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Glen Rock, New Jersey

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Glen Rock, New Jersey
Borough of Glen Rock
Glen Rock's eponymous boulder is located on the intersection of Rock Road and Doremus Avenue.
Glen Rock's eponymous boulder is located on the intersection of Rock Road and Doremus Avenue.
Glen Rock is located in Bergen County, New Jersey
Glen Rock
Glen Rock
Location in Bergen County
Glen Rock is located in New Jersey
Glen Rock
Glen Rock
Location in New Jersey
Glen Rock is located in the United States
Glen Rock
Glen Rock
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°57′34″N 74°07′31″W / 40.959471°N 74.125202°W / 40.959471; -74.125202Coordinates: 40°57′34″N 74°07′31″W / 40.959471°N 74.125202°W / 40.959471; -74.125202[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyBergen
IncorporatedSeptember 14, 1894
Named forProminent glacial erratic
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorKristine Morieko (D, term ends December 31, 2023)[3][4]
 • AdministratorLenora Benjamin[5]
 • Municipal clerkJacqueline Scalia[5]
Area
 • Total2.72 sq mi (7.04 km2)
 • Land2.70 sq mi (7.00 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.04 km2)  0.51%
 • Rank364th of 565 in state
35th of 70 in county[1]
Elevation131 ft (40 m)
Population
 • Total12,133
 • Estimate 
(12064)[9][11]
2,021
 • Rank209th of 566 in state
28th of 70 in county[12]
 • Density4,488.7/sq mi (1,733.1/km2)
  • Rank139th of 566 in state
35th of 70 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)201[15]
FIPS code3400326640[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0885233[1][18]
Websitewww.glenrocknj.net

Glen Rock is a borough in Bergen County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 United States census, the borough's population was 12,133,[9][10] an increase of 532 (+4.6%) from the 2010 census count of 11,601,[19][20][21] which in turn reflected increased by 55 (+0.5%) from the 11,546 counted in the 2000 census.[22]

The borough has been one of the state's highest-income communities. Based on data from the American Community Survey for 2013–2017, Glen Rock residents had a median household income of $162,443, ranked 6th in the state among municipalities with more than 10,000 residents, more than double the statewide median of $76,475.[23]

Glen Rock was voted one of the best places to live in New Jersey for its low crime rate, good schools, close proximity to New York City and its high property values, including in 2018, when Niche ranked it the 19th best place to live in New Jersey.[24]

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Borough (New Jersey)

Borough (New Jersey)

A borough, in the context of local government in the U.S. state of New Jersey, refers to one of five types and one of eleven forms of municipal government.

Bergen County, New Jersey

Bergen County, New Jersey

Bergen County is the most populous county in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 United States census, the county's population was 955,732, an increase of 50,616 (+5.6%) from the 2010 census count of 905,116, which in turn reflected an increase of 20,998 (2.4%) from the 884,118 counted in the 2000 census. Located in the northeastern corner of New Jersey and its Gateway Region, Bergen County and its many inner suburbs constitute a highly developed part of the New York City metropolitan area, bordering the Hudson River; the George Washington Bridge, which crosses the Hudson, connects Bergen County with Manhattan.

U.S. state

U.S. state

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory where it shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

New Jersey

New Jersey

New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States. It is bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by Delaware Bay and the state of Delaware. At 7,354 square miles (19,050 km2), New Jersey is the fifth-smallest state in land area; but with close to 9.3 million residents, it ranks 11th in population and first in population density. The state capital is Trenton, and the most populous city is Newark. With the exception of Warren County, all of the state's 21 counties lie within the combined statistical areas of New York City or Philadelphia.

2020 United States census

2020 United States census

The United States census of 2020 was the twenty-fourth decennial United States census. Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2020. Other than a pilot study during the 2000 census, this was the first U.S. census to offer options to respond online or by phone, in addition to the paper response form used for previous censuses. The census was taken during the COVID-19 pandemic, which affected its administration. The census recorded a resident population of 331,449,281 in the fifty states and the District of Columbia, an increase of 7.4 percent, or 22,703,743, over the preceding decade. The growth rate was the second-lowest ever recorded, and the net increase was the sixth highest in history. This was the first census where the ten most populous states each surpassed 10 million residents as well as the first census where the ten most populous cities each surpassed 1 million residents.

2010 United States census

2010 United States census

The United States census of 2010 was the twenty-third United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million people as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

2000 United States census

2000 United States census

The United States census of 2000, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2 percent over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 census. This was the twenty-second federal census and was at the time the largest civilly administered peacetime effort in the United States.

American Community Survey

American Community Survey

The American Community Survey (ACS) is a demographics survey program conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. It regularly gathers information previously contained only in the long form of the decennial census, including ancestry, citizenship, educational attainment, income, language proficiency, migration, disability, employment, and housing characteristics. These data are used by many public-sector, private-sector, and not-for-profit stakeholders to allocate funding, track shifting demographics, plan for emergencies, and learn about local communities. Sent to approximately 295,000 addresses monthly, it is the largest household survey that the Census Bureau administers.

New York City

New York City

New York, often called New York City or NYC, is the most populous city in the United States. With a 2020 population of 8,804,190 distributed over 300.46 square miles (778.2 km2), New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States, and is more than twice as populous as second-place Los Angeles. New York City lies at the southern tip of New York State, and constitutes the geographical and demographic center of both the Northeast megalopolis and the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the United States both by population and by urban landmass. With over 20.1 million people in its metropolitan statistical area and 23.5 million in its combined statistical area as of 2020, New York is one of the world's most populous megacities, and over 58 million people live within 250 mi (400 km) of the city. New York City is a global cultural, financial, entertainment, and media center with a significant influence on commerce, health care and life sciences, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, dining, art, fashion, and sports. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy, an established safe haven for global investors, and is sometimes described as the capital of the world.

Niche (company)

Niche (company)

Niche.com, formerly known as College Prowler, is an American company headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, that runs a ranking and review site. The company was founded by Luke Skurman in 2002 as a publisher of print guidebooks on US colleges, but is now an online resource providing information on K–12 schools, colleges, cities, neighborhoods, and companies across the United States.

History

Glen Rock was formed on September 14, 1894, from portions of Ridgewood Township and Saddle River Township during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone.[25][26][27] The main impetus for the break from Ridgewood Township was the decision to have Glen Rock students attend a new school closer to the center of Ridgewood instead of their one-room schoolhouse located at the intersection of Ackerman Avenue and Rock Road.[28] Originally, the borough was to be named "South Ridgewood", but in order to prevent confusion with the neighboring Ridgewood Village, resident Monsieur Viel suggested the alternative name of Glen Rock.[29]

The borough was settled around the Glen Rock, a large boulder in a small valley (glen), from which the borough gets its name.[30][31] The rock, a glacial erratic weighing in at 570 short tons (520 t) and located where Doremus Avenue meets Rock Road, is believed to have been carried to the site by a glacier that picked up the rock 15,000 years ago near Peekskill, New York and carried it for 20 miles (32 km) to its present location. The Lenape Native Americans called the boulder "Pamachapuka" (meaning "stone from heaven" or "stone from the sky") and used it for signal fires and as a trail marker.[28][32][33]

The borough was the site of one of Bergen County's most serious public transportation accidents. In 1911, a trolley operator for the North Jersey Rapid Transit Company, one day away from retirement, died in a crash with an opposing trolley around the intersection of Prospect and Grove Streets that was caused by signal problems. In addition to the death of the opposing trolley operator, 12 people were injured. This crash in part hastened the demise of this transportation mode which ran from Elmwood Park, New Jersey to Suffern, New York and competed with the Erie Railroad. The right of way for this trolley line was purchased by the Public Service Enterprise Group and is still visible today.[34][35]

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Boroughitis

Boroughitis

Boroughitis was the creation in the 1890s, usually by referendum, of large numbers of small boroughs in the U.S. state of New Jersey, particularly in Bergen County. Attempts by the New Jersey Legislature to reform local government and school systems led to the breakup of most of Bergen County's townships into small boroughs, which still balkanize the state's political map. This occurred following the development of commuter suburbs in New Jersey, residents of which wanted more government services, whereas the long-time rural population feared the increases in taxation that would result.

Glen Rock (boulder)

Glen Rock (boulder)

The Glen Rock is a 570-ton boulder located in Glen Rock, New Jersey. The boulder, which is the namesake of the town in which it is located, is the largest glacial erratic found atop Triassic bedrock in the state of New Jersey. The exact origin of the rock is uncertain, though studies alternatively place its origin in New York State's Hudson Highlands and the New Jersey Highlands. The Glen Rock, which is composed of gneiss, is located in the center of a former glacial lake.

Boulder

Boulder

In geology, a boulder is a rock fragment with size greater than 25.6 centimetres (10.1 in) in diameter. Smaller pieces are called cobbles and pebbles. While a boulder may be small enough to move or roll manually, others are extremely massive. In common usage, a boulder is too large for a person to move. Smaller boulders are usually just called rocks or stones. The word boulder derives from boulder stone, from the Middle English bulderston or Swedish bullersten.

Glen

Glen

A glen is a valley, typically one that is long and bounded by gently sloped concave sides, unlike a ravine, which is deep and bounded by steep slopes. Whittow defines it as a "Scottish term for a deep valley in the Highlands" that is "narrower than a strath". The word is Goidelic in origin: gleann in Irish and Scottish Gaelic, glion in Manx. The designation "glen" also occurs often in place names.

Glacial erratic

Glacial erratic

A glacial erratic is glacially deposited rock differing from the type of rock native to the area in which it rests. Erratics, which take their name from the Latin word errare, are carried by glacial ice, often over distances of hundreds of kilometres. Erratics can range in size from pebbles to large boulders such as Big Rock in Alberta.

Glacier

Glacier

A glacier is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight. A glacier forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation over many years, often centuries. It acquires distinguishing features, such as crevasses and seracs, as it slowly flows and deforms under stresses induced by its weight. As it moves, it abrades rock and debris from its substrate to create landforms such as cirques, moraines, or fjords. Although a glacier may flow into a body of water, it forms only on land and is distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water.

Peekskill, New York

Peekskill, New York

Peekskill is a city in northwestern Westchester County, New York, United States, 50 miles (80 km) from New York City. Established as a village in 1816, it was incorporated as a city in 1940. It lies on a bay along the east side of the Hudson River, across from Jones Point in Rockland County. The population was 25,431 at the 2020 US census, an increase over 23,583 during the 2010 census. It is the third largest municipality in northern Westchester County, after the towns of Cortlandt and Yorktown.

Lenape

Lenape

The Lenape also called the Leni Lenape, Lenni Lenape and Delaware people, are an indigenous peoples of the Northeastern Woodlands, who live in the United States and Canada. Their historical territory included present-day northeastern Delaware, New Jersey, the Lehigh Valley and other regions of eastern Pennsylvania, New York City, western Long Island, and the lower Hudson Valley. Today, Lenape people belong to the Delaware Nation and Delaware Tribe of Indians in Oklahoma; the Stockbridge–Munsee Community in Wisconsin; and the Munsee-Delaware Nation, Moravian of the Thames First Nation, and Delaware of Six Nations in Ontario.

Native Americans in the United States

Native Americans in the United States

Native Americans, also known as American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Americans, and other terms, are the Indigenous peoples of the mainland United States. There are 574 federally recognized tribes living within the US, about half of which are associated with Indian reservations. As defined by the United States Census, "Native Americans" are Indigenous tribes that are originally from the contiguous United States, along with Alaska Natives. Indigenous peoples of the United States who are not listed as American Indian or Alaska Native include Native Hawaiians, Samoan Americans, and Chamorros. The US Census groups these peoples as "Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islanders".

Elmwood Park, New Jersey

Elmwood Park, New Jersey

Elmwood Park is a borough in Bergen County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey, and is a bedroom suburb located 14 miles (23 km) from New York City. As of the 2020 United States census, the borough's population was 21,422, an increase of 2,019 (+10.4%) from the 2010 census count of 19,403, which in turn reflected an increase of 478 (+2.5%) from the 18,925 counted in the 2000 census.

Erie Railroad

Erie Railroad

The Erie Railroad was a railroad that operated in the northeastern United States, originally connecting New York City — more specifically Jersey City, New Jersey, where Erie's Pavonia Terminal, long demolished, used to stand — with Lake Erie, at Dunkirk, New York. It expanded west to Chicago with its 1865 merger with the former Atlantic and Great Western Railroad, also known as the New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio Railroad. Its mainline route proved influential in the development and economic growth of the Southern Tier of New York State, including cities such as Binghamton, Elmira, and Hornell. The Erie Railroad repair shops were located in Hornell and was Hornell's largest employer. Hornell was also where Erie's mainline split into two routes, one northwest to Buffalo and the other west to Chicago.

Public Service Enterprise Group

Public Service Enterprise Group

The Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG) is a publicly traded diversified energy company headquartered in Newark, New Jersey and was established in 1985 with a legacy dating back to 1903.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.72 square miles (7.04 km2), including 2.70 square miles (7.00 km2) of land and 0.01 square miles (0.04 km2) of water (0.51%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Ferndale.[36]

The borough borders the municipalities of Fair Lawn, Paramus and Ridgewood in Bergen County, and Hawthorne in Passaic County.[37][38][39]

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United States Census Bureau

United States Census Bureau

The United States Census Bureau (USCB), officially the Bureau of the Census, is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Fair Lawn, New Jersey

Fair Lawn, New Jersey

Fair Lawn is a borough in Bergen County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey, and a bedroom suburb located 12 miles (19 km) northwest of New York City. As of the 2020 United States census, the borough's population was 34,927, an increase of 2,470 (+7.6%) from the 2010 census count of 32,457, which in turn reflected an increase of 820 (+2.6%) from the 31,637 counted at the 2000 census.

Paramus, New Jersey

Paramus, New Jersey

Paramus is a borough in the central portion of Bergen County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. A suburb of New York City, Paramus is located 15 to 20 miles northwest of Midtown Manhattan and approximately 8 miles (13 km) west of Upper Manhattan. The Wall Street Journal characterized Paramus as "quintessentially suburban". The borough is a major commercial hub for North Jersey.

Ridgewood, New Jersey

Ridgewood, New Jersey

Ridgewood is a village in Bergen County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 United States census, the village's population was 25,979, an increase of 1,021 (+4.1%) from the 2010 census count of 24,958, which in turn reflected an increase of 22 (+0.1%) from 24,936 in the 2000 census. Ridgewood is a suburban bedroom community of New York City, located approximately 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Midtown Manhattan.

Hawthorne, New Jersey

Hawthorne, New Jersey

Hawthorne is a borough in Passaic County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 United States census, the borough's population was 19,637, an increase of 846 (+4.5%) from the 2010 census count of 18,791, which in turn reflected an increase of 573 (+3.1%) from the 18,218 counted in the 2000 census.

Passaic County, New Jersey

Passaic County, New Jersey

Passaic County is a county in the U.S. state of New Jersey that is part of the New York metropolitan area. As of the 2020 United States census, the population of Passaic County was enumerated at 524,118, an increase of 22,892 (4.6%) from the 501,226 counted at the 2010 U.S. census, in turn an increase of 12,177 (+2.5%) from the 489,049 counted in the 2000 census. The most populous place in Passaic County is Paterson, with 159,732 residents at the 2020 Census, more than 29% of the county's population, while West Milford covered 80.32 square miles (208.0 km2), the largest total area of any municipality and more than 40% of the county's area.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900613
19101,05572.1%
19202,181106.7%
19304,369100.3%
19405,17718.5%
19507,14538.0%
196012,89680.5%
197013,0110.9%
198011,497−11.6%
199010,883−5.3%
200011,5466.1%
201011,6010.5%
202012,1334.6%
2021 (est.)12,064[9][11]−0.6%
Population sources:
1900–1920[40] 1900–1910[41]
1910–1930[42] 1900–2010[43][44][45]
2000[46][47] 2010[19][20][21] 2020[9][10]

2010 census

The 2010 United States census counted 11,601 people, 3,917 households, and 3,290 families in the borough. The population density was 4,275.2 per square mile (1,650.7/km2). There were 4,016 housing units at an average density of 1,480.0 per square mile (571.4/km2). The racial makeup was 87.16% (10,111) White, 1.37% (159) Black or African American, 0.09% (10) Native American, 9.09% (1,054) Asian, 0.03% (3) Pacific Islander, 0.62% (72) from other races, and 1.66% (192) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.54% (527) of the population.[19]

Of the 3,917 households, 46.3% had children under the age of 18; 75.4% were married couples living together; 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present and 16.0% were non-families. Of all households, 14.2% were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.28.[19]

30.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 19.7% from 25 to 44, 32.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.2 years. For every 100 females, the population had 94.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 90.1 males.[19]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $140,882 (with a margin of error of +/− $13,445) and the median family income was $160,360 (+/− $10,024). Males had a median income of $110,506 (+/− $13,238) versus $64,250 (+/− $11,788) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $61,013 (+/− $6,466). About 1.1% of families and 1.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.6% of those under age 18 and 2.2% of those age 65 or over.[48]

Same-sex couples headed 20 households in 2010, an increase from the 15 counted in 2000.[49]

2000 census

As of the 2000 United States census[16] there were 11,546 people, 3,977 households, and 3,320 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,246.1 people per square mile (1,638.9/km2). There were 4,024 housing units at an average density of 1,479.9 per square mile (571.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 90.07% White, 1.81% African American, 0.16% Native American, 6.48% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.61% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.72% of the population.[46][47]

There were 3,977 households, out of which 43.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.1% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.5% were non-families. 14.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.22.[46][47]

In the borough the age distribution of the population shows 29.4% under the age of 18, 3.9% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.5 males.[46][47]

The median income for a household in the borough was $104,192, and the median income for a family was $111,280. Males had a median income of $84,614 versus $52,430 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $45,091. About 2.1% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.[46][47]

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1900 United States census

1900 United States census

The United States census of 1900, conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1900, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21.01% from the 62,979,766 persons enumerated during the 1890 census.

1910 United States census

1910 United States census

The United States census of 1910, conducted by the Census Bureau on April 15, 1910, determined the resident population of the United States to be 92,228,496, an increase of 21 percent over the 76,212,168 persons enumerated during the 1900 census. The 1910 census switched from a portrait page orientation to a landscape orientation.

1920 United States census

1920 United States census

The United States census of 1920, conducted by the Census Bureau during one month from January 5, 1920, determined the resident population of the United States to be 106,021,537, an increase of 15.0 percent over the 92,228,496 persons enumerated during the 1910 census.

1930 United States census

1930 United States census

The United States census of 1930, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from April 1, 1930, determined the resident population of the United States to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 census.

1940 United States census

1940 United States census

The United States census of 1940, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7.3 percent over the 1930 population of 122,775,046 people. The census date of record was April 1, 1940.

1950 United States census

1950 United States census

The United States census of 1950, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 150,697,361, an increase of 14.5 percent over the 131,669,275 persons enumerated during the 1940 census.

1960 United States census

1960 United States census

The United States census of 1960, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 179,323,175, an increase of 18.5 percent over the 151,325,798 persons enumerated during the 1950 census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over 200,000. This census's data determined the electoral votes for the 1964 and 1968 presidential elections. This was also the last census in which New York was the most populous state.

1970 United States census

1970 United States census

The United States census of 1970, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 203,392,031, an increase of 13.4 percent over the 179,323,175 persons enumerated during the 1960 census.

1980 United States census

1980 United States census

The United States census of 1980, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11.4 percent over the 203,184,772 persons enumerated during the 1970 census. It was the first census in which a state—California—recorded a population of 20 million people, as well as the first in which all states recorded populations of over 400,000.

1990 United States census

1990 United States census

The United States census of 1990, conducted by the Census Bureau, was the first census to be directed by a woman, Barbara Everitt Bryant. It determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9.8 percent over the 226,545,805 persons enumerated during the 1980 census.

2000 United States census

2000 United States census

The United States census of 2000, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2 percent over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 census. This was the twenty-second federal census and was at the time the largest civilly administered peacetime effort in the United States.

2010 United States census

2010 United States census

The United States census of 2010 was the twenty-third United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million people as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Economy

Glen Rock's central business district is situated on a roughly 0.2 mile (0.3 km) stretch of Rock Road between the borough's two train stations.[50] Long-standing businesses include the Glen Rock Inn, a bar and restaurant in operation since 1948,[51] and the Rock Ridge Pharmacy, opened in 1950.[52]

Corporate residents of Glen Rock include Genovese & Maddalene, an architectural firm that specialized in designing churches.[53]

Arts and culture

Musical groups from the borough include the indie-rock band Titus Andronicus.[54]

In October 2005, many scenes of prominent locations in town were shot for the film World Trade Center, starring Nicolas Cage and directed by Oliver Stone, with Glen Rock having had 11 residents who were killed in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.[55]

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Titus Andronicus (band)

Titus Andronicus (band)

Titus Andronicus is an American indie rock band formed in Glen Rock, New Jersey, in 2005. The band is composed of singer-lyricist-guitarist Patrick Stickles, guitarist Liam Betson, bassist R.J. Gordon, and drummer Chris Wilson. The group takes its name from the Shakespeare play Titus Andronicus, and has cited musical and stylistic influences such as Neutral Milk Hotel and Pulp.

World Trade Center (film)

World Trade Center (film)

World Trade Center is a 2006 American docudrama disaster film directed by Oliver Stone and written by Andrea Berloff, based on the experience of a few police officers during the September 11 attacks, in which they were trapped in the rubble of the collapsed World Trade Center. It stars Nicolas Cage, Maria Bello, Michael Peña, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Stephen Dorff, and Michael Shannon. The film was shot between October 2005 and February 2006, and theatrically released in the United States by Paramount Pictures on August 9, 2006. It was met with generally positive reviews from critics and grossed $163 million worldwide.

Nicolas Cage

Nicolas Cage

Nicolas Kim Coppola, known professionally as Nicolas Cage, is an American actor and film producer. Born into the Coppola family, he is the recipient of various accolades, including an Academy Award, a Screen Actors Guild Award, and a Golden Globe Award.

Oliver Stone

Oliver Stone

William Oliver Stone is an American film director, producer, and screenwriter. Stone won an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay as writer of Midnight Express (1978), and wrote the gangster film remake Scarface (1983). Stone achieved prominence as writer and director of the war drama Platoon (1986), which won Academy Awards for Best Director and Best Picture. Platoon was the first in a trilogy of films based on the Vietnam War, in which Stone served as an infantry soldier. He continued the series with Born on the Fourth of July (1989)—for which Stone won his second Best Director Oscar—and Heaven & Earth (1993). Stone's other works include the Salvadoran Civil War-based drama Salvador (1986); the financial drama Wall Street (1987) and its sequel Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (2010); the Jim Morrison biographical film The Doors (1991); the satirical black comedy crime film Natural Born Killers (1994); a trilogy of films based on the American Presidency: JFK (1991), Nixon (1995), and W. (2008); and Snowden (2016).

Government

Local government

Glen Rock Borough Hall
Glen Rock Borough Hall

Glen Rock is governed under the borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 564) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[56] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. The Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6][3]

The borough form of government used by Glen Rock is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the Mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The Mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The Mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the Mayor with the advice and consent of the Council.[57][58] The Council appoints a professional borough administrator who is the Chief Administrative Officer of the Borough, responsible to the Mayor and Council.[59]

As of 2022, the Mayor of Glen Rock is Democrat Kristine Morieko, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Teresa Gilbreath (D, 2022), Mary Barchetto (D, 2024), Jonathan Cole (D, 2023), Robert Dill (D, 2022), Amy Martin (D, 2023) and Jill Orlich (D, 2024).[3][60][61][62][63][64]

In January 2020, the Borough Council chose Caroline Unzaga from a list of three candidates nominated by the Democratic municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2021 that had been held by Kristine Morieko until she stepped down to take office as mayor.[65]

In July 2019, the Borough Council selected Michelle Torpey from a list of three names nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2019 that was vacated by Bill J. Leonard Jr. after he resigned from office and announced that he was moving out of the borough.[66]

Bruce Packer won the mayoral seat in the 2015 general election over incumbent John van Keuren, who had been seeking a fourth term. Packer's Democratic running-mates William "Skip" Huisking and Kristine Morieko were also elected to three-year Borough Council terms, giving the borough a Democratic mayor for the first time in 12 years, and a 3–3 split on the council.[67]

Glen Rock's borough government recognizes an annual Poverty Awareness Week. The community comes together for an annual project to combat extreme global poverty. In 2007, the community built a Habitat House in Paterson, New Jersey (the second home built by Glen Rock residents), and the community was honored as Paterson Habitat's Volunteers of the Year (a first for a community). In 2008, the Borough came together for the Water for Africa Music Festival. The event raised the funds to pay for two Roundabout PlayPump water systems in sub-Saharan Africa.[68] In 2009, the community continued its battle against poverty, raising funds to battle malaria in hurricane-ravaged Haiti.

The Borough government has declared Glen Rock a sustainable community, pursuing a "Green Up" policy that reflects a commitment to protecting the borough's trees, water and general environment. Shade trees are provided at no cost annually to citizens with cooperation from the DPW.[69][70] On April 10, 2019, the Borough Council passed an ordinance outlawing single-use plastic bags in retail establishments.[71]

Federal, state and county representation

Glen Rock is located in the 5th congressional district[72] and is part of New Jersey's 38th state legislative district.[20][73][74] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Glen Rock had been in the 35th state legislative district.[75]

For the 118th United States Congress, New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Josh Gottheimer (D, Wyckoff).[76][77] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[78] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[79][80]

For the 2022–2023 session, the 38th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Lagana (D, Paramus) and in the General Assembly by Lisa Swain (D, Fair Lawn) and Chris Tully (D, Bergenfield).[81]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a Board of County Commissioners comprised of seven members who are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each November; a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore are selected from among its seven members at a reorganization meeting held every January. Other Bergen County Constitutional Offices are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[82] As of 2022, the county executive is Democratic James J. Tedesco III of Paramus, whose term of office ends December 31, 2022.[83] Bergen County's Commissioners are Chairwoman Tracy Silna Zur (D, Franklin Lakes, term as commissioner ends December 31, 2024; term as chairwoman ends 2022),[84] Vice Chairman Thomas J. Sullivan Jr. (D, Montvale, 2022),[85] Chair Pro Tempore Joan Voss (D, Fort Lee, 2023),[86] Mary J. Amoroso (D, Mahwah, 2022),[87] Ramon M. Hache Sr. (D, Ridgewood, 2023),[88] Germaine M. Ortiz (D, Emerson, 2022)[89] and Steven A. Tanelli (D, North Arlington, 2024).[90][91][92][93][94][95][96][97] Bergen County's constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale, 2026),[98][99] Sheriff Anthony Cureton (D, Englewood, 2022)[100][101] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill, 2026).[102][103][93][104]

Politics

As of March 2011, there were a total of 8,112 registered voters in Glen Rock, of which 2,490 (30.7% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,971 (24.3% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 3,645 (44.9% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 6 voters registered as Libertarians or Greens.[105] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 69.9% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 99.9% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[105][106]

In the 2016 presidential election, Democrat Hillary Clinton received 4,063 votes (60.4% vs. 54.2% countywide), ahead of Republican Donald Trump with 2,355 votes (35.0% vs. 41.1%) and other candidates with 206 votes (3.1% vs. 4.6%), among the 6,787 ballots cast by the borough's 8885 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.7% (vs. 72.5% in Bergen County).[107] In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 3,326 votes (52.6% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 2,881 votes (45.5% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 50 votes (0.8% vs. 0.9%), among the 6,326 ballots cast by the borough's 8,486 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.5% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[108][109] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 3,762 votes (55.3% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 2,955 votes (43.4% vs. 44.5%) and other candidates with 45 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 6,807 ballots cast by the borough's 8,316 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.9% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[110][111] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 3,333 votes (51.5% vs. 51.7% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 3,092 votes (47.8% vs. 47.2%) and other candidates with 38 votes (0.6% vs. 0.7%), among the 6,475 ballots cast by the borough's 7,931 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.6% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[112]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 61.6% of the vote (2,606 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 37.2% (1,574 votes), and other candidates with 1.1% (48 votes), among the 4,329 ballots cast by the borough's 8,196 registered voters (101 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 52.8%.[113][114] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 2,204 ballots cast (47.2% vs. 48.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 2,116 votes (45.3% vs. 45.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 299 votes (6.4% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 11 votes (0.2% vs. 0.5%), among the 4,666 ballots cast by the borough's 8,203 registered voters, yielding a 56.9% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[115]

Gurbir Grewal, a member of Glen Rock's Indian American and Sikh communities, was nominated by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to the position of Bergen County prosecutor in September 2013.[116] Grewal was sworn as an assistant attorney general and acting Bergen County prosecutor on January 4, 2016.[117]

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Borough (New Jersey)

Borough (New Jersey)

A borough, in the context of local government in the U.S. state of New Jersey, refers to one of five types and one of eleven forms of municipal government.

At-large

At-large

At large is a description for members of a governing body who are elected or appointed to represent a whole membership or population, rather than a subset. In multi-hierarchical bodies the term rarely extends to a tier beneath the highest division. A contrast is implied, with certain electoral districts or narrower divisions. It can be given to the associated territory, if any, to denote its undivided nature, in a specific context. Unambiguous synonyms are the prefixes of cross-, all- or whole-, such as cross-membership, or all-state.

Legislature

Legislature

A legislature is an assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city. They are often contrasted with the executive and judicial powers of government.

Chief administrative officer

Chief administrative officer

A chief administrative officer (CAO) is a top-tier executive who supervises the daily operations of an organization and is ultimately responsible for its performance.

Mayor

Mayor

In many countries, a mayor is the highest-ranking official in a municipal government such as that of a city or a town. Worldwide, there is a wide variance in local laws and customs regarding the powers and responsibilities of a mayor as well as the means by which a mayor is elected or otherwise mandated. Depending on the system chosen, a mayor may be the chief executive officer of the municipal government, may simply chair a multi-member governing body with little or no independent power, or may play a solely ceremonial role. A mayor's duties and responsibilities may be to appoint and oversee municipal managers and employees, provide basic governmental services to constituents, and execute the laws and ordinances passed by a municipal governing body. Options for selection of a mayor include direct election by the public, or selection by an elected governing council or board.

Democratic Party (United States)

Democratic Party (United States)

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States. Founded in 1828, it was predominantly built by Martin Van Buren, who assembled a wide cadre of politicians in every state behind war hero Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party. Its main political rival has been the Republican Party since the 1850s. The party is a big tent, and is less ideologically uniform than the Republican Party due to the broader list of unique voting blocs that compose it, though modern liberalism is the majority ideology in the party.

Paterson, New Jersey

Paterson, New Jersey

Paterson is the largest city in and the county seat of Passaic County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2020 United States census, the city was the state's third-most-populous municipality, with a population of 159,732, an increase of 13,533 (+9.3%) from the 2010 census count of 146,199, which in turn reflected a decline of 3,023 (-2.0%) from the 149,222 counted in the 2000 census. The Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program calculated that the city's population was 157,794 in 2021, ranking the city as the 163rd-most-populous in the country.

New Jersey's 5th congressional district

New Jersey's 5th congressional district

New Jersey's 5th congressional district is represented by Democrat Josh Gottheimer, who has served in Congress since 2017. The district stretches across the entire northern border of the state and contains most of Bergen County, as well as parts of Passaic County and Sussex County.

New Jersey's 38th legislative district

New Jersey's 38th legislative district

New Jersey's 38th Legislative District is one of 40 districts that make up the map for the New Jersey Legislature. It covers the Bergen County municipalities of Bergenfield, Fair Lawn, Glen Rock, Hasbrouck Heights, Lodi, Maywood, New Milford, Oradell, Paramus, River Edge, Rochelle Park, and Saddle Brook and the Passaic County borough of Hawthorne.

New Jersey's 35th legislative district

New Jersey's 35th legislative district

New Jersey's 35th Legislative District is one of 40 districts that make up the map for the New Jersey Legislature. It encompasses the Bergen County municipalities of Elmwood Park and Garfield and the Passaic County municipalities of Haledon, North Haledon, Paterson, and Prospect Park.

118th United States Congress

118th United States Congress

The 118th United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It convened in Washington, D.C., on January 3, 2023, and is scheduled to continue until January 3, 2025, during the final two years of President Joe Biden's first term.

Josh Gottheimer

Josh Gottheimer

Joshua S. Gottheimer is an American attorney, writer, and public policy adviser who has served as the U.S. representative for New Jersey's 5th congressional district since 2017. The district stretches along the northern border of the state from New York City's densely populated metropolitan suburbs in Bergen County northwest through exurban and rural territory in northern Passaic and Sussex Counties.

Education

The four Glen Rock public elementary schools: (clockwise from top left) Richard E. Byrd School, Alexander Hamilton School, Central Elementary School, Clara E. Coleman School
The four Glen Rock public elementary schools: (clockwise from top left) Richard E. Byrd School, Alexander Hamilton School, Central Elementary School, Clara E. Coleman School
The four Glen Rock public elementary schools: (clockwise from top left) Richard E. Byrd School, Alexander Hamilton School, Central Elementary School, Clara E. Coleman School
The four Glen Rock public elementary schools: (clockwise from top left) Richard E. Byrd School, Alexander Hamilton School, Central Elementary School, Clara E. Coleman School
The four Glen Rock public elementary schools: (clockwise from top left) Richard E. Byrd School, Alexander Hamilton School, Central Elementary School, Clara E. Coleman School

The Glen Rock Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2019–20 school year, the district, comprised of six schools, had an enrollment of 2,567 students and 224.9 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.4:1.[118] The operation of the district is overseen by a nine-member board of education.[119] Schools in the district (with 2019–20 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[120]) are Richard E. Byrd School[121] with 272 students in grades K–5, Central Elementary School[122] with 345 students in grades K–5, Clara E. Coleman School[123] with 318 students in grades K–5, Alexander Hamilton Elementary School[124] with 279 students in grades K–5, Glen Rock Middle School[125] with 601 students in grades 6–8 and Glen Rock High School[126] with 715 students in grades 9–12.[127][128]

Public school students from the borough (and all of Bergen County) are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include Bergen County Academies in Hackensack and the Bergen Tech campuses in Teterboro and Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[129][130]

Academy of Our Lady is a Catholic school for students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade that is affiliated with St. Catharine's Roman Catholic Church located in Glen Rock and Our Lady of Mount Carmel in neighboring Ridgewood, and is operated under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.[131][132] In September 2013, the school was one of 15 schools in New Jersey to be recognized by the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program, which Education Secretary Arne Duncan described as schools that "represent examples of educational excellence".[133][134]

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Glen Rock Public Schools

Glen Rock Public Schools

The Glen Rock Public Schools is a comprehensive community public school district that serves students in kindergarten through twelfth grade from Glen Rock, in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States.

Kindergarten

Kindergarten

Kindergarten is a preschool educational approach based on playing, singing, practical activities such as drawing, and social interaction as part of the transition from home to school. Such institutions were originally made in the late 18th century in Germany, Bavaria and Alsace to serve children whose parents both worked outside home. The term was coined by German pedagogue Friedrich Fröbel, whose approach globally influenced early-years education. Today, the term is used in many countries to describe a variety of educational institutions and learning spaces for children ranging from 2 to 6 years of age, based on a variety of teaching methods.

Full-time equivalent

Full-time equivalent

Full-time equivalent (FTE), or whole time equivalent (WTE), is a unit of measurement that indicates the workload of an employed person in a way that makes workloads or class loads comparable across various contexts. FTE is often used to measure a worker's or student's involvement in a project, or to track cost reductions in an organization. An FTE of 1.0 is equivalent to a full-time worker or student, while an FTE of 0.5 signals half of a full work or school load.

Board of education

Board of education

A board of education, school committee or school board is the board of directors or board of trustees of a school, local school district or an equivalent institution.

Glen Rock High School

Glen Rock High School

Glen Rock High School is a four-year comprehensive public high school serving students in ninth through twelfth grades from Glen Rock, in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States, operating as the lone secondary school of the Glen Rock Public Schools. The school shares a campus with Glen Rock Middle School.

Bergen County Technical Schools

Bergen County Technical Schools

Bergen County Technical Schools (BCTS) is a county technical school district that serves as the vocational / technical education arm of all the school districts within the 70 municipalities in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. The primary programs offered are the Bergen County Academies and Bergen County Technical High School. It has its headquarters in Paramus.

Bergen County Academies

Bergen County Academies

Bergen County Academies (BCA) is a tuition-free public magnet high school located in Hackensack, New Jersey that serves students in the ninth through twelfth grades from Bergen County, New Jersey. The school was founded by John Grieco, also founder of the Academies at Englewood, in 1991.

Hackensack, New Jersey

Hackensack, New Jersey

The City of Hackensack is the most populous municipality and the county seat of Bergen County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. The area was officially named New Barbadoes Township until 1921, but has informally been known as Hackensack since at least the 18th century. As of the 2020 United States census, the city's population was 46,030, an increase of 3,020 (+7.0%) from the 2010 census count of 43,010, which in turn reflected an increase of 333 (+0.8%) from the 42,677 counted in the 2000 census.

Bergen County Technical High School, Teterboro Campus

Bergen County Technical High School, Teterboro Campus

Bergen County Technical High School, also known as Bergen Tech (BT), is a four-year, tuition-free public magnet high school located in Teterboro, New Jersey serving students in ninth through twelfth grades in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. Bergen Tech is part of the Bergen County Technical Schools, a countywide district that also includes Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, Applied Technology in Paramus, and Bergen Tech in Paramus. The school is nationally recognized, as students have the opportunity to be engaged in a technical major while fulfilling college preparatory classes and having the opportunity to take a wide variety of electives.

Bergen County Technical High School, Paramus Campus

Bergen County Technical High School, Paramus Campus

Bergen County Technical High School, Paramus Campus is a tuition-free public magnet high school in Paramus, serving students in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. The school is part of the Bergen County Technical Schools, which also includes Bergen County Academies in Hackensack and the Bergen County Technical High School, Teterboro Campus.

Catholic school

Catholic school

Catholic schools are pre-primary, primary and secondary educational institutions administered under the aegis or in association with the Catholic Church. As of 2011, the Catholic Church operates the world's largest religious, non-governmental school system. In 2016, the church supported 43,800 secondary schools and 95,200 primary schools. The schools include religious education alongside secular subjects in their curriculum.

Eighth grade

Eighth grade

Eighth grade is the eighth post-kindergarten year of formal education in the US. The eighth grade is the ninth school year, the second, third, fourth, or final year of middle school, or the second and/or final year of junior high school, and comes after 7th grade. Usually, students are 13-14 years old in this stage of education. Different terms and numbers are used in other parts of the world.

Transportation

Route 208 southbound in Glen Rock
Route 208 southbound in Glen Rock

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 44.67 miles (71.89 km) of roadways, of which 35.23 miles (56.70 km) were maintained by the municipality, 8.87 miles (14.27 km) by Bergen County, and 0.57 miles (0.92 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[135]

Glen Rock is served by Route 208, which runs southeast to northwest from Fair Lawn to Oakland.[136]

The Glen Rock Main Line station
The Glen Rock Main Line station

Public transportation

Glen Rock has two NJ Transit train stations: Glen Rock–Main Line station on the Main Line located at Rock Road and Main Street,[137] and Glen Rock–Boro Hall station on the Bergen County Line at Harding Plaza between Maple Avenue and Rock Road.[138] Both lines provide service to Hoboken Terminal, with transfers available at Secaucus Junction to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and to most of NJ Transit's other train lines.[139]

NJ Transit provides bus service to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 148 (on Route 208), 164, and 196 (also on Route 208) bus lines, service to the George Washington Bridge Bus Station on the 175, and local service on the 722 (on Lincoln Avenue) and 746 bus lines.[140][141]

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New Jersey Route 208

New Jersey Route 208

Route 208 is a state highway in the northern part of New Jersey in the United States. It runs 10.07 miles (16.21 km) from an interchange with Route 4 and County Route 79 in Fair Lawn northwest to an interchange with Interstate 287 (I-287) in Oakland. The route runs through suburban areas of Bergen and Passaic counties as a four- to six-lane divided highway. It is a limited-access road, as intersections with cross roads are controlled by interchanges, but is not a controlled access road as several driveways exist. The route runs through the communities of Fair Lawn, Glen Rock, Hawthorne, Wyckoff, and Franklin Lakes along the way, interchanging with CR 507 in Fair Lawn and CR 502 in Franklin Lakes.

New Jersey Department of Transportation

New Jersey Department of Transportation

The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) is the agency responsible for transportation issues and policy in New Jersey, including maintaining and operating the state's highway and public road system, planning and developing transportation policy, and assisting with rail, freight, and intermodal transportation issues. It is headed by the Commissioner of Transportation. The present Commissioner is Diane Gutierrez-Scaccetti.

Fair Lawn, New Jersey

Fair Lawn, New Jersey

Fair Lawn is a borough in Bergen County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey, and a bedroom suburb located 12 miles (19 km) northwest of New York City. As of the 2020 United States census, the borough's population was 34,927, an increase of 2,470 (+7.6%) from the 2010 census count of 32,457, which in turn reflected an increase of 820 (+2.6%) from the 31,637 counted at the 2000 census.

Oakland, New Jersey

Oakland, New Jersey

Oakland is a borough in Bergen County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey and a suburb of New York City. As of the 2020 United States census, the borough's population was 12,748, a decrease of six people from the 2010 census count of 12,754, which in turn reflected an increase of 288 (+2.3%) from the 12,466 counted in the 2000 census.

NJ Transit

NJ Transit

New Jersey Transit Corporation, branded as NJ Transit, and often shortened to NJT, is a state-owned public transportation system that serves the U.S. state of New Jersey, along with portions of New York State and Pennsylvania. It operates bus, light rail, and commuter rail services throughout the state, connecting to major commercial and employment centers both within the state and in the adjacent major cities of New York and Philadelphia. In 2021, the system had a ridership of 133,463,800.

Glen Rock–Main Line station

Glen Rock–Main Line station

Glen Rock is one of two railroad stations operated by New Jersey Transit in the borough of Glen Rock, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. Located on the Main Line, the station is signed as Glen Rock–Main Line to differentiate it from the Glen Rock–Boro Hall station, which lies two blocks east on Rock Road on the Bergen County Line.

Main Line (NJ Transit)

Main Line (NJ Transit)

The Main Line is a commuter rail line owned and operated by New Jersey Transit running from Suffern, New York to Hoboken, New Jersey, in the United States. It runs daily commuter service and was once the north–south main line of the Erie Railroad. It is colored yellow on NJ Transit system maps, and its symbol is a water wheel.

Glen Rock–Boro Hall station

Glen Rock–Boro Hall station

Glen Rock–Boro Hall is one of two railroad stations operated by New Jersey Transit in the borough of Glen Rock, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States on the Bergen County Line. Its name comes from the fact that the Glen Rock Municipal Building is located immediately east of the station, and to differentiate it from the Glen Rock–Main Line station, which lies two blocks west on Rock Road.

Bergen County Line

Bergen County Line

The Bergen County Line is a commuter rail line and service owned and operated by New Jersey Transit in the U.S. state of New Jersey. The line loops off the Main Line between the Meadowlands and Glen Rock, with trains continuing in either direction along the Main Line. It is colored on NJT system maps in grey, and its symbol is a cattail, which are commonly found in the Meadowlands where the line runs.

Hoboken Terminal

Hoboken Terminal

Hoboken Terminal is a commuter-oriented intermodal passenger station in Hoboken, Hudson County, New Jersey. One of the New York metropolitan area's major transportation hubs, it is served by nine NJ Transit (NJT) commuter rail lines, one Metro-North Railroad line, various NJT buses and private bus lines, the Hudson–Bergen Light Rail, the Port Authority Trans Hudson (PATH) rapid transit system, and NY Waterway-operated ferries.

Midtown Manhattan

Midtown Manhattan

Midtown Manhattan is the central portion of the New York City borough of Manhattan and serves as the city's primary central business district. Midtown is home to some of the city's most prominent buildings, including the Empire State Building, the Chrysler Building, the Hudson Yards Redevelopment Project, the headquarters of the United Nations, Grand Central Terminal, and Rockefeller Center, as several prominent tourist destinations including Broadway, Times Square, and Koreatown. Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan is the busiest transportation hub in the Western Hemisphere.

George Washington Bridge Bus Station

George Washington Bridge Bus Station

The George Washington Bridge Bus Station is a commuter bus terminal located at the east end of the George Washington Bridge in the Washington Heights area of Manhattan in New York City. The bus station is owned and operated by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. On a typical weekday, approximately 20,000 passengers on about 1,000 buses use the station.

Culture

The Hendrick Hopper House, a historic home on the National Register of Historic Places, is located on Ackerman Avenue in Glen Rock.
The Hendrick Hopper House, a historic home on the National Register of Historic Places, is located on Ackerman Avenue in Glen Rock.

The Hendrick Hopper House is a historic building located on the corner of Ackerman and Hillman Avenues. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983 as site #83001526.[142]

Glen Rock is home to an architecturally prominent Sikh gurudwara.[143] As much as 90% of the borough's Indian American constituency was estimated by one member in 2014 to have moved to Glen Rock within the preceding two-year period alone.[144] In February 2015, the Glen Rock Board of Education voted to designate the Hindu holy day Diwali as an annual school holiday, making it the county's first district to do so.[145]

The Jewish community is centered around the Glen Rock Jewish Center which offers prayer services and Jewish education.[146]

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Hendrick Hopper House

Hendrick Hopper House

The Hendrick Hopper Homestead is a historic building located in Glen Rock, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States, and was built in the early 19th century. It was home to the Hopper Family and is located on the corner of Ackerman Avenue and Hillman Avenue. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. This house is occupied by a family.

National Register of Historic Places

National Register of Historic Places

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance or "great artistic value". A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

Hinduism

Hinduism

Hinduism is an Indian religion or dharma, a religious and universal order or way of life by which followers abide. As a religion, it is the world's third-largest, with over 1.2–1.35 billion followers, or 15–16% of the global population, known as Hindus. The word Hindu is an exonym, and while Hinduism has been called the oldest religion in the world, many practitioners refer to their religion as Sanātana Dharma, a modern usage, which refers to the idea that its origins lie beyond human history, as revealed in the Hindu texts. Another endonym is Vaidika dharma, the dharma related to the Vedas.

Diwali

Diwali

Diwali, Dewali, Divali, or Deepavali, also known as the Festival of Lights, related to Jain Diwali, Bandi Chhor Divas, Tihar, Swanti, Sohrai, and Bandna, is a religious celebration in Indian religions. It is one of the most important festivals within Hinduism where it generally lasts five days, and is celebrated during the Hindu lunisolar months of Ashvin and Kartika. It is a post-harvest festival celebrating the bounty following the arrival of the monsoon in the subcontinent.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Glen Rock include:

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Kim Barnes Arico

Kim Barnes Arico

Kimberly Ann Barnes Arico is an American women's basketball coach, and the current head coach of the Michigan Wolverines women's basketball team. Previously, she was head coach of the St. John's University women's basketball team. She was inducted to the Suffolk Sports Hall of Fame in 2020.

Michigan Wolverines women's basketball

Michigan Wolverines women's basketball

The Michigan Wolverines women's basketball team is the intercollegiate women's basketball program representing the University of Michigan. The school competes in the Big Ten Conference in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The Wolverines play home basketball games at the Crisler Center on the university campus in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Larry Arico

Larry Arico

Laurence Andre Arico is a former American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Fairleigh Dickinson University–Florham (FDU) from 1997 to 1999 and William Paterson University (WPU) from 2000 to 2004, compiling a career college football coaching record of an overall record of 16–64. Arico was the athletic director and football coach at Marist High School in Bayonne, New Jersey.

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Fairleigh Dickinson University

Fairleigh Dickinson University is a private university with its main campuses in the U.S. state of New Jersey. Founded in 1942, Fairleigh Dickinson University currently offers more than 100 degree programs to its students. In addition to its two campuses in New Jersey, the university also has a campus in Canada, a campus in the United Kingdom, and an online platform. Fairleigh Dickinson University is New Jersey's largest private institution of higher education, with over 12,000 students.

Guy W. Calissi

Guy W. Calissi

Guy W. Calissi, was an American Democratic Party politician, prosecutor, lawyer and judge, who served for seven years as Mayor of Wood-Ridge, New Jersey, 16 years as Bergen County, New Jersey prosecutor and was appointed in 1970 to serve as a judge on New Jersey Superior Court, a post he served in until his mandatory retirement at age 70 in the year before his death.

Keith Cardona

Keith Cardona

Keith Francis Cardona is an American professional soccer player.

Indy Eleven

Indy Eleven

Indy Eleven is an American professional soccer team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. Founded in 2013, the team made its debut in the North American Soccer League in 2014, before moving to the United Soccer League in 2018. The franchise plays its home games at IU Michael A. Carroll Track & Soccer Stadium, with plans for a new stadium in the city's downtown district.

Michael Cavanaugh (musician)

Michael Cavanaugh (musician)

Michael Cavanaugh is an American actor and musician most famous for playing the piano and providing lead vocals in the band for the Broadway musical Movin' Out. Cavanaugh was handpicked by Billy Joel for this musical and appeared in the show for three years and over 1300 performances.

Movin' Out (musical)

Movin' Out (musical)

Movin' Out is a 2002 jukebox musical featuring the songs of Billy Joel. Conceived and created by Twyla Tharp, the musical tells the story of a generation of American youth growing up on Long Island during the 1960s and their experiences with the Vietnam War. The principal characters are drawn from those who appeared in various Joel tunes: high school sweethearts Brenda and Eddie, James ("James"), Judy, and Tony. The show diverts from the traditional musical in that it essentially is a series of dances linked by a thin plot, and none of the dancers sing. Instead, all the vocals are performed by a pianist and band suspended on a platform above the stage while the dancers act out the songs' lyrics, basically making the show a rock ballet.

Daniel Flaherty

Daniel Flaherty

Daniel Flaherty is an American actor, known for his role as Stanley Lucerne on the MTV teen drama series Skins.

MTV

MTV

MTV is an American cable channel that launched on August 1, 1981. Based in New York City, it serves as the flagship property of the MTV Entertainment Group, part of Paramount Media Networks, a division of Paramount Global.

Bob Franks

Bob Franks

Robert Douglas Franks was an American Republican politician who served as a U.S. Representative from New Jersey.

Source: "Glen Rock, New Jersey", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glen_Rock,_New_Jersey.

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  145. ^ Harris, Chris. "Glen Rock schools to close for Diwali", The Record, February 24, 2015. Accessed August 29, 2017. "Schools in the borough will be closed on Nov. 11, since the Board of Education voted to add Diwali, a Hindu holy day, to the district’s calendar. District officials claim Glen Rock, which has a burgeoning Indian community, is the first district in Bergen County to formally recognize Diwali with an instruction-free day."
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  147. ^ Staff. "Sires defeats Vas in 13th District", Asbury Park Press, June 7, 2006. Accessed December 10, 2014. "On the Democratic side, civil rights lawyer Camille M. Abate, 52, of Glen Rock, faced Paul Aronsohn, 39, a former pharmaceutical public relations executive."
  148. ^ O'Connor, Ian. "O'Connor: Glen Rock's Kim Barnes Arico is St. John's miracle worker", The Record, March 9, 2010, backed up by the Internet Archive as of August 10, 2016. Accessed August 29, 2017. "Out of her Rockwellian corner of Glen Rock, on the daily drive from Bergen to the urban realities of Queens, a mother of three tells a Big East success story that should embarrass every Tom, Dick and Harry – or every Norm, Freddie and Gonzo – failing to build a contender around the hurdles of their home, bittersweet home. Kim Barnes Arico, 39, head coach of the St. John's women, has future Sandra Bullock acceptance speech written all over her."
  149. ^ Wayne, Stephanie. "Formal committee will study artificial turf field proposal", Glen Rock Gazette, October 16, 2009, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 13, 2016. Accessed August 29, 2017. "Glen Rock resident Larry Arico, who is the athletic director and head football coach at Marist High School in Bayonne, said he has been on committees that have studied the safety of turf fields in-depth and nothing has shown that they are more dangerous than a grass field."
  150. ^ Kihss, Peter. "Guy W. Calissi, 71, Retired Judge And a Jersey Prosecutor, Is Dead; College Scholarship Yielded Byrne Made 1970 Appointment", The New York Times, December 9, 1980. Accessed October 3, 2018. "Guy W. Calissi, Bergen County Prosecutor for 16 years and later a Superior Court judge, died Saturday at his home in Glen Rock, N.J."
  151. ^ Fox, Ron. "Goalie Keith Cardona must 'save' his best attempt for later", Glen Rock Gazette, August 6, 2010. Accessed November 13, 2016. "It's difficult to believe that Parade Magazine All-American goalkeeper Keith Cardona once was a center-back. That was several years ago when the Glen Rock teen played for the Shooting Stars locally, and he felt content at that position.... Too bad Cardona won't be doing so for the Glen Rock High School team, even though he'll be a senior there next month."
  152. ^ Dunlap, LucyAnn. "What's New in Princeton & Central New Jersey?", U.S. 1 Newspaper, July 8, 2009. Accessed February 28, 2011. "His home base is Las Vegas. He and his family moved there from Glen Rock, New Jersey, where they had lived while he was on Broadway."
  153. ^ Rohan, Virginia. Commercials, TV and Motion Pictures."Glen Rock actor stars in MTV's Skins", The Record, January 17, 2011. Accessed February 2, 2011.
  154. ^ Staff. "Final Curtain", The Irish Echo, May 6, 2003. Accessed August 29, 2017. "Actress Pauline Flanagan, one of the pillars of New York's Irish Repertory Theatre and 2001 winner of London's coveted Laurence Olivier Award, died in the early hours of last Saturday morning, after having suffered a massive stroke on June 23... It was, in fact, in the midst of one of these sojourns, guest-starring in playwright Tom Stoppard's 'Indian Ink' at the Missouri Repertory Theatre in Kansas City, that the actress became sufficiently ill that she had to withdraw from the play a week before its closing performance and return to her home in Glen Rock, N.J., only a few weeks ago."
  155. ^ Dowling, Matthew J. "Election 2000 / For Franks, Family Life, Politics Go Hand in Hand", The Press of Atlantic City, October 29, 2000. Accessed December 10, 2014. "Franks, 49, was born in Hackensack and grew up in Glen Rock and Summit before attending college at DePauw University in Indiana."
  156. ^ Katzban, Nicholas. "Opioid crisis worse than crack epidemic, Glen Rock chief says", The Record, December 13, 2017. Accessed October 3, 2018. "Grewal, a Glen Rock resident, cited reporting by the New York Times that said while drug-related deaths remained relatively flat nationwide at around 10,000 per year in the '80s and '90s, that number jumped to about 55,000 in 2015, and is expected to hit 64,000 by year's end."
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  158. ^ "N.J. gets first Sikh attorney general in U.S. history". NJ.com. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
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  160. ^ Abbott, Jim. "This Bud's For You: That's The Message Of The Promotions For Wkcf News Anchor Bud Hedinger, The Man Around Whom The Station Is Building Its News Image.", Orlando Sentinel, December 7, 1999. Accessed February 28, 2011. "It didn't take long for John Harris Brady Hedinger III to become Bud. His mother, Annorah, gave him the nickname on the day he was born - Jan. 23, 1947 - in suburban Glen Rock, N.J."
  161. ^ McKay, Martha. "Bergen Teen Claims Win in Global Race to Unlock Iphone; Tech Whiz Cracks Code Tying It to AT&T Network", The Record, August 25, 2007, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 12, 2016. Accessed August 29, 2017. "The 17-year-old Glen Rock resident posted the complicated steps on his blog Thursday.... 'I've lived and breathed that phone for the last two months,' said Hotz, a Bergen County Academies grad who won a prestigious $20,000 Intel science fair prize this year for a device that projects a 3-D image.
  162. ^ Fox, Margalit. "John Houghtaling, Inventor of Magic Fingers Vibrating Bed, Dies at 92", The New York Times, June 19, 2009. Accessed May 9, 2012. "Tinkering in the basement of his home in Glen Rock, N.J., Mr. Houghtaling tested 300 motors before hitting on one that was light, unobtrusive and made the bed tingle at just the right frequency."
  163. ^ Ludlow, Jean . "Julia Meade Pays Nostalgic Visit To Ridgewood", Ridgewood Herald-News, May 8, 1969. Accessed October 24, 2021, via Newspapers.com. "Julia Meade came home last Wednesday. Back in 1944, she was a senior at Ridgewood High.... Meade was born Julia Meade Kunze, the daughter of Adam and Caroline Kunze. For years she lived at 440 Doremus Ave., Glen Rock, and the family has also lived in Ho-Ho-Kus and Allendale."
  164. ^ Fenton, Jim. "", The Enterprise, November 15, 2012. Accessed May 12, 2016. "Paul Melicharek, of Glen Rock, N.J., may not have known much about the area, but he was certainly familiar with the Bears' football program."
  165. ^ Americans Playing Abroad Archived 2013-10-30 at the Wayback Machine, Soccer Times, as of September 15, 2013. Accessed November 1, 2013. "Samuel Petrone - forward - Mjällby AIF - Glen Rock, N.J."
  166. ^ Warren Ruggiero, Delaware Fightin' Blue Hens football. Accessed September 5, 2021. "Hometown: Glen Rock, N.J.; High School: Glen Rock"
  167. ^ Snider, Susannah. "Marketing Executive Keeps Things Social on Internet", Los Angeles Business Journal copied at Social Media and More. Accessed November 3, 2014. "'Authenticity is really in,' noted Spira, who grew up in Glen Rock, a small New Jersey town."
  168. ^ Deshpande, Nirmal. "Stekler film debuts on PBS", Glen Rock Gazette, July 30, 2004. Accessed November 17, 2021, via Newspapers.com. "Glen Rock native Paul Stekler, the head of the film program at the University of Texas at Austin, has since won two George Foster Peabody Awards and three Emmy Awards for his political film documentaries."
  169. ^ Caramanica, Jon. "Two Bands Nurtured in a Garden State of Mind", The New York Times, March 12, 2010. Accessed May 12, 2016. "'Every great song about New Jersey has always been pretty much about getting out of there,' said Mr. Stickles, a native of Glen Rock, in a telephone interview on Tuesday, the day of the album's release on the XL label."
  170. ^ a b Fujimori, Sachi. "Meet the Tahans: Glen Rock brother-sister team lighting up the big screen", The Record, December 19, 2010. Accessed February 2, 2011.
  171. ^ Ludovicus M. M. Van Iersel Archived October 18, 2008, at the Wayback Machine, United States Army Center of Military History. Accessed February 28, 2011.
  172. ^ Staff. "Uncle Floyd - His TV Program Gathers a Cult - It's So Bad, It's Good", The Philadelphia Inquirer, February 26, 1984. Accessed December 10, 2014. "He studied piano as a child, and like his brothers - Jimmy, an arranger for the vocalist Phoebe Snow, and Larry, for years a saxophonist for Frankie Valli - began making a living at music soon after his graduation in 1969 from Glen Rock High School in Bergen County."
  173. ^ Stevens, Amanda. "John Sebastian & GR's Jimmy Vivino Electrify Mexicali Live; Rock & Roll Hall of Famer Sebastian and Vivino shared the stage in Teaneck", Ridgewood Patch, December 12, 2011. Accessed October 18, 2017. "John Sebastian and Glen Rock native Jimmy Vivino performed at Mexicali Live in Teaneck Saturday night before a full house. Vivino, a Glen Rock High School graduate, is the band leader of the Basic Cable Band on Conan O'Brien's late night talk show."
  174. ^ Klapisch, Bob. "Klapisch: Nobody beats The Woj", The Record, March 9, 2017. Accessed October 2, 2019. "But good luck trying to convince Wojnarowski he’s a star. Despite 1.5 million followers on Twitter, he still thinks of himself as a news-gathering grunt, happy to be living with his family in Glen Rock. Most of Wojnarowski’s neighbors remember him from The Record, where he won numerous awards as a general sports columnist from 1996-2006."
  175. ^ Ebeling. "At The Party: An Interview with Will Wood And The Tapeworms", The Aquarian Weekly, February 3, 2016. Accessed March 30, 2021. "The group's ringleader, Glen Rock native Will Wood, started writing music in his early teens, originally playing piano at various cafes as a solo artist."
  176. ^ Blank, Matthew. "Playbill.Com's Cue & A: Boardwalk Empire and Bad Jews Star Michael Zegen", Playbill, October 15, 2013. Accessed December 20, 2018. "Where you were born/where you were raised: Originally from Glen Rock, NJ… then moved one town over to Ridgewood in the 5th grade."
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