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HMCS Margaret Brooke

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HMCS Margaret Brooke Operation Nanook 2022.jpg
HMCS Margaret Brooke participates in Operation Nanook, 2022
History
Canada
NameMargaret Brooke
NamesakeMargaret Brooke
Ordered19 October 2011
BuilderIrving Shipbuilding, Halifax, Nova Scotia
Laid down29 May 2017
Launched10 November 2019
Commissioned28 October 2022
HomeportHalifax
Identification
StatusIn service
General characteristics
Type Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel
Displacement6,615 t (6,511 long tons)
Length103.6 m (339 ft 11 in)
Beam19.0 m (62 ft 4 in)
Draught5.7 m (18 ft 8 in)[1]
Ice classPolar Class 5
Installed power4 × MAN 6L32/44CR (4 × 3.6 MW)[1]
PropulsionDiesel-electric; two shafts (2 × 4.5 MW)[2]
Speed
  • 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) (open water)
  • 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) in 1 m (3 ft 3 in) ice[5]
Range6,800 nmi (12,600 km)
Boats & landing
craft carried
Complement65
Armament
  • 1 × BAE Mk 38 25 mm gun
  • 2 × M2 Browning machine gun
Aircraft carriedSikorsky CH-148 Cyclone or other helicopters/CU-176 Gargoyle UAV
Aviation facilitiesHangar and flight deck

HMCS Margaret Brooke (AOPV 431) is the second Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel for the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). The class was derived from the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship project as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy and is primarily designed for the patrol and support of Canada's Arctic regions. Named after Sub-Lieutenant Margaret Brooke, an RCN nursing sister who tried to save another person during the sinking of the ferry SS Caribou during World War II. Margaret Brooke was ordered in 2011, laid down in 2016 and launched in 2019. The vessel began contractor sea trials in May 2021, and it was delivered to the Royal Canadian Navy for post-acceptance sea trials on 15 July 2021. The official naming ceremony for the ship was conducted on 29 May 2022 in conjunction with that for sister ship Max Bernays. The vessel was commissioned on 28 October 2022.

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Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessels are warships of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) built within the Government of Canada Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) procurement project, part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. In July 2007 the federal government announced plans for acquiring six to eight icebreaking warships for the RCN.

Royal Canadian Navy

Royal Canadian Navy

The Royal Canadian Navy is the naval force of Canada. The RCN is one of three environmental commands within the Canadian Armed Forces. As of 2021, the RCN operates 12 frigates, four attack submarines, 12 coastal defence vessels, eight patrol class training vessels, two offshore patrol vessels, and several auxiliary vessels. The RCN consists of 8,570 Regular Force and 4,111 Primary Reserve sailors, supported by 3,800 civilians. Vice-Admiral Angus Topshee is the current commander of the Royal Canadian Navy and chief of the Naval Staff.

Margaret Brooke (Canadian naval officer)

Margaret Brooke (Canadian naval officer)

Margaret Brooke, served as a nursing sister during the Second World War rising to the rank of lieutenant commander in the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). Following the war, she earned a bachelor's degree and then a PhD in paleontology, serving as an instructor and researcher at the University of Saskatchewan's Department of Geological Sciences.

SS Caribou

SS Caribou

SS Caribou was a Newfoundland Railway passenger ferry that ran between Port aux Basques, in the Dominion of Newfoundland, and North Sydney, Nova Scotia between 1928 and 1942. During the Battle of the St. Lawrence the ferry participated in thrice-weekly convoys between Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. A German submarine attacked the convoy on 14 October 1942 and Caribou was sunk. She had women and children on board, and many of them were among the 137 who died. Her sinking, and large death toll, made it clear that the war had really arrived on Canada's and Newfoundland's home front. Her sinking is cited by many historians as the most significant sinking in Canadian-controlled waters during the Second World War.

World War II

World War II

World War II or the Second World War, often abbreviated as WWII or WW2, was a global conflict that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries, including all of the great powers, fought as part of two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. Many participants threw their economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind this total war, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. Aircraft played a major role, enabling the strategic bombing of population centres and the only two nuclear weapons ever used in war.

Keel laying

Keel laying

Laying the keel or laying down is the formal recognition of the start of a ship's construction. It is often marked with a ceremony attended by dignitaries from the shipbuilding company and the ultimate owners of the ship.

Ceremonial ship launching

Ceremonial ship launching

Ceremonial ship launching involves the performance of ceremonies associated with the process of transferring a vessel to the water. It is a nautical tradition in many cultures, dating back thousands of years, to accompany the physical process with ceremonies which have been observed as public celebration and a solemn blessing, usually but not always, in association with the launch itself.

HMCS Max Bernays

HMCS Max Bernays

Max Bernays is the third Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel for the Royal Canadian Navy. The class was derived from the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship project as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy and is primarily designed for the patrol and support of Canada's Arctic regions.

Design and description

The Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessels are designed for use in the Arctic regions of Canada for patrol and support within Canada's exclusive economic zone. The vessel is 103.6 m (339 ft 11 in) long overall with a beam of 19.0 m (62 ft 4 in). The ship has a displacement of 6,615 metric tons (6,511 long tons). The ship has an enclosed foredeck that protects machinery and work spaces from Arctic climates. The vessel is powered by a diesel-electric system composed of four 3.6-megawatt (4,800 hp) MAN 6L32/44CR[1] four-stroke medium-speed diesel generators and two electric propulsion motors rated at 4.5 megawatts (6,000 hp) driving two shafts. Margaret Brooke is capable of 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) in open water and 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) in 1-metre (3 ft 3 in) first-year sea ice. The ship is also equipped with a bow thruster to aid during manoeuvres and docking procedures without requiring tugboat assistance. The ship has a range of 6,800 nautical miles (12,600 km; 7,800 mi) and an endurance of 85. Margaret Brooke is equipped with fin stabilizers to decrease roll in open water but can be retracted during icebreaking.[6][2][7]

Margaret Brooke is able to deploy with multiple payloads, including shipping containers, underwater survey equipment or landing craft. Payload operations are aided by a 20-metric-ton (20-long-ton; 22-short-ton) crane for loading and unloading. The ship is equipped with a vehicle bay which can hold can pickup trucks, all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles. The ship also has two 8.5-metre (27 ft 11 in) multi-role rescue boats capable of over 35 knots (65 km/h; 40 mph). The ship is armed with one BAE Mk 38 25 mm (0.98 in) gun and two M2 Browning machine guns. The patrol ship has an onboard hangar and flight deck for helicopters up to the size of a Sikorsky CH-148 Cyclone. Margaret Brooke has a complement of 65 and accommodation for 85[6][2][7] or 87.[8]

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Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessels are warships of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) built within the Government of Canada Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) procurement project, part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. In July 2007 the federal government announced plans for acquiring six to eight icebreaking warships for the RCN.

Exclusive economic zone

Exclusive economic zone

An exclusive economic zone (EEZ), as prescribed by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, is an area of the sea in which a sovereign state has special rights regarding the exploration and use of marine resources, including energy production from water and wind. It stretches from the outer limit of the territorial sea out to 200 nautical miles (nmi) from the coast of the state in question. It is also referred to as a maritime continental margin and, in colloquial usage, may include the continental shelf. The term does not include either the territorial sea or the continental shelf beyond the 200 nautical mile limit. The difference between the territorial sea and the exclusive economic zone is that the first confers full sovereignty over the waters, whereas the second is merely a "sovereign right" which refers to the coastal state's rights below the surface of the sea. The surface waters, as can be seen in the map, are international waters.

Length overall

Length overall

Length overall is the maximum length of a vessel's hull measured parallel to the waterline. This length is important while docking the ship. It is the most commonly used way of expressing the size of a ship, and is also used for calculating the cost of a marina berth.

Beam (nautical)

Beam (nautical)

The beam of a ship is its width at its widest point. The maximum beam (BMAX) is the distance between planes passing through the outer extremities of the ship, beam of the hull (BH) only includes permanently fixed parts of the hull, and beam at waterline (BWL) is the maximum width where the hull intersects the surface of the water.

Displacement (ship)

Displacement (ship)

The displacement or displacement tonnage of a ship is its weight. As the term indicates, it is measured indirectly, using Archimedes' principle, by first calculating the volume of water displaced by the ship, then converting that value into weight. Traditionally, various measurement rules have been in use, giving various measures in long tons. Today, tonnes are more commonly used.

Long ton

Long ton

The long ton, also known as the imperial ton or displacement ton, is the name for the unit called the "ton" in the avoirdupois system of weights or Imperial system of measurements. It was standardised in the 13th century. It is used in the United Kingdom and several other Commonwealth of Nations countries alongside the mass-based metric tonne defined in 1799, as well as in the United States for bulk commodities.

MAN Energy Solutions

MAN Energy Solutions

MAN Energy Solutions SE is a German multinational company based in Augsburg that produces large-bore gas and diesel engines and also turbomachinery for marine, rail and stationary applications, as locomotive and marine propulsion systems, power plant applications, and turbochargers. The company was formed in 2010 from the merger of MAN Diesel and MAN Turbo. MAN Energy Solutions is a subsidiary of the German carmaker Volkswagen Group.

Diesel generator

Diesel generator

A diesel generator (DG) is the combination of a diesel engine with an electric generator to generate electrical energy. This is a specific case of engine generator. A diesel compression-ignition engine is usually designed to run on diesel fuel, but some types are adapted for other liquid fuels or natural gas.

Knot (unit)

Knot (unit)

The knot is a unit of speed equal to one nautical mile per hour, exactly 1.852 km/h. The ISO standard symbol for the knot is kn. The same symbol is preferred by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), while kt is also common, especially in aviation, where it is the form recommended by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The knot is a non-SI unit. The knot is used in meteorology, and in maritime and air navigation. A vessel travelling at 1 knot along a meridian travels approximately one minute of geographic latitude in one hour.

Nautical mile

Nautical mile

A nautical mile is a unit of length used in air, marine, and space navigation, and for the definition of territorial waters. Historically, it was defined as the meridian arc length corresponding to one minute of latitude. Today the international nautical mile is defined as exactly 1,852 metres. The derived unit of speed is the knot, one nautical mile per hour.

Landing craft

Landing craft

Landing craft are small and medium seagoing watercraft, such as boats and barges, used to convey a landing force from the sea to the shore during an amphibious assault. The term excludes landing ships, which are larger. Production of landing craft peaked during World War II, with a significant number of different designs produced in large quantities by the United Kingdom and United States.

Pickup truck

Pickup truck

A pickup truck or pickup is a light-duty truck that has an enclosed cabin, and a back end made up of a cargo bed that is enclosed by three low walls with no roof. In Australia and New Zealand, both pickups and coupé utilities are called utes, short for utility vehicle. In South Africa, people of all language groups use the term bakkie, a diminutive of bak, Afrikaans for "basket".

Service history

The order for the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships was placed on 19 October 2011 with Irving Shipyards of Halifax, Nova Scotia, as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.[9] The ship was constructed in 62 blocks, which were then pieced together into three larger blocks. These three "mega blocks" were fitted together to form the hull of the ship.[6] On 13 April 2015 the government announced a second ship would be named Margaret Brooke. During World War II, Margaret Brooke, a navy nursing sister, was decorated for her actions during the sinking of the passenger ferry SS Caribou.[10][11] The vessel's keel was laid down on 29 May 2017[12] and the vessel was launched on 10 November 2019.[13] The ship began contractor sea trials in May 2021.[14] The vessel was delivered to the Royal Canadian Navy for post-acceptance sea trials on 15 July 2021.[15] The naming ceremony was held on 29 May 2022 in conjunction with that for sister ship Max Bernays.[16]

The vessel, though not formally commissioned, was among the RCN ships deployed to the Arctic as part of the multinational military exercise Operation Nanook in August 2022. In September 2022, Margaret Brooke was tasked for hurricane relief efforts, after Hurricane Fiona's devastating impact to the Maritimes. The vessel provided assistance including damage assessment and welfare checks to the most impacted communities along the south coast of Newfoundland, where water access was the only means of entering the area.[17][18] The vessel was commissioned on 28 October 2022.[19]

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Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax is the capital and largest municipality of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, and the largest municipality in Atlantic Canada. Halifax is one of Canada's fastest growing municipalities, and as of 2022, it is estimated that the CMA population of Halifax was 480,582,with 348,634 people in its urban area. The regional municipality consists of four former municipalities that were amalgamated in 1996: Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford, and Halifax County.

Hull (watercraft)

Hull (watercraft)

A hull is the watertight body of a ship, boat, or flying boat. The hull may open at the top, or it may be fully or partially covered with a deck. Atop the deck may be a deckhouse and other superstructures, such as a funnel, derrick, or mast. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline.

Margaret Brooke (Canadian naval officer)

Margaret Brooke (Canadian naval officer)

Margaret Brooke, served as a nursing sister during the Second World War rising to the rank of lieutenant commander in the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). Following the war, she earned a bachelor's degree and then a PhD in paleontology, serving as an instructor and researcher at the University of Saskatchewan's Department of Geological Sciences.

SS Caribou

SS Caribou

SS Caribou was a Newfoundland Railway passenger ferry that ran between Port aux Basques, in the Dominion of Newfoundland, and North Sydney, Nova Scotia between 1928 and 1942. During the Battle of the St. Lawrence the ferry participated in thrice-weekly convoys between Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. A German submarine attacked the convoy on 14 October 1942 and Caribou was sunk. She had women and children on board, and many of them were among the 137 who died. Her sinking, and large death toll, made it clear that the war had really arrived on Canada's and Newfoundland's home front. Her sinking is cited by many historians as the most significant sinking in Canadian-controlled waters during the Second World War.

Keel

Keel

The keel is the bottom-most longitudinal structural element on a vessel. On some sailboats, it may have a hydrodynamic and counterbalancing purpose, as well. As the laying down of the keel is the initial step in the construction of a ship, in British and American shipbuilding traditions the construction is dated from this event.

Keel laying

Keel laying

Laying the keel or laying down is the formal recognition of the start of a ship's construction. It is often marked with a ceremony attended by dignitaries from the shipbuilding company and the ultimate owners of the ship.

Ceremonial ship launching

Ceremonial ship launching

Ceremonial ship launching involves the performance of ceremonies associated with the process of transferring a vessel to the water. It is a nautical tradition in many cultures, dating back thousands of years, to accompany the physical process with ceremonies which have been observed as public celebration and a solemn blessing, usually but not always, in association with the launch itself.

HMCS Max Bernays

HMCS Max Bernays

Max Bernays is the third Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel for the Royal Canadian Navy. The class was derived from the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship project as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy and is primarily designed for the patrol and support of Canada's Arctic regions.

Military exercise

Military exercise

A military exercise, training exercise, or war game is the employment of military resources in training for military operations. Military exercises are conducted to explore the effects of warfare or test tactics and strategies without actual combat. They also ensure the combat readiness of garrisoned or deployable forces prior to deployment from a home base.

Operation Nanook

Operation Nanook

Operation Nanook is an annual sovereignty operation and manoeuvre warfare exercise conducted by the Canadian Armed Forces in the Arctic. Sovereignty patrols in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and northern Canada are conducted by the Canadian Rangers, Canadian Coast Guard in tandem with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The exercise portion is intended to train the different elements of the Canadian Armed Forces to operate in the Arctic environment.

Hurricane Fiona

Hurricane Fiona

Hurricane Fiona was a large, powerful, and destructive Category 4 Atlantic hurricane which was the costliest and most intense tropical or post-tropical cyclone to hit Canada on record. It was the sixth named storm, third hurricane and first major hurricane of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season.

Newfoundland (island)

Newfoundland (island)

Newfoundland is a large island off the east coast of the North American mainland and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. It has 29 percent of the province's land area. The island is separated from the Labrador Peninsula by the Strait of Belle Isle and from Cape Breton Island by the Cabot Strait. It blocks the mouth of the Saint Lawrence River, creating the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, the world's largest estuary. Newfoundland's nearest neighbour is the French overseas collectivity of Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

Source: "HMCS Margaret Brooke", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_Margaret_Brooke.

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References
  1. ^ a b c "Margaret Brooke (4702515)". Sea-web. Retrieved 22 October 2022.
  2. ^ a b c "Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships". Royal Canadian Navy. January 2015. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  3. ^ "Irving Shipbuilding Selects Rosborough Boats to supply Multi-Role Rescue Boats for AOPS vessels". Irving Shipbuilding. 13 March 2017. Retrieved 17 May 2022.
  4. ^ "ABCO Industries to Build 12m Landing Craft for Royal Canadian Navy". Baird Maritime. 17 October 2018. Archived from the original on 11 October 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2020.
  5. ^ "Royal Canadian Navy's OPV HMCS Max Bernays starts sea trials". Navy Recognition. 26 July 2022. Retrieved 23 October 2022.
  6. ^ a b c Pugliese, David (16 January 2015). "Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships to be constructed in three "mega blocks"". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  7. ^ a b "Harry DeWolf-class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship Factsheet" (PDF). Department of National Defence of Canada. January 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  8. ^ "Largest Active Combat Ship Built in Canada - HMCS Harry Dewolf - Commissioned Today" (Press release). Irving Shipbuilding. 26 June 2021.
  9. ^ Woods, Allan (19 October 2011). "Two winners and one big loser in contest to build military ships". The Toronto Star. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  10. ^ "New Royal Canadian Navy ship to be named after naval hero of SS Caribou sinking" (Press release). Government of Canada. 13 April 2015. Archived from the original on 14 April 2015. Retrieved 13 April 2015.
  11. ^ MacVicar, Adam (16 March 2018). "Royal Canadian Navy ship named after Saskatchewan war hero". Global News. Retrieved 14 November 2019.
  12. ^ "Keel-laying ceremony for HMCS Margaret Brooke marks a shipbuilding milestone" (Press release). Department of National Defence of Canada. 29 May 2017. Archived from the original on 1 June 2017. Retrieved 30 May 2017.
  13. ^ "Halifax Shipyard launches Canada's second Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship". globenewswire.com (Press release). Irving Shipbuilding. 10 November 2019. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  14. ^ Ruskin, Brett (5 May 2021). "Irving Shipbuilding invites international staff to Halifax for its latest ship test". CBC News. Retrieved 5 May 2021.
  15. ^ "Irving Shipbuilding delivers second Arctic patrol warship to Royal Canadian Navy". CTV News. 15 July 2021. Retrieved 15 July 2021.
  16. ^ "Halifax Shipyard Marks Major Milestone with the Joint Naming Ceremony of HMCS Margaret Brooke and HMCS Max Bernays" (Press release). Irving Shipbuilding. 29 May 2022.
  17. ^ "Ottawa sending Canadian Forces to Newfoundland's southwest coast to help with Fiona cleanup". CBC News. 26 September 2022. Retrieved 27 September 2022.
  18. ^ Gillies, Rob (26 September 2022). "Canadian navy vessel headed to areas hit hardest by Fiona". ABC News. Associated Press. Retrieved 27 September 2022.
  19. ^ "His Majesty's Canadian Ship Margaret Brooke commissioned into service" (Press release). Department of National Defence of Canada. 28 October 2022. Retrieved 28 October 2022.

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