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HMCS Cayuga

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HMCS Cayuga 80-G-642748.jpg
Cayuga in 1954
History
Canada
NameCayuga
NamesakeCayuga nation
OrderedApril 1942
BuilderHalifax Shipyards, Halifax
Laid down7 October 1943
Launched28 July 1945
Commissioned20 October 1947
Decommissioned27 February 1964
Identificationpennant number: R04 Later DDE 218
Motto
  • Onenh owa den dya
  • ("Now let us proceed")[1]
Honours and
awards
Korea 1950–52[1]
FateScrapped, Faslane
NotesLivery Colours: Gold and scarlet
BadgeBlazon Or, an Indian of the Cayuga tribe, facing dexter, in kneeling posture, right knee on the ground, left leg bent and forward, two feathers in hair, lower part of body clad, upper bare, a quiver of arrows pendant from the left shoulder, the base resting on ground beside the right knee, the Indian holding a bow and arrow in the "ready" position all gules.[1]
General characteristics
Class and typeTribal-class destroyer
Displacement
  • 1,850 tons (standard),
  • 2,520 tons (full)
Length377 ft (114.9 m)
Beam37.5 ft (11.4 m)
Draught9 ft (2.7 m)
Propulsion3 × Admiralty 3-drum boilers, steam turbines, 2 shafts, 44,000 shp
Speed36 knots (67 km/h)
Range
  • 5,700 nautical miles (10,600 km) at 15 knots (28 km/h)
  • 524 tons oil
Complement190 (219 as leader)
Armament

HMCS Cayuga was a Tribal-class destroyer that served in the Royal Canadian Navy from 1946 until 1964. She saw action in the Korean War. She was named for the Cayuga nation, a First Nations people of Canada.

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Tribal-class destroyer (1936)

Tribal-class destroyer (1936)

The Tribal class, or Afridi class, were a class of destroyers built for the Royal Navy, Royal Canadian Navy and Royal Australian Navy that saw service in World War II. Originally conceived during design studies for a light fleet cruiser, the Tribals evolved into fast, powerful destroyers, with greater emphasis on guns over torpedoes than previous destroyers, in response to new designs by Japan, Italy, and Germany. The Tribals were well admired by their crews and the public when they were in service due to their power, often becoming symbols of prestige while in service.

Destroyer

Destroyer

In naval terminology, a destroyer is a fast, manoeuvrable, long-endurance warship intended to escort larger vessels in a fleet, convoy, or battle group and defend them against powerful short-range attackers. They were originally developed in 1885 by Fernando Villaamil for the Spanish Navy as a defense against torpedo boats, and by the time of the Russo-Japanese War in 1904, these "torpedo boat destroyers" (TBDs) were "large, swift, and powerfully armed torpedo boats designed to destroy other torpedo boats". Although the term "destroyer" had been used interchangeably with "TBD" and "torpedo boat destroyer" by navies since 1892, the term "torpedo boat destroyer" had been generally shortened to simply "destroyer" by nearly all navies by the First World War.

Royal Canadian Navy

Royal Canadian Navy

The Royal Canadian Navy is the naval force of Canada. The RCN is one of three environmental commands within the Canadian Armed Forces. As of 2021, the RCN operates 12 frigates, four attack submarines, 12 coastal defence vessels, eight patrol class training vessels, two offshore patrol vessels, and several auxiliary vessels. The RCN consists of 8,570 Regular Force and 4,111 Primary Reserve sailors, supported by 3,800 civilians. Vice-Admiral Angus Topshee is the current commander of the Royal Canadian Navy and chief of the Naval Staff.

Korean War

Korean War

The Korean War was fought between North Korea and South Korea from 1950 to 1953. The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea following clashes along the border and rebellions in South Korea. North Korea was supported by China and the Soviet Union while South Korea was supported by the United States and allied countries. The fighting ended with an armistice on 27 July 1953.

Construction and career

Cayuga was ordered in April 1942 as part of the 1942 building programme.[2] She was laid down on 7 October 1943 by Halifax Shipyards at Halifax, Nova Scotia and launched 28 July 1945.[3] Cayuga was commissioned on 20 October 1947 at Halifax with the pennant number R04.[2][3]

On 4 February 1948, Cayuga transferred to the west coast for Esquimalt, British Columbia.[3] In October 1948, Cayuga joined the cruiser Ontario, destroyers Athabaskan, Crescent and the frigate Antigonish in sailing to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; the largest deployment of the Royal Canadian Navy following the war.[4] In March 1950, with Ontario and Sioux, the destroyer participated in a training cruise to Mexico, making several port visits.[5]

Korean War

Cayuga served a total of three tours of Korea, the last in 1954 after the conflict had ended. Cayuga was part of this initial first dispatch of three ships by Canada to Korea, departing Esquimalt on 5 July 1950.[3] In 1952, Cayuga was reconstructed as a destroyer escort[3] and given the new hull number 218. It was on this vessel that Ferdinand Demara, "the great impostor", served while impersonating a Canadian medical officer.

After the Korean War, Cayuga served as a training ship on the west coast. On 1 January 1955, Cayuga was assigned to the Second Canadian Escort Squadron. The initial commanding officer of the group was Commander Henry H. Davidson, captain of Cayuga.[6] In November 1955, the Second Canadian Escort Squadron was among the Canadian units that took part in one of the largest naval exercises since the Second World War off the coast of California.[7] In January 1959 she transferred back to Halifax. There the destroyer escort served as a training ship until being paid off on 27 February 1964. The destroyer was sold for scrap and broken up at Faslane, Scotland in 1965.[3]

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Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Halifax is the capital and largest municipality of the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, and the largest municipality in Atlantic Canada. Halifax is one of Canada's fastest growing municipalities, and as of 2022, it is estimated that the CMA population of Halifax was 480,582, with 348,634 people in its urban area. The regional municipality consists of four former municipalities that were amalgamated in 1996: Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford, and Halifax County.

CFB Esquimalt

CFB Esquimalt

Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt is Canada's Pacific Coast naval base and home port to Maritime Forces Pacific and Joint Task Force Pacific Headquarters. As of 2018, 4,411 military personnel and 2,762 civilians work at CFB Esquimalt.

Cruiser

Cruiser

A cruiser is a type of warship. Modern cruisers are generally the largest ships in a fleet after aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships, and can usually perform several roles.

HMCS Ontario (C53)

HMCS Ontario (C53)

HMCS Ontario was a Minotaur-class light cruiser built for the Royal Navy as HMS Minotaur (53), but transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy on completion and renamed Ontario.

HMCS Athabaskan (R79)

HMCS Athabaskan (R79)

HMCS Athabaskan was a Tribal-class destroyer that served with the Royal Canadian Navy in the immediate post-Second World War era. She was the second destroyer to bear the name "Athabaskan", after the many tribes throughout western Canada that speak Athabaskan family languages. Both this ship and the original HMCS Athabaskan were destroyers and thus this one became known as Athabaskan II.

Frigate

Frigate

A frigate is a type of warship. In different eras, the roles and capabilities of ships classified as frigates have varied somewhat.

Hawaii

Hawaii

Hawaii is a state in the Western United States, about 2,000 miles (3,200 km) from the U.S. mainland in the Pacific Ocean. It is the only U.S. state outside North America, the only state that is an archipelago, and the only state in the tropics.

HMCS Sioux (R64)

HMCS Sioux (R64)

HMCS Sioux was a V-class destroyer of the Royal Canadian Navy which fought in the Second World War and the Korean War. She was launched as HMS Vixen for the British Royal Navy before being transferred to the Royal Canadian Navy. She was then named for the Sioux people of Canada's western provinces.

Canada in the Korean War

Canada in the Korean War

The Canadian Forces were involved in the 1950–1953 Korean War and its aftermath. 26,000 Canadians participated on the side of the United Nations, and Canada sent eight destroyers. Canadian aircraft provided transport, supply and logistics. 516 Canadians died, 312 of which were from combat. After the war, Canadian troops remained for three years as military observers.

Destroyer escort

Destroyer escort

Destroyer escort (DE) was the United States Navy mid-20th-century classification for a 20-knot warship designed with the endurance necessary to escort mid-ocean convoys of merchant marine ships.

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

Hull classification symbol (Canada)

The Royal Canadian Navy uses hull classification symbols to identify the types of its ships, which are similar to the United States Navy's hull classification symbol system. The Royal Navy and some European and Commonwealth navies use a somewhat analogous system of pennant numbers.

Ferdinand Waldo Demara

Ferdinand Waldo Demara

Ferdinand Waldo Demara Jr. was an American impostor.

RCSCC Cayuga

In 1954 the 30th Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps, RCSCC Exeter, was renamed after HMCS Cayuga and renumbered 140, and continues to operate to this day, on CFB Wainwright, Alberta. RCSCC Cayuga is approximately 25 strong. The corps shares the same motto and badge as its namesake.

Badge

The Ship's badge is blazoned Or, an Indian of the Cayuga tribe, facing dexter, in kneeling posture, right knee on the ground, left leg bent and forward, two feathers in hair, lower part of body clad, upper bare, a quiver of arrows pendant from the left shoulder, the base resting on ground beside the right knee, the Indian holding a bow and arrow in the "ready" position all gules. When used to represent HMCS Cayuga, the name plate is in the livery colours, i.e. red with gold lettering, but when used to represent the RCSCC, it uses a gold nameplate with black lettering. The naval version has gold maple leaves at the base, but the cadet version has red leaves.

The badge of HMCS Cayuga. Note the nameplate and maple leaves.
The badge of HMCS Cayuga. Note the nameplate and maple leaves.
The badge of RCSCC Cayuga. Ships Badges as used by RCSCCs are called Corps Crests
The badge of RCSCC Cayuga. Ships Badges as used by RCSCCs are called Corps Crests

Source: "HMCS Cayuga", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMCS_Cayuga.

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Notes
  1. ^ a b c Arbuckle, p. 22
  2. ^ a b "HMCS Cayuga (R04)". uboat.net. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Macpherson and Barrie, p. 240
  4. ^ "Plenty of Seatime". The Crowsnest. Vol. 1, no. 1. King's Printer. November 1948. p. 2.
  5. ^ "Pacific Training Cruise". The Crowsnest. Vol. 2, no. 5. King's Printer. March 1950. p. 2.
  6. ^ "Two New Squadrons for Pacific Command". The Crowsnest. Vol. 7, no. 4. Queen's Printer. February 1955. pp. 2–3.
  7. ^ "Biggest West Coast Exercises Held". The Crowsnest. Vol. 8, no. 2. Ottawa: Queen's Printer. December 1955. pp. 2–3.
References
  • Arbuckle, J. Graeme (1987). Badges of the Canadian Navy. Halifax, Nova Scotia: Nimbus Publishing. ISBN 0-920852-49-1.
  • Brice, Martin H. (1971). The Tribals. London: Ian Allan. ISBN 0-7110-0245-2.
  • Robert Crichton, The Great Imposter, Random House, New York, 1959
  • Friedman, Norman (2006). British Destroyers and Frigates, the Second World War and After. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-86176-137-6.
  • English, John (2001). Afridi to Nizam: British Fleet Destroyers 1937–43. Gravesend, Kent: World Ship Society. ISBN 0-905617-95-0.
  • Macpherson, Ken; Barrie, Ron (2002). The Ships of Canada's Naval Forces 1910–2002 (Third ed.). St. Catharines, Ontario: Vanwell Publishing. ISBN 1-55125-072-1.
  • Rohwer, Jürgen (2005). Chronology of the War at Sea 1939–1945: The Naval History of World War Two (Third Revised ed.). Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-119-2.
  • Whitley, M. J. (1988). Destroyers of World War Two: An International Encyclopedia. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-326-1.
External links

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