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HMCS Harry DeWolf

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HMCS Harry DeWolf Pulls into Naval Station Norfolk 1.jpg
HMCS Harry DeWolf pulls into Naval Station Norfolk, 2021
History
Canada
NameHarry DeWolf
NamesakeHarry DeWolf
Ordered19 October 2011
BuilderIrving Shipbuilding, Halifax, Nova Scotia
Laid down11 March 2016
Launched15 September 2018
Commissioned26 June 2021
HomeportHalifax
Identification
StatusShip in active service
General characteristics
Type Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel
Displacement6,615 t (6,511 long tons)
Length103.6 m (339 ft 11 in)
Beam19.0 m (62 ft 4 in)
Draught5.7 m (18 ft 8 in)[1]
Ice classPolar Class 5
Installed power4 × MAN 6L32/44CR (4 × 3.6 MW)[1]
PropulsionDiesel-electric; two shafts (2 × 4.5 MW)[2]
Speed
  • 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) (open water)
  • 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) in 1 m (3 ft 3 in) ice[5]
Range6,800 nmi (12,600 km; 7,800 mi)
Boats & landing
craft carried
Complement65
Armament
Aircraft carriedSikorsky CH-148 Cyclone or other helicopters/CU-176 Gargoyle UAV
Aviation facilitiesHangar and flight deck

HMCS Harry DeWolf (AOPV 430) is the lead ship of its class of offshore patrol vessels for the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). The class was derived from the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship project as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy and is primarily designed for the patrol and support of Canada's Arctic regions. Named after Vice Admiral Harry DeWolf, a former head of the RCN, the vessel was ordered in 2011, laid down in 2016 and launched in 2018. The vessel completed contractors sea trials in July 2020, was delivered to the RCN on 31 July 2020 and began post-acceptance sea trials. Harry DeWolf was commissioned on 26 June 2021.

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Lead ship

Lead ship

The lead ship, name ship, or class leader is the first of a series or class of ships all constructed according to the same general design. The term is applicable to naval ships and large civilian vessels.

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessels are warships of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) built within the Government of Canada Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) procurement project, part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. In July 2007 the federal government announced plans for acquiring six to eight icebreaking warships for the RCN.

Royal Canadian Navy

Royal Canadian Navy

The Royal Canadian Navy is the naval force of Canada. The RCN is one of three environmental commands within the Canadian Armed Forces. As of 2021, the RCN operates 12 frigates, four attack submarines, 12 coastal defence vessels, eight patrol class training vessels, two offshore patrol vessels, and several auxiliary vessels. The RCN consists of 8,570 Regular Force and 4,111 Primary Reserve sailors, supported by 3,800 civilians. Vice-Admiral Angus Topshee is the current commander of the Royal Canadian Navy and chief of the Naval Staff.

Harry DeWolf

Harry DeWolf

Vice Admiral Henry George DeWolf was a Canadian naval officer who was famous as the first commander of HMCS Haida during the Second World War.

Keel laying

Keel laying

Laying the keel or laying down is the formal recognition of the start of a ship's construction. It is often marked with a ceremony attended by dignitaries from the shipbuilding company and the ultimate owners of the ship.

Ceremonial ship launching

Ceremonial ship launching

Ceremonial ship launching involves the performance of ceremonies associated with the process of transferring a vessel to the water. It is a nautical tradition in many cultures, dating back thousands of years, to accompany the physical process with ceremonies which have been observed as public celebration and a solemn blessing, usually but not always, in association with the launch itself.

Sea trial

Sea trial

A sea trial is the testing phase of a watercraft. It is also referred to as a "shakedown cruise" by many naval personnel. It is usually the last phase of construction and takes place on open water, and it can last from a few hours to many days.

Ship commissioning

Ship commissioning

Ship commissioning is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning. The term is most commonly applied to placing a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are often rooted in centuries-old naval tradition.

Design and description

The Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessels are designed for use in the Arctic regions of Canada for patrol and support within Canada's exclusive economic zone. The vessel is 103.6 m (339 ft 11 in) long overall with a beam of 19.0 m (62 ft 4 in). The ship has a displacement of 6,615 metric tons (6,511 long tons). The ship has an enclosed foredeck that protects machinery and work spaces from Arctic climates. The vessel is powered by a diesel-electric system composed of four 3.6-megawatt (4,800 hp) MAN 6L32/44CR[1] four-stroke medium-speed diesel generators and two electric propulsion motors rated at 4.5 megawatts (6,000 hp) driving two shafts. Harry DeWolf is capable of 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) in open water and 3 knots (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) in 1-metre (3 ft 3 in) first-year sea ice. The ship is also equipped with a bow thruster to aid during manoeuvres and docking procedures without requiring tugboat assistance. The ship has a range of 6,800 nautical miles (12,600 km; 7,800 mi) and an endurance of 85 days. Harry DeWolf is equipped with fin stabilizers to decrease roll in open water but can be retracted during icebreaking.[6][2][7]

Harry DeWolf is able to deploy with multiple payloads, including shipping containers, underwater survey equipment or landing craft. Payload operations are aided by a 20-metric-ton (20-long-ton; 22-short-ton) crane for loading and unloading. The ship is equipped with a vehicle bay which can hold pickup trucks, all-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles. The ship also has two 8.5-metre (27 ft 11 in) multi-role rescue boats capable of over 35 knots (65 km/h; 40 mph). The ship is armed with one BAE Mk 38 25 mm (0.98 in) gun and two M2 Browning machine guns. The patrol ship has an onboard hangar and flight deck for helicopters up to the size of a Sikorsky CH-148 Cyclone. Harry DeWolf has a complement of 65 and accommodation for 85[6][2][7] or 87.[8]

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Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessel

Harry DeWolf-class offshore patrol vessels are warships of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) built within the Government of Canada Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS) procurement project, part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. In July 2007 the federal government announced plans for acquiring six to eight icebreaking warships for the RCN.

Exclusive economic zone

Exclusive economic zone

An exclusive economic zone (EEZ), as prescribed by the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, is an area of the sea in which a sovereign state has special rights regarding the exploration and use of marine resources, including energy production from water and wind. It stretches from the outer limit of the territorial sea out to 200 nautical miles (nmi) from the coast of the state in question. It is also referred to as a maritime continental margin and, in colloquial usage, may include the continental shelf. The term does not include either the territorial sea or the continental shelf beyond the 200 nautical mile limit. The difference between the territorial sea and the exclusive economic zone is that the first confers full sovereignty over the waters, whereas the second is merely a "sovereign right" which refers to the coastal state's rights below the surface of the sea. The surface waters, as can be seen in the map, are international waters.

Length overall

Length overall

Length overall is the maximum length of a vessel's hull measured parallel to the waterline. This length is important while docking the ship. It is the most commonly used way of expressing the size of a ship, and is also used for calculating the cost of a marina berth.

Beam (nautical)

Beam (nautical)

The beam of a ship is its width at its widest point. The maximum beam (BMAX) is the distance between planes passing through the outer extremities of the ship, beam of the hull (BH) only includes permanently fixed parts of the hull, and beam at waterline (BWL) is the maximum width where the hull intersects the surface of the water.

Displacement (ship)

Displacement (ship)

The displacement or displacement tonnage of a ship is its weight. As the term indicates, it is measured indirectly, using Archimedes' principle, by first calculating the volume of water displaced by the ship, then converting that value into weight. Traditionally, various measurement rules have been in use, giving various measures in long tons. Today, tonnes are more commonly used.

MAN Energy Solutions

MAN Energy Solutions

MAN Energy Solutions SE is a German multinational company based in Augsburg that produces large-bore gas and diesel engines and also turbomachinery for marine, rail and stationary applications, as locomotive and marine propulsion systems, power plant applications, and turbochargers. The company was formed in 2010 from the merger of MAN Diesel and MAN Turbo. MAN Energy Solutions is a subsidiary of the German carmaker Volkswagen Group.

Diesel generator

Diesel generator

A diesel generator (DG) is the combination of a diesel engine with an electric generator to generate electrical energy. This is a specific case of engine generator. A diesel compression-ignition engine is usually designed to run on diesel fuel, but some types are adapted for other liquid fuels or natural gas.

Propeller

Propeller

A propeller is a device with a rotating hub and radiating blades that are set at a pitch to form a helical spiral which, when rotated, exerts linear thrust upon a working fluid such as water or air. Propellers are used to pump fluid through a pipe or duct, or to create thrust to propel a boat through water or an aircraft through air. The blades are shaped so that their rotational motion through the fluid causes a pressure difference between the two surfaces of the blade by Bernoulli's principle which exerts force on the fluid. Most marine propellers are screw propellers with helical blades rotating on a propeller shaft with an approximately horizontal axis.

Knot (unit)

Knot (unit)

The knot is a unit of speed equal to one nautical mile per hour, exactly 1.852 km/h. The ISO standard symbol for the knot is kn. The same symbol is preferred by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), while kt is also common, especially in aviation, where it is the form recommended by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The knot is a non-SI unit. The knot is used in meteorology, and in maritime and air navigation. A vessel travelling at 1 knot along a meridian travels approximately one minute of geographic latitude in one hour.

Nautical mile

Nautical mile

A nautical mile is a unit of length used in air, marine, and space navigation, and for the definition of territorial waters. Historically, it was defined as the meridian arc length corresponding to one minute of latitude. Today the international nautical mile is defined as exactly 1,852 metres. The derived unit of speed is the knot, one nautical mile per hour.

Landing craft

Landing craft

Landing craft are small and medium seagoing watercraft, such as boats and barges, used to convey a landing force from the sea to the shore during an amphibious assault. The term excludes landing ships, which are larger. Production of landing craft peaked during World War II, with a significant number of different designs produced in large quantities by the United Kingdom and United States.

Pickup truck

Pickup truck

A pickup truck or pickup is a light-duty truck that has an enclosed cabin, and a back end made up of a cargo bed that is enclosed by three low walls with no roof. In Australia and New Zealand, both pickups and coupé utilities are called utes, short for utility vehicle. In South Africa, people of all language groups use the term bakkie, a diminutive of bak, Afrikaans for "basket".

Construction

Harry DeWolf under construction in May 2018
Harry DeWolf under construction in May 2018

The order for the Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships was placed on 19 October 2011 with Irving Shipyards of Halifax, Nova Scotia, as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.[9] The ship was to be constructed in 62 blocks, which would then be pieced together into three larger blocks. These three "mega blocks" would be fitted together to form the hull of the ship.[6] On 18 September 2014, it was announced that the first ship of the class was to be named Harry DeWolf in honour of Rear Admiral Harry DeWolf, a decorated naval officer who served during World War II in European waters and as the Royal Canadian Navy Chief of the Naval Staff during the early Cold War.[10] The ship was given the hull number AOPV 430.[2] On 18 June 2015 it was reported that the construction of test modules for Harry DeWolf was underway.[11] The first sections of keel were placed on 11 March 2016, but the official laying of the keel of Harry DeWolf was held on 9 June 2016, marking the first naval construction in Canada since 1998.[12][13] On 8 December 2017, the three main sections of Harry DeWolf were fitted into place.[14]

Harry DeWolf was launched on 15 September 2018. The vessel was loaded onto the semi-submersible barge Boa Barge 37 and taken out into Halifax Harbour. There, the barge was submerged and the ship floated free, to be towed back to the shipyard.[15] The vessel was officially named at Halifax on 5 October 2018 by sponsor Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, the wife of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.[16] Harry DeWolf began builders sea trials on 22 November 2019.[17] The ship was delivered to the Royal Canadian Navy on 31 July 2020 and began post-acceptance sea trials.[18][19] The ship was commissioned on 26 June 2021.[20]

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Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax is the capital and largest municipality of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, and the largest municipality in Atlantic Canada. Halifax is one of Canada's fastest growing municipalities, and as of 2022, it is estimated that the CMA population of Halifax was 480,582,with 348,634 people in its urban area. The regional municipality consists of four former municipalities that were amalgamated in 1996: Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford, and Halifax County.

Hull (watercraft)

Hull (watercraft)

A hull is the watertight body of a ship, boat, or flying boat. The hull may open at the top, or it may be fully or partially covered with a deck. Atop the deck may be a deckhouse and other superstructures, such as a funnel, derrick, or mast. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline.

Harry DeWolf

Harry DeWolf

Vice Admiral Henry George DeWolf was a Canadian naval officer who was famous as the first commander of HMCS Haida during the Second World War.

Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy

Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy

The Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy is the institutional head of the Royal Canadian Navy. This appointment also includes the title Chief of the Naval Staff and is based at National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa, Ontario. This individual reports to the Chief of the Defence Staff, who then responds to the Commander-in-Chief of the Canadian Armed Forces.

Cold War

Cold War

The Cold War is a term commonly used to refer to a period of geopolitical tension between the United States and the Soviet Union and their respective allies, the Western Bloc and the Eastern Bloc. The term cold war is used because there was no large-scale fighting directly between the two superpowers, but they each supported opposing sides in major regional conflicts known as proxy wars. The conflict was based around the ideological and geopolitical struggle for global influence by these two superpowers, following their temporary alliance and victory against Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan in 1945. Aside from the nuclear arsenal development and conventional military deployment, the struggle for dominance was expressed via indirect means such as psychological warfare, propaganda campaigns, espionage, far-reaching embargoes, rivalry at sports events, and technological competitions such as the Space Race.

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

The Royal Canadian Navy uses hull classification symbols to identify the types of its ships, which are similar to the United States Navy's hull classification symbol system. The Royal Navy and some European and Commonwealth navies use a somewhat analogous system of pennant numbers.

Keel

Keel

The keel is the bottom-most longitudinal structural element on a vessel. On some sailboats, it may have a hydrodynamic and counterbalancing purpose, as well. The laying of the keel is often the initial step in the construction of a ship. In the British and American shipbuilding traditions, this event marks the beginning date of a ships construction.

Keel laying

Keel laying

Laying the keel or laying down is the formal recognition of the start of a ship's construction. It is often marked with a ceremony attended by dignitaries from the shipbuilding company and the ultimate owners of the ship.

Ceremonial ship launching

Ceremonial ship launching

Ceremonial ship launching involves the performance of ceremonies associated with the process of transferring a vessel to the water. It is a nautical tradition in many cultures, dating back thousands of years, to accompany the physical process with ceremonies which have been observed as public celebration and a solemn blessing, usually but not always, in association with the launch itself.

Heavy-lift ship

Heavy-lift ship

A heavy-lift ship is a vessel designed to move very large loads that cannot be handled by normal ships. They are of two types:Semi-submersible ships that take on water ballast to allow the load—usually another vessel—to be floated over the deck, whereupon the ballast is jettisoned and the ship's deck and cargo raised above the waterline. Project cargo ships that use at least one heavy-lift crane for handling heavy cargo and sufficient ballast to assure stability and sea-keeping properties.

Halifax Harbour

Halifax Harbour

Halifax Harbour is a large natural harbour on the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia, Canada, located in the Halifax Regional Municipality. Halifax largely owes its existence to the harbour, being one of the largest and deepest ice-free natural harbours in the world. Before Confederation it was one of the most important commercial ports on the Atlantic seaboard. In 1917, it was the site of the world's largest man-made accidental explosion, when the SS Mont-Blanc blew up in the Halifax Explosion of December 6.

Justin Trudeau

Justin Trudeau

Justin Pierre James Trudeau is a Canadian politician who is the 23rd and current prime minister of Canada. He has served as the prime minister of Canada since 2015 and as the leader of the Liberal Party since 2013. Trudeau is the second-youngest prime minister in Canadian history after Joe Clark; he is also the first to be the child or other relative of a previous holder of the post, as the eldest son of Pierre Trudeau.

Service history

Harry DeWolf transiting the Northwest Passage on its maiden voyage
Harry DeWolf transiting the Northwest Passage on its maiden voyage

Harry DeWolf embarked on its inaugural deployment on 3 August 2021.[21] It participated in Operation Nanook, Canada's annual sovereignty operation and manoeuvre warfare exercise conducted in the Arctic, alongside HMCS Goose Bay and elements of the Canadian Coast Guard and the United States Coast Guard.[22] The ship then proceeded through the Northwest Passage, and docked at CFB Esquimalt on 4 October 2021.[23] Harry DeWolf left CFB Esquimalt on 22 October 2021, and sailed to the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean via the Panama Canal.[24] During this second leg of its journey, it took part in Operation Caribbe — Canada's contribution to the US-led anti-drug smuggling effort Operation Martillo — and seized almost 3,000 kilograms (6,600 lb) of cocaine.[25][24] Harry DeWolf returned to CFB Halifax on 16 December 2021, becoming the first Canadian naval vessel to circumnavigate North America since HMCS Labrador made a similar voyage in 1954.[25]

In August 2022, Harry DeWolf was among the Canadian warships that were to be deployed to the Arctic as part of the multinational military exercise Operation Nanook.[26] However, after two of four generators on the ship ceased functioning, the ship's participation in the exercise was cancelled due to a need to return to Halifax for repairs.[27] The ship is not expected to return to service until April 2023.[28]

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Northwest Passage

Northwest Passage

The Northwest Passage (NWP) is the sea route between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans through the Arctic Ocean, along the northern coast of North America via waterways through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The eastern route along the Arctic coasts of Norway and Siberia is accordingly called the Northeast Passage (NEP). The various islands of the archipelago are separated from one another and from Mainland Canada by a series of Arctic waterways collectively known as the Northwest Passages, Northwestern Passages or the Canadian Internal Waters.

Operation Nanook

Operation Nanook

Operation Nanook is an annual sovereignty operation and manoeuvre warfare exercise conducted by the Canadian Armed Forces in the Arctic. Sovereignty patrols in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and northern Canada are conducted by the Canadian Rangers, Canadian Coast Guard in tandem with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The exercise portion is intended to train the different elements of the Canadian Armed Forces to operate in the Arctic environment.

Sovereignty

Sovereignty

Sovereignty is the defining authority within individual consciousness, social construct, or territory. Sovereignty entails hierarchy within the state, as well as external autonomy for states. In any state, sovereignty is assigned to the person, body, or institution that has the ultimate authority over other people in order to establish a law or change existing laws. In political theory, sovereignty is a substantive term designating supreme legitimate authority over some polity. In international law, sovereignty is the exercise of power by a state. De jure sovereignty refers to the legal right to do so; de facto sovereignty refers to the factual ability to do so. This can become an issue of special concern upon the failure of the usual expectation that de jure and de facto sovereignty exist at the place and time of concern, and reside within the same organization.

Arctic

Arctic

The Arctic is a polar region located at the northernmost part of Earth. The Arctic consists of the Arctic Ocean, adjacent seas, and parts of Canada, Danish Realm (Greenland), northern Finland (Lapland), Iceland, northern Norway, Russia, northernmost Sweden and the United States (Alaska). Land within the Arctic region has seasonally varying snow and ice cover, with predominantly treeless permafrost containing tundra. Arctic seas contain seasonal sea ice in many places.

HMCS Goose Bay

HMCS Goose Bay

HMCS Goose Bay is a Kingston-class coastal defence vessel that has served in the Canadian Forces since 1998. Goose Bay is the eighth ship of her class which is the name for the Maritime Coastal Defence Vessel Project. She is the first vessel to be named Goose Bay. The coastal defence vessel is assigned to Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT) and is homeported at CFB Halifax.

Canadian Coast Guard

Canadian Coast Guard

The Canadian Coast Guard is the coast guard of Canada. Formed in 1962, the coast guard is tasked with marine search and rescue (SAR), communication, navigation, and transportation issues in Canadian waters, such as navigation aids and icebreaking, marine pollution response, and support for other Canadian government initiatives. The coast guard operates 119 vessels of varying sizes and 23 helicopters, along with a variety of smaller craft. The CCG is headquartered in Ottawa, Ontario, and is a special operating agency within Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

CFB Esquimalt

CFB Esquimalt

Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt is Canada's Pacific Coast naval base and home port to Maritime Forces Pacific and Joint Task Force Pacific Headquarters. As of 2018, 4,411 military personnel and 2,762 civilians work at CFB Esquimalt.

Panama Canal

Panama Canal

The Panama Canal is an artificial 82 km (51 mi) waterway in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean and divides North and South America. The canal cuts across the Isthmus of Panama and is a conduit for maritime trade. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, the Panama Canal shortcut greatly reduces the time for ships to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, enabling them to avoid the lengthy, hazardous Cape Horn route around the southernmost tip of South America via the Drake Passage or Strait of Magellan and the even less popular route through the Arctic Archipelago and the Bering Strait.

Operation Caribbe

Operation Caribbe

Operation Caribbe is the Canadian Armed Forces contribution to the elimination of illegal trafficking in the Caribbean Sea and the eastern Pacific Ocean by organized crime. The operation began in 2006 and its mandate has been altered twice since then.

Operation Martillo

Operation Martillo

Operation Martillo is a multi-national anti drug operation that began on 15 January 2012, and "aims to combat international drug trafficking, and promote peace, stability in Central and South America", according to the U.S. Southern Command, as one of the public institutions involved in it. It is a defense project led by the United States Southern Command with help of multi-national forces from Latin American and European countries. News coverage of their activities and results reach back to 2012 and up to 2020, but mainly from defense focused media.

CFB Halifax

CFB Halifax

Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Halifax is Canada's east coast naval base and home port to the Royal Canadian Navy Atlantic fleet, known as Canadian Fleet Atlantic (CANFLTLANT), that forms part of the formation Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT).

Military exercise

Military exercise

A military exercise, training exercise, or war game is the employment of military resources in training for military operations. Military exercises are conducted to explore the effects of warfare or test tactics and strategies without actual combat. They also ensure the combat readiness of garrisoned or deployable forces prior to deployment from a home base.

Source: "HMCS Harry DeWolf", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_Harry_DeWolf.

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References
  1. ^ a b c "Harry DeWolf (4702503)". Sea-web. Retrieved 22 October 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d "Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships". Royal Canadian Navy. January 2015. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  3. ^ "Irving Shipbuilding Selects Rosborough Boats to supply Multi-Role Rescue Boats for AOPS vessels". Irving Shipbuilding. 13 March 2017. Retrieved 17 May 2022.
  4. ^ "ABCO Industries to Build 12m Landing Craft for Royal Canadian Navy". Baird Maritime. 17 October 2018. Archived from the original on 11 October 2019. Retrieved 11 August 2020.
  5. ^ "Royal Canadian Navy's OPV HMCS Max Bernays starts sea trials". Navy Recognition. 26 July 2022. Retrieved 23 October 2022.
  6. ^ a b c Pugliese, David (16 January 2015). "Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships to be constructed in three "mega blocks"". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  7. ^ a b "Harry DeWolf-class Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship Factsheet" (PDF). Department of National Defence of Canada. January 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  8. ^ "Largest Active Combat Ship Built in Canada - HMCS Harry Dewolf- Commissioned Today" (Press release). Irving Shipbuilding. 26 June 2021.
  9. ^ Woods, Allan (19 October 2011). "Two winners and one big loser in contest to build military ships". The Toronto Star. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  10. ^ "PM Announces the Name of the First of the Royal Canadian Navy's Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships". Prime Minister of Canada. 18 September 2014. Archived from the original on 22 September 2014. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  11. ^ Brooks, Patricia (18 June 2015). "Arctic patrol vessels 'really have started' construction, says Irving president". Halifax Chronicle Herald. Archived from the original on 3 August 2017. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  12. ^ "Timeline". Irving Shipyards. 2016. Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 20 December 2016.
  13. ^ Gunn, Andrea (10 June 2016). "Irving, Royal Canadian Navy celebrate construction milestone with wolf coin". Halifax Chronicle Herald. Archived from the original on 6 April 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  14. ^ "First Arctic patrol ship clicks into place at Halifax Shipyard". CBC News. The Canadian Press. 8 December 2017. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  15. ^ Ziobrowski, Peter (17 September 2018). "Canada's newest navy vessel, Future HMCS Harry DeWolf, enters the water". Halifax Chronicle Herald. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018.
  16. ^ Sevunts, Levon (5 October 2018). "Royal Canadian Navy celebrates official naming of its future Arctic patrol ship". Radio Canada International. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  17. ^ "The future HMCS Harry DeWolf starts initial sea trials". halifaxtoday.com. 22 November 2019. Retrieved 27 November 2019.
  18. ^ Berthiaume, Lee (31 July 2020). "Canadian navy enters new era with long-awaited Arctic warship". The Globe and Mail. The Canadian Press. Retrieved 4 August 2020.
  19. ^ "Government of Canada receives first new Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship" (Press release). Government of Canada. 31 July 2020. Retrieved 11 August 2020.
  20. ^ Melanson, Ryan (25 June 2021). "HMCS Harry DeWolf: RCN to commission first new ship in over two decades". Government of Canada. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  21. ^ Seguin, Nicola (3 August 2021). "Canadian navy ship sets sail for trip through Northwest Passage". CBC News. Retrieved 4 August 2021.
  22. ^ "Operation Nanook 2021 activities begin in Canada's Arctic region" (Press release). Government of Canada. 26 June 2021. Retrieved 4 August 2021.
  23. ^ Wilson, Carla (5 October 2021). "Through the Northwest Passage to Esquimalt, new naval ship arrives in B.C." Vancouver Sun. Retrieved 5 October 2021.
  24. ^ a b McSheffrey, Elizabeth (1 October 2021). "HMCS Harry DeWolf docks in North Vancouver between 'historic' sails". Global News. Retrieved 5 October 2021.
  25. ^ a b Debison, Amanda (16 December 2021). "HMCS Harry Dewolf returns home after inaugural four-month voyage". CTV News. Retrieved 17 December 2021.
  26. ^ "Canadian warships deployed to Arctic for two-month, multinational mission". Global News. The Canadian Press. 2 August 2022. Retrieved 3 August 2022.
  27. ^ "Offshore patrol vessel HMCS Harry DeWolf returning to Halifax after generator failure". CBC News. 19 August 2022. Retrieved 22 August 2022.
  28. ^ Pugliese, David (5 December 2022). "Navy's new Arctic ship sidelined until April because of mechanical problems". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 16 December 2022.

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