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HMCS Cedarwood

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History
Name
  • J.E. Kinney (1943–44)
  • General Schmidlin (1944–46)
Owner
  • J.E.Kinney Co Ltd (1943–44)
  • Canadian Army (1944–46)
Port of registryHalifax Canada (1943–46)
BuilderSmith and Rhuland
Launched1941
Out of service1948
Fateacquired by Royal Canadian Navy 1948
Canada
NameCedarwood
Acquired1946
Commissioned22 September 1948
Decommissioned9 July 1958
IdentificationAGSC 539
Fatesold for mercantile use 1959
BadgeOr, parted in base wavy azure, a cedar tree eradicated, trunk and branches vert, roots of the first in base[1]
History
NameCedarwood
Owner
  • Coast Cargo Services Ltd (1959–65)
  • McCartney Enterprises Ltd & Berven Enterprises Ltd (1965–66)
  • Offshore Seismic Services Ltd (1966–69)
Port of registry
In service1959
Out of service1969
FateBroken up, 1969
General characteristics
TypeSurvey ship
Displacement566 long tons (575 t)
Length166.0 ft (50.6 m)
Beam30.5 ft (9.3 m)
Draught10.0 ft (3.0 m)
Propulsion1 × Fairbanks Morse diesel engine
Speed11 knots (20 km/h; 13 mph)
Complement23

HMCS Cedarwood was a surveying vessel in the Royal Canadian Navy. She was a wooden sailing ship that was built as MV J.E. Kinney by Smith and Rhuland at Lunenburg, Nova Scotia and used in the harbours of the east coast of Canada by the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps as General Schmidlin during the Second World War. Following the war the vessel was purchased by the Royal Canadian Navy. The ship was sold again for mercantile service in 1959 and remained in service until 1969.

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Description

Cedarwood was 166 feet (51 m) long with a beam of 30 feet 6 inches (9.30 m) and a draught of 10 feet (3.0 m). Cedarwood had a displacement of 566 tons.[2] The vessel was powered by one Fairbanks Morse diesel engine making the ship capable of 11 knots (20 km/h; 13 mph) and had a complement of 23.[3][4]

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Length overall

Length overall

Length overall is the maximum length of a vessel's hull measured parallel to the waterline. This length is important while docking the ship. It is the most commonly used way of expressing the size of a ship, and is also used for calculating the cost of a marina berth.

Beam (nautical)

Beam (nautical)

The beam of a ship is its width at its widest point. The maximum beam (BMAX) is the distance between planes passing through the outer extremities of the ship, beam of the hull (BH) only includes permanently fixed parts of the hull, and beam at waterline (BWL) is the maximum width where the hull intersects the surface of the water.

Draft (hull)

Draft (hull)

The draft or draught of a ship's hull is the vertical distance between the waterline and the bottom of the hull (keel). The draught of the vessel is the maximum depth of any part of the vessel, including appendages such as rudders, propellers and drop keels if deployed. Draft determines the minimum depth of water a ship or boat can safely navigate. The related term air draft is the maximum height of any part of the vessel above the water.

Displacement (ship)

Displacement (ship)

The displacement or displacement tonnage of a ship is its weight. As the term indicates, it is measured indirectly, using Archimedes' principle, by first calculating the volume of water displaced by the ship, then converting that value into weight. Traditionally, various measurement rules have been in use, giving various measures in long tons. Today, tonnes are more commonly used.

Diesel engine

Diesel engine

The diesel engine, named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to mechanical compression; thus, the diesel engine is called a compression-ignition engine. This contrasts with engines using spark plug-ignition of the air-fuel mixture, such as a petrol engine or a gas engine.

Knot (unit)

Knot (unit)

The knot is a unit of speed equal to one nautical mile per hour, exactly 1.852 km/h. The ISO standard symbol for the knot is kn. The same symbol is preferred by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), while kt is also common, especially in aviation, where it is the form recommended by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The knot is a non-SI unit. The knot is used in meteorology, and in maritime and air navigation. A vessel travelling at 1 knot along a meridian travels approximately one minute of geographic latitude in one hour.

Ship's company

Ship's company

A ship's company comprises all officers, non-commissioned officers and enlisted personnel aboard a naval vessel. The size of the ship's company is the number of people on board, excluding civilians and guests.

Service history

MV J.E. Kinney and RCASC General Schmidlin

Launched at Lunenburg in 1941 by Smith and Rhuland as MV J.E. Kinney, she was taken over by the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps in 1944 during the Second World War and renamed General Schmidlin.[2][3] She was used to resupply Canadian Army detachments scattered throughout the Maritimes.[2] During the war, General Schmidlin was used to tow targets for shore batteries. In April 1944 the vessel was spotted by a U-boat off Halifax, Nova Scotia and chased. General Schmidlin escaped the German submarine by fleeing to Halifax. Upon arrival it was found that every bearing in her engine had been burned out. Following the war, the Canadian Army placed the ship in reserve.[4]

Royal Canadian Navy and mercantile service

General Schmidlin transferred to the west coast in 1946 and was used as an ammunition dumping tender by the Army.[4] General Schmidlin's purchase by the Royal Canadian Navy was requested by the Pacific Oceanographic Group who wished to use her as an oceanographic survey vessel to replace HMCS Ekholi, which was considered too small for their needs. The ship was acquired in 1946.[5][3] The purchase was approved and she was renamed Cedarwood and commissioned on 22 September 1948.[5]

Cedarwood was based in Esquimalt. During her service with the Royal Canadian Navy she was used to travel into the Arctic Ocean and test equipment. She also did bathythermographic surveys along with general biology, oceanography and acoustic surveys. During her time in the Bering Sea, she laid submarine cables and carried scientists of both Canada and the United States on survey missions, mapping a large amount of the British Columbia coastline. On 22 September 1950, Cedarwood was heavily damaged by a storm while in the Hecate Strait. The repairs took a month to fix. She continued in her service until she was paid off on 9 July 1958.[5]

After her naval service she was converted as a replica of the paddle steamer Beaver and then had other dummy fittings added to play the role of the steamer Commodore during the British Columbia centennial celebrations. She was sold in 1959 to Coast Cargo Services Ltd of Vancouver, keeping her name.[2][3] Cedarwood was sold again in 1965 McCartney Enterprises Ltd & Berven Enterprises Ltd of Vancouver before being acquired by Offshore Seismic Services Ltd and having her port of registry changed to Nassau, Bahamas in 1966. Cedarwood was broken up in 1969.[3]

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Canadian Army

Canadian Army

The Canadian Army is the command responsible for the operational readiness of the conventional ground forces of the Canadian Armed Forces. It maintains regular forces units at bases across Canada, and is also responsible for the Army Reserve, the largest component of the Primary Reserve. The Army is headed by the concurrently held Commander of the Canadian Army and Chief of the Army Staff, who is subordinate to the Chief of the Defence Staff. The Army is also supported by 3,000 civilian employees from the civil service.

The Maritimes

The Maritimes

The Maritimes, also called the Maritime provinces, is a region of Eastern Canada consisting of three provinces: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island. The Maritimes had a population of 1,899,324 in 2021, which makes up 5.1% of Canada's population. Together with Canada's easternmost province, Newfoundland and Labrador, the Maritime provinces make up the region of Atlantic Canada.

Coastal artillery

Coastal artillery

Coastal artillery is the branch of the armed forces concerned with operating anti-ship artillery or fixed gun batteries in coastal fortifications.

U-boat

U-boat

U-boats were naval submarines operated by Germany, particularly in the First and Second World Wars. Although at times they were efficient fleet weapons against enemy naval warships, they were most effectively used in an economic-warfare role and enforcing a naval blockade against enemy shipping. The primary targets of the U-boat campaigns in both wars were the merchant convoys bringing supplies from Canada and other parts of the British Empire, and from the United States, to the United Kingdom and to the Soviet Union and the Allied territories in the Mediterranean. German submarines also destroyed Brazilian merchant ships during World War II, causing Brazil to declare war on both Germany and Italy on 22 August 1942.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax is the capital and largest municipality of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, and the largest municipality in Atlantic Canada. Halifax is one of Canada's fastest growing municipalities, and as of 2022, it is estimated that the CMA population of Halifax was 480,582,with 348,634 people in its urban area. The regional municipality consists of four former municipalities that were amalgamated in 1996: Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford, and Halifax County.

Ship commissioning

Ship commissioning

Ship commissioning is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning. The term is most commonly applied to placing a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are often rooted in centuries-old naval tradition.

Arctic Ocean

Arctic Ocean

The Arctic Ocean is the smallest and shallowest of the world's five major oceans. It spans an area of approximately 14,060,000 km2 (5,430,000 sq mi) and is known as the coldest of all the oceans. The International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) recognizes it as an ocean, although some oceanographers call it the Arctic Mediterranean Sea. It has been described approximately as an estuary of the Atlantic Ocean. It is also seen as the northernmost part of the all-encompassing World Ocean.

Bering Sea

Bering Sea

The Bering Sea is a marginal sea of the Northern Pacific Ocean. It forms, along with the Bering Strait, the divide between the two largest landmasses on Earth: Eurasia and The Americas. It comprises a deep water basin, which then rises through a narrow slope into the shallower water above the continental shelves. The Bering Sea is named for Vitus Bering, a Danish navigator in Russian service, who, in 1728, was the first European to systematically explore it, sailing from the Pacific Ocean northward to the Arctic Ocean.

British Columbia

British Columbia

British Columbia, commonly abbreviated as BC, is the westernmost province of Canada, situated between the Pacific Ocean and the Rocky Mountains. It has a diverse geography, with rugged landscapes that include rocky coastlines, sandy beaches, forests, lakes, mountains, inland deserts and grassy plains, and borders the province of Alberta to the east and the Yukon and Northwest Territories to the north. With an estimated population of 5.3 million as of 2022, it is Canada's third-most populous province. The capital of British Columbia is Victoria and its largest city is Vancouver. Vancouver is the third-largest metropolitan area in Canada; the 2021 census recorded 2.6 million people in Metro Vancouver.

Hecate Strait

Hecate Strait

Hecate Strait is a wide but shallow strait between Haida Gwaii and the mainland of British Columbia, Canada. It merges with Queen Charlotte Sound to the south and Dixon Entrance to the north. About 140 kilometres (87 mi) wide at its southern end, Hecate Strait narrows in the north to about 48 kilometres (30 mi). It is about 260 kilometres (160 mi) in length.

Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau is the capital and largest city of the Bahamas. With a population of 274,400 as of 2016, or just over 70% of the entire population of the Bahamas, Nassau is commonly defined as a primate city, dwarfing all other towns in the country. It is the centre of commerce, education, law, administration, and media of the country.

Ship breaking

Ship breaking

Ship-breaking is a type of ship disposal involving the breaking up of ships for either a source of parts, which can be sold for re-use, or for the extraction of raw materials, chiefly scrap. Modern ships have a lifespan of 25 to 30 years before corrosion, metal fatigue and a lack of parts render them uneconomical to operate. Ship-breaking allows the materials from the ship, especially steel, to be recycled and made into new products. This lowers the demand for mined iron ore and reduces energy use in the steelmaking process. Fixtures and other equipment on board the vessels can also be reused. While ship-breaking is sustainable, there are concerns about the use by poorer countries without stringent environmental legislation. It is also labour-intensive, and considered one of the world's most dangerous industries.

Source: "HMCS Cedarwood", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_Cedarwood.

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Citations
  1. ^ Arbuckle 1987, p. 23.
  2. ^ a b c d Macpherson & Barrie 2002, p. 286.
  3. ^ a b c d e Miramar Ship Index.
  4. ^ a b c The Crowsnest, p. 15.
  5. ^ a b c Campbell 2012, pp. 10–14.
References
  • Arbuckle, J. Graeme (1987). Badges of the Canadian Navy. Halifax, Nova Scotia: Nimbus Publishing. ISBN 0-920852-49-1.
  • Campbell, Isabel (Spring 2012). "Making a Difference in Arctic Naval Research: HMCS Cedarwood, 1948 to 1956" (PDF). Canadian Naval Review. Vol. 8, no. 1. Dalhousie University Press. ISSN 1715-0213. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2018.
  • Macpherson, Ken; Barrie, Ron (2002). The Ships of Canada's Naval Forces 1910–2002 (Third ed.). St. Catharines, Ontario: Vanwell Publishing. ISBN 1-55125-072-1.
  • "J.E.Kinney (5066815)". Miramar Ship Index. Retrieved 31 July 2016.
  • "Small Ship—Big Job". The Crowsnest. Vol. 1, no. 6. Ottawa, Ontario: King's Printer. April 1949. ISSN 0704-7185.
External links

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