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HMS Ulleswater (1917)

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A Destroyer Torpedoed. (hms Ullswater) Art.IWMART1351.jpg
A painting of the sinking of HMS Ulleswater by Charles Pears
History
United Kingdom
NameHMS Ulleswater
Ordered1916
BuilderYarrow Shipbuilders, Glasgow
Laid down1916
Launched4 August 1917
FateSunk on 15 August 1918
General characteristics
Class and typeYarrow M-class destroyer
Displacement930 long tons (940 t)
Length273 ft 6 in (83.36 m)
Beam25 ft 7+12 in (7.81 m)
Draught9 ft (2.7 m)
Propulsion
  • 3 boilers
  • 2 Parsons direct drive steam turbines, 27,000 shp (20,000 kW)
Speed36 knots (41.4 mph; 66.7 km/h)
Complement82
Armament

HMS Ulleswater (or Ullswater) was an Yarrow Later M-class destroyer which fought in the First World War as part of the Royal Navy.[1][2]

She was ordered and laid down in 1916 at Yarrow Shipbuilders, being completed and launched on 4 August 1917.[1][2][3]

On 15 August 1918, she was sunk by German submarine U-71[4] or UC-17[1][2][5] in the North Sea. Five sailors were reported to have died.[6]

There is a painting of the sinking by the war artist Charles Pears in the Imperial War Museum.[7]

Discover more about HMS Ulleswater (1917) related topics

Yarrow Later M-class destroyer

Yarrow Later M-class destroyer

The Yarrow Later M class were a class of seven destroyers built for the Royal Navy that saw service during World War I. They were based on the preceding and successful Yarrow M class with minor alterations; notably reduced beam to compensate for increased displacement and a sloping stern. They were sometimes described as the Yarrow R class of destroyers.

Royal Navy

Royal Navy

The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by English and Scottish kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years' War against France. The modern Royal Navy traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is consequently known as the Senior Service.

Yarrow Shipbuilders

Yarrow Shipbuilders

Yarrow Shipbuilders Limited (YSL), often styled as simply Yarrows, was a major shipbuilding firm based in the Scotstoun district of Glasgow on the River Clyde. It is now part of BAE Systems Surface Ships, owned by BAE Systems, which has also operated the nearby Govan shipyard since 1999.

SM U-71

SM U-71

SM U-71 was one of 329 submarines serving in the Imperial German Navy in World War I. U-71 was engaged in the naval warfare and took part in the First Battle of the Atlantic.

SM UC-17

SM UC-17

SM UC-17 was a German Type UC II minelaying submarine or U-boat in the Imperial German Navy in World War I. She was ordered on 29 August 1915 and launched on 29 February 1916. She was commissioned into the Imperial German Navy on 21 July 1916 as SM UC-17.

Charles Pears

Charles Pears

Charles Pears was a British painter, illustrator and artist. His work was part of the art competitions at the 1928 Summer Olympics and the 1932 Summer Olympics.

Imperial War Museum

Imperial War Museum

Imperial War Museums (IWM) is a British national museum organisation with branches at five locations in England, three of which are in London. Founded as the Imperial War Museum in 1917, the museum was intended to record the civil and military war effort and sacrifice of Britain and its Empire during the First World War. The museum's remit has since expanded to include all conflicts in which British or Commonwealth forces have been involved since 1914. As of 2012, the museum aims "to provide for, and to encourage, the study and understanding of the history of modern war and 'wartime experience'."

Source: "HMS Ulleswater (1917)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Ulleswater_(1917).

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References
  1. ^ a b c "HMS Ullswater". The Dreadnought Project. Retrieved 25 November 2022.
  2. ^ a b c Randall, Ian (1997). Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1906-1921. Conway Maritime. p. 81. ISBN 978-0851772455.
  3. ^ "Destroyers – World War 1". Harwich and Dover Court. Retrieved 25 November 2022.
  4. ^ "HMS Ulleswater". Uboat.net. Retrieved 25 November 2012.
  5. ^ Rower, R.P.P (2022). A Concise Chronicle of Events of the Great War. DigiCat. p. 143.
  6. ^ "HMS Ulleswater (F83) (+1918)". Wrecksite. Retrieved 25 November 2022.
  7. ^ "A Destroyer Torpedoed. HMS Ullswater". IWM. Retrieved 25 November 2022.

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