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Guthrie, Texas

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Guthrie, Texas
The old King County Courthouse in Guthrie
The old King County Courthouse in Guthrie
Guthrie is located in Texas
Guthrie
Guthrie
Location in Texas and the United States
Guthrie is located in the United States
Guthrie
Guthrie
Guthrie (the United States)
Coordinates: 33°37′14″N 100°19′22″W / 33.62056°N 100.32278°W / 33.62056; -100.32278Coordinates: 33°37′14″N 100°19′22″W / 33.62056°N 100.32278°W / 33.62056; -100.32278
CountryUnited States
StateTexas
CountyKing
Area
 • Total1.78 sq mi (4.61 km2)
 • Land1.78 sq mi (4.61 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation
1,739 ft (530 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total160
 • Density90/sq mi (34.7/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
79236
Area code806
FIPS code48-31640
GNIS feature ID1358533

Guthrie is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in, and the county seat of, King County in the U.S. state of Texas. It is in the northern part of the state, 93 miles (150 km) east of Lubbock. It serves as the principal headquarters of the Four Sixes Ranch.[1] As of the 2010 census, its population was 160.[2]

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Census-designated place

Census-designated place

A census-designated place (CDP) is a concentration of population defined by the United States Census Bureau for statistical purposes only.

King County, Texas

King County, Texas

King County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2020 Census, its population was 265, making it the second-smallest county in Texas and the third-smallest county in the United States. King County has no incorporated communities. Its county seat is the census-designated place (CDP) of Guthrie. The county was created in 1876 and organized in 1891. It is named for William Philip King, who died at the Battle of the Alamo.

U.S. state

U.S. state

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory where it shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

Texas

Texas

Texas is a state in the South Central region of the United States. At 268,596 square miles (695,662 km2), and with more than 30 million residents in 2022, it is the second-largest U.S. state by both area and population. Texas shares borders with the states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the south and southwest; and has a coastline with the Gulf of Mexico to the southeast.

Lubbock, Texas

Lubbock, Texas

Lubbock is the 10th-most populous city in the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of government of Lubbock County. With a population of 260,993 in 2021, the city is also the 85th-most populous in the United States. The city is in the northwestern part of the state, a region known historically and geographically as the Llano Estacado, and ecologically is part of the southern end of the High Plains, lying at the economic center of the Lubbock metropolitan area, which had an estimated population of 325,245 in 2021.

6666 Ranch

6666 Ranch

The 6666 Ranch is a ranch in King County, Texas as well as Carson County and Hutchinson County.

History

Guthrie's recorded history begins in 1883, when the Louisville Land and Cattle Company in Louisville, Kentucky, purchased several hundred acres in what later became King County. Named after Louisville Land and Cattle stockholder W.H. Guthrie, the community's townsite was platted in 1891 by Andrew Chester Tackitt (son of Rev. Pleasant Tackitt, who had built Guthrie's first residence). When King County was organized that same year, Louisville Land and Cattle proposed the platting of a company townsite, to be named "Ashville", to serve as the county's seat. Tackitt strongly opposed this proposition and led a charge to bring the seat to Guthrie, instead. Tackitt's hotly contested campaign ultimately proved successful, and he not only succeeded in making Guthrie the county seat, but was also elected to serve as King County's first county judge. Late in 1891, the Guthrie post office opened to the public.

The next year, Tackitt and a man by the name of Charlie Bradford brought in lumber from the neighboring community of Seymour and constructed Guthrie's first school, a small, one-room building. A larger school followed in 1895, though the lone teacher continued to depend upon schools in Seymour and Benjamin for curriculum. Proprietor John Gibson began to keep a stock of school books at his Guthrie general store in 1897, decreasing the school's dependence upon other districts.

In 1904, Guthrie claimed 101 residents, and though hurt by the effects of the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl, remained stable through to the mid-20th century, with the 1950 Census also reporting 101 residents. In 1959, schools in nearby Dumont were consolidated with Guthrie's schools, and by 1963, its population had more than doubled to 210.

The mid- to late 1960s brought an end to Guthrie's growth; the population had fallen to 125 by 1970. It increased to 140 in 1980 and 160 in 1990, a figure it maintained through to the 2010 census. Being a company town, very few homes in Guthrie are privately owned; most residents live in housing provided by the 6666 (Four Sixes) or Pitchfork ranches, or the school district.[3]

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Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the 28th most-populous city in the United States. Louisville is the historical seat and, since 2003, the nominal seat of Jefferson County, on the Indiana border.

Pleasant Tackitt

Pleasant Tackitt

Pleasant Tackitt was a 19th-century politician, pioneer Methodist minister, stockman, teacher, farmer, Indian fighter, and Confederate officer. Tackitt was a key figure in the history of Arkansas and North Texas, including a state representative in the Arkansas General Assembly. Because of his battles with Indians in Texas, Tackitt became known as "the Fighting Parson".

Seymour, Texas

Seymour, Texas

Seymour is a city in and the county seat of Baylor County, Texas, United States. Its population was 2,575 as of the 2020 Census.

Benjamin, Texas

Benjamin, Texas

Benjamin is a city in and the county seat of Knox County, Texas, United States. Its population was 258 at the 2010 census.

Great Depression in the United States

Great Depression in the United States

In the United States, the Great Depression began with the Wall Street Crash of October 1929 and then spread worldwide. The nadir came in 1931–1933, and recovery came in 1940. The stock market crash marked the beginning of a decade of high unemployment, poverty, low profits, deflation, plunging farm incomes, and lost opportunities for economic growth as well as for personal advancement. Altogether, there was a general loss of confidence in the economic future.

Dust Bowl

Dust Bowl

The Dust Bowl was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the American and Canadian prairies during the 1930s. The phenomenon was caused by a combination of both natural factors and manmade factors. The drought came in three waves: 1934, 1936, and 1939–1940, but some regions of the High Plains experienced drought conditions for as many as eight years.

Dumont, Texas

Dumont, Texas

Dumont is an unincorporated community in King County, Texas, United States. It lies in the far northwestern corner of the county, near the Dickens County line. As of the 2000 census, the population was estimated to be 85, making it the second largest community in the sparsely populated county, behind the county seat of Guthrie.

Company town

Company town

A company town is a place where practically all stores and housing are owned by the one company that is also the main employer. Company towns are often planned with a suite of amenities such as stores, houses of worship, schools, markets and recreation facilities. They are usually bigger than a model village.

Geography

Guthrie is located in west-central King County, on the north side of the South Wichita River. U.S. Route 82 passes through the western side of the community, and U.S. Route 83 passes through the center of Guthrie.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Guthrie CDP has an area of 11,000 acres (4,600 ha), of which 7.1 acres (2.87 ha), or 0.06%, is covered by water.[4]

Climate

According to the Köppen climate classification, Guthrie has a semiarid climate, denoted as BSk on climate maps.[5]

Guthrie has a USDA hardiness zone of 7b, with minimum temperatures ranging from 5 to 10 °F.[6]

Climate data for Guthrie (1,744 feet above sea level)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 86
(30)
93
(34)
103
(39)
109
(43)
113
(45)
119
(48)
111
(44)
114
(46)
109
(43)
107
(42)
92
(33)
89
(32)
119
(48)
Average high °F (°C) 55.0
(12.8)
59.0
(15.0)
67.0
(19.4)
77.0
(25.0)
85.0
(29.4)
92.0
(33.3)
96.0
(35.6)
96.0
(35.6)
88.0
(31.1)
77.0
(25.0)
66.0
(18.9)
56.0
(13.3)
76.2
(24.5)
Daily mean °F (°C) 41.0
(5.0)
45.0
(7.2)
52.5
(11.4)
61.5
(16.4)
71.0
(21.7)
79.0
(26.1)
83.0
(28.3)
82.5
(28.1)
74.0
(23.3)
63.0
(17.2)
51.5
(10.8)
42.0
(5.6)
62.2
(16.8)
Average low °F (°C) 27.0
(−2.8)
31.0
(−0.6)
38.0
(3.3)
46.0
(7.8)
57.0
(13.9)
66.0
(18.9)
70.0
(21.1)
69.0
(20.6)
60.0
(15.6)
49.0
(9.4)
37.0
(2.8)
28.0
(−2.2)
48.2
(9.0)
Record low °F (°C) 0
(−18)
−4
(−20)
8
(−13)
19
(−7)
34
(1)
46
(8)
56
(13)
52
(11)
34
(1)
16
(−9)
10
(−12)
−10
(−23)
−10
(−23)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 1.03
(26)
1.47
(37)
1.53
(39)
2.06
(52)
3.42
(87)
3.66
(93)
2.27
(58)
2.69
(68)
2.58
(66)
2.50
(64)
1.30
(33)
1.07
(27)
25.58
(650)
Source: Weather Channel[7]

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Wichita River

Wichita River

The Wichita River, part of the Red River watershed, lies in north-central Texas. Rising in northeastern Knox County at the confluence of its North and South Forks, the river flows 90 miles (140 km) northeast across Baylor, Archer, Wichita, and Clay counties before joining the Red River just west of Byers Bend in northern Clay County.

U.S. Route 82

U.S. Route 82

U.S. Route 82 is an east–west United States highway in the Southern United States. Created on July 1, 1931 across central Mississippi and southern Arkansas, US 82 eventually became a 1,625-mile-long (2,615 km) route extending from the White Sands of New Mexico to Georgia's Atlantic coast.

U.S. Route 83

U.S. Route 83

U.S. Route 83 (US 83) is a major north–south United States Numbered Highway that extends 1,885 miles (3,034 km) in the central United States. Only four other north–south routes are longer: US 1, US 41, US 59, and US 87, while US 83 follows a straighter north-south path than all of these. Nearly half of its mileage is in the state of Texas. The highway's northern terminus is north of Westhope, North Dakota, at the Canadian border, where it continues as Manitoba Highway 83 (PTH 83). The southern terminus is at the Veterans International Bridge in Brownsville, Texas. Together, US 83 and PTH 83 form a continuously numbered north-south highway with a combined distance of 3,450 kilometres (2,140 mi).

Köppen climate classification

Köppen climate classification

The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by German-Russian climatologist Wladimir Köppen (1846–1940) in 1884, with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936. Later, German climatologist Rudolf Geiger (1894–1981) introduced some changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification.

Precipitation

Precipitation

In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravitational pull from clouds. The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, ice pellets, graupel and hail. Precipitation occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates" or falls. Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but colloids, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud. Short, intense periods of rain in scattered locations are called showers.

Demographics

2020 census

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race. [8][9]

Guthrie racial composition[10]
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race Number Percentage
White (NH) 141 93.38%
Pacific Islander (NH) 1 0.66%
Mixed/Multi-Racial (NH) 1 0.66%
Hispanic or Latino 8 5.3%
Total 151

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 151 people, 63 households, and 50 families residing in the CDP.

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Pacific Islander Americans

Pacific Islander Americans

Pacific Islander Americans are Americans who are of Pacific Islander ancestry. For its purposes, the United States census also counts Aboriginal Australians as part of this group.

Multiracial Americans

Multiracial Americans

Multiracial Americans are Americans who have mixed ancestry of two or more races. The term may also include Americans of mixed race ancestry who self-identify with just one group culturally and socially. In the 2010 United States census, approximately 9 million individuals or 3.2% of the population, self-identified as multiracial. There is evidence that an accounting by genetic ancestry would produce a higher number. Historical reasons are said to have created a racial caste such as the European-American suppression of Native Americans, often led people to identify or be classified by only one ethnicity, generally that of the culture in which they were raised. Prior to the mid-20th century, many people hid their multiracial heritage because of racial discrimination against minorities. While many Americans may be considered multiracial, they often do not know it or do not identify so culturally, any more than they maintain all the differing traditions of a variety of national ancestries.

Hispanic and Latino Americans

Hispanic and Latino Americans

Hispanic and Latino Americans are Americans of Spanish and/ or Latin American ancestry. More broadly, these demographics include all Americans who identify as Hispanic or Latino regardless of ancestry. As of 2020, the Census Bureau estimated that there were almost 65.3 million Hispanics and Latinos living in the United States and its territories.

2020 United States census

2020 United States census

The United States census of 2020 was the twenty-fourth decennial United States census. Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2020. Other than a pilot study during the 2000 census, this was the first U.S. census to offer options to respond online or by phone, in addition to the paper response form used for previous censuses. The census was taken during the COVID-19 pandemic, which affected its administration. The census recorded a resident population of 331,449,281 in the fifty states and the District of Columbia, an increase of 7.4 percent, or 22,703,743, over the preceding decade. The growth rate was the second-lowest ever recorded, and the net increase was the sixth highest in history. This was the first census where the ten most populous states each surpassed 10 million residents as well as the first census where the ten most populous cities each surpassed 1 million residents.

Education

Guthrie is served by the Guthrie Common School District, which consistently ranks as a recognized school district by the Texas Education Agency.

Notable people

In popular culture

Author Mitch Cullin graduated from Guthrie School in 1986, and while the setting of his early writings was often the town of Claude in Armstrong County, Cullin said in interviews that his novels Whompyjawed and Branches were based on Guthrie.[12]

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Mitch Cullin

Mitch Cullin

Mitch Cullin is an American writer. He is the author of seven novels, and one short story collection. He currently resides in Arcadia, California and Tokyo, Japan with his partner and frequent collaborator Peter I. Chang. His books have been translated into over 10 languages, among them French, Polish, Japanese, and Italian.

Guthrie Common School District

Guthrie Common School District

Guthrie Common School District is a public school district based in the community of Guthrie, Texas (USA), in central King County.

Claude, Texas

Claude, Texas

Claude is a city in and the county seat of Armstrong County, Texas, United States. The population was 1,196 at the 2010 census. It is located east of Amarillo in the south Texas Panhandle. Claude is part of the Amarillo Metropolitan Statistical Area but is some thirty miles east of Amarillo.

Armstrong County, Texas

Armstrong County, Texas

Armstrong County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. It is in the Texas Panhandle and its county seat is Claude.

Whompyjawed

Whompyjawed

Whompyjawed is the debut novel by American author Mitch Cullin. It is the first installment of the writer's Texas Trilogy that also includes the dark novel-in-verse Branches and the surrealistic novel Tideland.

Branches (novel)

Branches (novel)

Branches is a novel-in-verse by American author Mitch Cullin, with illustrations by the Japanese artist Ryuzo Kikushima. It is the second installment of the writer's Texas Trilogy that also includes the coming-of-age football novel Whompyjawed and the surrealistic novel Tideland.

Source: "Guthrie, Texas", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guthrie,_Texas.

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References
  1. ^ "Guthrie on TSHA". Retrieved 28 November 2014.
  2. ^ "2010 Census: Population of Texas Cities". Retrieved 28 November 2014.
  3. ^ Handbook of Texas Online - GUTHRIE, TX
  4. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001), Guthrie CDP, Texas". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved May 9, 2019.
  5. ^ "Climate Summary for Guthrie, Texas". Weatherbase. Retrieved 28 November 2014.
  6. ^ "USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map". usda.gov. Archived from the original on 2014-02-27. Retrieved 2018-05-12.
  7. ^ "Guthrie, TX Monthly Weather Forecast". Weather Channel. Retrieved 11 May 2018.
  8. ^ https://www.census.gov/
  9. ^ "About the Hispanic Population and its Origin". www.census.gov. Retrieved 18 May 2022.
  10. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved 2022-05-18.
  11. ^ "Small-town legend made mark on city". The Dallas Morning News. January 24, 2010.
  12. ^ "The Austin Chronicle (Nov. 10, 2000)". Retrieved 28 November 2014.
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