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HMCS Nonsuch

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HMCS Nonsuch
Nonsuchships crest.jpg
Active1927–present
CountryCanada
BranchRoyal Canadian Navy
TypeStone frigate
RoleReserve unit
Part ofCanadian Forces Naval Reserve
Garrison/HQEdmonton, Alberta
Motto(s)Latin: A campis ad maria, lit.'From the prairies to the sea'
ColoursGold and scarlet
Battle honoursFirst Anglo-Dutch War

Franco-Dutch War

American Revolutionary War

World War I

HMCS Nonsuch is a naval reserve division (NRD) located in Edmonton, Alberta. Dubbed a stone frigate, HMCS Nonsuch is a land-based naval establishment for part-time sailors as well as a local recruitment centre for the Canadian Forces Naval Reserve. It is one of 24 naval reserve divisions located in major cities across Canada.[1]

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Operations

Nonsuch is properly referred to as a ship, being commissioned into the Royal Canadian Navy. She is part of the Reserves, and therefore operations are usually held on weekdays and certain weekends. However, her sailors may participate in any operation run by the Canadian Armed Forces year round, if they so choose.

History

His Majesty's Canadian Ship (HMCS) Nonsuch was founded on 9 April 1923, as a Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve half-company. On 1 November 1941 she was commissioned as a tender to HMCS Naden, now part of CFB Esquimalt. She was commissioned as the independent unit, HMCS Nonsuch, on 1 September 1942. During World War 2, over 3500 sailors, and 114 officers were enlisted at Nonsuch. After the war she transitioned into a peacetime force, and was paid off on 30 November 1964. She was recommissioned on September 26, 1975.[2]

Nonsuch has two historic naval weapons outside of the building. One is a mark 12 5"/38 calibre gun, from the United States. It was originally to be used on a US Navy destroyer; however, the Second World War ended before the ship was built. The gun comes from a pair handed over to Canada for testing. The two guns were used to fire various ammunition in CFB Suffield, in southern Alberta. When they were deemed to have completed their jobs, they were turned over to HMCS Nonsuch and HMCS Tecumseh, located in Calgary.

The second weapon Nonsuch has is a Bliss-Leavitt Mark 9 torpedo from the Second World War, as would have been launched from Canadian destroyers.

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CFB Esquimalt

CFB Esquimalt

Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt is Canada's Pacific Coast naval base and home port to Maritime Forces Pacific and Joint Task Force Pacific Headquarters. As of 2018, 4,411 military personnel and 2,762 civilians work at CFB Esquimalt.

CFB Suffield

CFB Suffield

Canadian Forces Base Suffield is a Canadian Forces base, host to the largest military training area in Canada. It is located in southeastern Alberta, 3 nautical miles north-northwest of Suffield, 50 km (31 mi) northwest of the city of Medicine Hat and 250 km (160 mi) southeast of Calgary. It is accessible via Highway 884, a public road that bisects the main hub section of the base.

HMCS Tecumseh

HMCS Tecumseh

HMCS Tecumseh is a Canadian Forces Naval Reserve division (NRD) located in Calgary, Alberta. Dubbed a stone frigate, HMCS Tecumseh is a land-based naval training establishment crewed by part-time sailors and also serves as a local recruitment centre for the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). It is one of 24 naval reserve divisions located in major cities across Canada.

Bliss-Leavitt Mark 9 torpedo

Bliss-Leavitt Mark 9 torpedo

The Bliss-Leavitt Mark 9 torpedo was a Bliss-Leavitt torpedo developed and produced by the E. W. Bliss Company and the Naval Torpedo Station in Newport, Rhode Island in 1915. The Mark 9 was originally intended to be used on battleships. Before the Mark 9 could be issued, however, use of torpedoes on battleships was discontinued and Mark 9 torpedoes were placed in storage. These torpedoes were modified for deployment on R-class and S-class submarines, and used in early World War II to supplement the initial supply of Mark 14 torpedoes. Torpedo production for the U.S. Navy was terminated by the E.W. Bliss Company about 1920 after completion of the Mark 9 project.

Battle honours

HMCS Nonsuch carries on the battle honours of 11 Royal Navy ships bearing her name in the past.[3]

Pre-First World War

First World War

HMCS Nonsuch in Edmonton, Alberta
HMCS Nonsuch in Edmonton, Alberta

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Battle honour

Battle honour

A battle honour is an award of a right by a government or sovereign to a military unit to emblazon the name of a battle or operation on its flags ("colours"), uniforms or other accessories where ornamentation is possible.

HMS Nonsuch

HMS Nonsuch

Several vessels of the Royal Navy have been named HMS Nonsuch, presumably named after Nonsuch Palace:HMS Nonsuch (1603), a 38-gun great ship, rebuilt from a previous ship and sold c. 1645 HMS Nonsuch (1646), a 34-gun ship launched in 1646 and wrecked 1664 Nonsuch, an 8-gun ketch launched in 1650 that the Royal Navy purchased in 1654 and sold in 1667; later as the merchant vessel Nonsuch she made the trading voyage establishing the Hudson's Bay Company HMS Nonsuch (1668), a 36-gun fifth rate launched in 1668. Upgraded to a 42-gun fourth rate in 1669, but reverted to 36-gun fifth rate in 1691. She was captured in 1695 by the French privateer Le Francais HMS Nonsuch (1686), a 5-gun hoy launched in 1686 and sold 1714 HMS Nonsuch (1696), a 48-gun fourth-rate ship of the line, launched in 1696, rebuilt 1717, and broken up in 1745 HMS Nonsuch (1741), a 50-gun fourth-rate ship of the line in service from 1741 to 1766 HMS Nonsuch (1774), a 64-gun third-rate ship of the line launched in 1774, used as a floating battery from 1794, and broken up in 1802 HMS Nonsuch (1915), an Admiralty M-class destroyer launched in 1915 and sold in 1921 HMS Nonsuch (1945), a Black Swan-class sloop laid down in February 1945 and canceled in October of that year HMS Nonsuch (D107), the former German Type 1936A ('Narvik') destroyer Z38 taken after the end of World War II, and scrapped in 1949

Battle of the Kentish Knock

Battle of the Kentish Knock

The Battle of the Kentish Knock was a naval battle between the fleets of the Dutch Republic and England, fought on 28 September 1652, during the First Anglo-Dutch War near the shoal called the Kentish Knock in the North Sea about thirty kilometres east of the mouth of the river Thames. The Dutch fleet, internally divided on political, regional and personal grounds, proved incapable of making a determined effort and was soon forced to withdraw, losing two ships and many casualties. In Dutch the action is called the Slag bij de Hoofden.

Battle of Portland

Battle of Portland

The naval Battle of Portland, or Three Days' Battle took place during 18–20 February 1653, during the First Anglo-Dutch War, when the fleet of the Commonwealth of England under General at Sea Robert Blake was attacked by a fleet of the Dutch Republic under Lieutenant-Admiral Maarten Tromp escorting merchant shipping through the English Channel.

Battle of the Gabbard

Battle of the Gabbard

The naval Battle of the Gabbard, also known as the Battle of Gabbard Bank, the Battle of the North Foreland or the Second Battle of Nieuwpoort took place on 2–3 June 1653. during the First Anglo-Dutch War near the Gabbard shoal off the coast of Suffolk, England between fleets of the Commonwealth of England and the United Provinces.

Battle of Texel

Battle of Texel

The naval Battle of Texel or Battle of Kijkduin took place off the southern coast of island of Texel on 21 August 1673 between the Dutch and the combined English and French fleets. It was the last major battle of the Third Anglo-Dutch War, which was itself part of the Franco-Dutch War (1672–1678), during which Louis XIV of France invaded the Republic and sought to establish control over the Spanish Netherlands. English involvement came about because of the Treaty of Dover, secretly concluded by Charles II of England, and which was highly unpopular with the English Parliament.

Battle of St. Lucia

Battle of St. Lucia

The Battle of St. Lucia or the Battle of the Cul de Sac was a naval battle fought off the island of St. Lucia in the West Indies during the American Revolutionary War on 15 December 1778, between the British Royal Navy and the French Navy.

Battle of the Saintes

Battle of the Saintes

The Battle of the Saintes, also known as the Battle of Dominica, was an important naval battle in the Caribbean between the British and the French that took place 9–12 April 1782. The British victory was considered their greatest over the French during the American Revolutionary War.

Battle of Jutland

Battle of Jutland

The Battle of Jutland was a naval battle fought between Britain's Royal Navy Grand Fleet, under Admiral Sir John Jellicoe, and the Imperial German Navy's High Seas Fleet, under Vice-Admiral Reinhard Scheer, during the First World War. The battle unfolded in extensive manoeuvring and three main engagements, from 31 May to 1 June 1916, off the North Sea coast of Denmark's Jutland Peninsula. It was the largest naval battle and the only full-scale clash of battleships in that war. Jutland was the third fleet action between steel battleships, following the Battle of the Yellow Sea in 1904 and the Battle of Tsushima in 1905, during the Russo-Japanese War. Jutland was the last major battle in history fought primarily by battleships.

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Description

Or a beaver rampant proper gorged with a collar Gules edged Or upon which a roundel displaying the device of St. George.[4]

Etymology

Nonsuch's name comes from the French phrase non pareil meaning "of no equal". Besides being used as a name for many former RN warships, Nonsuch was also the first overseas ship into Hudson Bay, in 1688.[5]

Source: "HMCS Nonsuch", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_Nonsuch.

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References
  1. ^ "Naval reserves of the RCN", navy-marine.forces.gc.ca, 2018-01-11
  2. ^ "HMCS NONSUCH - For Posterity's Sake". www.forposterityssake.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-26.
  3. ^ Personnel, Government of Canada, National Defence, Chief Military. "HMCS Nonsuch". www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
  4. ^ Personnel, Government of Canada, National Defence, Chief Military. "HMCS Nonsuch". www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca. Retrieved 2018-10-18.
  5. ^ "HMCS NONSUCH - For Posterity's Sake". www.forposterityssake.ca. Retrieved 2018-03-26.

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