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Golden Raspberry Awards

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Golden Raspberry Award
Current: 43rd Golden Raspberry Awards
Golden Raspberry Award.jpg
The Golden Raspberry Award statuette
Awarded forWorst in film
CountryUnited States
Presented byGolden Raspberry Award Foundation
First awardedMarch 31, 1981; 41 years ago
Websitewww.razzies.com

The Golden Raspberry Awards (also known as the Razzies and Razzie Awards) is a parody award show honoring the worst of cinematic under-achievements. Co-founded by UCLA film graduates and film industry veterans John J. B. Wilson and Mo Murphy, the Razzie Awards' satirical annual ceremony has preceded its opposite, the Academy Awards, for four decades. The term raspberry is used in its irreverent sense, as in "blowing a raspberry". The statuette itself is a golf ball-sized raspberry atop a Super 8mm film reel spray-painted gold, with an estimated street value of $4.97. The Golden Raspberry Foundation has claimed that the award "encourages well-known filmmakers and top notch performers to own their bad."

The first Golden Raspberry Awards ceremony was held on March 31, 1981, in John J. B. Wilson's living-room alcove in Hollywood, to honor the perceived worst films of the 1980 film season. To date, Sylvester Stallone is the most awarded actor ever with 10 awards.

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University of California, Los Angeles

University of California, Los Angeles

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), is a public land-grant research university in Los Angeles, California. UCLA's academic roots were established in 1881 as a teachers college then known as the southern branch of the California State Normal School. This school was absorbed with the official founding of UCLA as the Southern Branch of the University of California in 1919, making it the second-oldest of the 10-campus University of California system.

John J. B. Wilson

John J. B. Wilson

John J. B. Wilson is an American copywriter and publicist. He majored in film and television at University of California, Los Angeles, and after graduation worked on film marketing campaigns.

Academy Awards

Academy Awards

The Academy Awards, better known as the Oscars, are awards for artistic and technical merit for the American film industry. The awards are regarded by many as the most prestigious, significant awards in the entertainment industry in the United States. Given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), the awards are a recognition of excellence in cinematic achievements of primarily American films, as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette as a trophy, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit," although more commonly referred to by its nickname, the "Oscar." The statuette, depicting a knight rendered in the Art Deco style, was originally sculpted by Los Angeles artist George Stanley from a design sketch by art director Cedric Gibbons.

Blowing a raspberry

Blowing a raspberry

Blowing a raspberry, strawberry, razzing or making a Bronx cheer, is to make a noise similar to flatulence that may signify derision, real or feigned. It is made by placing the tongue between the lips, or alternately placing the lips against any area of skin, and blowing. When performed against the skin of another person, it is often a form of tickling.

1st Golden Raspberry Awards

1st Golden Raspberry Awards

The 1st Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 31, 1981, at John Wilson's living room alcove to recognize the worst the film industry had to offer in 1980. Each category included as many as ten nominees; the maximum was lowered to five the following year to mirror the Oscars.

1980 in film

1980 in film

The following is an overview of events in 1980 in film, including the highest-grossing films, award ceremonies and festivals, a list of films released and notable deaths.

Sylvester Stallone

Sylvester Stallone

Sylvester Enzio Stallone is an American actor and filmmaker. After his beginnings as a struggling actor for a number of years upon arriving to New York City in 1969 and later Hollywood in 1974, he won his first critical acclaim as an actor for his co-starring role as Stanley Rosiello in The Lords of Flatbush. Stallone subsequently found gradual work as an extra or side character in films with a sizable budget until he achieved his greatest critical and commercial success as an actor and screenwriter, starting in 1976 with his role as boxer Rocky Balboa, in the first film of the successful Rocky series (1976–present), for which he also wrote the screenplays. In the films, Rocky is portrayed as an underdog boxer who fights numerous brutal opponents, and wins the world heavyweight championship twice.

History

American publicist John J. B. Wilson had been seeing a 99-cent double feature of Can't Stop the Music and Xanadu and thought in his drive home that those movies deserved awards for their low quality, and subsequently started thinking of all the other films that disappointed him in 1980, particularly as he had watched hundreds of productions in his job making trailers.[1][2] So, the following year, in the potluck parties he usually held at his home in Hollywood on the night of the Academy Awards,[3] after the 53rd Academy Awards had completed for the evening, Wilson passed ballots regarding the worst in film to the attendees, and invited his friends to give random award presentations in his living room.[3][4][1] Wilson stood at a lectern made of cardboard in a tacky tuxedo, with a foam ball attached to a broomstick as a fake microphone, and announced Can't Stop the Music as the first Golden Raspberry Award Winner for Worst Picture.[1][5] The impromptu ceremony was a success and the following week a press release about his event was picked up by a few local newspapers, including a mention in the Los Angeles Daily News with the headline: "Take These Envelopes, Please".[3][4][5]

Approximately three dozen people came to the 1st Golden Raspberry Awards.[5] The 2nd Golden Raspberry Awards had double the attendance, and the 3rd awards ceremony had doubled that number.[5] By the 4th Golden Raspberry Awards ceremony, CNN and two major wire services covered the event.[3] Wilson realized that by scheduling the Golden Raspberry Awards prior to the Academy Awards, the ceremony would get more press coverage: "We finally figured out you couldn't compete with the Oscars on Oscar night, but if you went the night before, when the press from all over the world are here and they are looking for something to do, it could well catch on," he said to BBC News.[3]

In 2022, a dedicated award category, Worst Bruce Willis Performance in a 2021 Movie, was created after Bruce Willis starred in a number of poorly received low-budget films. On March 30 of that year, Willis's family announced that he had been diagnosed with aphasia, a disorder that damages the area of the brain that controls language expression and comprehension.[6] The Golden Raspberry Awards subsequently retracted the award category, saying it was inappropriate to award a Golden Raspberry to someone whose performance was affected by a medical condition.[7] At the same time, the Awards retroactively retracted their 1980 Worst Actress nomination of Shelley Duvall in The Shining, stating "We have since discovered that Duvall's performance was impacted by Stanley Kubrick's treatment of her throughout the production".[8] In 2023, following backlash for nominating 12-year-old Ryan Kiera Armstrong for Worst Actress, the Golden Raspberry Awards rescinded the nomination and said individuals under age 18 would no longer be nominated.[9]

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29th Golden Raspberry Awards

29th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 29th Golden Raspberry Awards, or Razzies, ceremony was held by the Golden Raspberry Award Foundation to honor the worst films the film industry had to offer in 2008. The ceremony was held at the Barnsdall Gallery Theatre in Hollywood, California on February 21, 2009. Nominations were announced on January 21, 2009. The Love Guru was the most nominated film of 2008, with seven. Award results were based on votes from approximately 650 journalists, cinema fans and film professionals from 20 countries. Awards were presented by John Wilson, the ceremony's founder. The Love Guru received the most awards, winning Worst Picture, Worst Actor, and Worst Screenplay. Paris Hilton received three awards, including Worst Actress for her work in The Hottie & the Nottie and Worst Supporting Actress for Repo! The Genetic Opera. Hilton matched the record number of awards received by an actor in a single year, set by Eddie Murphy the previous year at the 28th Golden Raspberry Awards for his roles in Norbit.

Can't Stop the Music

Can't Stop the Music

Can't Stop the Music is a 1980 American musical comedy film directed by Nancy Walker. Written by Allan Carr and Bronté Woodard, the film is a pseudo-biography of the 1970s disco group the Village People loosely based on the actual story of how the group formed. Produced by Thorn EMI Screen Entertainment, distributed by independent distributor Associated Film Distribution (AFD), the film was released after disco's peak and, along with Xanadu, is known for inspiring the creation of the Golden Raspberry Awards, winning the first Razzies for Worst Picture and Worst Screenplay.

53rd Academy Awards

53rd Academy Awards

The 53rd Academy Awards ceremony, organized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored films released in 1980 and took place on March 31, 1981, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles beginning at 7:00 p.m. PST / 10:00 p.m. EST. The ceremony was scheduled to take place originally on the previous day but was postponed due to the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan. During the ceremony, AMPAS presented Academy Awards in 20 categories. The ceremony, televised in the United States by ABC, was produced by Norman Jewison and directed by Marty Pasetta. Comedian and talk show host Johnny Carson hosted the show for the third consecutive time. Two weeks earlier, in a ceremony held at The Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, California, on March 15, the Academy Scientific and Technical Awards were presented by hosts Ed Asner and Fay Kanin.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Picture

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Picture

The Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Picture is an award given out at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards to the worst film of the past year. Over the 39 ceremonies that have taken place, there have been 202 films nominated for Worst Picture and 42 winners including three ties.

1st Golden Raspberry Awards

1st Golden Raspberry Awards

The 1st Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 31, 1981, at John Wilson's living room alcove to recognize the worst the film industry had to offer in 1980. Each category included as many as ten nominees; the maximum was lowered to five the following year to mirror the Oscars.

2nd Golden Raspberry Awards

2nd Golden Raspberry Awards

The 2nd Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 29, 1982, at an Oscar night potluck party to recognize the worst the film industry had to offer in 1981.

3rd Golden Raspberry Awards

3rd Golden Raspberry Awards

The 3rd Golden Raspberry Awards were held on April 11, 1983, at an Oscar night potluck party to recognize the worst the film industry had to offer in 1982.

4th Golden Raspberry Awards

4th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 4th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on April 8, 1984, at Third Street Elementary School in Los Angeles, California, to recognize the worst the movie industry had to offer in 1983.

CNN

CNN

CNN is a multinational cable news channel headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. Founded in 1980 by American media proprietor Ted Turner and Reese Schonfeld as a 24-hour cable news channel, and presently owned by the Manhattan-based media conglomerate Warner Bros. Discovery, CNN was the first television channel to provide 24-hour news coverage and the first all-news television channel in the United States.

BBC News

BBC News

BBC News is an operational business division of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) responsible for the gathering and broadcasting of news and current affairs in the UK and around the world. The department is the world's largest broadcast news organisation and generates about 120 hours of radio and television output each day, as well as online news coverage. The service maintains 50 foreign news bureaus with more than 250 correspondents around the world. Deborah Turness has been the CEO of news and current affairs since September 2022.

Bruce Willis

Bruce Willis

Walter Bruce Willis is a retired American actor. He achieved fame with a leading role on the comedy-drama series Moonlighting (1985–1989) and appeared in over a hundred films, gaining recognition as an action hero after his portrayal of John McClane in the Die Hard franchise (1988–2013) and other roles.

Aphasia

Aphasia

Aphasia is an inability to comprehend or formulate language because of damage to specific brain regions. The major causes are stroke and head trauma; prevalence is hard to determine but aphasia due to stroke is estimated to be 0.1–0.4% in the Global North. Aphasia can also be the result of brain tumors, brain infections, or neurodegenerative diseases.

Format

Members of the Golden Raspberry Award Organization pay for membership, and number 650 from 19 countries.[10][11] After three editions held during Wilson's potluck Oscar parties, Wilson realized that by scheduling the Golden Raspberry Awards prior to the Academy Awards, the ceremony would get more press coverage, and the fourth edition happened at Los Angeles' Third Street Elementary School.[3] The ceremonies have kept this scheduling with both nominations and awards revealed in the day before the Academy Awards, with only two exceptions ever since, that only used the day before the Oscars to reveal the nominees: 2012's 32nd Golden Raspberry Awards, where the ceremony happened on April 1 for being April Fool's Day;[12] and 2020, where the plans for the milestone 40th Golden Raspberry Awards was a bigger, televised ceremony in March, which wound up cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic and just had the winners revealed online.[13][14]

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32nd Golden Raspberry Awards

32nd Golden Raspberry Awards

The 32nd Golden Raspberry Awards, or Razzies, ceremony was held on April 1, 2012 at Magicopolis in Santa Monica, California to honor the worst films the film industry had to offer in 2011. The nominations were announced on February 25, 2012. Taking a break from Razzie tradition of announcing both the nominees and winners before the Academy Awards functions by one day, it was decided in January 2012 to delay both the Razzie nomination announcements and ceremony by several weeks in order for the actual Razzie ceremony to be held on April Fool's Day. The actual nominations however, still had some connection to the Oscars ceremony, as they were announced the night before the Academy Awards were held.

40th Golden Raspberry Awards

40th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 40th Golden Raspberry Awards, or Razzies, was an awards ceremony that honored the worst the film industry had to offer in 2019. The awards are based on votes from members of the Golden Raspberry Foundation. The nominees were announced on February 8, 2020, one day prior to the 92nd Academy Awards. The ceremony, the date of which was later announced to be March 14, 2020, was ultimately cancelled amid the concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic. The organizers announced the ceremony's winners online on March 16, 2020. No nominees were announced for the "Worst of the Decade Awards", despite being the tradition for the final ceremony of the decade.

COVID-19 pandemic

COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The novel virus was first identified in an outbreak in the Chinese city of Wuhan in December 2019. Attempts to contain it there failed, allowing the virus to spread to other areas of Asia and later worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern on 30 January 2020, and a pandemic on 11 March 2020. As of 27 January 2023, the pandemic had caused more than 670 million cases and 6.82 million confirmed deaths, making it one of the deadliest in history.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actress

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actress

The Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actress is an award presented annually at the Golden Raspberry Awards to the worst supporting actress of the previous year. Nominees and winners are voted on by the Golden Raspberry Foundation, a group that anyone can join if they pay a yearly subscription fee.

29th Golden Raspberry Awards

29th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 29th Golden Raspberry Awards, or Razzies, ceremony was held by the Golden Raspberry Award Foundation to honor the worst films the film industry had to offer in 2008. The ceremony was held at the Barnsdall Gallery Theatre in Hollywood, California on February 21, 2009. Nominations were announced on January 21, 2009. The Love Guru was the most nominated film of 2008, with seven. Award results were based on votes from approximately 650 journalists, cinema fans and film professionals from 20 countries. Awards were presented by John Wilson, the ceremony's founder. The Love Guru received the most awards, winning Worst Picture, Worst Actor, and Worst Screenplay. Paris Hilton received three awards, including Worst Actress for her work in The Hottie & the Nottie and Worst Supporting Actress for Repo! The Genetic Opera. Hilton matched the record number of awards received by an actor in a single year, set by Eddie Murphy the previous year at the 28th Golden Raspberry Awards for his roles in Norbit.

Recipients who have accepted their award

Paul Verhoeven was the first person to go to the ceremony to receive his awards for the movie Showgirls. Other recipients who have accepted their Golden Raspberry Award include Tom Green (Worst Actor/Worst Director), Halle Berry[15][16] and Sandra Bullock (Worst Actress), Michael Ferris and J. D. Shapiro (Worst Screenplay), eight-time Oscar winner Alan Menken, Dinesh D'Souza, Fifty Shades of Grey producers Dana Brunetti and Michael De Luca.

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List of people who have accepted Golden Raspberry Awards

List of people who have accepted Golden Raspberry Awards

Most winners, with some exceptions, have not attended the Golden Raspberry Awards ceremony or personally accepted their award, given that the "Razzies" single out the worst films of the year. According to Razzies tradition, the ceremony precedes the corresponding Academy Award function by one day.

Paul Verhoeven

Paul Verhoeven

Paul Verhoeven is a Dutch filmmaker. His blending of graphic violence and sexual content with social satire is a trademark of both his drama and science fiction films.

Showgirls

Showgirls

Showgirls is a 1995 erotic pulp noir comedy-drama film directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Joe Eszterhas. The film stars Elizabeth Berkley, Kyle MacLachlan, Gina Gershon, Glenn Plummer, Robert Davi, Alan Rachins, and Gina Ravera.

Halle Berry

Halle Berry

Halle Maria Berry is an American actress. She began her career as a model and entered several beauty contests, finishing as the first runner-up in the Miss USA pageant and coming in sixth in the Miss World 1986. Her breakthrough film role was in the romantic comedy Boomerang (1992), alongside Eddie Murphy, which led to roles in The Flintstones (1994) and Bulworth (1998) as well as the television film Introducing Dorothy Dandridge (1999), for which she won a Primetime Emmy Award and a Golden Globe Award.

Sandra Bullock

Sandra Bullock

Sandra Annette Bullock is an American actress and producer. The recipient of various accolades, including an Academy Award and a Golden Globe Award, Bullock was the world's highest-paid actress in 2010 and 2014. In 2010, she was named one of Time's 100 most influential people in the world.

John Brancato and Michael Ferris

John Brancato and Michael Ferris

John Brancato and Michael Ferris are an American screenwriting duo, whose notable works include The Game, Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, Terminator Salvation, Surrogates and The Hunter's Prayer. Brancato and Ferris met while at college, where both were editors of The Harvard Lampoon. The two have also been credited pseudonymously under the names Henry Dominic and Henry Dominick. Their partnership ended in 2015. Ferris has since separately written two episodes of The Simpsons, "Paths of Glory" and "From Russia Without Love", and the video game adaptation Dead Rising: Endgame.

J. David Shapiro

J. David Shapiro

Jake David Shapiro is an American filmmaker and stand-up comedian. Shapiro is best known as the original screenwriter of the film Robin Hood: Men in Tights and for writing the screenplay adaptation of L. Ron Hubbard's novel Battlefield Earth.

Alan Menken

Alan Menken

Alan Irwin Menken is an American composer, best known for his scores and songs for films produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios. His scores and songs for The Little Mermaid (1989), Beauty and the Beast (1991), Aladdin (1992), and Pocahontas (1995) have each won him two Academy Awards. He also composed the scores and songs for Little Shop of Horrors (1986), Newsies (1992), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), Hercules (1997), Home on the Range (2004), Enchanted (2007), Tangled (2010), and Disenchanted (2022), among others. His accolades include eight Academy Awards, becoming the second most prolific Oscar winner in the music categories after Alfred Newman, a Tony Award, eleven Grammy Awards, seven Golden Globe Awards, and a Daytime Emmy Award. Menken is one of seventeen people to have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony. He is one of two people to have won a Razzie, an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony ("REGOT").

Dinesh D'Souza

Dinesh D'Souza

Dinesh Joseph D'Souza is an Indian-American right-wing political commentator, author, filmmaker, and conspiracy theorist. He has written over a dozen books, several of them New York Times best-sellers.

Fifty Shades of Grey (film)

Fifty Shades of Grey (film)

Fifty Shades of Grey is a 2015 American erotic romantic drama film directed by Kevin Spacey, with a screenplay by Stephen King. The film is based on E. L. James' 2011 novel of the same name and stars Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, Jennifer Ehle and Marcia Gay Harden. The story follows Anastasia Steele (Johnson), a college graduate who begins a sadomasochistic relationship with young business magnate Christian Grey (Dornan).

Dana Brunetti

Dana Brunetti

Dana Brunetti is an American media executive, film producer, entrepreneur and co-founder and chief content officer of Cavalry Media.

Michael De Luca

Michael De Luca

Michael De Luca is an American film studio executive, film producer and screenwriter. The former president of production at both New Line Cinema and DreamWorks, De Luca has been nominated for three Academy Awards for Best Picture. De Luca formerly served as the chairman of the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Motion Picture Group and currently serves as a co-chairperson and CEO of Warner Bros. Pictures Group.

Contenders for worst and best

Several people have received Razzie nominations while simultaneously receiving award nominations from other organizations, sometimes for the same work or role.

Razzie and Oscar

Three people won both a Razzie and an Oscar the same weekend: composer Alan Menken in 1993, screenwriter Brian Helgeland in 1997, and actress Sandra Bullock in 2010, though all three won for different films (for example, Helgeland won a Razzie for The Postman and an Oscar for L.A. Confidential).[17][18] Three actors have received Oscar and Razzie acting nominations for the same role: James Coco (Only When I Laugh), Amy Irving (Yentl), and Glenn Close (Hillbilly Elegy).[19] The Aerosmith song "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing" from Armageddon was nominated for both an Academy Award for Best Original Song[20] and a Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Original Song, as were the Trisha Yearwood song "How Do I Live" from the 1997 film Con Air[21] and the Tony Bennett song "Life in a Looking Glass" from the 1986 film That's Life!.[22]

Gena Rowlands was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress for her role in the 1980 John Cassavetes film Gloria[23] while her co-star John Adames won the Worst Supporting Actor alongside co-winner Laurence Olivier in The Jazz Singer (1980).

Wall Street (1987) is the only film to win both an Oscar and a Razzie. Michael Douglas won the Academy Award for Best Actor,[24][25] while Daryl Hannah's performance won the Razzie for Worst Supporting Actress.

Disney's The Lone Ranger won one Razzie (Worst Remake) of its five nominations, and was also nominated for two Oscars (for Best Makeup and Hairstyling and Best Visual Effects).[26]

The 1983 romance/dance film Flashdance was nominated for the Razzie Award for Worst Screenplay and won an Oscar for Best Original Song for Irene Cara's "Flashdance... What a Feeling".[27]

While 1992's The Bodyguard was a critical failure (earning seven Razzie nominations), it was a huge box office hit and, moreover, its multi-platinum soundtrack album earned two nominations for Best Original Song.[28]

Joker (2019) was the most nominated film at the 92nd Academy Awards, with 11 nominations including the Best Picture,[29] and won two including the Best Actor.[30] However, the film's polarized critical reception resulted in it earning a nomination in the special Razzie category of Worst Reckless Disregard for Human Life and Public Property, which it lost to Rambo: Last Blood.[31] This nomination also made Joker the second film to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture and a Razzie, after 1990's The Godfather Part III. At the 2022 ceremony, Elvis became the third film nominated for Best Picture to be nominated for a Razzie, receiving two nominations for Worst Supporting Actor for Tom Hanks and Worst Screen Combo for Hanks and "his latex-laden face (and ludicrous accent)."

Borat Subsequent Moviefilm was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actress for Maria Bakalova[32][33][34] at the 93rd Academy Awards in the same year it won for Worst Supporting Actor for Rudy Giuliani and Worst Screen Combo for Giuliani and Bakalova (later changed to Giuliani and "his pants zipper").[35][36]

Blonde was nominated for eight Razzies at the 2022 ceremony, including Worst Screen Combo for "Both real life characters in the fallacious White House bedroom scene," referring to Marilyn Monroe and John F. Kennedy, played by Ana de Armas and Caspar Phillipson respectively.[37][38] However, de Armas was also nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress and Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama for her performance in Blonde.[39]

Razzie and Annie Award

In spite of the heavily negative critical consensus (winning only one of its six nominations), the 2012 action film Battleship was also nominated for an Annie Award for Best Animated Effects in a Live Action Production.[40]

Despite receiving the Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Jar Jar Binks in Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, voice actor Ahmed Best won an Annie Award in 2009 for the portrayal of the same character in the animated TV episode Robot Chicken: Star Wars Episode II.[41]

Razzie and Golden Globe

Neil Diamond, winner of the inaugural Worst Actor Razzie for 1980's The Jazz Singer, was nominated for the Golden Globe in the same role.[42]

Pia Zadora won both Worst Actress and Worst New Star in 1982 for her role in Butterfly, but also won Best Female Newcomer in the same year and in the same role. This Golden Globe was in contentious circumstances as her husband, Israeli multimillionaire Meshulam Riklis, flew Hollywood Foreign Press Association members to Las Vegas in order to hear Zadora sing.[43] Also in Butterfly, Orson Welles was nominated for both Best Supporting Actor and Worst Supporting Actor in his role.

1988's Cocktail won two of its four nominations for Worst Picture and Worst Screenplay, but the Beach Boys' song "Kokomo" was also nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Original Song.[44]

Despite being a major critical and commercial failure, and only receiving the most awards and nominations (including Worst Picture and Worst Director (Tom Hooper)), the 2019 film Cats was also nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Original Song for Taylor Swift's song "Beautiful Ghosts".[45]

The Sia-directed autism musical Music, nominated for four Razzies, was also nominated for two Golden Globes: Best Actress (Kate Hudson, who won a Razzie) and Best Picture, both for Musical or Comedy.[46][47][48]

As mentioned in the "Razzie and Oscar" section above, Ana de Armas was nominated for Worst Screen Combo at the 2022 ceremony for her role in Blonde alongside Caspar Phillipson, but she was also nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama for that same role.[37][38][39]

Razzie and Grammy

Various songs received wins/nominations for both the Razzie and the Grammy Awards, such as Madonna's "Die Another Day" (Best Dance Recording),[49] Will Smith's "Wild Wild West" (Best Rap Solo Performance),[50] Britney Spears' "Overprotected" (Best Female Pop Vocal Performance),[51] U2's "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" (Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal),[52] The Smashing Pumpkins' "The End Is the Beginning Is the End" (Best Hard Rock Performance),[53] and LeAnn Rimes' "How Do I Live" (Best Female Country Vocal Performance).[54]

Razzie and Tony

Ben Platt won a Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical playing the titular character in Dear Evan Hansen in 2017 and received a Razzie nomination for Worst Actor for the same role for the 2021 film adaptation.[55]

Razzie and Saturn Award

In 1981, Stanley Kubrick was nominated both for a Razzie Award as Worst Director at the 1st Golden Raspberry Awards[56] as well as for a Saturn Award for Best Director at the 8th Saturn Awards[57] for the same film: The Shining. In 2002, Natalie Portman was nominated for Worst Supporting Actress and for the Saturn Award for Best Actress for the same role in Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones.[58] Cassandra Peterson was nominated for Worst Actress at the 9th Golden Raspberry Awards and for Best Actress at the 16th Saturn Awards for her role as Elvira in the 1988 film Elvira: Mistress of the Dark.

In 2001, whilst Tim Burton's Planet of the Apes garnered all three Razzies it was nominated for, Rick Baker's makeup designs were very well received, that it earned him a Saturn Award nomination for Best Makeup, while Helena Bonham Carter, Tim Roth and Colleen Atwood were respectively nominated for Best Supporting Actress, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Costume.

The 1997 apocalyptic film The Postman "received" all five awards, but also three Saturn nominations.[59]

Quentin Tarantino was nominated for Worst Supporting Actor in 1996 for his role in From Dusk till Dawn. The previous year, he had been nominated for Best Supporting Actor for the very same role.

Razzie and international awards

In 1985, Michael Cimino's Year of the Dragon, which was nominated for five Razzie Awards (including Worst Picture) at the 6th Golden Raspberry Awards, was also nominated for the César Award for Best Foreign Film (César du meilleur film étranger) and was listed by the prestigious French magazine Cahiers du Cinéma as the third best film of 1985.[60][61][62]

In 2017, Darren Aronofsky, director of Mother!, was nominated for both the Worst Director Razzie at the 38th Golden Raspberry Awards and the Golden Lion (the highest award offered at the Venice Film Festival) at the 74th Venice International Film Festival.[63][64]

In 2018, the mystery comedy Holmes & Watson won four of its six nominations (including Worst Picture and Worst Director (Etan Cohen)) at the 39th Golden Raspberry Awards, but was also nominated for two ALFS Awards (including British Actor (Steve Coogan) and Young British Performer (Noah Jupe)).

Despite Johnny Depp receiving two Razzie nominations for his performance in the film, Emily Blunt received an ALFS Award nomination for her performance in the CGI-animated box office hit Sherlock Gnomes. She also received nominations for her parts in the critically acclaimed movies A Quiet Place and Mary Poppins Returns.[65]

While M. Night Shyamalan's After Earth tied Movie 43 for the most awards with three, it also brought its composer James Newton Howard a World Soundtrack Award nomination for Film Composer of the Year.

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Alan Menken

Alan Menken

Alan Irwin Menken is an American composer, best known for his scores and songs for films produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios. His scores and songs for The Little Mermaid (1989), Beauty and the Beast (1991), Aladdin (1992), and Pocahontas (1995) have each won him two Academy Awards. He also composed the scores and songs for Little Shop of Horrors (1986), Newsies (1992), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), Hercules (1997), Home on the Range (2004), Enchanted (2007), Tangled (2010), and Disenchanted (2022), among others. His accolades include eight Academy Awards, becoming the second most prolific Oscar winner in the music categories after Alfred Newman, a Tony Award, eleven Grammy Awards, seven Golden Globe Awards, and a Daytime Emmy Award. Menken is one of seventeen people to have won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony. He is one of two people to have won a Razzie, an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony ("REGOT").

Brian Helgeland

Brian Helgeland

Brian Thomas Helgeland is an American screenwriter, film producer and director. He is most known for writing the screenplays for the films L.A. Confidential and Mystic River. He also wrote and directed the films 42, a biopic of Jackie Robinson, and Legend, about the rise and fall of the infamous London gangsters the Kray twins. His work on L.A. Confidential earned him the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Amy Irving

Amy Irving

Amy Davis Irving is an American actress and singer, who worked in film, stage, and television. Her accolades include an Obie Award, and nominations for two Golden Globe Awards and an Academy Award.

Glenn Close

Glenn Close

Glenn Close is an American actress. Throughout her career spanning over four decades, Close has garnered numerous accolades, including two Screen Actors Guild Awards, three Golden Globe Awards, three Primetime Emmy Awards, and three Tony Awards. Additionally, she has been nominated eight times for an Academy Award, holding the record for the most nominations in an acting category without a win. In 2016, she was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame, and in 2019, Time magazine named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world.

Hillbilly Elegy (film)

Hillbilly Elegy (film)

Hillbilly Elegy is a 2020 American drama film directed by Ron Howard from a screenplay by Vanessa Taylor, It is based on the 2016 memoir of the same name, by J. D. Vance. The film stars Amy Adams, Glenn Close, Gabriel Basso, Haley Bennett, Freida Pinto, Bo Hopkins, and Owen Asztalos.

Aerosmith

Aerosmith

Aerosmith is an American rock band formed in Boston in 1970. The group consists of Steven Tyler, Joe Perry (guitar), Tom Hamilton (bass), Joey Kramer (drums) and Brad Whitford (guitar). Their style, which is rooted in blues-based hard rock, has also incorporated elements of pop rock, heavy metal, glam metal, and rhythm and blues, and has inspired many subsequent rock artists. They are sometimes referred to as "the Bad Boys from Boston" and "America's Greatest Rock and Roll Band". The primary songwriting team of Tyler and Perry is often known as the "Toxic Twins".

I Don't Want to Miss a Thing

I Don't Want to Miss a Thing

"I Don't Want to Miss a Thing" is a song performed by American hard rock band Aerosmith as the official theme song for the 1998 sci-fi disaster film Armageddon, in which lead singer Steven Tyler's daughter Liv starred. It is one of four songs performed by the band for the film, the other three being "What Kind of Love Are You On", "Come Together", and "Sweet Emotion". The power ballad was written by Diane Warren, who originally envisioned it would be performed by "Celine Dion or somebody like that". The song received its airplay premiere on May 12, 1998, and was officially added to radio a week later.

Armageddon (1998 film)

Armageddon (1998 film)

Armageddon is a 1998 American science fiction disaster film produced and directed by Michael Bay, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, and released by Touchstone Pictures. The film follows a group of blue-collar deep-core drillers sent by NASA to stop a gigantic asteroid on a collision course with Earth. It stars Bruce Willis with Billy Bob Thornton, Liv Tyler, Ben Affleck, Will Patton, Peter Stormare, Keith David and Steve Buscemi.

Academy Award for Best Original Song

Academy Award for Best Original Song

The Academy Award for Best Original Song is one of the awards given annually to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). It is presented to the songwriters who have composed the best original song written specifically for a film. The performers of a song are not credited with the Academy Award unless they contributed either to music, lyrics, or both in their own right. The songs that are nominated for this award are typically performed during the ceremony and before this award is presented.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Original Song

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Original Song

The Razzie Award for Worst Original Song was an award presented at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards for the worst song written for a film in the previous year. The following is a list of recipients and nominees of that award, along with the film for which they were nominated.

How Do I Live

How Do I Live

"How Do I Live" is a song written by Diane Warren. It was performed by American singer, songwriter and actress Trisha Yearwood and was featured in the film Con Air. It was also performed by American singer and actress LeAnn Rimes and the extended version of the song was later featured on her second studio album, You Light Up My Life: Inspirational Songs (1997). Both versions were released to radio on May 23, 1997.

Con Air

Con Air

Con Air is a 1997 American action thriller film directed by Simon West and starring Nicolas Cage, John Cusack and John Malkovich. Written by Scott Rosenberg and produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, the film centers on a prison break aboard a Justice Prisoner and Alien Transportation System aircraft, nicknamed "con air". It features Steve Buscemi, Ving Rhames, Colm Meaney, Mykelti Williamson, Dave Chappelle, Rachel Ticotin, Danny Trejo, and Monica Potter in supporting roles.

Categories

Current Awards

Retired

Special categories

Special categories have also been introduced for specific years. Such special awards include:

Year Category Winner Nominees
1996 Worst Written Film Grossing Over $100 Million TwisterMichael Crichton & Anne-Marie Martin The Hunchback of Notre DameTab Murphy, Irene Mecchi, Bob Tzudiker & Noni White
Independence DayDean Devlin & Roland Emmerich
Mission: ImpossibleDavid Koepp and Robert Towne
A Time to KillAkiva Goldsman
1997 Worst Reckless Disregard for Human Life and Public Property Con Air Batman & Robin
The Lost World: Jurassic Park
Turbulence
Volcano
1998 Worst Movie Trends of the Year 58-year-old leading men wooing 28-year-old leading ladies Trailers that give away the film's entire plot
Longer movies, shorter plots
THX Deafening Audio
Mega-zillion-dollar cross-promotional overkill: Armageddon, Godzilla, etc.
2002 Most Flatulent Teen-Targeted Movie Jackass: The Movie Eight Crazy Nights
Crossroads
Scooby-Doo
XXX
2003 Worst Excuse for an Actual Movie (All Concept/No Content) The Cat in the Hat 2 Fast 2 Furious
Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle
From Justin to Kelly
The Real Cancun
2005 Most Tiresome Tabloid Targets Tom Cruise, his baby, Katie Holmes, Oprah Winfrey's couch and the Eiffel Tower Tom Cruise and his anti-psychiatry rant
Paris Hilton and... "who EVER!"
Mr. and Mrs. Britney, their baby (Sean Preston Federline) and their camcorder
The Simpsons: Ashlee, Jessica and Nick
2006 Worst Excuse for Family Entertainment RV Deck the Halls
Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties
The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause
The Shaggy Dog
2007 Worst Excuse for a Horror Movie I Know Who Killed Me Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem
Captivity
Hannibal Rising
Hostel: Part II
2010 Worst Eye-Gouging Misuse of 3D The Last Airbender[66] Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore
Clash of the Titans
The Nutcracker
Saw 3D
2017 The Razzie Nominee So Rotten You Loved It Baywatch The Emoji Movie[67]
Fifty Shades Darker
The Mummy
Transformers: The Last Knight
2019 Worst Reckless Disregard for Human Life and Public Property Rambo: Last Blood Dragged Across Concrete
The Haunting of Sharon Tate
Hellboy
Joker
2021 Worst Bruce Willis Performance in a 2021 Movie[a] Cosmic Sin American Siege
Apex
Deadlock
Fortress
Midnight in the Switchgrass
Out of Death
Survive the Game

Anniversary awards

Every decade-closing ceremony includes an award for the worst actors and movies of the decade—though the 2000 ceremony put the actors as worst of the 20th century instead. Special prizes for the 25th anniversary of the Razzies awards were also given out in 2005.

Period/Ceremony Category Winner Nominees
1980s (10th) Worst Actor Sylvester Stallone Christopher Atkins
Ryan O'Neal
Prince
John Travolta
Worst Actress Bo Derek Faye Dunaway
Madonna
Brooke Shields
Pia Zadora
Worst Picture of the Decade Mommie Dearest (1981) Bolero (1984)
Howard the Duck (1986)
The Lonely Lady (1983)
Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989)
Worst New Star of the Decade Pia Zadora Christopher Atkins
Madonna
Prince
Diana Scarwid
1990s (20th) Worst Actor of the Century Sylvester Stallone Kevin Costner
Prince
William Shatner
Pauly Shore
Worst Actress of the Century Madonna Elizabeth Berkley
Bo Derek
Brooke Shields
Pia Zadora
Worst Picture of the Decade Showgirls (1995) An Alan Smithee Film: Burn Hollywood Burn (1998)
Hudson Hawk (1991)
The Postman (1997)
Striptease (1996)
Worst New Star of the Decade Pauly Shore Elizabeth Berkley
Ahmed Best
Sofia Coppola
Dennis Rodman
Of Our First 25 Years (25th) Worst Razzie Loser Arnold Schwarzenegger Kim Basinger
Angelina Jolie
Ryan O'Neal
Keanu Reeves
Worst Drama Battlefield Earth (2000) The Lonely Lady (1983)
Mommie Dearest (1981)
Showgirls (1995)
Swept Away (2002)
Worst Comedy Gigli (2003) The Adventures of Pluto Nash (2002)
The Cat in the Hat (2003)
Freddy Got Fingered (2001)
Leonard Part 6 (1987)
Worst Musical From Justin to Kelly (2003) Can't Stop the Music (1980)
Glitter (2001)
Rhinestone (1984)
Spice World (1998)
Xanadu (1980)
2000s (30th) Worst Actor of the Decade Eddie Murphy Ben Affleck
Mike Myers
Rob Schneider
John Travolta
Worst Actress of the Decade Paris Hilton Mariah Carey
Lindsay Lohan
Jennifer Lopez
Madonna
Worst Picture of the Decade Battlefield Earth (2000) Freddy Got Fingered (2001)
Gigli (2003)
I Know Who Killed Me (2007)
Swept Away (2002)

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Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Picture

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Picture

The Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Picture is an award given out at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards to the worst film of the past year. Over the 39 ceremonies that have taken place, there have been 202 films nominated for Worst Picture and 42 winners including three ties.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Director

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Director

The Razzie Award for Worst Director is an award presented at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards to the worst director of the previous year. The following is a list of nominees and recipients of that award, along with the film(s) for which they were nominated.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actor

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actor

The Razzie Award for Worst Actor is an award presented at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards to the worst actor of the previous year. The following is a list of nominees and recipients of that award, along with the film(s) for which they were nominated.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress

Razzie Award for Worst Actress is an award presented at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards to the worst actress of the previous year. Male actors performing in drag are eligible, as it is intended as a humorous award.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actor

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actor

The Razzie Award for Worst Supporting Actor is an award presented at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards to the worst supporting actor of the previous year. The following is a list of nominees and recipients of that award, along with the film(s) for which they were nominated.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actress

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actress

The Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Supporting Actress is an award presented annually at the Golden Raspberry Awards to the worst supporting actress of the previous year. Nominees and winners are voted on by the Golden Raspberry Foundation, a group that anyone can join if they pay a yearly subscription fee.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Screenplay

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Screenplay

The Razzie Award for Worst Screenplay is an award presented at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards for the worst film screenplay of the past year. The following is a list of nominees and recipients of that award, including each screenplay's author(s).

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Original Song

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Original Song

The Razzie Award for Worst Original Song was an award presented at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards for the worst song written for a film in the previous year. The following is a list of recipients and nominees of that award, along with the film for which they were nominated.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst New Star

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst New Star

The Razzie Award for Worst New Star was an award presented at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards to the worst new actor or actress of the previous year.

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Musical Score

Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Musical Score

The Razzie Award for Worst Musical Score was an award presented at the annual Golden Raspberry Awards for the worst score composed for a film in the previous year. The following is a list of recipients and nominees of that award, along with the film for which they were nominated. The category was discontinued in 1985.

Michael Crichton

Michael Crichton

John Michael Crichton was an American author and filmmaker. His books have sold over 200 million copies worldwide, and over a dozen have been adapted into films. His literary works heavily feature technology and are usually within the science fiction, techno-thriller, and medical fiction genres. His novels often explore technology and failures of human interaction with it, especially resulting in catastrophes with biotechnology. Many of his novels have medical or scientific underpinnings, reflecting his medical training and scientific background.

Anne-Marie Martin

Anne-Marie Martin

Anne-Marie Martin is a Canadian retired actress, screenwriter and equestrian who is perhaps best known for playing Sgt. Dori Doreau in the American television comedy series Sledge Hammer! from 1986 to 1988, as well as her roles in several horror films, such as Prom Night (1980) and The Boogens (1981).

Other types of awards

Razzie Redeemer Award

The Razzie Redeemer Award is presented to a former nominee or winner who has subsequently made a comeback from critical or commercial failure. The award was introduced in 2014. Winners include Ben Affleck, Sylvester Stallone, Mel Gibson, "A Safe Hollywood-Haven", Melissa McCarthy, Eddie Murphy and Will Smith.

Worst Career Achievement

This award has been given five times, to Ronald Reagan in 1981, to Linda Blair in 1983, to Irwin Allen in 1985, to "Bruce the Rubber Shark" from Jaws[68] in 1987, and to director Uwe Boll[69] in 2009 who received this for his achievement as "Germany's answer to Ed Wood".

Governor's Award

This is a special award given by Razzie Award Governor John J. B. Wilson to an individual whose achievements are not covered by the Razzies' other categories. It was awarded in 2003 to Travis Payne for "Distinguished Under-Achievement in Choreography" in the film From Justin to Kelly.[70]

Barry L. Bumstead Award

This award is given to a critical and financial failure that would have been nominated if it had received an eligible release. It was awarded in 2015 to United Passions,[71][72] to Misconduct in 2016,[73] in 2017 to CHiPs and in 2018 to Billionaire Boys Club.

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Ben Affleck

Ben Affleck

Benjamin Géza Affleck is an American actor and filmmaker. His accolades include two Academy Awards and three Golden Globe Awards. Affleck began his career as a child when he starred in the PBS educational series The Voyage of the Mimi. He later appeared in the independent comedy Dazed and Confused (1993) and various Kevin Smith films.

Mel Gibson

Mel Gibson

Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson is an American actor and film director. He is best known for his action hero roles, particularly his breakout role as Max Rockatansky in the first three films of the post-apocalyptic action series Mad Max and as Martin Riggs in the buddy cop action-comedy film series Lethal Weapon.

Melissa McCarthy

Melissa McCarthy

Melissa Ann McCarthy is an American actress, comedian, producer, writer, and fashion designer. She is the recipient of numerous accolades, including two Primetime Emmy Awards, and nominations for two Academy Awards and two Golden Globe Awards. McCarthy was named by Time as one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2016, and she has been featured multiple times in annual rankings of the highest-paid actresses in the world. In 2020, The New York Times ranked her #22 in its list of the 25 Greatest Actors of the 21st Century.

Eddie Murphy

Eddie Murphy

Edward Regan Murphy is an American actor, comedian, writer, producer, and singer. He rose to fame on the sketch comedy show Saturday Night Live, for which he was a regular cast member from 1980 to 1984. Murphy has also worked as a stand-up comedian and is ranked No. 10 on Comedy Central's list of the 100 Greatest Stand-ups of All Time. Murphy has received a Grammy Award and Emmy Award and was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor in 2015 and the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 2023.

Linda Blair

Linda Blair

Linda Denise Blair is an American actress and activist. She played Regan MacNeil in the horror film The Exorcist (1973), for which she won a Golden Globe Award and received a nomination for an Academy Award. The film established her as a horror icon and scream queen; she reprised the role in the sequel Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977), for which she earned a nomination for a Saturn Award.

Irwin Allen

Irwin Allen

Irwin Allen was an American film and television producer and director, known for his work in science fiction, then later as the "Master of Disaster" for his work in the disaster film genre. His most successful productions were The Poseidon Adventure (1972) and The Towering Inferno (1974). He also created and produced the popular 1960s science-fiction television series Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Lost in Space, The Time Tunnel, and Land of the Giants.

Jaws (franchise)

Jaws (franchise)

Jaws is an American natural horror film series that started with a 1975 film that expanded into three sequels, a theme park ride, and other tie-in merchandise, based on a 1974 novel. The main subject of the saga is a great white shark and its attacks on people in specific areas of the United States and The Bahamas. The Brody family is featured in all of the films as the primary antithesis to the shark. The original film was based on a novel written by Peter Benchley, which itself was inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916. Benchley adapted his novel, along with help from Carl Gottlieb and Howard Sackler, into the 1975 film Jaws, which was directed by Steven Spielberg. Although Gottlieb went on to pen two of the three sequels, neither Benchley nor Spielberg returned to the film series in any capacity.

Ed Wood

Ed Wood

Edward Davis Wood Jr. was an American filmmaker, actor, and pulp novel author.

John J. B. Wilson

John J. B. Wilson

John J. B. Wilson is an American copywriter and publicist. He majored in film and television at University of California, Los Angeles, and after graduation worked on film marketing campaigns.

From Justin to Kelly

From Justin to Kelly

From Justin to Kelly is a 2003 American musical romantic comedy film written by Kim Fuller and directed by Robert Iscove. The film, starring American Idol first-season winner Kelly Clarkson and runner-up Justin Guarini, won the Golden Raspberry Award for "Worst 'Musical' of Our First 25 Years" in 2005. This film is often regarded as one of the worst movies ever made.

CHiPs (film)

CHiPs (film)

CHiPs is a 2017 American buddy cop action comedy film written and directed by Dax Shepard, based on the 1977–1983 television series of the same name created by Rick Rosner. The film stars Shepard as Officer Jon Baker and Michael Peña as Frank "Ponch" Poncherello, with Rosa Salazar, Adam Brody and Vincent D'Onofrio in supporting roles.

Billionaire Boys Club (2018 film)

Billionaire Boys Club (2018 film)

Billionaire Boys Club is a 2018 American biographical crime drama film directed by James Cox and co-written by Cox and Captain Mauzner. The film is about the social club and Ponzi scheme of the same name. The film stars Ansel Elgort, Taron Egerton, Emma Roberts, Kevin Spacey, Jeremy Irvine, Thomas Cocquerel, Rosanna Arquette, Cary Elwes, and Judd Nelson. The film is based on the real life Billionaire Boys Club from Southern California during the 1980s, a group of rich teenagers who get involved in a Ponzi scheme and eventual murder. The story was previously made into a television film in 1987, which starred Judd Nelson as Joe Hunt, while he plays that character's father in the 2018 version.

Ceremonies

Discover more about Ceremonies related topics

1st Golden Raspberry Awards

1st Golden Raspberry Awards

The 1st Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 31, 1981, at John Wilson's living room alcove to recognize the worst the film industry had to offer in 1980. Each category included as many as ten nominees; the maximum was lowered to five the following year to mirror the Oscars.

10th Golden Raspberry Awards

10th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 10th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 25, 1990, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to recognize the worst the film industry had to offer in 1989.

11th Golden Raspberry Awards

11th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 11th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 24, 1991, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to recognize the worst the movie industry had to offer in 1990.

12th Golden Raspberry Awards

12th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 12th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 29, 1992, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to recognize the worst the movie industry had to offer in 1991.

13th Golden Raspberry Awards

13th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 13th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 28, 1993, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to recognize the worst the movie industry had to offer in 1992. Shining Through and Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot each won three Razzies, though the latter wasn't nominated for Worst Picture. Tom Selleck did not attend the ceremony and later accepted his award on The Chevy Chase Show.

14th Golden Raspberry Awards

14th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 14th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 20, 1994, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to recognize the worst the movie industry had to offer in 1993.

15th Golden Raspberry Awards

15th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 15th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 26, 1995, at the El Rey Hotel in Los Angeles, California, to recognize the worst the movie industry had to offer in 1994. Erotic thriller Color of Night became the first Golden Raspberry Worst Picture "winner" to not receive a single other Razzie. Thumbelina became the first animated film to be nominated for and win a Razzie, which it received for Worst Original Song. The Specialist, Wyatt Earp, The Flintstones and Naked Gun 33+1⁄3: The Final Insult each took home two awards, even though the latter two were not nominated for Worst Picture.

16th Golden Raspberry Awards

16th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 16th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 24, 1996, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to recognize the worst the movie industry had to offer in 1995. For the first time in Razzie history, an actual "winner" showed up to the ceremony and accepted his award: Showgirls director Paul Verhoeven.

17th Golden Raspberry Awards

17th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 17th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 23, 1997, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to recognise the worst the movie industry had to offer in 1996. Striptease took home the most Razzies of the evening, winning 6 out of 7 nominations, including Worst Picture.

18th Golden Raspberry Awards

18th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 18th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 22, 1998, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel to recognize the worst the movie industry had to offer in 1997. This year, the film with the most nominations was Batman & Robin with 11, followed by Speed 2: Cruise Control with eight nominations, Anaconda with six nominations, The Postman with five nominations and Fire Down Below with four nominations. The film winning the most awards was The Postman, with all five categories for which it was nominated.

19th Golden Raspberry Awards

19th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 19th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 20, 1999, at the Huntley Hotel Garden Room in Santa Monica, California, to recognize the worst movie industry had to offer in 1998.

20th Golden Raspberry Awards

20th Golden Raspberry Awards

The 20th Golden Raspberry Awards were held on March 25, 2000 at the Sheraton Hotel in Santa Monica, California to recognize the worst the film industry had to offer in 1999.

Criticism

The Razzies have received criticism, including from news sources such as IndieWire[74] and The Daily Telegraph,[75] for several issues, including that members of the Golden Raspberry Foundation are not required to watch the nominated films,[74] it follows a different set of rules[74] which is different from the invitation-only Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.[76][77] Critics take issue with the Razzies picking "easy targets" and critically panned mainstream films instead of those perceived as less popular but more deserving productions,[78] continuing to appeal to celebrities, seemingly for publicity and attention, over other, worthier films and performances.[74]

Sam Adams of IndieWire has said the Razzies are "like hecklers hurling insults at comedians or a concertgoer yelling out 'Whoo!' during a quiet song, they're not-so-secretly crying out to be noticed. The Razzies, properly enough, avoid pouncing on the little guy; they don't trash no-budget indies no one has seen for having bad lighting or terrible sound".[74] Robbie Collin of The Daily Telegraph has said, "the Razzies' ongoing failure to train its sights on anything but the most obvious targets means it grows more tired and redundant by the year".[75] CraveOnline's William Bibbiani stated that the Razzies follow "a cheap shot of pranksterism", and "with only a handful of exceptions, the Razzies have only seen fit to nominate the most infamous movies of the year, and not necessarily the worst."[78] In 2018, Scott Meslow, writing for GQ, accused the Razzies of being "pretty lazy, very sexist, and a little racist" in their choices, reiterating criticism that voters were overreliant on films already widely perceived as notorious, and further asserting they disproportionally nominated films directed by and starring Tyler Perry and films marketed towards women.[79]

In 2021, Liam Gaughan of the Dallas Observer wrote, "It’s easy to find fault in any awards nominations, be it Oscars or Razzies, but the greater issue that the Razzies face is that making fun of bad movies is no longer original. Film criticism, essays and satire all live in abundance on the internet, from both established publications and non-professionals."[77] Daniel Cook Johnson of MovieWeb echoed a similar sentiment, writing, "Wilson and Murphy’s insulting event may have been a wonderfully snarky and skewering enterprise back in the ‘80s when there was much less film criticism and audience reactions to recent movies. But now, there’s little reason for such an invalid vehicle, and the retirement option should be recognized before their relevance and shaky reputation are completely gone."[80]

The Razzies have also seen significant criticism from both within the industry and its own voting body for including underage actors in their ballots and nominations, with many noting the outcome of their careers and later personal and legal issues. Among those who were nominated or won include Gary Coleman (at age 14) for On the Right Track in 1982, Macaulay Culkin (at age 14) for Getting Even With Dad, The Pagemaster, and Richie Rich in 1995, Jake Lloyd (at age 11) for Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace, Jaden Smith (age 15) for After Earth ("winner"), Ryan Kiera Armstrong (at age 12) for Firestarter. Maddie Ziegler, though 18 years old when nominated, "won" Worst Supporting Actress for Music, released in 2021, for a role she played at 14 years old during filming in 2017. In 2023, the Razzies announced they would no longer nominate individuals under age 18.[9]

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Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a professional honorary organization with the stated goal of advancing the arts and sciences of motion pictures. The Academy's corporate management and general policies are overseen by a board of governors, which includes representatives from each of the craft branches.

GQ

GQ

GQ is an American international monthly men's magazine based in New York City and founded in 1931. The publication focuses on fashion, style, and culture for men, though articles on food, movies, fitness, sex, music, travel, celebrities' sports, technology, and books are also featured.

Dallas Observer

Dallas Observer

Dallas Observer is a free digital and print publication based in Dallas, Texas. The Observer publishes daily online coverage of local news, restaurants, music, and arts, as well as longform narrative journalism. A weekly print issue circulates every Thursday. The Observer has been owned by Voice Media Group since January 2013.

MovieWeb

MovieWeb

MovieWeb is an entertainment news website and video brand.

Gary Coleman

Gary Coleman

Gary Wayne Coleman was an American actor and comedian. Coleman was the highest-paid child actor on television throughout the late 1970s and 1980s. He was rated first on a list of VH1's "100 Greatest Kid Stars".

On the Right Track

On the Right Track

On the Right Track is a 1981 American romantic comedy film with the feature film debut of Gary Coleman. It was directed by Lee Philips, produced by Ronald Jacobs, and released to theaters by 20th Century Fox in Spring 1981.

Macaulay Culkin

Macaulay Culkin

Macaulay Macaulay Culkin Culkin is an American actor. Often regarded as one of the most successful child actors of the 1990s, he was placed 2nd on VH1's list of the "100 Greatest Kid-Stars". Culkin rose to prominence as a child actor starring as Kevin McCallister in the first two films of the Home Alone film series, for which he was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy. He also starred in the films My Girl (1991), The Good Son (1993), The Nutcracker (1993), Getting Even with Dad (1994), The Pagemaster (1994), and Richie Rich (1994).

Getting Even with Dad

Getting Even with Dad

Getting Even with Dad is a 1994 American comedy film starring Macaulay Culkin and Ted Danson.

Richie Rich (film)

Richie Rich (film)

Richie Rich is a 1994 American comedy film directed by Donald Petrie and based on the comic character of the same name created by Alfred Harvey and Warren Kremer. The film was distributed by Warner Bros. under their Warner Bros. Family Entertainment label. The film stars Macaulay Culkin, John Larroquette, Edward Herrmann, Jonathan Hyde, and Christine Ebersole, while Reggie Jackson, Claudia Schiffer, and Ben Stein appear in cameo roles. Culkin's younger brother, Rory Culkin, played the part of Young Richie Rich. In theaters, the film was shown with a Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner cartoon called Chariots of Fur, and it was followed by the 1998 direct-to-video sequel Richie Rich's Christmas Wish.

Jake Lloyd

Jake Lloyd

Jake Matthew Lloyd, also known as Jake Broadbent, is an American former actor who portrayed young Anakin Skywalker in the 1999 film Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace and Jamie Langston in Jingle All the Way.

Jaden Smith

Jaden Smith

Jaden Christopher Syre Smith, also known mononymously as Jaden, is an American rapper, singer, and actor. He has received various accolades, including a Teen Choice Award, an MTV Movie Award, a BET Award and a Young Artist Award, among nominations for a Grammy Award, two NAACP Image Awards and an Empire Award.

After Earth

After Earth

After Earth is a 2013 American post-apocalyptic action film directed by M. Night Shyamalan, who co-wrote it with Gary Whitta. The film was loosely based on an original story idea by Will Smith about a father-and-son trip in the wilderness before it was eventually reworked into a sci-fi setting, taking place 1,000 years in the future where humans evacuated Earth to another planet due to a massive environmental catastrophe. It is the second film after The Pursuit of Happyness that stars real-life father and son Will and Jaden Smith; Will Smith also produced via his company Overbrook Entertainment, and the distribution was by Columbia Pictures. The film was co-produced by John Rusk, who was also the first assistant director on this film as well as on many of Shyamalan's other films. The film follows father and son, Cypher and Kitai Raige, who find themselves crash-landing on the abandoned Earth. When Cypher gets injured from the crash, Kitai must travel across the wild environment in search of a backup beacon to fire a distress signal, while having to fend himself from the highly evolved animals, as well as an extraterrestrial creature that detects its prey by smelling fear.

Source: "Golden Raspberry Awards", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Raspberry_Awards.

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See also
Notes
  1. ^ The category was retracted after the disclosure of Bruce Willis having aphasia.[7]
References
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