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HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280)

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Iroquois in 2009
Iroquois in 2009
History
Canada
NameIroquois
NamesakeIroquois
BuilderMarine Industries Ltd., Sorel
Laid down15 January 1969
Launched28 November 1970
Commissioned29 July 1972
Decommissioned1 May 2015
Refit3 July 1992
HomeportCFB Halifax
Identification
MottoRelentless in chase[1]
Honours and
awards
Atlantic, 1943; Arctic, 1943–1945; Biscay, 1943–44; Norway, 1945; Korea, 1952–53,[1][2] Arabian Sea[3]
StatusPaid off
NotesColours:Gold and black[1]
BadgeOr, the head of an Iroquois brave, couped at the base of the neck, properly coloured and wearing two eagle feathers in his hair and a gold ring pendant from the ear.[1]
General characteristics
Class and type Iroquois-class destroyer
Displacement5100 t
Length129.8 m (425.9 ft)
Beam15.2 m (49.9 ft)
Draught4.7 m (15.4 ft)
Propulsion
Speed29 kn (53.7 km/h)
Range4,500 nmi (8,334.0 km)
Complement280
Sensors and
processing systems
  • Signaal AN/SPQ 501 DA-08 radar
  • Signaal LW-08 AN/SPQ 502 radar
  • SQS-510 hull sonar
  • SQS-510 VDS sonar
Armament
Aircraft carried2 × CH-124 Sea King helicopters
Aviation facilitieshangar and flight deck

HMCS Iroquois was the lead ship of the Iroquois-class destroyers of the Royal Canadian Navy, also known as the Tribal class or the 280 class. The second vessel to carry the name, she carried the hull number DDG 280. Entering service in 1972 she was assigned to Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT) and was homeported at CFB Halifax. Iroquois was deployed overseas for blockade and anti-terrorism duties, including participating in Operation Apollo in 2002–03. Taken out of service in 2014 and paid off in 2015.

Iroquois was an area air defence destroyer. She served on MARLANT missions protecting Canada's sovereignty in the Atlantic Ocean and enforcing Canadian laws in its territorial sea and Exclusive Economic Zone. Iroquois was deployed on missions throughout the Atlantic and to the Indian Ocean; specifically the Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea on anti-terrorism operations. She has also deployed on counter-narcotics operations in the Caribbean Basin. The destroyer participated in several NATO missions, patrolling the Atlantic Ocean as part of Standing Naval Force Atlantic (STANAVFORLANT) and its successor Standing NATO Response Force Maritime Group 1 (SNMG1).

Discover more about HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280) related topics

Lead ship

Lead ship

The lead ship, name ship, or class leader is the first of a series or class of ships all constructed according to the same general design. The term is applicable to naval ships and large civilian vessels.

Iroquois-class destroyer

Iroquois-class destroyer

Iroquois-class destroyers, also known as Tribal class or DDG 280 class, were a class of four helicopter-carrying, guided missile destroyers of the Royal Canadian Navy. The ships were named to honour the First Nations of Canada.

Destroyer

Destroyer

In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast, manoeuvrable, long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy, or battle group and defend them against powerful short-range attackers. They were originally developed in 1885 by Fernando Villaamil for the Spanish Navy as a defense against torpedo boats, and by the time of the Russo-Japanese War in 1904, these "torpedo boat destroyers" (TBDs) were "large, swift, and powerfully armed torpedo boats designed to destroy other torpedo boats". Although the term "destroyer" had been used interchangeably with "TBD" and "torpedo boat destroyer" by navies since 1892, the term "torpedo boat destroyer" had been generally shortened to simply "destroyer" by nearly all navies by the First World War.

Royal Canadian Navy

Royal Canadian Navy

The Royal Canadian Navy is the naval force of Canada. The RCN is one of three environmental commands within the Canadian Armed Forces. As of 2021, the RCN operates 12 frigates, four attack submarines, 12 coastal defence vessels, eight patrol class training vessels, two offshore patrol vessels, and several auxiliary vessels. The RCN consists of 8,570 Regular Force and 4,111 Primary Reserve sailors, supported by 3,800 civilians. Vice-Admiral Angus Topshee is the current commander of the Royal Canadian Navy and chief of the Naval Staff.

HMCS Iroquois

HMCS Iroquois

Several Canadian naval units have been named HMCS Iroquois.HMCS Iroquois (G89), a Second World War Tribal-class destroyer. HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280), an Iroquois-class destroyer commissioned in 1972.

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

The Royal Canadian Navy uses hull classification symbols to identify the types of its ships, which are similar to the United States Navy's hull classification symbol system. The Royal Navy and some European and Commonwealth navies use a somewhat analogous system of pennant numbers.

Maritime Forces Atlantic

Maritime Forces Atlantic

In the Canadian Forces, Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT) is responsible for the fleet training and operational readiness of the Royal Canadian Navy in the Atlantic Ocean and Arctic Ocean. It was once referred to as Canadian Atlantic Station.

CFB Halifax

CFB Halifax

Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Halifax is Canada's east coast naval base and home port to the Royal Canadian Navy Atlantic fleet, known as Canadian Fleet Atlantic (CANFLTLANT), that forms part of the formation Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT).

Persian Gulf

Persian Gulf

The Persian Gulf, sometimes called the Arabian Gulf, is a mediterranean sea in Western Asia. The body of water is an extension of the Indian Ocean located between Iran and the Arabian Peninsula. It is connected to the Gulf of Oman in the east by the Strait of Hormuz. The Shatt al-Arab river delta forms the northwest shoreline.

Arabian Sea

Arabian Sea

The Arabian Sea is a region of the northern Indian Ocean bounded on the north by Pakistan, Iran and the Gulf of Oman, on the west by the Gulf of Aden, Guardafui Channel and the Arabian Peninsula, on the southeast by the Laccadive Sea and the Maldives, on the southwest by Somalia, and on the east by India. Its total area is 3,862,000 km2 (1,491,000 sq mi) and its maximum depth is 4,652 meters (15,262 ft). The Gulf of Aden in the west connects the Arabian Sea to the Red Sea through the strait of Bab-el-Mandeb, and the Gulf of Oman is in the northwest, connecting it to the Persian Gulf.

Caribbean Basin

Caribbean Basin

In Geography, the Caribbean Basin is generally defined as the area running from Florida westward along the Gulf coast, then south along the Mexican coast through Central America and then eastward across the northern coast of South America. This region includes the islands of the archipelago of the West Indies. Bermuda is also included within the region even though it is in the west-central Atlantic, due to its common cultural history created by European colonization of the region, and in most of the region by the presence of a significant group of African descent.

NATO

NATO

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance between 30 member states – 28 European and two North American. Established in the aftermath of World War II, the organization implemented the North Atlantic Treaty, signed in Washington, D.C., on 4 April 1949. NATO is a collective security system: its independent member states agree to defend each other against attacks by third parties. During the Cold War, NATO operated as a check on the perceived threat posed by the Soviet Union. The alliance remained in place after the dissolution of the Soviet Union and has been involved in military operations in the Balkans, the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa. The organization's motto is animus in consulendo liber.

Service history

Iroquois at New York before her TRUMP refit, in 1986.
Iroquois at New York before her TRUMP refit, in 1986.

The destroyer's keel was laid down on 15 January 1969 by Marine Industries at their yard in Sorel, Quebec. The ship was launched on 28 November 1970 and Iroquois was commissioned on 29 July 1972 with the hull number DDH 280, the first of four Iroquois-class destroyers .[4]

In 1978, the destroyer took part in naval exercises off Portugal and Denmark. On 4 December 1983, the ship responded to the merchant vessel Ho Ming 5's SOS. Iroquois rescued the crew of the vessel, which was in danger of capsizing in gale-force winds.[4] Iroquois was a flagship of STANAVFORLANT in 1978–79.[5]

On 1 November 1989 Iroquois began the Tribal Class Update and Modernization Project (TRUMP) refit, transforming her into a modern area air defence platform with state of the art weapons, sensors, and command and control systems. The refit was completed on 3 July 1992, upon which the ship's hull number changed to DDG 280. Iroquois deployed to the Adriatic Sea from 25 September 1993 to 25 April 1994 as part of the blockade force enforcing sanctions on Yugoslavia.[4][6] During this period, Iroquois succeeded sister ship Algonquin as flagship of STANAVFORLANT.[4] While in the Adriatic, the vessels would board and inspect vessels travelling to Yugoslavia. Iroquois intercepted a vessel attempting to evade the blockade carrying tanks and ammunition.[7]

On 17 June 1995, Iroquois was made the flagship of Maritime Operations Group 1.[4] In the late 1990s, Iroquois became the first warship of Maritime Forces to integrate women into the crew.[8] On 21 March 2000, the destroyer was sent to aid the bulk carrier Leader L which had sunk northeast of Bermuda. Iroquois rescued thirteen survivors and the remains of six others.[4] After the September 11 attacks on the United States by terrorists, Iroquois, which was at sea operating off eastern North America, was used to track aircraft entering North American airspace for NORAD.[9]

Operation Apollo was created to support the United States invasion of Afghanistan. A naval task group was formed, which Iroquois was made flagship of on 17 October. The task group was composed of Iroquois, the auxiliary vessel Preserver and frigates Halifax and Charlottetown.[10] All the ships with the exception of Halifax sailed from Halifax on 24 October. Iroquois, Charlottetown and Preserver arrived in theatre on 20 November. Iroquois was later incorporated into a US amphibious ready group for escort duties for United States Marine Corps transports positioned close to Pakistan.[11] The destroyer returned to Halifax on 27 April 2002.[4]

After the US invaded Iraq in 2003, Commodore Roger Girouard was given command of Task Force 151, comprising ships of allied nations who chose not to join the Iraq War but continued to support the War in Afghanistan. Fredericton was the next Canadian ship slated to deploy to the theatre. However, Commodore Girouard requested Iroquois be sent instead, due to the vessel's flagship accommodations and better communications equipment. In order to accommodate the request, MARLANT reassigned Fredericton's helicopter and aircrew to Iroquois, allowing the destroyer to sail on 24 February. However, on 27 February, the Sea King crashed into the ship's deck, forcing Iroquois to return to Halifax. The destroyer sailed with Fredericton on 5 March bound for the Persian Gulf, this time with no helicopter.[12] Iroquois departed the theatre in June.[13]

In August 2006, the destroyer was assigned to Standing NATO Maritime Group 1 as flagship.[14] In 2008 Iroquois, Calgary and Protecteur were deployed to the waters off Somalia as part of CTF 150, the multi-national task force that concerned itself with drug and people smuggling and piracy in the region.[15] In 2012, Iroquois was among the Canadian warships sent to the Caribbean Sea to help stem the flow of illegal drugs into North America as part of Operation Caribbe.[16]

After rust was found in a machinery space, coupled with structural cracks in the hull of the destroyer, Iroquois was laid up at Halifax in mid-April 2014.[17] The decision to discard the vessel was taken in September 2014 and Iroquois was paid off on 1 May 2015.[18][19] On 24 November 2016 the destroyer was towed out of Halifax harbour en route to Liverpool, Nova Scotia to be broken up for scrap.[20]

Discover more about Service history related topics

Keel

Keel

The keel is the bottom-most longitudinal structural element on a vessel. On some sailboats, it may have a hydrodynamic and counterbalancing purpose, as well. The laying of the keel is often the initial step in the construction of a ship. In the British and American shipbuilding traditions, this event marks the beginning date of a ships construction.

Marine Industries

Marine Industries

Marine Industries Limited (MIL) was a Canadian ship building, hydro-electric and rail car manufacturing company, in Sorel-Tracy, Quebec, with a shipyard located on the Richelieu river about 1 km from the St. Lawrence River. It employed up to 8,500 people during the World War II support effort.

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

The Royal Canadian Navy uses hull classification symbols to identify the types of its ships, which are similar to the United States Navy's hull classification symbol system. The Royal Navy and some European and Commonwealth navies use a somewhat analogous system of pennant numbers.

Flagship

Flagship

A flagship is a vessel used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships, characteristically a flag officer entitled by custom to fly a distinguishing flag. Used more loosely, it is the lead ship in a fleet of vessels, typically the first, largest, fastest, most heavily armed, or best known.

HMCS Algonquin (DDG 283)

HMCS Algonquin (DDG 283)

HMCS Algonquin was an Iroquois-class destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) from 1973 to 2015.

Bulk carrier

Bulk carrier

A bulk carrier or bulker is a merchant ship specially designed to transport unpackaged bulk cargo — such as grains, coal, ore, steel coils, and cement — in its cargo holds. Since the first specialized bulk carrier was built in 1852, economic forces have led to continued development of these ships, resulting in increased size and sophistication. Today's bulk carriers are specially designed to maximize capacity, safety, efficiency, and durability.

NORAD

NORAD

North American Aerospace Defense Command, known until March 1981 as the North American Air Defense Command, is a combined organization of the United States and Canada that provides aerospace warning, air sovereignty, and protection for Canada and the continental United States.

Operation Enduring Freedom

Operation Enduring Freedom

Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) was the official name used synonymously by the U.S. government for both the War in Afghanistan (2001–2021) and the larger-scale Global War on Terrorism. On 7 October 2001, in response to the September 11 attacks, President George W. Bush announced that airstrikes targeting Al-Qaeda and the Taliban had begun in Afghanistan. Operation Enduring Freedom primarily refers to the War in Afghanistan, but it was also affiliated with counterterrorism operations in other countries, such as OEF-Philippines and OEF-Trans Sahara.

HMCS Preserver (AOR 510)

HMCS Preserver (AOR 510)

HMCS Preserver was a Protecteur-class auxiliary oiler replenishment of the Royal Canadian Navy commissioned in 1970. Built at Saint John, New Brunswick and launched in 1969, the vessel took part in several overseas deployments, including Operation Deliverance, which became better known as the Somalia Affair. The ship underwent a major refit in 2005, after she was plagued by electrical problems. With these difficulties unresolved, Preserver was withdrawn from sea-going service in 2014 and was paid off on 21 October 2016. The vessel was broken up for scrap at Sydney, Nova Scotia in 2017.

Frigate

Frigate

A frigate is a type of warship. In different eras, the roles and capabilities of ships classified as frigates have varied somewhat.

HMCS Halifax (FFH 330)

HMCS Halifax (FFH 330)

HMCS Halifax is a Halifax-class frigate that has served in the Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Forces since 1992. Halifax is the lead ship in her class which is the name for the Canadian Patrol Frigate Project. She is the second vessel to carry the designation HMCS Halifax. She carries the hull classification symbol FFH 330.

HMCS Charlottetown (FFH 339)

HMCS Charlottetown (FFH 339)

HMCS Charlottetown is a Halifax-class frigate that has served in the Royal Canadian Navy since 1995. Charlottetown is the tenth ship in her class which is based on the Canadian Patrol Frigate Project. She is the third vessel to carry the designation HMCS Charlottetown. Charlottetown, assigned to Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT) and homeported at CFB Halifax, serves on missions protecting Canada's sovereignty in the Atlantic Ocean and enforcing Canadian laws in its territorial sea and exclusive economic zone. Charlottetown has also participated in several NATO missions, patrolling the Atlantic Ocean as part of Standing Naval Force Atlantic (STANAVFORLANT) and its successors Standing NATO Maritime Group 1 and 2. Charlottetown has also been deployed on missions throughout the Atlantic and to the Indian Ocean, specifically the Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea on anti-terrorism operations.

Source: "HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_Iroquois_(DDG_280).

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References

Citations

  1. ^ a b c d Arbuckle, p. 50
  2. ^ "Official Lineages, Volume 2: Ships". National Defence and the Canadian Forces. 2012. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  3. ^ "South-West Asia Theatre Honours". Prime Minister of Canada. Archived from the original on 12 May 2014. Retrieved 9 May 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Macpherson and Barrie, p. 265
  5. ^ German, p. 315
  6. ^ Tracy, p. 226
  7. ^ Tracy, p. 227
  8. ^ Milner, p. 309
  9. ^ Milner, p. 314
  10. ^ Tracy, pp. 264–65
  11. ^ Tracy, p. 265
  12. ^ Milner, pp. 318–19
  13. ^ Milner, p. 320
  14. ^ Milner, p. 327
  15. ^ Tracy, pp. 277, 279
  16. ^ "Operation Caribbe". National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. Retrieved 16 September 2016.
  17. ^ "HMCS Iroquois sidelined indefinitely after rust found in hull". CBC News. The Canadian Press. 7 May 2014. Retrieved 15 September 2016.
  18. ^ "Navy sending four Cold War era ships into retirement". CTV News. The Canadian Press. 19 September 2014. Retrieved 15 September 2016.
  19. ^ Mccleod, Paul (15 April 2015). "Navy destroyers HMCS Iroquois and HMCS Algonquin retire in May". The Chronicle-Herald. Retrieved 15 September 2016.
  20. ^ "Tweet: @RCN_MARLANT bids Fair Winds and Following Seas to #HMCSIroquois in its final voyage to Liverpool, NS". Canadian Armed Forces. Retrieved 25 November 2016.

Sources

  • Arbuckle, J. Graeme (1987). Badges of the Canadian Navy. Halifax, Nova Scotia: Nimbus Publishing. ISBN 0-920852-49-1.
  • German, Tony (1990). The Sea is at Our Gates: The History of the Canadian Navy. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart Incorporated. ISBN 0-7710-3269-2.
  • Macpherson, Ken; Barrie, Ron (2002). The Ships of Canada's Naval Forces 1910–2002 (Third ed.). St. Catharines, Ontario: Vanwell Publishing. ISBN 1-55125-072-1.
  • Milner, Marc (2010). Canada's Navy: The First Century (Second ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press. ISBN 978-0-8020-9604-3.
  • Tracy, Nicholas (2012). A Two-Edged Sword: The Navy as an Instrument of Canadian Foreign Policy. Montreal, Quebec and Kingston, Ontario: McGill-Queens University Press. ISBN 978-0-7735-4051-4.
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