers an area of 30,528 km2 (11,787 sq mi) and has a population of more than 11.5 million, making it the 22nd most densely populated country in the world and the 6th most densely populated country in Europe, with a density of 376 per square kilometre (970/sq mi). The capital and largest city is Brussels; other major cities are Antwerp, Ghent, Charleroi, Liège, Bruges, Namur, and Leuven.

East Flanders

East Flanders

East Flanders is a province of Belgium. It borders the Dutch province of Zeeland and the Flemish province of Antwerp, Flemish Brabant, Hainaut and West Flanders. It has an area of 3,007 km2 (1,161 sq mi), divided into six administrative districts containing 60 municipalities, and a population of 1,515,064 as of January 2019. The capital is Ghent, home to the Ghent University and the Port of Ghent.

Charleroi

Charleroi

Charleroi is a city and a municipality of Wallonia, located in the province of Hainaut, Belgium. By 1 January 2008, the total population of Charleroi was 201,593. The metropolitan area, including the outer commuter zone, covers an area of 1,462 square kilometres (564 sq mi) with a total population of 522,522 by 1 January 2008, ranking it as the 5th most populous in Belgium after Brussels, Antwerp, Liège, and Ghent. The inhabitants are called Carolorégiens or simply Carolos.

Ardennes

Ardennes

The Ardennes, also known as the Ardennes Forest or Forest of Ardennes, is a region of extensive forests, rough terrain, rolling hills and ridges primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, extending into Germany and France. Geologically, the range is a western extension of the Eifel; both were raised during the Givetian age of the Devonian, as were several other named ranges of the same greater range.

Fagne (natural region)

Fagne (natural region)

The Fagne or la Fagne is a natural region in southern Belgium and northern France, sometimes grouped with Famenne as Fagne-Famenne. It should not be confused with the High Fens, which are further east and straddle the border of Belgium and Germany.

Condroz

Condroz

The Condroz is a natural region in Wallonia, located to the north-west of the Ardennes. Its unofficial capital is Ciney. The region preserves the name of the Condrusi, a Germanic tribe which inhabited the area in the Roman era.

Eau d'Heure lakes

Eau d'Heure lakes

The Eau d'Heure lakes is a complex of five artificial lakes in Wallonia, forming the largest lake area in Belgium.

Borinage

Borinage

The Borinage is an area in the Walloon province of Hainaut in Belgium. The name derives from the coal mines of the region, bores meaning mineshafts. In French the inhabitants of the Borinage are called Borains.

Flemish Ardennes

Flemish Ardennes

The Flemish Ardennes is an informal name given to a hilly region in the south of the province of East Flanders, Belgium. Highest summit is the Hotondberg. Main characteristics of the region are rural hilly landscapes with hilltop bluebell woodlands, windmills and watermills.

Language

Picard is spoken in the western and centre parts of the province, while in the eastern part a mixture of Walloon and Picard is spoken (Wallo-Picard).

Some Flemish and Brabantic is spoken in the municipalities bordering the Flemish region.

History

Historical map of the County of Hainaut, with in red the current French-Belgian border.
Historical map of the County of Hainaut, with in red the current French-Belgian border.

The province derives from the French Revolutionary Jemmape department, formed in 1795 from part of the medieval County of Hainaut, the small territory of Tournai and the Tournaisis, a part of the county of Namur (Charleroi), and also a small part of the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (Thuin). (A large part of the historical county of Hainaut is now within France and sometimes referred to as French Hainaut.)

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County of Hainaut

County of Hainaut

The County of Hainaut, sometimes spelled Hainault, was a territorial lordship within the medieval Holy Roman Empire that straddled what is now the border of Belgium and France. Its most important towns included Mons, now in Belgium, and Valenciennes, now in France.

Jemmape (department)

Jemmape (department)

Jemmape [ʒɛ.map] was a department of the First French Republic and of the First French Empire in present-day Belgium. It was named after the Battle of Jemappes, fought between the French and the Austrians in 1792 near the village of Jemappes, near Mons. Jemappes was spelled Jemmape, Jemmapes or Jemmappes at the time. Its territory corresponded more or less with that of the Belgian province of Hainaut. It was firstly created on 2 March 1793, and then recreated on 1 October 1795, when the Austrian Netherlands and the Prince-Bishopric of Liège were officially annexed by the French Republic. Before annexation, its territory lay in the County of Hainaut, Tournai and the Tournaisis, the County of Namur (Charleroi) and the Bishopric of Liège (Thuin).

County of Namur

County of Namur

Namur was a county of the Carolingian and later Holy Roman Empire in the Low Countries. Its territories largely correspond with the present-day Belgian arrondissement Namur plus the northwestern part of the arrondissement Dinant, both part of the modern province of Namur, and previously part of the French Republican department of Sambre-et-Meuse.

Charleroi

Charleroi

Charleroi is a city and a municipality of Wallonia, located in the province of Hainaut, Belgium. By 1 January 2008, the total population of Charleroi was 201,593. The metropolitan area, including the outer commuter zone, covers an area of 1,462 square kilometres (564 sq mi) with a total population of 522,522 by 1 January 2008, ranking it as the 5th most populous in Belgium after Brussels, Antwerp, Liège, and Ghent. The inhabitants are called Carolorégiens or simply Carolos.

Prince-Bishopric of Liège

Prince-Bishopric of Liège

The Prince-Bishopric of Liège or Principality of Liège was an ecclesiastical principality of the Holy Roman Empire that was situated for the most part in present-day Belgium. It was an Imperial Estate, so the bishop of Liège, as its prince, had a seat and a vote in the Imperial Diet. The Prince-Bishopric of Liège should not be confused with the Diocese of Liège, which was larger and over which the prince-bishop exercised only the usual responsibilities of a bishop.

Thuin

Thuin

Thuin is a city and municipality of Wallonia located in the province of Hainaut, Belgium.

French Hainaut

French Hainaut

French Hainaut is one of two areas in France that form the département du Nord, its eastern part. It corresponds roughly with the Arrondissement of Avesnes-sur-Helpe (east), Arrondissement of Cambrai (south-west) and Arrondissement of Valenciennes (north-west).

Subdivisions

Hainaut province is divided into 7 administrative districts (arrondissements), subdivided into a total of 69 municipalities. It has an area of 3,831 square kilometres (1,479 sq mi).

Arrondissements

Municipalities

Municipalities Hainaut Belgium Map - Number.svg
Map no. Municipality Arrondissement
1 Aiseau-Presles Charleroi
2 Anderlues Thuin
3 Antoing Tournai-Mouscron
4 Ath Ath
5 Beaumont Thuin
6 Belœil Ath
7 Bernissart Ath
8 Binche La Louvière
9 Boussu Mons
10 Braine-le-Comte Soignies
11 Brugelette Ath
12 Brunehaut Tournai-Mouscron
13 Celles Tournai-Mouscron
14 Chapelle-lez-Herlaimont Charleroi
15 Charleroi Charleroi
16 Châtelet Charleroi
17 Chièvres Ath
18 Chimay Thuin
19 Colfontaine Mons
20 Comines-Warneton Tournai-Mouscron
21 Courcelles Charleroi
22 Dour Mons
23 Écaussinnes Soignies
24 Ellezelles Ath
25 Enghien Ath
26 Erquelinnes Thuin
27 Estaimpuis Tournai-Mouscron
28 Estinnes La Louvière
29 Farciennes Charleroi
30 Fleurus Charleroi
31 Flobecq Ath
32 Fontaine-l'Evêque Charleroi
33 Frameries Mons
34 Frasnes-lez-Anvaing Ath
35 Froidchapelle Thuin
36 Gerpinnes Charleroi
37 Ham-sur-Heure-Nalinnes Thuin
38 Hensies Mons
39 Honnelles Mons
40 Jurbise Mons
41 La Louvière La Louvière
42 Le Rœulx Soignies
43 Lens Mons
44 Les Bons Villers Charleroi
45 Lessines Ath
46 Leuze-en-Hainaut Tournai-Mouscron
47 Lobbes Thuin
48 Manage Soignies
49 Merbes-le-Château Thuin
50 Momignies Thuin
51 Mons Mons
52 Mont-de-l'Enclus Tournai-Mouscron
53 Montigny-le-Tilleul Charleroi
54 Morlanwelz La Louvière
55 Mouscron Tournai-Mouscron
56 Pecq Tournai-Mouscron
57 Péruwelz Tournai-Mouscron
58 Pont-à-Celles Charleroi
59 Quaregnon Mons
60 Quévy Mons
61 Quiévrain Mons
62 Rumes Tournai-Mouscron
63 Saint-Ghislain Mons
64 Seneffe Soignies
65 Silly Ath
66 Sivry-Rance Thuin
67 Soignies Soignies
68 Thuin Thuin
69 Tournai Tournai-Mouscron

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Arrondissements of Belgium

Arrondissements of Belgium

Arrondissements of Belgium are subdivisions below the provinces of Belgium. There are administrative, judicial and electoral arrondissements. These may or may not relate to identical geographical areas.

Arrondissement of Ath

Arrondissement of Ath

The Arrondissement of Ath is one of the seven administrative arrondissements in the Walloon province of Hainaut, Belgium. It is not a judicial arrondissement. Two of its municipalities, Brugelette and Chièvres, are part of the Judicial Arrondissement of Mons, while the others are part of the Judicial Arrondissement of Tournai.

Arrondissement of Charleroi

Arrondissement of Charleroi

The Arrondissement of Charleroi is one of the seven administrative arrondissements in the Walloon province of Hainaut, Belgium. It is both an administrative and a judicial arrondissement. However, the Judicial Arrondissement of Charleroi also comprises the municipalities of the Arrondissement of Thuin.

Arrondissement of La Louvière

Arrondissement of La Louvière

The Arrondissement of La Louvière is one of the seven administrative arrondissements in the Walloon province of Hainaut, Belgium. The Arrondissement of La Louvière was created in 2019 from the municipalities of La Louvière and Binche, Estinnes, Morlanwelz.

Arrondissement of Mons

Arrondissement of Mons

The Arrondissement of Mons is one of the seven administrative arrondissements in the Walloon province of Hainaut, Belgium.

Arrondissement of Soignies

Arrondissement of Soignies

The Arrondissement of Soignies is one of the seven administrative arrondissements in the Walloon province of Hainaut, Belgium.

Arrondissement of Thuin

Arrondissement of Thuin

The Arrondissement of Thuin is one of the seven administrative arrondissements in the Walloon province of Hainaut, Belgium.

Arrondissement of Tournai-Mouscron

Arrondissement of Tournai-Mouscron

The Arrondissement of Tournai-Mouscron is one of the seven administrative arrondissements in the Walloon province of Hainaut, Belgium. The Arrondissement of Tournai-Mouscron was created in 2019 by the merger of the former arrondissements of Tournai and Mouscron.

Aiseau-Presles

Aiseau-Presles

Aiseau-Presles is a municipality of Wallonia located in the province of Hainaut, Belgium.

Anderlues

Anderlues

Anderlues is a municipality of Wallonia located in the province of Hainaut, Belgium.

Antoing

Antoing

Antoing is a city and municipality of Wallonia located in the province of Hainaut, Belgium.

Ath

Ath

Ath is a city and municipality of Wallonia located in the province of Hainaut, Belgium.

Governors

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Jean-Baptiste Thorn

Jean-Baptiste Thorn

Jean-Baptiste Thorn was a Luxembourg-born jurist and politician that held office in both Luxembourg and Belgium during and immediately after the Belgian Revolution.

Charles Liedts

Charles Liedts

Charles Augustin Baron Liedts was a Belgian liberal politician.

Augustin Dumon-Dumortier

Augustin Dumon-Dumortier

Augustin Aimable Dumon-Dumortier was a Belgian industrialist, diplomat and liberal politician.

Oswald de Kerchove de Denterghem

Oswald de Kerchove de Denterghem

Oswald Charles Eugène Marie Ghislain de Kerchove de Denterghem, was a Belgian liberal politician. Oswald de Kerchove was a son of the Ghentian mayor Charles de Kerchove de Denterghem. De Kerchove was a lawyer and became a liberal senator. He was governor in Hainaut from 1878 to 1884. He was an internationally recognized authority in the study of palms and orchids.

Charles d'Ursel

Charles d'Ursel

Charles-Marie-Leon, Count d'Ursel (1848–1903) was a Belgian politician of the Catholic Party.

Michel Tromont

Michel Tromont

Michel Jules Arthur Tromont was a Belgian politician. A member of the Liberal Reformist Party, he was a deputy in the Chamber of Representatives from 1978 to 1983, serving as Minister of National Education from 1981 to 1983 and mayor of Quiévrain from 1977 to 1983. He was also Governor of the Hainaut province from 1983 to 2004.

Tommy Leclercq

Tommy Leclercq

Tommy Leclercq is a Belgian politician who has been governor of the province of Hainaut, Belgium, since March 2013.

Economy

The Gross domestic product (GDP) of the province was 34.2 billion € in 2018, accounting for 7.4% of Belgium's economic output. GDP per capita adjusted for purchasing power was 22,500 € or 75% of the EU27 average in the same year. Hainaut is the province with the second lowest GDP per capita.[8]

Miscellaneous

The patron saint of the province Hainaut is Saint Waltrude.[9]

Source: "Hainaut Province", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hainaut_Province.

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References
  1. ^ "Be.STAT".
  2. ^ "Structuur van de bevolking | Statbel".
  3. ^ "Sub-national HDI - Area Database - Global Data Lab".
  4. ^ "Hainaut". The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (5th ed.). HarperCollins. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  5. ^ "Hainaut" (US) and "Hainaut". Lexico UK English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Archived from the original on 2020-03-22.
  6. ^ "Hainaut". Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  7. ^ "Structuur van de bevolking | Statbel".
  8. ^ "Regional GDP per capita ranged from 30% to 263% of the EU average in 2018". Eurostat.
  9. ^ St. Waltrude at saints.sqpn.com. Retrieved 26.March 2013.
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