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HMCS Halifax (FFH 330)

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HMCS Halifax (FFH 330) en route to Haiti 2010-01-18.jpg
HMCS Halifax en route to Haiti in January 2010 as part of Operation Hestia
History
Canada
NameHalifax
NamesakeHalifax, Nova Scotia
BuilderSaint John Shipbuilding Ltd., Saint John
Laid down19 March 1987
Launched30 April 1988
Commissioned29 June 1992
RefitHCM/FELEX September 2010 – September 2011
HomeportCFB Halifax
Identification
MottoSior gaisgiel (ever brave/bravery endures)
Honours and
awards
Atlantic 1942–45, Arabian Sea[1]
Statusin active service
Badge
  • HMCS Halifax crest.jpg
  • Argent a kingfisher holding a trident in bend points upward Or.
General characteristics
Class and type Halifax-class frigate
Displacement
  • 3,995 tonnes (light)
  • 4,795 tonnes (operational)
  • 5,032 tonnes (deep load)
Length134.2 m (440 ft)
Beam16.5 m (54 ft)
Draught7.1 m (23 ft)
Propulsion
Speed30 knots (56 km/h; 35 mph)
Range9,500 nautical miles (17,600 km)
Complement225 (including air detachment)
Armament
Aircraft carried1 × CH-148 Cyclone

HMCS Halifax (FFH 330) is a Halifax-class frigate that has served in the Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Forces since 1992. Halifax is the lead ship in her class which is the name for the Canadian Patrol Frigate Project. She is the second vessel to carry the designation HMCS Halifax. She carries the hull classification symbol FFH 330.

She is assigned to Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT) and is homeported at CFB Halifax in her namesake city, Halifax, Nova Scotia, a name that was also borne by HMCS Halifax (K237), a Flower-class corvette during the Second World War as well as the first warship built in Halifax, HMS Halifax (1768).[2]

Discover more about HMCS Halifax (FFH 330) related topics

Halifax-class frigate

Halifax-class frigate

The Halifax-class frigate, also referred to as the City class, is a class of multi-role patrol frigates that have served the Royal Canadian Navy since 1992. The class is the outcome of the Canadian Patrol Frigate Project, which dates to the mid-1970s. HMCS Halifax was the first of an eventual twelve Canadian-designed and Canadian-built vessels which combine traditional anti-submarine capabilities with systems to deal with surface and air threats as well. All ships of the class are named after a major city in each province plus the cities of Ottawa and Montreal.

Frigate

Frigate

A frigate is a type of warship. In different eras, the roles and capabilities of ships classified as frigates have varied somewhat.

Lead ship

Lead ship

The lead ship, name ship, or class leader is the first of a series or class of ships all constructed according to the same general design. The term is applicable to naval ships and large civilian vessels.

Canadian Patrol Frigate Project

Canadian Patrol Frigate Project

The Canadian Patrol Frigate Project (CPFP) was a procurement project undertaken by the Department of National Defence of Canada beginning in 1975 to find a replacement for the 20 combined ships of the Annapolis, Mackenzie, Restigouche, and St. Laurent classes of destroyer escorts. The CPFP was considered a core effort in the fleet modernization of Canada in the 1980s. Facing several contract hurdles, the construction program got underway in 1987. The CPFP became known as the Halifax-class frigate upon the construction of the ships. The Halifax class replaced the destroyer escort classes in the 1990s and remains a core element of the fleet.

HMCS Halifax

HMCS Halifax

Several Canadian naval units have been named HMCS Halifax.HMCS Halifax (K237) (I) was a Flower-class corvette that served in the Second World War. HMCS Halifax (FFH 330) (II) is the lead ship for the Halifax-class frigates.

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

The Royal Canadian Navy uses hull classification symbols to identify the types of its ships, which are similar to the United States Navy's hull classification symbol system. The Royal Navy and some European and Commonwealth navies use a somewhat analogous system of pennant numbers.

CFB Halifax

CFB Halifax

Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Halifax is Canada's east coast naval base and home port to the Royal Canadian Navy Atlantic fleet, known as Canadian Fleet Atlantic (CANFLTLANT), that forms part of the formation Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT).

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax is the capital and largest municipality of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, and the largest municipality in Atlantic Canada. Halifax is one of Canada's fastest growing municipalities, and as of 2022, it is estimated that the CMA population of Halifax was 480,582,with 348,634 people in its urban area. The regional municipality consists of four former municipalities that were amalgamated in 1996: Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford, and Halifax County.

HMCS Halifax (K237)

HMCS Halifax (K237)

HMCS Halifax was a Royal Canadian Navy revised Flower-class corvette which took part in convoy escort duties during the Second World War. She served primarily in the Battle of the Atlantic. She was named for Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Flower-class corvette

Flower-class corvette

The Flower-class corvette was a British class of 294 corvettes used during World War II by the Allied navies particularly as anti-submarine convoy escorts in the Battle of the Atlantic. Royal Navy ships of this class were named after flowers.

Corvette

Corvette

A corvette is a small warship. It is traditionally the smallest class of vessel considered to be a proper warship. The warship class above the corvette is that of the frigate, while the class below was historically that of the sloop-of-war.

HMS Halifax (1768)

HMS Halifax (1768)

HMS Halifax was a schooner built for merchant service at Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1765 that the British Royal Navy purchased in 1768 for coastal patrol in North America in the years just prior to the American Revolution. She is one of the best documented schooners from early North America.

Description and design

The Halifax-class frigate design of which Halifax belongs, was ordered by the Canadian Forces in 1977 as a replacement for the aging St. Laurent, Restigouche, Mackenzie, and Annapolis classes of destroyer escorts , which were all tasked with anti-submarine warfare.[3] In July 1983, the federal government approved the budget for the design and construction of the first batch of six new frigates of which Halifax was a part, out of twelve that were eventually built.[4] To reflect the changing long-term strategy of the Navy during the 1980s and 1990s, the Halifax-class frigates was designed as a general purpose warship with particular focus on anti-submarine capabilities.[3]

As built, the Halifax-class vessels displaced 4,750 long tons (4,830 t) and were 134.65 metres (441 ft 9 in) long overall and 124.49 metres (408 ft 5 in) between perpendiculars with a beam of 16.36 metres (53 ft 8 in) and a draught of 4.98 metres (16 ft 4 in).[4][5] That made them slightly larger than the Iroquois-class destroyers.[4] The vessels are propelled by two shafts with Escher Wyss controllable pitch propellers driven by a CODOG system of two General Electric LM2500 gas turbines, generating 47,500 shaft horsepower (35,400 kW) and one SEMT Pielstick 20 PA6 V 280 diesel engine, generating 8,800 shaft horsepower (6,600 kW).[5]

This gives the frigates a maximum speed of 29 knots (54 km/h; 33 mph) and a range of 7,000 nautical miles (13,000 km; 8,100 mi) at 15 knots (28 km/h; 17 mph) while using their diesel engines.[4][5] Using their gas turbines, the ships have a range of 3,930 nautical miles (7,280 km; 4,520 mi) at 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph). The Halifax class have a complement of 198 naval personnel of which 17 are officers and 17 aircrew of which 8 are officers.[5]

Armament and aircraft

As built the Halifax-class vessels deployed the CH-124 Sea King helicopter, which acted in concert with shipboard sensors to seek out and destroy submarines at long distances from the ships. The ships have a helicopter deck fitted with a "bear trap" system allowing the launch and recovery of helicopters in up to sea state 6. The Halifax class also carries a close-in anti-submarine weapon in the form of the Mark 46 torpedo, launched from twin Mark 32 Mod 9 torpedo tubes in launcher compartments either side of the forward end of the helicopter hangar.[5]

As built, the anti-shipping role is supported by the RGM-84 Harpoon Block 1C surface-to-surface missile, mounted in two quadruple launch tubes at the main deck level between the funnel and the helicopter hangar.[4][5] For anti-aircraft self-defence the ships are armed with the Sea Sparrow vertical launch surface-to-air missile in two Mk 48 Mod 0 eight-cell launchers placed to port and starboard of the funnel. The vessels carry 16 missiles.[5] A Raytheon/General Dynamics Phalanx Mark 15 Mod 21 Close-In Weapon System (CIWS) is mounted on top of the helicopter hangar for "last-ditch" defence against targets that evade the Sea Sparrow.[5]

As built, the main gun on the forecastle is a 57 mm (2.2 in)/70 calibre Mark 2 gun from Bofors.[a] The gun is capable of firing 2.4-kilogram (5.3 lb) shells at a rate of 220 rounds per minute at a range of more than 17 kilometres (11 mi).[5]

Countermeasures and sensors

As built, the decoy system comprises two BAE Systems Shield Mark 2 decoy launchers which fire chaff to 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) and infrared rockets to 169 metres (185 yd) in distraction, confusion and centroid seduction modes. The torpedo decoy is the AN/SLQ-25A Nixie towed acoustic decoy from Argon ST. The ship's radar warning receiver, the CANEWS (Canadian Electronic Warfare System), SLQ-501, and the radar jammer, SLQ-505, were developed by Thorn and Lockheed Martin Canada.[5]

Two Thales Nederland (formerly Signaal) SPG-503 (STIR 1.8) fire control radars are installed one on the roof of the bridge and one on the raised radar platform immediately forward of the helicopter hangar. The ship is also fitted with Raytheon AN/SPS-49(V)5 long-range active air search radar operating at C and D bands, Ericsson HC150 Sea Giraffe medium-range air and surface search radar operating at G and H bands, and Kelvin Hughes Type 1007 I-band navigation radar. The sonar suite includes the CANTASS Canadian Towed Array and GD-C AN/SQS-510 hull mounted sonar and incorporates an acoustic range prediction system. The sonobuoy processing system is the GD-C AN/UYS-503.[5]

Modernization

The Halifax class underwent a modernization program, known as the Halifax Class Modernization (HCM) program, in order to update the frigates' capabilities in combatting modern smaller, faster and more mobile threats. This involved upgrading the command and control, radar, communications, electronic warfare and armament systems. Further improvements, such as modifying the vessel to accommodate the new Sikorsky CH-148 Cyclone helicopter and satellite links will be done separately from the main Frigate Equipment Life Extension (FELEX) program.[6]

The FELEX program comprised upgrading the combat systems integration to CMS330. The SPS-49 2D long range air search radar was replaced by the Thales Nederland SMART-S Mk 2 E/F-band 3D surveillance radar, and the two STIR 1.8 fire control radars were replaced by a pair of Saab Ceros 200 re-control radars. A Telephonics IFF Mode 5/S interrogator was installed and the Elisra NS9003A-V2HC ESM system replaced the SLQ-501 CANEWS. An IBM multi-link (Link 11, Link 16 and Link 22 enabled) datalink processing system was installed along with two Raytheon Anschütz Pathfinder Mk II navigation radars. Furthermore, Rheinmetall's Multi-Ammunition Soft kill System (MASS), known as MASS DUERAS was introduced to replace the Plessey Shield decoy system. The existing 57 mm Mk 2 guns were upgraded to the Mk 3 standard and the Harpoon missiles were improved to Block II levels, the Phalanx was upgraded to Block 1B and the obsolete Sea Sparrow system was replaced by the Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile.[7]

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Mackenzie-class destroyer

Mackenzie-class destroyer

The Mackenzie-class destroyer was a class of warship used by the Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Forces from the 1960s–1990s. Six such ships were envisioned, of which four were completed to this specification. The last two hulls were completed to the post DDH conversion St. Laurent-class design ; they were designated as the Annapolis class instead. The four Mackenzie-class destroyers spent most of their service in the Pacific Ocean, used primarily in a training role. Their only significant update was the DELEX program, which was completed between 1982 and 1985 and updated their navigational radar and their sonar.

Annapolis-class destroyer

Annapolis-class destroyer

The Annapolis-class destroyer escort was a two-ship class of destroyer escorts that saw service with the Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Forces from the 1960s to the 1990s. The final version of the St. Laurent-class design, the class was used extensively for anti-submarine warfare purposes. Both ships were sunk as artificial reefs after being retired, one on each coast of Canada.

Destroyer escort

Destroyer escort

Destroyer escort (DE) was the United States Navy mid-20th-century classification for a 20-knot warship designed with the endurance necessary to escort mid-ocean convoys of merchant marine ships.

Anti-submarine warfare

Anti-submarine warfare

Anti-submarine warfare is a branch of underwater warfare that uses surface warships, aircraft, submarines, or other platforms, to find, track, and deter, damage, or destroy enemy submarines. Such operations are typically carried out to protect friendly shipping and coastal facilities from submarine attacks and to overcome blockades.

Displacement (ship)

Displacement (ship)

The displacement or displacement tonnage of a ship is its weight. As the term indicates, it is measured indirectly, using Archimedes' principle, by first calculating the volume of water displaced by the ship, then converting that value into weight. Traditionally, various measurement rules have been in use, giving various measures in long tons. Today, tonnes are more commonly used.

Length overall

Length overall

Length overall is the maximum length of a vessel's hull measured parallel to the waterline. This length is important while docking the ship. It is the most commonly used way of expressing the size of a ship, and is also used for calculating the cost of a marina berth.

Length between perpendiculars

Length between perpendiculars

Length between perpendiculars is the length of a ship along the summer load line from the forward surface of the stem, or main bow perpendicular member, to the after surface of the sternpost, or main stern perpendicular member. When there is no sternpost, the centerline axis of the rudder stock is used as the aft end of the length between perpendiculars.

Beam (nautical)

Beam (nautical)

The beam of a ship is its width at its widest point. The maximum beam (BMAX) is the distance between planes passing through the outer extremities of the ship, beam of the hull (BH) only includes permanently fixed parts of the hull, and beam at waterline (BWL) is the maximum width where the hull intersects the surface of the water.

Draft (hull)

Draft (hull)

The draft or draught of a ship's hull is the vertical distance between the waterline and the bottom of the hull (keel). The draught of the vessel is the maximum depth of any part of the vessel, including appendages such as rudders, propellers and drop keels if deployed. Draft determines the minimum depth of water a ship or boat can safely navigate. The related term air draft is the maximum height of any part of the vessel above the water.

General Electric LM2500

General Electric LM2500

The General Electric LM2500 is an industrial and marine gas turbine produced by GE Aviation. The LM2500 is a derivative of the General Electric CF6 aircraft engine.

Diesel engine

Diesel engine

The diesel engine, named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to mechanical compression; thus, the diesel engine is called a compression-ignition engine. This contrasts with engines using spark plug-ignition of the air-fuel mixture, such as a petrol engine or a gas engine.

Knot (unit)

Knot (unit)

The knot is a unit of speed equal to one nautical mile per hour, exactly 1.852 km/h. The ISO standard symbol for the knot is kn. The same symbol is preferred by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), while kt is also common, especially in aviation, where it is the form recommended by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The knot is a non-SI unit. The knot is used in meteorology, and in maritime and air navigation. A vessel travelling at 1 knot along a meridian travels approximately one minute of geographic latitude in one hour.

Service

The frigate's keel was laid down on 19 March 1987 by Saint John Shipbuilding Ltd. at Saint John, New Brunswick. The first warship constructed in Canada since 1971, the vessel was launched on 30 April 1988.[8] The ship was provisionally accepted by the Canadian Forces in June 1991. This was followed by a year of sea trials, which after a series of issues that arose during the trials led to modifications in later vessels of the design.[9] The ship was commissioned into the Canadian Forces on 29 June 1992.[8]

On 2 April 1994, Halifax sailed to relieve the destroyer Iroquois as Canada's contribution to the naval blockade of Yugoslavia in the Adriatic Sea.[8][10] While in transit to Adriatic, one of the ship's diesel engines broke down and the frigate was forced to continue on gas turbines only. Halifax's tour ended when the ship returned to CFB Halifax on 9 September.[8] In early 1995, the frigate sailed to Europe and made several port visits in connection with the 50th anniversary of the end of the Second World War in Europe. Halifax then took part in the NATO naval exercise "Linked Seas" off Portugal, returning to Halifax in June.[8]

On 18 March 1996, Halifax departed for the Adriatic for a second tour with the embargo force, operating as flagship of the group for part of the ship's deployment. In 1998, the frigate took part in the NATO naval exercise "Strong Resolve" off Norway and assisted in the recovery operation following the crash of Swissair Flight 111. In 2000, Halifax deployed with NATO's STANAVFORLANT fleet between 26 July and 15 December.[8]

Halifax departed Halifax on 15 August 2001 to join STANAVFORLANT. However, on 8 October 2001 the ship was diverted for combat operations in the Indian Ocean following the September 11 attacks on the United States.[8][11] The frigate was the first Canadian ship on station and was deployed in the north Arabian Sea, integrated into the USS Carl Vinson carrier battle group.[11] Halifax was replaced by sister ship Toronto in December.[12] The ship returned to Halifax on 11 February 2002.[8]

On 13 January 2010, as part of Operation Hestia, it was announced that Halifax would be deployed to the waters around Haiti to assist in relief efforts after the January 2010 earthquake, along with the destroyer Athabaskan. Specifically Halifax was to be deployed outside the area of Jacmel, which was slow to receive aid due to the fact the roads were cut off and the airport was too small to handle large aircraft.[13] The frigate arrived off Jacmel on 18 January.[14] Halifax provided air traffic control for Jacmel Airport on the ship.[15] The ship departed Haiti's waters on 19 February.[16] On 4 September 2010, Halifax was turned over to Irving Shipbuilding's Halifax Shipyards, to start an 18-month mid-life upgrading and modernization.

Halifax participated in the acceptance trials of the new CH-148 Cyclone helicopters acquired for the Royal Canadian Navy.[17] In September 2015, Halifax, along with Athabaskan, were deployed for two large NATO training missions, "Joint Warrior" and "Trident Juncture".[18] Halifax underwent a year-long refit at Halifax Shipyard beginning in 2016. The vessel returned to service on 27 September 2017.[19] In October 2018, Halifax was among the Canadian ships sent to participate in the large NATO exercise Trident Juncture in the North Atlantic and Baltic Seas.[20] On 26 October 2018, a minor fire began in the starboard gas turbine in the forward engine room of Halifax. The fire was extinguished quickly and the frigate continued on her deployment.[21][22]

On 6 July 2019, Halifax sailed for the Mediterranean Sea to join Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2) as part of Operation Reassurance. Once the frigate joins SNMG2, Halifax will become flagship of the unit.[23] However, within 24 hours of the frigate's departure, Halifax returned to port after an oil leak was discovered in one of the engine rooms. The vessel's departure for the Mediterranean was delayed.[24] The oil leak was repaired and Halifax sailed for the Mediterranean, where the frigate spent six months. The vessel returned to Canada on 24 January 2020.[25]

Halifax departed Canada on 1 January 2021 to join the Standing NATO Maritime Group 1 (SNMG1) for six months.[26] Upon the vessel's arrival on 18 January in Lisbon, Portugal, command was transferred to Halifax as the flagship of the unit.[27] Upon the ship's return to Canada on 19 July, the crew was ordered to isolate aboard the ship in Halifax, after a crew member tested positive for COVID-19.[28] A second sailor tested positive for COVID-19 on 20 July,[29] and later a third.[30]

On 22 February 2022 the federal government announced that Halifax would depart again to accompany HMCS Montreal for Operation Reassurance to provide additional military support, regional security and humanitarian assistance to Central and Eastern Europe in the wake of Russian aggression in Ukraine. Halifax departed Canada with a crew of 253 on 19 March 2022 to join the Standing NATO Maritime Group 1 in the Baltic Sea.[31]

Discover more about Service related topics

Keel

Keel

The keel is the bottom-most longitudinal structural element on a vessel. On some sailboats, it may have a hydrodynamic and counterbalancing purpose, as well. As the laying down of the keel is the initial step in the construction of a ship, in British and American shipbuilding traditions the construction is dated from this event.

Keel laying

Keel laying

Laying the keel or laying down is the formal recognition of the start of a ship's construction. It is often marked with a ceremony attended by dignitaries from the shipbuilding company and the ultimate owners of the ship.

Saint John Shipbuilding

Saint John Shipbuilding

Saint John Shipbuilding was a Canadian shipbuilding company located in Saint John, New Brunswick. The shipyard was active from 1923 to 2003.

Saint John, New Brunswick

Saint John, New Brunswick

Saint John is a seaport city of the Atlantic Ocean located on the Bay of Fundy in the province of New Brunswick, Canada. Saint John is the oldest incorporated city in Canada, established by royal charter on May 18, 1785, during the reign of King George III. The port is Canada's third-largest port by tonnage with a cargo base that includes dry and liquid bulk, break bulk, containers, and cruise. The city was the most populous in New Brunswick until the 2016 census, when it was overtaken by Moncton. It is currently the second-largest city in the province, with a population of 69,895 over an area of 315.59 km2 (121.85 sq mi).

Destroyer

Destroyer

In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast, manoeuvrable, long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy, or battle group and defend them against powerful short-range attackers. They were originally developed in 1885 by Fernando Villaamil for the Spanish Navy as a defense against torpedo boats, and by the time of the Russo-Japanese War in 1904, these "torpedo boat destroyers" (TBDs) were "large, swift, and powerfully armed torpedo boats designed to destroy other torpedo boats". Although the term "destroyer" had been used interchangeably with "TBD" and "torpedo boat destroyer" by navies since 1892, the term "torpedo boat destroyer" had been generally shortened to simply "destroyer" by nearly all navies by the First World War.

HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280)

HMCS Iroquois (DDG 280)

HMCS Iroquois was the lead ship of the Iroquois-class destroyers of the Royal Canadian Navy, also known as the Tribal class or the 280 class. The second vessel to carry the name, she carried the hull number DDG 280. Entering service in 1972 she was assigned to Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT) and was homeported at CFB Halifax. Iroquois was deployed overseas for blockade and anti-terrorism duties, including participating in Operation Apollo in 2002–03. Taken out of service in 2014 and paid off in 2015.

NATO

NATO

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, also called the North Atlantic Alliance, is an intergovernmental military alliance between 30 member states – 28 European and two North American. Established in the aftermath of World War II, the organization implemented the North Atlantic Treaty, signed in Washington, D.C., on 4 April 1949. NATO is a collective security system: its independent member states agree to defend each other against attacks by third parties. During the Cold War, NATO operated as a check on the perceived threat posed by the Soviet Union. The alliance remained in place after the dissolution of the Soviet Union and has been involved in military operations in the Balkans, the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa. The organization's motto is animus in consulendo liber.

Flagship

Flagship

A flagship is a vessel used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships, characteristically a flag officer entitled by custom to fly a distinguishing flag. Used more loosely, it is the lead ship in a fleet of vessels, typically the first, largest, fastest, most heavily armed, or best known.

September 11 attacks

September 11 attacks

The September 11 attacks, commonly known as 9/11, were four coordinated suicide terrorist attacks carried out by the militant Islamist extremist network al-Qaeda against the United States on September 11, 2001. That morning, nineteen terrorists hijacked four commercial airliners scheduled to travel from the New England and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States to California. The hijackers crashed the first two planes into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, and the third plane into the Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia. The fourth plane was intended to hit a federal government building in Washington, D.C., but crashed in a field following a passenger revolt. The attacks killed nearly 3,000 people and instigated the global war on terror.

Carrier battle group

Carrier battle group

A carrier battle group (CVBG) is a naval fleet consisting of an aircraft carrier capital ship and its large number of escorts, together defining the group. The CV in CVBG is the United States Navy hull classification code for an aircraft carrier.

HMCS Toronto (FFH 333)

HMCS Toronto (FFH 333)

HMCS Toronto is a Halifax-class frigate that has served in the Canadian Forces since 1993. Toronto is the fourth ship in her class which is the name for the Canadian Patrol Frigate Project. She is the second RCN ship to be named for Canada's largest city. When not on operations she is assigned to Maritime Forces Atlantic (MARLANT) and is based at CFB Halifax. Toronto serves on MARLANT missions protecting Canada's sovereignty in the Atlantic Ocean and enforcing Canadian laws in its territorial sea and exclusive economic zone.

Operation Hestia

Operation Hestia

Operation Hestia is the name of the Canadian Forces humanitarian response to the 2010 Haiti earthquake which struck Haiti on 12 January 2010. Operation Hestia is the military component of an interagency response that also involves Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) and the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). The headquarters for Operation Hestia were established in the city of Jacmel.

Source: "HMCS Halifax (FFH 330)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_Halifax_(FFH_330).

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References

Notes

  1. ^ The 70 calibre denotes the length of the gun. This means that the length of the gun barrel is 70 times the bore diameter.

Citations

  1. ^ "South-West Asia Theatre Honours". Prime Minister of Canada. 9 May 2014. Archived from the original on 12 May 2014. Retrieved 9 September 2015.
  2. ^ Kenchington, Trevor (April 1993), "The Navy's First Halifax", Argonauta, Canadian Nautical Research Society, vol. X, no. 2, pp. 8–11
  3. ^ a b Milner, p. 284
  4. ^ a b c d e Macpherson and Barrie, p. 291
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Saunders, p. 90
  6. ^ "Halifax-class Modernization / Frigate Life Extension". National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. Archived from the original on 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  7. ^ Scott, Richard (26 May 2016). "Halifax class upgrade on finals [CANSEC2016D2]". janes.com. Archived from the original on 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Macpherson and Barrie, p. 293
  9. ^ Milner, p. 301
  10. ^ Tracy, pp. 225–226
  11. ^ a b Tracy, p. 265
  12. ^ Tracy, p. 266
  13. ^ "Canadian Forces head to port town of Jacmel". CBC News. 18 January 2010. Archived from the original on 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  14. ^ "Jacmel entre les mains de l'EICC". Radio-Canada (in French). Presse canadienne. 19 January 2010. Archived from the original on 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  15. ^ Romandie (20 January 2010). "Haïti : le Canada va rouvrir l'aéroport de Jacmel" (in French). Agence France-Presse. Archived from the original on 18 July 2011. Retrieved 21 January 2010.
  16. ^ "Canadian death toll in Haiti set to jump". The Globe and Mail. The Canadian Press. 22 February 2010. Archived from the original on 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  17. ^ Pugliese, David (12 July 2015). "Cyclone helicopter sea trials – 322 landings and takeoffs from HMCS Halifax". Ottawa Citizen. Archived from the original on 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  18. ^ "HMCS Halifax, Athabaskan depart for NATO exercises". CBC News. 8 September 2015. Archived from the original on 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  19. ^ "Halifax (the ship) is back after $30 million overhaul". The Chronicle Herald. 27 September 2017. Archived from the original on 17 February 2018. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  20. ^ Pugliese, David (25 October 2018). "Approximately 2,000 Canadian military personnel in Europe for major NATO exercise". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  21. ^ Prentiss, Mairin (27 October 2018). "Navy says engine fire onboard HMCS Halifax 'minor'". CBC News. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  22. ^ Pugliese, David (30 October 2018). "HMCS Toronto headed to Belfast for repairs after electrical problems cause loss of power". Ottawa Citizen. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  23. ^ Draus, Alison (6 July 2019). "HMCS Halifax departs for 6-month overseas deployment in the Mediterranean". Global News. Retrieved 14 July 2019.
  24. ^ Benjamin, Graeme (10 July 2019). "Oil leak results in return of HMCS Halifax to dockyard". Global News. Retrieved 14 July 2019.
  25. ^ Moore, Matthew (24 January 2020). "HMCS Halifax returns home following 6-month deployment overseas (7 photos)". halifaxtoday.com. Retrieved 20 February 2020.
  26. ^ Renic, Karla; Draus, Alicia (1 January 2021). "Families send off HMCS Halifax crew as ship embarks on 6-month NATO mission". Global News. Retrieved 26 April 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  27. ^ Melanson, Ryan (15 January 2021). "HMCS Halifax departs for six-month Operation Reassurance deployment". Royal Canadian Navy. Retrieved 26 April 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  28. ^ "HMCS Halifax crew member tests positive for COVID-19, in isolation aboard docked ship". Toronto Star. The Canadian Press. 19 July 2021. Retrieved 4 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  29. ^ "2nd positive COVID-19 case confirmed on board HMCS Halifax". CBC News. 20 July 2021. Retrieved 4 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  30. ^ Walton, Victoria (28 July 2021). "The disease slows down, and so does doctor Strang". The Coast (Halifax). Retrieved 4 August 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  31. ^ Veitch, Joanie (5 April 2022). "HMCS Halifax departs to join Operation Reassurance". Government of Canada. Retrieved 12 April 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

Sources

  • Macpherson, Ken; Barrie, Ron (2002). The Ships of Canada's Naval Forces 1910–2002 (Third ed.). St. Catharines, Ontario: Vanwell Publishing. ISBN 1-55125-072-1.
  • Milner, Marc (2010). Canada's Navy: The First Century (Second ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press. ISBN 978-0-8020-9604-3.
  • Saunders, Stephen, ed. (2004). Jane's Fighting Ships 2004–05. Alexandria, Virginia: Jane's Information Group Inc. ISBN 0-7106-2623-1.
  • Tracy, Nicholas (2012). A Two-Edged Sword: The Navy as an Instrument of Canadian Foreign Policy. Montreal, Quebec and Kingston, Ontario: McGill-Queens University Press. ISBN 978-0-7735-4051-4.
External links

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