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HMCS Max Bernays

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History
Canada
NameMax Bernays
NamesakeMax Bernays
BuilderIrving Shipbuilding, Halifax, Nova Scotia
Laid down5 December 2018
Launched23 October 2021
HomeportEsquimalt (planned)[1]
IdentificationIMO number4702527
StatusSea trials
General characteristics
Type Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel
Displacement6,615 t (6,511 long tons)
Length103.6 m (339 ft 11 in)
Beam19.0 m (62 ft 4 in)
Draught5.7 m (18 ft 8 in)[2]
Ice classPolar Class 5
Installed power4 × MAN 6L32/44CR (4 × 3.6 MW)[2]
PropulsionDiesel-electric; two shafts (2 × 4.5 MW)[3]
Speed
  • 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) (open water)
  • 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) in 1 m (3 ft 3 in) ice[6]
Range6,800 nmi (12,600 km; 7,800 mi)
Boats & landing
craft carried
Complement65
Armament
Aircraft carriedSikorsky CH-148 Cyclone or other helicopters/CU-176 Gargoyle UAV
Aviation facilitiesHangar and flight deck

Max Bernays (AOPV 432) is the third Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel for the Royal Canadian Navy. The class was derived from the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship project as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy and is primarily designed for the patrol and support of Canada's Arctic regions.

Design and construction

The Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessels are designed for use in the Arctic regions of Canada for patrol and support within Canada's exclusive economic zone. The vessel is 103.6 m (339 ft 11 in) long overall with a beam of 19.0 m (62 ft 4 in). The ship will have a displacement of 6,615 metric tons (6,511 long tons). The ship has an enclosed foredeck that protects machinery and work spaces from Arctic climates. The vessel will be powered by a diesel-electric system composed of four 3.6-megawatt (4,800 hp) MAN 6L32/44CR[2] four-stroke medium-speed diesel generators and two electric propulsion motors rated at 4.5 megawatts (6,000 hp) driving two shafts. Max Bernays will be capable of 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) in open water and 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) in 1-metre (3 ft 3 in) first-year sea ice. The ship will also equipped with a bow thruster to aid during manoeuvres and docking procedures without requiring tugboat assistance. The ship will have a range of 6,800 nautical miles (12,600 km; 7,800 mi) and an endurance of 85. Max Bernays will be equipped with fin stabilizers to decrease roll in open water but can be retracted during icebreaking.[7][3][8]

Max Bernays will be able to deploy with multiple payloads, including shipping containers, underwater survey equipment or landing craft. Payload operations are aided by a 20-metric-ton (20-long-ton; 22-short-ton) crane for loading and unloading. The ship is equipped with a vehicle bay which can hold pickup trucks, all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles. The ship will also have two 8.5-metre (27 ft 11 in) multi-role rescue boats capable of over 35 knots (65 km/h; 40 mph). The ship will be armed with one BAE Mk 38 25 mm (0.98 in) gun and two M2 Browning machine guns. The patrol ship has an onboard hangar and flight deck for helicopters up to the size of a Sikorsky CH-148 Cyclone. Max Bernays will have a complement of 65 and accommodation for 85[7][3][8] or 87.[9]

The patrol vessel keel was laid down on 5 December 2018 by Irving Shipbuilding at Halifax, Nova Scotia.[10] The ship was launched on 23 October 2021, and was delivered to the Royal Canadian Navy 2 September 2022.[11] The naming ceremony was conducted on 29 May 2022 in conjunction with that for sister ship Margaret Brooke.[12] The ship began sea trials in July 2022.[13]

The ship was delivered to the RCN in September 2022 for post-acceptance trials and it was indicated that she would be the first vessel of her class to be based in the Pacific region, starting in 2023.[14][15]

Discover more about Design and construction related topics

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessels are warships of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) built within the Government of Canada Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) procurement project, part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. In July 2007 the federal government announced plans for acquiring six to eight icebreaking warships for the RCN.

Exclusive economic zone

Exclusive economic zone

An exclusive economic zone (EEZ), as prescribed by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, is an area of the sea in which a sovereign state has special rights regarding the exploration and use of marine resources, including energy production from water and wind. It stretches from the outer limit of the territorial sea out to 200 nautical miles (nmi) from the coast of the state in question. It is also referred to as a maritime continental margin and, in colloquial usage, may include the continental shelf. The term does not include either the territorial sea or the continental shelf beyond the 200 nautical mile limit. The difference between the territorial sea and the exclusive economic zone is that the first confers full sovereignty over the waters, whereas the second is merely a "sovereign right" which refers to the coastal state's rights below the surface of the sea. The surface waters, as can be seen in the map, are international waters.

Length overall

Length overall

Length overall is the maximum length of a vessel's hull measured parallel to the waterline. This length is important while docking the ship. It is the most commonly used way of expressing the size of a ship, and is also used for calculating the cost of a marina berth.

Beam (nautical)

Beam (nautical)

The beam of a ship is its width at its widest point. The maximum beam (BMAX) is the distance between planes passing through the outer extremities of the ship, beam of the hull (BH) only includes permanently fixed parts of the hull, and beam at waterline (BWL) is the maximum width where the hull intersects the surface of the water.

Displacement (ship)

Displacement (ship)

The displacement or displacement tonnage of a ship is its weight. As the term indicates, it is measured indirectly, using Archimedes' principle, by first calculating the volume of water displaced by the ship, then converting that value into weight. Traditionally, various measurement rules have been in use, giving various measures in long tons. Today, tonnes are more commonly used.

MAN Energy Solutions

MAN Energy Solutions

MAN Energy Solutions SE is a German multinational company based in Augsburg that produces large-bore gas and diesel engines and also turbomachinery for marine, rail and stationary applications, as locomotive and marine propulsion systems, power plant applications, and turbochargers. The company was formed in 2010 from the merger of MAN Diesel and MAN Turbo. MAN Energy Solutions is a subsidiary of the German carmaker Volkswagen Group.

Diesel generator

Diesel generator

A diesel generator (DG) is the combination of a diesel engine with an electric generator to generate electrical energy. This is a specific case of engine generator. A diesel compression-ignition engine is usually designed to run on diesel fuel, but some types are adapted for other liquid fuels or natural gas.

Propeller

Propeller

A propeller is a device with a rotating hub and radiating blades that are set at a pitch to form a helical spiral which, when rotated, exerts linear thrust upon a working fluid such as water or air. Propellers are used to pump fluid through a pipe or duct, or to create thrust to propel a boat through water or an aircraft through air. The blades are shaped so that their rotational motion through the fluid causes a pressure difference between the two surfaces of the blade by Bernoulli's principle which exerts force on the fluid. Most marine propellers are screw propellers with helical blades rotating on a propeller shaft with an approximately horizontal axis.

Knot (unit)

Knot (unit)

The knot is a unit of speed equal to one nautical mile per hour, exactly 1.852 km/h. The ISO standard symbol for the knot is kn. The same symbol is preferred by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), while kt is also common, especially in aviation, where it is the form recommended by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The knot is a non-SI unit. The knot is used in meteorology, and in maritime and air navigation. A vessel travelling at 1 knot along a meridian travels approximately one minute of geographic latitude in one hour.

Nautical mile

Nautical mile

A nautical mile is a unit of length used in air, marine, and space navigation, and for the definition of territorial waters. Historically, it was defined as the meridian arc length corresponding to one minute of latitude. Today the international nautical mile is defined as exactly 1,852 metres. The derived unit of speed is the knot, one nautical mile per hour.

Landing craft

Landing craft

Landing craft are small and medium seagoing watercraft, such as boats and barges, used to convey a landing force from the sea to the shore during an amphibious assault. The term excludes landing ships, which are larger. Production of landing craft peaked during World War II, with a significant number of different designs produced in large quantities by the United Kingdom and United States.

Pickup truck

Pickup truck

A pickup truck or pickup is a light-duty truck that has an enclosed cabin, and a back end made up of a cargo bed that is enclosed by three low walls with no roof. In Australia and New Zealand, both pickups and coupé utilities are called utes, short for utility vehicle. In South Africa, people of all language groups use the term bakkie, a diminutive of bak, Afrikaans for "basket".

Source: "HMCS Max Bernays", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_Max_Bernays.

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References
  1. ^ "Third new Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship delivered to Canada" (Press release). Government of Canada. 2 September 2022. Retrieved 9 September 2022.
  2. ^ a b c "Harry DeWolf (4702503)". Sea-web. Retrieved 22 October 2022.
  3. ^ a b c "Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships". Royal Canadian Navy. January 2015. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  4. ^ "Irving Shipbuilding Selects Rosborough Boats to supply Multi-Role Rescue Boats for AOPS vessels". Irving Shipbuilding. 13 March 2017. Retrieved 17 May 2022.
  5. ^ "ABCO Industries to Build 12m Landing Craft for Royal Canadian Navy". Baird Maritime. 17 October 2018. Archived from the original on 11 October 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2020.
  6. ^ "Royal Canadian Navy's OPV HMCS Max Bernays starts sea trials". Navy Recognition. 26 July 2022. Retrieved 23 October 2022.
  7. ^ a b Pugliese, David (16 January 2015). "Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships to be constructed in three "mega blocks"". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Harry DeWolf-class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship Factsheet" (PDF). Department of National Defence of Canada. January 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  9. ^ "Largest Active Combat Ship Built in Canada - HMCS Harry Dewolf- Commissioned Today" (Press release). Irving Shipbuilding. 26 June 2021.
  10. ^ Defence, National (6 December 2018). "Another important shipbuilding milestone: the third Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship receives its lucky coin". www.canada.ca. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  11. ^ Bryden-Blom, Skye. "Irving Shipbuilding launches 3rd Arctic patrol ship". CKBW. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  12. ^ "Halifax Shipyard Marks Major Milestone with the Joint Naming Ceremony of HMCS Margaret Brooke and HMCS Max Bernays" (Press release). Irving Shipbuilding. 29 May 2022.
  13. ^ "Royal Canadian Navy's OPV HMCS Max Bernays starts sea trials". navyrecognition.com. 26 July 2022. Retrieved 27 July 2022.
  14. ^ "Third new Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship delivered to Canada" (Press release). Government of Canada. 2 September 2022. Retrieved 8 September 2022.
  15. ^ "Canadian Navy receives 3rd Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS)". Naval News. 6 September 2022. Retrieved 8 September 2022.

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