Get Our Extension

Greater Belgium

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Greater Belgium with less common claims in light green
Greater Belgium with less common claims in light green

Greater Belgium (French: Grande Belgique) is a Belgian irredentist concept which lays claim on territory nationalists deem as rightfully Belgian. It usually laid claim to: German territory historically belonging to the former Duchy of Limburg (Land of Eupen), Dutch Limburg, Zeelandic Flanders, and the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.[1][2] To a lesser degree, they also claimed Dutch North Brabant[3] and the French Netherlands (Nord-Pas-de-Calais).[4] Shortly after the Belgian Revolution, some groups even proposed a Belgo-Rhine federation.[5]

Nowadays, belief in Belgian irredentism is very uncommon and overshadowed by talk of partitioning Belgium or the incorporation of Flanders into the Netherlands (see Greater Netherlands). Although after World War I, Belgium gained the region of Eupen-Malmedy from the German Empire. Since 1921, there has also been a Belgium–Luxembourg Economic Union.

Discover more about Greater Belgium related topics

French language

French language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the Latin spoken in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

Belgium

Belgium

Belgium, officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a country in Northwestern Europe. The country is bordered by the Netherlands to the north, Germany to the east, Luxembourg to the southeast, France to the southwest, and the North Sea to the northwest. It covers an area of 30,528 km2 (11,787 sq mi) and has a population of more than 11.5 million, making it the 22nd most densely populated country in the world and the 6th most densely populated country in Europe, with a density of 376 per square kilometre (970/sq mi). The capital and largest city is Brussels; other major cities are Antwerp, Ghent, Charleroi, Liège, Bruges, Namur, and Leuven.

Irredentism

Irredentism

Irredentism is the doctrine of political or popular movements that claim and seek to occupy territory considered "lost" to the nation, based on history or legend. The scope is occasionally subject to disputes about underlying claims of expansionism, owing to lack of clarity on the historical bounds of putative nations or peoples.

Germany

Germany

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central Europe. It is the second most populous country in Europe after Russia, and the most populous member state of the European Union. Germany is situated between the Baltic and North seas to the north, and the Alps to the south; it covers an area of 357,022 square kilometres (137,847 sq mi), with a population of almost 84 million within its 16 constituent states. Germany borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, and France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands to the west. The nation's capital and most populous city is Berlin and its financial centre is Frankfurt; the largest urban area is the Ruhr.

Duchy of Limburg

Duchy of Limburg

The Duchy of Limburg or Limbourg was an imperial estate of the Holy Roman Empire. Much of the area of the duchy is today located within Liège Province of Belgium, with a small portion in the municipality of Voeren, an exclave of the neighbouring Limburg Province. Its chief town was Limbourg-sur-Vesdre, in today's Liège Province.

Land of Eupen

Land of Eupen

The Land of Eupen or Eupen Land, corresponding to the Canton of Eupen, is the northern part of the German-speaking Community of Belgium, lying on the border with Germany. Eupen is the capital of this region. To the south lies the Canton of Sankt Vith, which makes up the rest of the German-speaking Community.

Belgian Revolution

Belgian Revolution

The Belgian Revolution was the conflict which led to the secession of the southern provinces from the United Kingdom of the Netherlands and the establishment of an independent Kingdom of Belgium.

Flanders

Flanders

Flanders is the Flemish-speaking northern portion of Belgium and one of the communities, regions and language areas of Belgium. However, there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics, and history, and sometimes involving neighbouring countries. The demonym associated with Flanders is Fleming, while the corresponding adjective is Flemish. The official capital of Flanders is the City of Brussels, although the Brussels-Capital Region has an independent regional government. The powers of the government of Flanders consist, among others, of economic affairs in the Flemish Region and the community aspects of Flanders life in Brussels, such as Flemish culture and education.

Greater Netherlands

Greater Netherlands

Greater Netherlands is an irredentist concept which unites the Netherlands, Flanders, and sometimes including Brussels. Additionally, a Greater Netherlands state may include the annexation of the French Westhoek, Suriname, formerly Dutch-speaking areas of Germany and France, or even the ethnically Dutch and/or Afrikaans-speaking parts of South Africa, though such variants are mostly limited to far-right groups. A related proposal is the Pan-Netherlands concept, which includes Wallonia and potentially also Luxembourg.

Eupen-Malmedy

Eupen-Malmedy

Eupen-Malmedy is a small, predominantly German-speaking region in eastern Belgium. It consists of three administrative cantons around the towns of Eupen, Malmedy, and Sankt Vith which encompass some 730 square kilometres (280 sq mi). Elsewhere in Belgium, the region is commonly referred to as the East Cantons.

German Empire

German Empire

The German Empire, also referred to as Imperial Germany, the Kaiserreich, the Second Reich, as well as simply Germany, was the period of the German Reich from the unification of Germany in 1871 until the November Revolution in 1918, when the German Reich changed its form of government from a monarchy to a republic.

Belgium–Luxembourg Economic Union

Belgium–Luxembourg Economic Union

The Belgium–Luxembourg Economic Union, abbreviated to BLEU or UEBL, is an economic union between Belgium and Luxembourg, two countries in the Benelux Union.

History

Belgian Revolution

Belgium between 1830 en 1839
Belgium between 1830 en 1839

When the Belgian state became de facto independent from the Netherlands in 1830, it initially also encompassed eastern Limburg (except for Dutch-occupied Maastricht) and eastern Luxembourg (except for Prussian-occupied Luxemburg City). The young state also claimed North Brabant and Zeelandic Flanders, but was unable to conquer this territory. In 1839, Belgium's borders were officially recognised, but it had to give up eastern Limburg and Luxembourg. Afterwards some Belgians fought to retake these territories. Even King Leopold II made plans to invade the north.[6]

The Great War

After World War I, Belgian irredentism became relevant again as the claims were seen as reparation. The Belgians viewed the Netherlands' actions during this war as collaboration, and because of this, the Belgian state claimed Zeelandic Flanders and Dutch Limburg once again. After negotiations Belgium only gained the German territory of Eupen-Malmedy through the Treaty of Versailles.[2] This could be seen as the first and only success the Belgian irredentists achieved on the European continent.

In 1919, Luxembourg held a referendum which could've led to a Belgian on the throne, but this was rejected by its population.[7] Shortly after, Belgium and Luxembourg did create an Economic Union which led to greater economic collaboration.

After World War II, Belgium again annexed a few German border regions, although it returned most of them in 1958, keeping only the towns of Losheimergraben (Büllingen) and Leykaul (Bütgenbach).[8]

Discover more about History related topics

Belgian Revolution

Belgian Revolution

The Belgian Revolution was the conflict which led to the secession of the southern provinces from the United Kingdom of the Netherlands and the establishment of an independent Kingdom of Belgium.

United Kingdom of the Netherlands

United Kingdom of the Netherlands

The United Kingdom of the Netherlands is the unofficial name given to the Kingdom of the Netherlands as it existed between 1815 and 1839. The United Netherlands was created in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars through the fusion of territories that had belonged to the former Dutch Republic, Austrian Netherlands, and Prince-Bishopric of Liège in order to form a buffer state between the major European powers. The polity was a constitutional monarchy, ruled by William I of the House of Orange-Nassau.

Maastricht

Maastricht

Maastricht is a city and a municipality in the southeastern Netherlands. It is the capital and largest city of the province of Limburg. Maastricht is located on both sides of the Meuse, at the point where the Jeker joins it. Mount Saint Peter (Sint-Pietersberg) is largely situated within the city's municipal borders. Maastricht is about 175 km south east of the capital Amsterdam and 65 km from Eindhoven; it is adjacent to the border with Belgium and is part of the Meuse-Rhine Euroregion, an international metropolis with a population of about 3.9 million, which includes the nearby German and Belgian cities of Aachen, Liège and Hasselt.

Luxembourg City

Luxembourg City

Luxembourg, also known as Luxembourg City, is the capital city of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the country's most populous commune. Standing at the confluence of the Alzette and Pétrusse rivers in southern Luxembourg, the city lies at the heart of Western Europe, situated 213 km (132 mi) by road from Brussels, 372 km (231 mi) from Paris, and 209 km (130 mi) from Cologne. The city contains Luxembourg Castle, established by the Franks in the Early Middle Ages, around which a settlement developed.

Leopold II of Belgium

Leopold II of Belgium

Leopold II was the second King of the Belgians from 1865 to 1909 and the self-made autocratic ruler of the Congo Free State from 1885 to 1908.

World War I

World War I

World War I or the First World War, often abbreviated as WWI or WW1, and referred to by some Anglophone authors as the "Great War" or the "War to End All Wars", was a global conflict which lasted from 1914 to 1918, and is considered one of the deadliest conflicts in history. Belligerents included much of Europe, the Russian Empire, the United States, and the Ottoman Empire, with fighting occurring throughout Europe, the Middle East, Africa, the Pacific, and parts of Asia. An estimated 9 million soldiers were killed in combat, plus another 23 million wounded, while 5 million civilians died as a result of military action, hunger, and disease. Millions more died in genocides within the Ottoman Empire and the 1918 influenza pandemic, which was exacerbated by the movement of combatants during the war.

Eupen-Malmedy

Eupen-Malmedy

Eupen-Malmedy is a small, predominantly German-speaking region in eastern Belgium. It consists of three administrative cantons around the towns of Eupen, Malmedy, and Sankt Vith which encompass some 730 square kilometres (280 sq mi). Elsewhere in Belgium, the region is commonly referred to as the East Cantons.

Treaty of Versailles

Treaty of Versailles

The Treaty of Versailles was the most important of the peace treaties of World War I. It ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919 in the Palace of Versailles, exactly five years after the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, which led to the war. The other Central Powers on the German side signed separate treaties. Although the armistice of 11 November 1918 ended the actual fighting, it took six months of Allied negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the peace treaty. The treaty was registered by the Secretariat of the League of Nations on 21 October 1919.

Belgium–Luxembourg Economic Union

Belgium–Luxembourg Economic Union

The Belgium–Luxembourg Economic Union, abbreviated to BLEU or UEBL, is an economic union between Belgium and Luxembourg, two countries in the Benelux Union.

World War II

World War II

World War II or the Second World War, often abbreviated as WWII or WW2, was a world war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. It involved the vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis powers. World War II was a total war that directly involved more than 100 million personnel from more than 30 countries.

Büllingen

Büllingen

Büllingen is a municipality of East Belgium, located in the Belgian province of Liège, Wallonia. On January 1, 2006, Büllingen had a total population of 5,385. The total area is 150.49 km² which gives a population density of 36 inhabitants per km².

Bütgenbach

Bütgenbach

Bütgenbach is a municipality located in the Belgian province of Liège. On January 1, 2006, Bütgenbach had a total population of 5,574. The total area is 97.31 km² which gives a population density of 57 inhabitants per km². As part of the German-speaking Community of Belgium, the official language in this municipality is German.

Source: "Greater Belgium", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Belgium.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ "Les rêves d'une Grande Belgique (1916-1921) | Connaître la Wallonie". connaitrelawallonie.wallonie.be. Retrieved 2021-08-08.
  2. ^ a b Kossmann, E. H. (1970-11-02), "The Low Countries", The New Cambridge Modern History, Cambridge University Press, pp. 359–384, doi:10.1017/chol9780521076180.013, ISBN 978-1-139-05579-6, retrieved 2021-08-08
  3. ^ "Noord-Brabant en de Opstand van 1830". uitgeverij-zhc.nl. Retrieved 2021-08-08.
  4. ^ DBNL. "De Franse Nederlanden / Les Pays-Bas Français. Jaargang 1979 · dbnl". DBNL (in Dutch). Retrieved 2021-08-08.
  5. ^ DBNL. "Bijdragen en Mededelingen van het Historisch Genootschap. Deel 76 · dbnl". DBNL (in Dutch). Retrieved 2021-08-08.
  6. ^ "Leopold II wilde Nederland binnenvallen". De Standaard Mobile (in Flemish). Retrieved 2021-08-08.
  7. ^ Elections in Europe : a data handbook. Dieter Nohlen, Philip Stöver (1st ed.). Baden-Baden, Germany: Nomos. 2010. ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7. OCLC 617565273.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: others (link)
  8. ^ "GR-Atlas - GA081 1956: Aachen-Bildchen ..." archive.is. 2013-02-21. Archived from the original on 2013-02-21. Retrieved 2021-08-08.

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.