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HMCS Lady Evelyn

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HMCS Lady Evelyn CN-3274.jpg
HMCS Lady Evelyn during the First World War
History
NameDeerhound
BuilderJohn Jones and Sons, Tranmere, Merseyside
Yard number180
Launched1901
CompletedMay 1901
In service1901
Out of service1907
FateTransferred to Canadian government 1907
Canada
NameLady Evelyn
Acquired1907
Commissioned1917, as HMCS Lady Evelyn
Decommissioned1919
FateBroken up 1936
General characteristics
TypePatrol vessel
Tonnage482 GRT
Length189 ft (57.6 m) pp.
Beam26.1 ft (8.0 m)
Draught9.5 ft (2.9 m)
PropulsionTriple expansion steam engine, 2 × shafts
Speed9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph)
Armament

HMCS Lady Evelyn was a commissioned patrol boat of the Royal Canadian Navy during the First World War. Originally built as a passenger liner, Deerhound, she was acquired in 1907 by the Canadian government and renamed Lady Evelyn for use by the post office. After the war, she was sold for civilian service and scrapped in 1936.

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Patrol boat

Patrol boat

A patrol boat is a relatively small naval vessel generally designed for coastal defence, border security, or law enforcement. There are many designs for patrol boats, and they generally range in size. They may be operated by a nation's navy, coast guard, police, or customs, and may be intended for marine, estuarine, or river environments.

Royal Canadian Navy

Royal Canadian Navy

The Royal Canadian Navy is the naval force of Canada. The RCN is one of three environmental commands within the Canadian Armed Forces. As of 2021, the RCN operates 12 frigates, four attack submarines, 12 coastal defence vessels, eight patrol class training vessels, two offshore patrol vessels, and several auxiliary vessels. The RCN consists of 8,570 Regular Force and 4,111 Primary Reserve sailors, supported by 3,800 civilians. Vice-Admiral Angus Topshee is the current commander of the Royal Canadian Navy and chief of the Naval Staff.

World War I

World War I

World War I, often abbreviated as WWI, was one of the deadliest global conflicts in history. It was fought between two coalitions, the first being the Allies, whose key members included France, Britain, Russia, Italy, Japan and their respective colonial empires, with the United States joining as an associated power in 1917. They faced the Central Powers, primarily Germany, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire, with fighting occurring throughout Europe, the Middle East, Africa, the Pacific, and parts of Asia. An estimated 9 million soldiers were killed in combat, plus another 23 million wounded, while 5 million civilians died as a result of military action, hunger, and disease. Millions more died as a result of genocide, while the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic was exacerbated by the movement of combatants during the war.

Canada Post

Canada Post

Canada Post Corporation, trading as Canada Post, is a Crown corporation that functions as the primary postal operator in Canada. Originally known as Royal Mail Canada, rebranding was done to the "Canada Post" name in the late 1960s, even though it had not yet been separated from the government. On October 16, 1981, the Canada Post Corporation Act came into effect. This abolished the Post Office Department and created the present-day Crown corporation which provides postal service. The act aimed to set a new direction for the postal service by ensuring the postal service's financial security and independence.

Ship breaking

Ship breaking

Ship-breaking is a type of ship disposal involving the breaking up of ships for either a source of parts, which can be sold for re-use, or for the extraction of raw materials, chiefly scrap. Modern ships have a lifespan of 25 to 30 years before corrosion, metal fatigue and a lack of parts render them uneconomical to operate. Ship-breaking allows the materials from the ship, especially steel, to be recycled and made into new products. This lowers the demand for mined iron ore and reduces energy use in the steelmaking process. Fixtures and other equipment on board the vessels can also be reused. While ship-breaking is sustainable, there are concerns about the use by poorer countries without stringent environmental legislation. It is also labour-intensive, and considered one of the world's most dangerous industries.

Description

Originally constructed as a passenger liner, the ship was 189 feet (57.6 m) long between perpendiculars with a beam of 26.1 feet (8.0 m) and a draught of 9.5 feet (2.9 m). The ship had a tonnage of 482 gross register tons (GRT). The ship was powered by a triple-expansion steam engine driving two shafts. The ship had a maximum speed of 9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph).[1][2] In Royal Canadian Navy service the ship was armed with one 4-inch (102 mm) gun and one QF 12-pounder 12 cwt naval gun.[3][a]

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Length between perpendiculars

Length between perpendiculars

Length between perpendiculars is the length of a ship along the summer load line from the forward surface of the stem, or main bow perpendicular member, to the after surface of the sternpost, or main stern perpendicular member. When there is no sternpost, the centerline axis of the rudder stock is used as the aft end of the length between perpendiculars.

Beam (nautical)

Beam (nautical)

The beam of a ship is its width at its widest point. The maximum beam (BMAX) is the distance between planes passing through the outer extremities of the ship, beam of the hull (BH) only includes permanently fixed parts of the hull, and beam at waterline (BWL) is the maximum width where the hull intersects the surface of the water.

Draft (hull)

Draft (hull)

The draft or draught of a ship's hull is the vertical distance between the waterline and the bottom of the hull (keel). The draught of the vessel is the maximum depth of any part of the vessel, including appendages such as rudders, propellers and drop keels if deployed. Draft determines the minimum depth of water a ship or boat can safely navigate. The related term air draft is the maximum height of any part of the vessel above the water.

Gross register tonnage

Gross register tonnage

Gross register tonnage or gross registered tonnage, is a ship's total internal volume expressed in "register tons", each of which is equal to 100 cubic feet (2.83 m3). Replaced by Gross Tonnage (GT), gross register tonnage uses the total permanently enclosed capacity of the vessel as its basis for volume. Typically this is used for dockage fees, canal transit fees, and similar purposes where it is appropriate to charge based on the size of the entire vessel. Internationally, GRT may be abbreviated as BRT for the German "Bruttoregistertonne".

Propeller

Propeller

A propeller is a device with a rotating hub and radiating blades that are set at a pitch to form a helical spiral which, when rotated, exerts linear thrust upon a working fluid such as water or air. Propellers are used to pump fluid through a pipe or duct, or to create thrust to propel a boat through water or an aircraft through air. The blades are specially shaped so that their rotational motion through the fluid causes a pressure difference between the two surfaces of the blade by Bernoulli's principle which exerts force on the fluid. Most marine propellers are screw propellers with helical blades rotating on a propeller shaft with an approximately horizontal axis.

Knot (unit)

Knot (unit)

The knot is a unit of speed equal to one nautical mile per hour, exactly 1.852 km/h. The ISO standard symbol for the knot is kn. The same symbol is preferred by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), while kt is also common, especially in aviation, where it is the form recommended by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The knot is a non-SI unit. The knot is used in meteorology, and in maritime and air navigation. A vessel travelling at 1 knot along a meridian travels approximately one minute of geographic latitude in one hour.

Royal Canadian Navy

Royal Canadian Navy

The Royal Canadian Navy is the naval force of Canada. The RCN is one of three environmental commands within the Canadian Armed Forces. As of 2021, the RCN operates 12 frigates, four attack submarines, 12 coastal defence vessels, eight patrol class training vessels, two offshore patrol vessels, and several auxiliary vessels. The RCN consists of 8,570 Regular Force and 4,111 Primary Reserve sailors, supported by 3,800 civilians. Vice-Admiral Angus Topshee is the current commander of the Royal Canadian Navy and chief of the Naval Staff.

QF 12-pounder 12 cwt naval gun

QF 12-pounder 12 cwt naval gun

The QF 12-pounder 12-cwt gun (Quick-Firing) was a common, versatile 3-inch (76.2 mm) calibre naval gun introduced in 1894 and used until the middle of the 20th century. It was produced by Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick and used on Royal Navy warships, exported to allied countries, and used for land service. In British service "12-pounder" was the rounded value of the projectile weight, and "12 cwt (hundredweight)" was the weight of the barrel and breech, to differentiate it from other "12-pounder" guns.

Service history

Deerhound was built by John Jones and Sons in 1901 at their yard in Tranmere, Merseyside with the yard number 180.[2][1][b] The ship was constructed for the North Pier Steam Ship Company Limited of Blackpool and completed in May 1901. In 1905 the North Pier Steam Ship Company sold the vessel to the West Cornwall Steam Ship Company.[2] From 1905 to 1907 she operated between Penzance and the Isles of Scilly, replacing the older ship, Lady of the Isles.[4]

Canada's Postmaster General purchased Deerhound in 1907 at a cost of some $65,000 to act as a mail tender for transatlantic steamers. Renamed Lady Evelyn, she met ocean liners in the Gulf of St. Lawrence to transfer mail to and from trains at Rimouski, Quebec in order to speed its delivery. She replaced Rhoda, an older and smaller ship that had previously performed these duties.[5] In 1914 Lady Evelyn was involved in the rescue of survivors from RMS Empress of Ireland when that ship sank following a collision off Rimouski.[6]

Lady Evelyn was one of a number of Canadian government ships taken over by the Royal Canadian Navy during the First World War. Commissioned in June 1917, she spent her career on the East Coast. The ship's ability as a patrol vessel was limited by her 9-knot maximum speed. However, the ship was still assigned to seaward patrols against German U-boats, even though the ship was not capable of operating in heavy seas.[7] At the time of the December 1917 Halifax Explosion, Lady Evelyn was patrolling off the harbour's approaches.[8] On 18 August 1918 Lady Evelyn dropped depth charges on a possible submarine contact after spotting a periscope.[3] As attacks on shipping in Canadian waters increased, Lady Evelyn was used to escort convoys.[9] Following the war, the ship was decommissioned in 1919.[1]

In 1921 Lady Evelyn was sold to the Gulf of St Lawrence Sg & Tdg Company of Montreal. A year later, the Howe Sound Navigation Co. brought Lady Evelyn to Vancouver. In 1923 she was bought by the Union Steamship Company of British Columbia for service along the West Coast and remained with them until 1936. The ship was sold for scrap and broken up in Bedwell Bay in the fourth quarter of 1936.[2]

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Jones, Turner and Evans

Jones, Turner and Evans

Jones, Turner and Evans was a locomotive manufacturer in Newton-le-Willows, England from 1837, known as Jones and Potts between 1844 and 1852.

Blackpool

Blackpool

Blackpool is a seaside resort in Lancashire, England. Located on the northwest coast of England, it is the main settlement within the borough also called Blackpool. The town is by the Irish Sea, between the Ribble and Wyre rivers, and is 27 miles (43 km) north of Liverpool and 40 miles (64 km) northwest of Manchester. At the 2011 census, the unitary authority of Blackpool had an estimated population of 139,720 while the urban settlement had a population of 147,663, making it the most populous settlement in Lancashire, and the fifth-most populous in North West England after Manchester, Liverpool, Bolton and Warrington. The wider built-up area had a population of 239,409, making it the fifth-most populous urban area in the North West after the Manchester, Liverpool, Preston and Birkenhead areas. It is home to the Blackpool Tower, which when built in 1894 was the tallest building in the British Empire.

Penzance

Penzance

Penzance is a town, civil parish and port in the Penwith district of Cornwall, United Kingdom. It is the most westerly major town in Cornwall and is about 64 miles (103 km) west-southwest of Plymouth and 255 miles (410 km) west-southwest of London. Situated in the shelter of Mount's Bay, the town faces south-east onto the English Channel, is bordered to the west by the fishing port of Newlyn, to the north by the civil parish of Madron and to the east by the civil parish of Ludgvan. The civil parish includes the town of Newlyn and the villages of Mousehole, Paul, Gulval, and Heamoor. Granted various royal charters from 1512 onwards and incorporated on 9 May 1614, it has a population of 21,200.

Isles of Scilly

Isles of Scilly

The Isles of Scilly is an archipelago off the southwestern tip of Cornwall, England. One of the islands, St Agnes, is the most southerly point in Britain, being over four miles further south than the most southerly point of the British mainland at Lizard Point.

Mail tender

Mail tender

A mail tender is a small steamboat used to carry mail. As a tender it only carries mail for short distances between ship and shore, ferrying it to and from a large mail steamer.

Ocean liner

Ocean liner

An ocean liner is a large passenger ship primarily used as a form of transportation across seas or oceans. Ocean liners may also carry cargo or mail, and may sometimes be used for other purposes.

Gulf of St. Lawrence

Gulf of St. Lawrence

The Gulf of St. Lawrence is the outlet of the North American Great Lakes via the St. Lawrence River into the Atlantic Ocean. The gulf is a semi-enclosed sea, covering an area of about 226,000 square kilometres (87,000 sq mi) and containing about 34,500 cubic kilometres (8,300 cu mi) of water, at an average depth of 152 metres (500 ft).

Atlantic Canada

Atlantic Canada

Atlantic Canada, also called the Atlantic provinces, is the region of Eastern Canada comprising the provinces located on the Atlantic coast, excluding Quebec. The four provinces are New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island. As of 2021, the landmass of the four Atlantic provinces was approximately 488,000 km2, and had a population of over 2.4 million people. The provinces combined had an approximate GDP of $121.888 billion in 2011. The term Atlantic Canada was popularized following the admission of Newfoundland as a Canadian province in 1949.

Halifax Explosion

Halifax Explosion

On the morning of 6 December 1917, the French cargo ship SS Mont-Blanc collided with the Norwegian vessel SS Imo in the waters of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. The Mont-Blanc, laden with high explosives, caught fire and exploded, devastating the Richmond district of Halifax. 1,782 people were killed, largely in Halifax and Dartmouth, by the blast, debris, fires, or collapsed buildings, and an estimated 9,000 others were injured. The blast was the largest human-made explosion at the time, releasing the equivalent energy of roughly 2.9 kilotons of TNT (12 TJ).

Depth charge

Depth charge

A depth charge is an anti-submarine warfare (ASW) weapon. It is intended to destroy a submarine by being dropped into the water nearby and detonating, subjecting the target to a powerful and destructive hydraulic shock. Most depth charges use high explosive charges and a fuze set to detonate the charge, typically at a specific depth. Depth charges can be dropped by ships, patrol aircraft, and helicopters.

Periscope

Periscope

A periscope is an instrument for observation over, around or through an object, obstacle or condition that prevents direct line-of-sight observation from an observer's current position.

Convoy

Convoy

A convoy is a group of vehicles, typically motor vehicles or ships, traveling together for mutual support and protection. Often, a convoy is organized with armed defensive support and can help maintain cohesion within a unit. It may also be used in a non-military sense, for example when driving through remote areas.

Source: "HMCS Lady Evelyn", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_Lady_Evelyn.

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Notes
  1. ^ "QF" is the abbreviation for quick-firing gun. "Cwt" is the abbreviation for hundredweight, 20 cwt referring to the weight of the gun.
  2. ^ The Miramar Ship Index has the ship constructed at Birkenhead.
Citations
  1. ^ a b c Macpherson & Barrie 2002, p. 21.
  2. ^ a b c d Miramar Ship Index.
  3. ^ a b Johnston et al. 2010, p. 743.
  4. ^ Gill 1975, pp. 129, 148.
  5. ^ "Against Cigarettes: Government may Introduce a Bill this Session, Announces Mr. Fielding" (report on Parliamentary debates)". The Montreal Gazette. 27 April 1908. p. 21. Retrieved 20 May 2017 – via Google News Archive.
  6. ^ "Empress Wireless had Only 8 Minutes; In That Time the Operator Was Able to Summon Two Boats". The New York Times. 5 June 1914. p. 3. Retrieved 20 May 2017.
  7. ^ Johnston et al. 2010, pp. 468–470, 485, 617.
  8. ^ Armstrong 2002, pp. 31, 52.
  9. ^ Johnston et al. 2010, p. 779.
Sources
  • Armstrong, John Griffith (2002). The Halifax Explosion and the Royal Canadian Navy: Inquiry and Intrigue. Vancouver: UBC Press. ISBN 0-7748-0891-8.
  • Gill, Crispin (1975). The Isles of Scilly. London: David & Charles. ISBN 0-7153-6957-1.
  • Johnston, William; Rawling, William G.P.; Gimblett, Richard H. & MacFarlane, John (2010). The Seabound Coast: The Official History of the Royal Canadian Navy, 1867–1939. Vol. 1. Toronto: Dundurn Press. ISBN 978-1-55488-908-2.
  • Macpherson, Ken & Barrie, Ron (2002). The Ships of Canada's Naval Forces 1910–2002 (Third ed.). St. Catharines, Ontario: Vanwell Publishing. ISBN 1-55125-072-1.
  • "Deerhound (1109680)". Miramar Ship Index. Retrieved 20 May 2017.

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